Lighter than aircraft

People should make ibles about lighter than air aircraft. Then we can go flying

Topic by ANDY!   |  last reply


i how many psi can a lighter hold? and can i make a valve to release so it stays at the right pressure?

I want  to make a mini air gun and i thought i could use a lighter to hold the air. so i need to make sure i know when its full so i can use it.

Question by tzq33tdq 


Air Rifle Repair

I have an old daisy .177 cal. air rifle in which the seal is broken... Can I get/make a new, reliable one for less than the cost of a full tune up?

Topic by smmcguir   |  last reply


need air compressor help Answered

I have a air compressor that uses a car cigarette lighter for power is there any way i can convert it to use a house plug?

Question by fidgety2   |  last reply


Can a vacuum balloon be built with current material technologies? Answered

A balloon's bouyancy (lifting force) is a function of how much air it displaces. Today's balloons use hot air, hydrogen, helium and other lighter than air gases for lift. In 1670 Franceso de Lana, an italian monk, proposed the use of a vacuum. One major problem is how to make the structure light enough to support a vacuum without collapsing in on itself due to the outside pressure.

Question by sansoy   |  last reply


Air tank testing

I have recently acquired a 25 litre compressor on which the motor was seized so my plan is to replace the motor and pump with a couple of fridge compressors however the tank is more than 10 years old and although I cannot see any damage is their anyway to check it is safe to pressurize to 8 bar? it has 175PSI stamped on it so I assume its designed with that as the maximum working pressure but I want to know if I can get it checked as I don't want to blow myself and my garage apart if it bursts I'm in the UK

Topic by patrickshadow   |  last reply


Hacking and Air Rights

Wondering how wifi data, hacking and air rights work in terms of law and wireless security. If data packets are entering my "air space" why are or aren't I allowed to do with them as I want? So long as packets aren't injected or intended to alter private APs, I assume my air rights on my property trump other laws. I'm proposing no laws are broken; using legal, open software and or writing your own code. I honestly don't care one way or the other, I'm just curious as to what others know, or their opinions on the matter. A Google search with hacking, air, rights, etc..... turns up more than what I care to sort through.

Topic by Sovereignty   |  last reply


how does a jet lighter work? Answered

hey im wanting to try and make my own jet lighter but i dont know how the main turbine part works. if someone coud post a few pitures like the shape of the blades the layout of them and how the gas and air mixes that would be a big help thanks    (^_^)

Question by rug   |  last reply


Air Compressor RPM? Answered

I found an old cast iron 50 + year old 2 stage air compressor and I was wondering what RPM's I should run it at.  My dad says it is running much slower than he remembered and it is going 323 RPM's compared to the original gear ratio that would have run at 269 RPM's.  That should be dramatically faster, so could going too fast decrease performance, or something, or is there a reason the original motor may have slowed down? The RPM's are a complete guess based upon the 1725 RPM motor average.  The only reason I had to change pullies was because the original had FLAT BELTS (awesome) from back when people cared and build stuff right.  Now I have a v-belt on it and the compressor pulley wobbles by like 2 inches and the thing is out of line, but these shouldn't be slowing it down. Basically I need to know what RPM's I should be running the compressor at. P.S.  It can double as a vacuum  pump and it uses old fashion check valves!

Question by jj.inc   |  last reply


My time as an AiR

When I got the invitation to be an Artist in Residence, my wife's first reaction was hilarity, since I have the drawing skills of an orangutan. Getting here, and being here, has been a really big deal.  This site has been a big part of my life for several years, and it has been a real pleasure to share space with some of the most intelligent and creative people I have ever encountered.  I have seen genuine art being created, and wonderfully subversive acts being committed. Being in such an environment was, in equal parts, intimidating and exhilarating.  Although I have a long list of projects to try, I was sometimes spoiled for choice because of the freedom to create as I pleased. Projects I have created in my time here have been; Duct tape boomerang Paper bag kite Coffee stapler Cardboard conch Sculpted head Small-scale wave power generator (mentioned in the newsletter - woot!) Laser-cut penny maze Rock, Paper, Scissors board game Robot face stencil This is a shorter list than I would have liked (boy, you should see the length of my "to do" list!), but the downside of being given the freedom to create is the lack of enforced deadlines.  That is a failing on my part, and not a failing of the AIR system. On the up side, I have been involved in a lot more of the running and planning of the site than I thought I would.  I have judged contests, taken part in planning meetings, got involved in longer-term projects on the site, and helped de-bug the new AiR process (bring your bank details!).  The phrase dates me, but I grok the site a lot more now.  I've also seen the planned projects of the next guy, and they are awesome! I also got the chance to run a site Challenge to launch the new Birding Channel.  This was, I've got to say, disappointing - given the amount of publicity I managed to get for the challenge amongst the birding community, I had hoped for a lot more entries.  I guess that there are not many folk who are both Maker and Birder? I also got the opportunity to help out in other folks' projects, and to learn new skills, both traditional and modern (laser cutters are awesome!), from folk like Noah, Matt, Kelsey, and got a far clearer image of how hard, and how fun, it is to keep this site running. San Francisco is a great, mad, weird city, and I love it, but the most surreal day was being the witness to the wedding of an ex-pupil, who came over to the US to get married and have the honeymoon all at once.  I first met this person when they were nine, and now they're married... (I feel old again). It's hard, in a piece like this, to avoid rambling, so I'll stop now, except for one final point: This past month genuinely ranks as one of my top Life Experiences.  That may sound like an exaggeration, but if you know me, you know how important this site has been to me over the years.  Eric, if I ever get the chance to do it again, I will have your arm off at the elbow! And, you know, I think the rest of my family will as well ...

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


My experience as an AIR

Wow! What an experience. Probably the most enjoyable, action packed, creativity-loaded 2 months of my life.  I have been tinkering in what I used to call shops; building, hacking, creating, for as long as I can remember but this... this was more than I had ever dreamed. The residency program at Instructables is a dream come true. Access to a state of the art shop, surrounded by creative, inspiring, fun people. What more could you ask for. Take one of the most creative, forward thinking, cutting edge areas of the United States (the Bay); the coolest city in that area (San Francisco); the prettiest/most unique part of that city (the Embarcadero) and slap the worlds best creative work shop on it, right over the water (Pier 9). Walking in the doors for the first time was surreal. From the swinging meeting table to the coolest kitchen I have ever seen; water jet to brand new Bridgeport; 3-D printers to industrial sewing machines, Instructables has done it. Within hours of being assigned a desk I was signing up for workshop classes and using Autodesk software to mock up some design ideas for the bicycle frame jig I spent most of my residency building. I later used this jig to build a bicycle frame.  Not only was I having a blast building what I wanted to build, I was building skills I hope to use professionally. I am hoping to start my own business building custom bicycle frames. The time to tinker and build at Instructables gave me a tremendous jump start. I wish it hadn't ended.

Topic by Tanner W   |  last reply


Compressed air engine help?

My friend and i are making a compressed air engine strong enough to work lawnmowers or better yet, a small car. Does anybody know any equations for calculating torque or RPM's? We are somewhat basing it off of the Airhogs air engine but better. Also, does anybody think making it out of PVC would be a good decision? or aluminum? I don't know if it will make lots of heat since there is no igniting of gases so i think it will be safe to use PVC for a lighter engine so more power can be used for moving. any thing wrong/bad about that?

Question by Lego man   |  last reply


What can I do with warm (45 degC) air?

Hi, I got an Air-Con today - I'm pleased with it. The exhaust vent shoots air out at 45 degC - other than blowing bright paper windmills with it, are there any suggestions what I can do the warm air, given that it is Summer and I don't particularly want to vent it into another room - I did think about my greenhouse - any others ideas?

Question by kevinhannan   |  last reply


Could I use a car vacuum cleaner to make an ice chest evap cooler ?

I have been reading through the various evap cooler ibles and was wondering if a car vacuum cleaner could be used instead of a fan It's already set up to plug into cig lighter and has forced air flowing in & out. I haven't finished my coffee yet so brain isn't functioning well enough figure out if I'd need a hose attached or which end of vacuum would would go into the cooler opening.

Question by dulciquilt   |  last reply


masynmachien's time as an AIR

I had the honour and pleasure of spending the month of July 2013 as an Artist in Residence at Instructables HQ. An unforgettable experience! I feel like I cannot even begin to describe it, so forgive me for keeping it simple. The most tangible amazing thing is the unbelievable workshop, a true makers heaven! I mainly worked on the laser cutters and the 3D printers myself, but these are just a part of the new workshop set up at Pier 9. There’s also the experimental kitchen, the sowing corner, the electronics lab, the high-end CNC machines, a complete wood shop and a full blown metal shop. More importantly however was working among the people behind Instructables. To experience up close how they work very hard to make Instructables not only the biggest and best Show-and-Tell buy also the best “maker medium” ever. Having just moved to the new facilities at Pier 9, there was a lot of extra work to get the workshop accessible and operational, but they moved mountains to get us Artists in Residence onto the machines and making things. Working alongside three other Artists in Residence was also unique chance. Usually, when I’m surrounded by makers, most of them aren’t older than 12. But even as each of us had his inner kid very much alive, having some serious making going on around you is very inspiring (as some of my Instructables will show). I also very much appreciate how my daughter Tika was warmly received when see joined me at Instructables HQ. One month was far too short to spend with the people at Instructables HQ.  I was constantly torn between on the one hand getting to know the people better and on the other hand leaving them continue there hard work and trying to make as much things as possible myself. And to make it even harder there were the lures of the magnificent city of San Francisco and of the Bay Area. My conclusion is clear: I want to come back! But then, being a month away from home is not easy either. Tika joined me during the second half of my stay, which was great, but I missed my wife and youngest daughter. Back home in Belgium I’m first taking some rest, spending time with family and friends, working on some due home improvements and preparing some kids workshops. Writing up the Instructables on the projects I did will take some time. They will be published over the coming months. After all, I have about 15 new projects to document. The thread through my AIR was a laser cut (advent) calendar. A series of toy/gift assembly kits designed to be laser cut out of one acrylic sheet and to be wrapped into a cardboard package opening separately on each kit. The only parts added to the laser cut parts are some elastic bands, screws and nuts. The idea is to have a calendar that is easily made in several copies, with designs accommodating for thickness variations in the acrylic sheet and a concept of cutting and wrapping it all with little handwork. I managed to design, cut and test 13 different toys/gifts. I consider it the first chapter of a full advent calendar. I will make an Instructable on each of the 13 and put them in a collection, together with an Instructable on the calendar concept. The eye catcher of my stay was an iPhone/iPad (or Android) controlled RC Blimp with video feedback. For this I used the plug-and-play Dension WIRC system. This system leading to rather heavy build (200g) comparted to my other blimp projects, I decided upon using a large spherical balloon. From this (and from watching Doctor Who) sprung the idea to make it into a large eye. I named it ‘In the blimp of an eye”. The project that was the most of a learning experience was designing and 3D printing nested dolls. Deviating from the classic Russian dolls, I learned how to design these in 123D Design, how to calculate sizes and experienced the possibilities and limitations of different 3D printing techniques. I hope you will enjoy reading the resulting Instructables, just as I enjoyed doing these projects at Instructables HQ. I want to thank once more the people at Instructables and Autodesk for this wonderful opportunity. Thank you, thank you, thank you! Yvon Masyn aka masynmachien

Topic by masynmachien   |  last reply


electrical

Why does an AC of 1.5 Ton with 1 to 5 Star rating differ in power consumption though they all have the same compressor. I fail to understand how a 1 Star AC consumes more current than a 5 star rated AC?

Topic by Dipankar   |  last reply


Can a home made AC unit be run through a mini fridge?

When making an air conditioning unit, would it be possible to run the system through the inside of a mini-fridge, rather than a bucket of ice? maybe drill some holes and put the system inside, in a little bin of water.

Question by roboman827   |  last reply


Building A 12 V Table Cigar lighter For My Birthday

I would like to build a distinctive 12 V electric table lighter. I have a really nice cigar box to hold the works, what should I use to power the car cigar lighter assembly I'm using? I have a leftover 120 V AC to 12 V 1 A converter, or should I just use a 120 V to 12 V transformer? I'm pretty sure that the lighter would work with AC and don't know if the 1 A from the converter would be enough. Usually in a car you get more than 12 V, more like 13 to 14 V

Question by Phoghat   |  last reply


al-air battery powered electric bike or scooter? Answered

  Hey, i was wondering if it would be possible to rig up an electric bike or scooter powered by an array of pvc al-air batteries. The use of al-air batteries would eliminate charging time and be much lighter than lead acid batteries.By pvc al-air batteries i mean a section of pvc pipe with a piece cut out from the side and covered in carbon paper and an aluminum electrode running through the middle.

Question by LiquidLightning   |  last reply


Swamp/evaporative air conditioner question?

Does it matter where the air out flow is? Seems to make more sense to have an opening in the front of the ice box unit than on the top.

Question by brandegor   |  last reply


How does this thinkgeek air conditioning device work? Answered

I was wondering, how does this device work? http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/travel-outdoors/c400/ I tried to understand it, but if it does work filtering water, wouldn't the water have to steal heat from the device, and than the vapor would be blowed to my face, giving it heat to return to liquid state?

Question by guiks   |  last reply


Casing dimension to install Chilled Water Coil sizes for cooling

I need help on dimensions please. I need to build a box (casing) to install Chilled Water Coils and a squirrel fan to run well water thru for cooling a work shop. In short, I have very cold well water and want to take advantage of it. My shop is 50’ x 29’ x 10’ height. I’m figuring 14,500 cubic feet to cool. What I need to know is if a casing of 24” square that is about 5’ long would be enough to have one coil in front, fan in the middle and a 2nd coil on the other end? I will have a return vent and include at least 4 vents for air out flow. What I’m not sure of is how to calculate if I need to use bigger coils other than 24”? Do I need to give more information to get an answer? Thanks

Question by opc167   |  last reply


Another car that runs on fresh air.

Here's another chap with a car that runs on compressed air.He's got more potential than past attempts, though - F1 engineering background, large backer, neat trick for extending range.The video and Previous BBC "airing"Canadian news articleCritical article from Oil Drum (Australian energy site)Oil Drum: part 2Air Car siteEDIT (MORE REFERENCES)Another BBC articleMDI Engineering site (they make the engines)Tata Motors (who plan to build the car)

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Air cannon/spud gun trigger Answered

I've opted to go for the modded sprinkler valve trigger. My questions are thus: Where can I find the required 'blow gun'? What is the 'blow gun' for when not killing potatoes? Will the valve reseal if the trigger is released before all the pressure in the tank is gone? So, can you fire more than once before pumping up again?

Question by AdmiralNiik   |  last reply


Making The Most Of Your Time Here

If you're reading this, you're hopefully about to become an AiR in the best workshop on earth. Congratulations! This is an amazing opportunity, and i'd like to share my experiences so that you can hopefully glean some wisdom. When I got here, I was quickly humbled. For the first time in my life, I was intimidated. I had never been in such a vast playground and wealth of resources. I put myself under a lot of pressure. I started with some smaller projects that ended up taking a lot longer than anticipated. I did everything the hard way. During this time I formed a great relationship with shop staff, and gained a deep respect for them. A month will go by and you will look back and wonder where it all went. There are a million distractions, and it's a tough game to balance them all. In my last two months, I decided I needed to pick a problem to solve. I bit off more than I could chew, and I chewed it. I did something a bit unconventional, and did a project on sustainability. I was in over my head, and I brought in a friend for help. And i'm really glad I did. Don't constrain yourself to being an 'artist'. You are about to immerse yourself deep in the heart of the maker movement. Make things that you will be proud of, that you can do nowhere else.  This is an nearly infinite opportunity, with the only limiting factor being time. You are skilled enough, have the aptitude, and can do absolutely anything. So what on earth do you make?  Quick Tips: -Pick a problem, and solve it.  Pick a problem that's bigger than one person.  -Don't shackle additional commitments during this time. (I burnt out from a big side project) Devote yourself to the shop. -Reach out to someone at Autodesk, and see if you can get mentorship, or use your art to inform things that they are interested in. Form a relationship with them. You will find wisdom and friendship. -Find a peer, and check in regularly about the scope of your work.  -Pick someone to collaborate on a big project with. Make someone else's dream come true.  -Space out your classes. Don't do it all at once, or you'll forget what that critical button on the DMS is.  Time Breakdown: 33% of your time goes towards collaboration 33% towards learning new stuff that's way above your comfort level 33% for the stuff you can do with your eyes closed

Topic by buchananwp   |  last reply


Fozzy13's AiR Experience!

Being an Artist in Residence at Instructables was an amazing experience.  It's difficult to put into words but I'll give it my best shot. Let's start at the beginning!  Because where else would you start?  I'm a college student, but I wasn't when I started to love building things.  A knee injury years ago took me out of wrestling for a summer and I used my ample free time during that time period quickly filled up as I was excited by the idea of breaking water into hydrogen and oxygen.  Over the past five years, I've grown to love making all sorts of things.  Instructables has always been a fantastic community to get ideas for projects and share what I've made.  After being part of the community for so long I wanted a chance to be a bigger part of Instructables and have the opportunity to meet some of the people who I've been following on this website for years!  Hopefully that only sounds mildly creepy.  The Artist in Residence program allowed me to have just that opportunity. I had the honor of being one of the very first Artists to make use of Instructables/Autodesk's brand new facility.  It's incredible.  If you're on a tour, it will be referred to as the greatest workshop and creative space in the world, and after working in it for a month,  that's an easy statement for me to believe.  The metal shop is where I loved spending most of my time as I worked on my main project: a jet engine.  However, I barely scratched the surface of what's possible even when I dabbled in playing around with 3D printing and laser cutting.  I'll post links to the projects I did when I'm done at the bottom of this post! I could go on and on about how exciting it was to learn how to TIG weld, or pull my first 3D printed object out of the printer for cleaning.  That's not what I loved most about being an Artist in Residence.  Don't get me wrong, that's why I was there, and I loved every minute of it!  But what I loved most was just being in the office at Instructables.  It was an amazing feeling to get to interact with lots of different people who all in some way loved to make things.  Being around people who know what Maker Faire is meant a lot to me!  Usually mentioning it only yields confused faces in my city.  It was great getting to talk about different projects people had done or were working on, which made me love "Build Day"s more than anything.  Being at the headquarters of Maker Culture made me feel at home. I've been away from the Pier where Instructables HQ is for a few weeks now.  I miss everyone I got to meet there, and I miss having the resources to make anything I could imagine.  Being and Artist in Residence will always be one of my best memories ever, and I can only hope that at some point I'll end up back at Instructables to see the awesome people I met and build some more cool stuff. Thank you to everyone at Instructables who made my short stay a great experience!  I can't thank you enough. - Projects! https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Make-a-Mini-Compressed-Air-Turbine/ https://www.instructables.com/id/3D-Printed-Modular-Ball-and-Socket-Joints/ https://www.instructables.com/id/Make-your-own-Instructables-Robot-Keychain Jet Engine Instructable coming later!

Topic by fozzy13   |  last reply


Reading Rainbow Goes off the Air :(

Reading Rainbow comes to the end of its 26-year run on Friday; it has won more than two-dozen Emmys, and is the third longest-running children's show in PBS history — outlasted only by Sesame Street and Mister Rogers.StoryHere's the best episode (I can remember)... And Stand back! I take large steps.Part 1 Part 2 Did anyone else notice that LeVar Burton really doesn't age?

Topic by trebuchet03   |  last reply


Solar Air Con for animal shelter

I am thinking of moving to a warmer country ( SW France ) than England but I have a small pack of huskies that I would like to keep cool in the warmest weather. I was wondering if it is possible to use the solar energy available in abundance to provide an air cooling system for them. I realise that aircon normally requires a lot of electricity but I am only looking to keep a small space ( block built shelter of about maybe 7-800 cubic feet ) cool and hoped that this might be possible. Any ideas ?

Topic by ukpicker   |  last reply


Operate a 12v/6Amps air pump, with DIY battery pack? Answered

Hello guys... I have an electric air pump and i want to operate it with a battery pack (for camping purposes, away from any kind of electricity source). Its a 12V/72W pump (works with car lighter connector) so by my poor calculations, i need something that can give me 6Amps for at least 5-10 minutes. I have a lot of 18650 batteries in my disposal, so i thought that i maybe can put together a portable battery pack, so when i go camping for example i can carry it with me. My circuits design skills are... nonexistent... My DIY skills are reasonable... so my questions are: 1) Is it possible to create something that can provide at least 5-10 minutes operation, once per every charge? 2) If yes... can you please tell me or point me at the right direction so i can accurately calculate the amount of batteries that i need and the proper way to connect them? 3) or... any other easier "portable" solution? for example something lighter and cheaper than a motorcycle battery...? Thank you for your time! :)

Question by the_phantom_boy   |  last reply


Removing heatsink from air conditioner? Answered

I got an old (functional) AC lying around and before i get rid of it i tough i'll try to do something with it. I tough about removing the heatsinks from the rear coil and cooling it with another copper tube with water pool flowing in. This way i hope to achieve 2 things : incrase the eficiency of the AC by cooling it with another coil of cold water and heating my pool for free ( and hopefully with better and more constant results than the solar heater) Since im'not HVAC certified, i'll have to remove the heat sinks pieces without removing the refregirant tubings. Any tips on removing thoses?

Question by gazoutg   |  last reply


how to get more than 1 shot (homemade PCP )

I think any 1 who has made a basic PCP rifle is sick and tired of pumping up their rifles ea shot... or at least i have :). I can't come up with a way to solve this problem without attaching my rifle to an air compressor. But the other day I was brain storming and I came up with an idea, what if we had 2 tanks, which were connected via a thin pipe so it takes a fairly long time for them both to arrive at the same air pressure.(refer to picture), yeah so dose any 1 have an constructive criticism to dish out?

Topic by chinnerz   |  last reply


Ceramic capacitor in air conditioner DPAC12010H

Hi there,  I received a not-working air conditioner model DPAC12010H from someone who didn't need it anymore, and I took it to a friend who works with refrigerators to see if we could find the problem. We took it apart, and we found that a fuse mounted on the main PCB was shot. The fuse is 120V and 3.75A so I suppose it's only for the control circuit as the whole air conditioner runs at more than 9A on max capacity. Anyway, we temporarily bypassed the fuse with a copper wire to continue testing. We plugged it in, and immediately a component on the PCB (which I now believe is a ceramic capacitor) spew sparks and melted it's insulation. However after this incident the air conditioner works perfectly, and it blows very cool air (its a 12000 BTU machine after all). However I'm still concerned about that capacitor. I can not post a picture right now, maybe when I get back from work. It was brownish yellow, about 3/4" in diameter roughly same shape as a nickel. Does anyone have any idea what that capacitor might be for? Since the air conditioner is working now I'm guessing the sparks made it conductive, or maybe it's used for the dehumidifier which I have not tested.  I will buy a new fuse today and see what happens. The air conditioner draws about 9 A at full operation. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Topic by colorex   |  last reply


Airsoft minigun

Here is an awesome easy airsoft gun I built from Nighthawkinlight. link:http:// https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Make-a-Full-Auto-Airsoft-Minigun-Halo-Insp/ Highly recomended!!!! I built it for about 30$. My plan i am working on right now is to use the same compressed air method to build a paintball pistol with a 8 cap mag, its working out great so far. Here are the stats for the gun pictured. PROS Compressed air powered!!! (to me this is awesome so i dont have to spend $ on Co2, or a battery that you need to charge) great range 250ft! lighter than it looks high rate of fire 50/ sec sturdy design very accurate CONS uses ammo up quickly kinda large takes a while to pump PLZ RATE AND COMMENT PLZ

Topic by Football viking boy   |  last reply


Car Air conditioning without Engine Running

Thinkin of running the AC from batteries at times I don't have the engine running. So- electric motor rather than direct drive from engine? How long will battery last? maybe need to have a second battery for this?

Topic by Toga_Dan   |  last reply


Vortex Air / Vacuum Amplifier Help?!

Ok I need something to amplify my shop vac. I am building a cnc machine and I will have a vacuum attached near the cutting head. The problem is the distance of the pipe. The vacuum will barely be strong enough to pick up dust. I have seen some really cool vacuum amplifiers and air amplifiers that just run off compressed air. You get 25x what you put into it, but they want an insane amount of money for a machined metal ring. Here is what I am talking aboutwww.airtxinternational.comhttp://www.airtxinternational.com/catalog/air_amplifiers.phphttp://www.airtxinternational.com/catalog/high_thrust_air_jets.phpIt is all based off of the Hilsch vortex tube. There is an instructable on how to make one. They are just spinning the air to induce the surrounding air to move.There has to be a way to do the same thing or make these for a ton less than what they are charging. Anyone have any ideas?

Topic by Distorted Designs   |  last reply


Kyoto Trough, is it greener than the Kyoto Box?

The idea behind the Kyoto Trough is to use a parabolic trough (rotated inwards round its focal line) so that all the light it collects over a certain time (1 2 3 or 4 hours) focuses BELOW the focal line. Then you use other troughs (probably facing at right angles to the first one) to concentrate this light further onto the cooking pot. I have done a rudimentary test in software and the concept does work there. I think it will also work as a panel cooker. It is very important to line up the primary trough with the path of the sun across the sky. It should also work as a panel cooker. Just a much longer panel cooker with the v shaped little wings like in the diagram Or perhaps a panel cooker with just one "tail" going up in the air and insulation on the back half of your cooking pot? (taking away one half of the device) Thanks Brian

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply


To Pier 9, Thanks for Everything !

Tl;dr : 1. people are the greatest resource at the pier 2. sometimes it’s hard to work due to too much awesomeness Seriously. Me and my collaborator, Radamés Ajna, had a couple of projects we wanted to do in the spring/summer of 2014, and while looking for some shop space in Oakland, someone recommended we check out the AiR program. We applied. We thought that if we got accepted Autodesk would give us a desk, some nice hand tools, and access to their software. And that would’ve been great. Coming from Brazil, where it feels like we solve everything using hot glue, zip ties and duct tape, that would have been more than enough. Weren’t we surprised when we visited the shop. . . Holy crap, everything is here. Some of the machines are bigger than my apartment, and there’s even a swimming pool ! I’m pretty sure everyone has written about all the great machines, because, yeah, they are great, but to me, the most important aspect of being an AiR at the pier was the people. The shop staff who not only teach you how to use the machines, but also have enough collective experience to help you solve any kind of material/machining/construction problem. Want to vacuum form foam? No problem. Want to glue glass to cement? Someone has done it before. Want to weld titanium? Easy. Having access to the tools is good, but having people that know how to use them is even more awesomenest. The same is true for the CAD people who help you set up and use all kinds of modeling and design software. Not only that, but they get excited when you use their software. Not having had a lot of experience with 3D modeling prior to my residency, it was a great opportunity to learn it using Fusion 360. Another very special group of people were the other AiRs. The ones that came in with us (Anouk, Alex, U-Ram, Adrien, Paolo, Scott, Mikaela) and the ones that were already there when we  arrived (Andy, Aaron, Rima, Andreas, Ben). What a diverse crowd. It was great to get to know everybody, and also to be able to share experiences and expertise. I don’t even know how many times Paolo and Andy saved me from searching for “metal thing with a hole” or “thing with a thing inside” on google, because they knew exactly what I was looking for. Invaluable! Sometimes it’s a bit tricky to explain your project and get everyone excited about it, because everyone has such a diverse background and set of interests, but learning how to talk about our projects from different perspectives was a challenge that I enjoyed. And, last but not least, the IRL Instructables community; another very diverse, active and enthusiastic group of people at the pier. I don’t know how they do it, but it seems like they are always happy, and making cookies. The sum of all of these people is something awesome. There’s always something interesting going on at the Pier (even at night and on the weekends), which sometimes can be a bit distracting, but also motivating. I will sorely surely miss them all.

Topic by thiagohersan   |  last reply


Operate 12v air pump using 12v 8ah battery with relay?

Hello guys I want to connect a 12v electric air pump to a 12v 8h battery with a relay microcontroller.   The air pump has receptacle for a cigarette lighter. Is it possible I can  remove the receptacle and connect the wires to the relay? I want the air pump to turn on every 15 minutes. The battery will be connected to the relay also. Sorry I dont have any electrical experience.  Any help would be appreciated

Question by dabretts   |  last reply


Compressed air can - How to make larger one, refillable?

Hello! You know those compressed air can for cleaning dust form electronics and computers. They are working well, but if you use them a lot they become pretty expensive. For heavy user's alternative is to use compressor. They are not so expensive any more, but they are loud, heavy, large and not so practical to carry with you… So, after take in consideration that written above great thing would be to make reusable, larger, compressed air can. Something simple to use, some on/off leverage and small nozzle, and also refillable - fill it with that compressor which is heavy and loud. Some manometer would be nice, just to know how much air is inside. That "can" should be larger than Do you have any idea how to make it? Please share details, ideas, plans, other help… Thank you in advance! Best to all!

Topic by davor07   |  last reply


Rc Airplane Guide

I have been thinking about building an R/C airplane. Here are the specifications I need. L:3ft W:4ft H:6in ( 15 with prop and landing gear Engine: Chain saw motor Prop: 12in Control surfaces: 2 ailerons, elevator I don't know anything about R/C and here are my questions: 1.) How do you assemble an R/C system? 2.) What is needed to run 4 servos(3 control, 1 throttle)? 3.) Where should I buy stuff? 4.) What else should I know? I know how to connect servos to an air frame and everything, but I need to know how to connect a full R/C system together( receiver, servos, battery, etc.). Any help? Please. P.S. My air frame will be, a wing, a wooden dowel going to tail, tail, motor and muffler. I used this design because I have no weight added other than required materials.

Topic by ry25920   |  last reply


12v to 120v sine inverter boosting

I have a 20 year old van. The a/c leaked and it is much cheaper to buy a 120v window unit ($140 with a 3-year walk-in exchange warranty) than to pay a shop to rebuilt the vehicle a/c. I chose a 5k BTU window unit that uses 4.1 amps running, and have a 1k watt sine wave inverter. Alone, the inverter will not start the a/c unit, but will power the fan. I confirmed a trick to start motors with an inverter. I connected an 8" bench grinder to the inverter and started it. It took a few restarts to get it up to speed. Then I started the a/c and it ran without problems. The bench grinder motor was able to supply the reactive power the a/c compressor needed to start. Both continued to run without straining the van's alternator. BUT, I don't want to travel with a running bench grinder going, that's not safe. Is there another way to supply the reactive boost that is safe to travel with? Once I get a simple stable way to run the a/c I'll work on a mount to vent the hot side. The van has sliding windows.

Topic by DavidN71 


Is a helmet lighter when made with a plastic cast mix or a resin mix?

See, I am making an airsoft helmet and I wanted to know if using a plastic cast mix (such as the Smooth-on brand) would be lighter than a resin mix (such as fiberglass resin and Aqua Resin). Please give me an answer and/or links to find out more.

Question by IdealL   |  last reply


Mercury??? Answered

Well i have seen some "places" that sell mercury (dont ask me where), and I was wondering what would someone need mercury for, other than making a thermometer?

Question by bwpatton1   |  last reply


Study: Ethanol Worse for Climate Than Gasoline

Ethanol is under fire again: At first blush, biofuels such as corn ethanol and soybean diesel seem like they would be great from the standpoint of global warming. The crops soak up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as they grow, and that balances out the carbon dioxide they produce when they're burned. But until now, nobody has fully analyzed all the ripple effects of this industry. And Tim Searchinger, a visiting scholar at Princeton University, says those effects turn out to be huge. "The simplest explanation is that when we divert our corn or soybeans to fuel, if people around the world are going to continue to eat the same amount that they're already eating, you have to replace that food somewhere else," Searchinger says.Searchinger and his colleagues looked globally to figure out where the new cropland is coming from, as American farmers produce fuel crops where they used to grow food. The answer is that biofuel production here is driving agriculture to expand in other parts of the world."That's done in a significant part by burning down forests, plowing up grasslands. That releases a great deal of carbon dioxide," Searchinger says.In fact, Searchinger's group's study, published online by Science magazine, shows those actions end up releasing huge amounts of carbon dioxide. The study finds that over a 30-year span, biofuels end up contributing twice as much carbon dioxide to the air as that amount of gasoline would, when you add in the global effects. The rest of the article (and radio broadcast) is here

Topic by Goodhart   |  last reply


How do I make a carbon fibre pipe for an air intake?

Hello folks! I'm trying to figure out how I can make a carbon fibre pipe for my cars air intake. I have a semi-flexi alloy pipe which I have managed to bend into shape and it will keep its shape without changing even if I take it out of the engine bay. I was wondering how I would go about making a mould of the pipe to make a replica of it out of carbon fibre for ultra cool points. Plus Carbon fibre helps repel heat better than aluminium. I was originally just going to get a Carbon Fibre vinyl wrap around the pipe but, why fake it?

Topic by apmaman   |  last reply


Paper Bags Are Better Than Plastic, Right?

Paper Bags Are Better Than Plastic, Right? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Summary: The answer to the "paper or plastic?" dilemma is: Neither. They're roughly equal in pros and cons. While convenient addictions, they both gobble up natural resources and cause significant pollution. Get basic design benefits of a paper bag and plastic bag with our award-winning replacements - the ACME Bags Workhorse (the plastic bag replacement) and the EarthTote (the paper bag replacement). Same brilliant basic design as their wasteful relatives, but designed to be used thousands of times. __________________ Issue 1: Energy and natural resources It takes more than four times as much energy to manufacture a paper bag as it does to manufacture a plastic bag. ENERGY TO PRODUCE BAG ORIGINALLY (BTUs) Safeway Plastic Bags: 594 BTUs Safeway Paper Bags: 2511 BTUs (Source: 1989 Plastic Recycling Directory, Society of Plastics Industry.) Of course, most paper comes from tree pulp, so the impact of paper bag production on forests is enormous. In 1999, 14 million trees were cut to produce the 10 billion paper grocery bags used by Americans that year alone. Paper bag production delivers a global warming double-whammy forests (major absorbers of greenhouse gases) have to be cut down, and then the subsequent manufacturing of bags produces greenhouse gases. Issue 2: Pollution The majority of kraft paper is made by heating wood chips under pressure at high temperatures in a chemical solution. As evidenced by the unmistakable stench commonly associated with paper mills, the use of these toxic chemicals contributes to both air pollution, such as acid rain, and water pollution. Millions of gallons of these chemicals pour into our waterways each year; the toxicity of the chemicals is long-term and settles into the sediments, working its way through the food chain. Further toxicity is generated as both plastic and paper bags degrade. POLLUTANTS PAPER V.S. PLASTIC Paper sacks generate 70% more air and 50 times more water pollutants than plastic bags. Source: "Comparison of the Effects on the Environment of Polyethylene and Paper Carrier Bags," Federal Office of the Environment, August 1988 Issue 3: Recycling It takes 91% less energy to recycle a pound of plastic than it takes to recycle a pound of paper. But recycling rates of either type of disposable bag are extremely low, with only 10 to 15% of paper bags and 1 to 3% of plastic bags being recycled, according to the Wall Street Journal. ENERGY TO RECYCLE PACKAGE ONCE (BTUs) Safeway Plastic Bags: 17 BTUs Safeway Paper Bags: 1444 BTUs Source: 1989 Plastic Recycling Directory, Society of Plastics Industry. Although paper bags have a higher recycling rate than plastic, each new paper grocery bag you use is made from mostly virgin pulp for better strength and elasticity. Issue 4: Degradability Current research demonstrates that paper in today's landfills does not degrade or break down at a substantially faster rate than plastic does. In fact, nothing completely degrades in modern landfills because of the lack of water, light, oxygen and other important elements that are necessary for the degradation process to be completed. A paper bags takes up more space than a plastic bag in a landfill, but because paper is recycled at a higher rate, saving space in landfills is less of an issue. Do you have any conclusion on paper bag or plastic bag?

Topic by paperbag4u 


Where are the vacuum balloons?

I am interested in making a vacuum balloon. I have been looking around and I can't find a single vacuum balloon that floated. If anyone has any links, pictures, videos, or suggestions they would be very helpful. The closest I found is this and it collapsed just before it floated.http://s113.photobucket.com/albums/n219/coreview2/?action=view&current;=VB03.jpg

Question by Danjor   |  last reply


It's fozzy13's AIRniversary!

"AIRniversary" meaning, one year anniversary of being an Airtist in Residence. It has been over a year since I left San Francisco when my Artist in Residency ended.  The experience was awesome and it has been exciting to see the program grow with the new wave or artists that have created so many incredible things.  It has been a big year for me personally.  I changed my major in school, I joined a fraternity, I cut my hair, and things that I learned at Instructables keep popping up every day. During the past month or so I found myself reflecting on the experience in all of its different aspects.  The experience at Instructables was fantastic, but moving to such a big city was, in hindsight, more stressful than I thought when I was living there.  It was a big change to what I was used to at home, and was pretty overwhelming at times.  The vlog I have embedded is meant to describe some of the stress that I had while moving to a big city, by sharing part of the story of my first hours in San Francisco. That said, I'm incredibly thankful to have had the opportunity.  I learned so much from the experience including new things every day that I can take away when thinking about my time there. Today, and over the past year, I have began to see my projects in a new way.  I value planning way more than I used to.  I value using the right tool for the right job.  I have tried to put more effort into the quality of my documentation and explanation for all of my projects, and to make more videos to give a better feel for what the project really is. I have to end with saying "Thank You" again to everyone at Instructables, and the extended community for supporting not only my projects, but the projects of everyone in the community by giving them a means to share and connect with other makers. -Adam

Topic by fozzy13 


What is better? the Gamo blue flame or red fire?

Yes I know the blue flame is a lot lighter, but I want to know what other users think would be better out of a 600 fps break barrel against squirrels.

Question by DELETED_tetra28 


How clouds act as an air pump to suck in air. Not how you think they do!

I have been thinking a long time about the biotic pump theory but I still don't understand it.  The math is too hard for me.   BUT it got me to thinking.   It is a point of major dispute in the meteorological world.   Does condensation cause low pressure?  2 russian nuclear physicists say yes,  almost everyone else says no!   So,  I thought and thought and thought.  Now I think I have a simple enough explanation And yes, they may not necessarily cause low pressure under the cloud (probably do)  but they definitely suck in air from elsewhere.  Imagine a fleet of huge doughnut shaped dirigible airships. They are sitting at 10,000 ft just floating there.   Now the commander tells everyone that they must now fly at 5000 ft.   So they turn on their propellers (in the hole in the doughnut) and drop down to 5000 ft by propelling air up  through the hole.   Now staying at 5000 ft is achieved by running the propellers at just fast enough.  So at 5000 ft they are pumping air from under the doughnuts to above them.   Now imagine a cumulus cloud.  Even though it is not fixed in size or shape and it does not have a propeller,  it is doing the exact same thing.  Air is being pumped up the middle and the clouds are sitting lower in the sky than they "should",  because they are sending that column of air up into the sky.   Here is my video to explain it visually.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPO8dWm_GIg

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply