Solar Maple Syrup?

Making maple syrup is a great activity for those of us lucky enough in the north, but it's also very energy intensive.  A wood fire is not the worst of the energy choices to reduce the sap, but there must be someone out there with the creativity to come up with a DYI solar evaporator. any  ideas?

Topic by alanrb 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Any Maple alternatives?

I need a something that plots graphs (three-dimensional is better), solves differential equations and counts integrals - Maple would be ideal - plus I think that learning to use it is a nice constructive thing to do in the summer before starting university, but it costs a lot more than I can painlessly pay...  Any ideas? Probably some older versions are free or cheap, or there are any other programs? I looks like I'm only going to use it in the summer as they probably should give something to students... To be more specific, I'm trying to learn GTR and calculate some geodesics.

Question by gruffalo child 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Is it possible to get hard maple as a 4" x 4" or 2" x 4"? Answered

I'd doing a project which requires a 4" x 4" x 24" piece of hard maple. If 4" x 4" doesn't exist or is very hard to get, a 2" x 4" would be ideal as well so I don't have to layer 4 1" x 4" pieces, i am just not sure of its availability

Question by kewlmaster38 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


How to download maple story to a psp???

If you know TELL ME PLEASE

Question by philip_hollywood 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


I'm looking for a hard candy recipe made with real maple syrup.? Answered

I've been making hard candy with maple flavoring oil but would like a recipe made with real maple syrup. I tried making the hard candy and adding maple syrup instead of flavoring.. but it was very sticky and sticking to everyones teeth. Not sure if I did something wrong? I'm looking for hard candy recipe.. not the maple candy. Thanks!

Question by sherriperry 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


is there a way to add iron into dirt?

I am trying to plant a maple tree and i found that it needs quite a bit of iron 

Question by Jay353 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Custom drums can be made for you

If anybody is interested, i now have a good source of maple where i can make atabaques (and presumably congas and bongos) to your specific dimensions for quite cheap. i was just doing a writeup for a group in my area for an atabaque at 32" tall with an 11" head, 14" bulge, and 4.5" foot in half inch maple for about $200. now, other woods can be used (and the type of wood dictates if the price goes up or down). if you have an idea about the sizes you would want, just throw them my way and i can get you prices of raw materials and labor. i can also burn patterns into them if you would wish. Happy drumming Chapa-de-frente

Topic by chapa-de-frente 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Question about foods that modify urine. Answered

Do you remember the first time that you ate asparagus  (Asparagusic acid) and being amazed at the burning rubber smell that came from your piddle within minutes of eating? Also I get a Sugar Puffs smell from real coffee and red wee from beetroot (betacyanins). Recently I have discovered that a handful of fenugreek will give an awful smell reminiscent of maple syrup gone wrong (3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethylfuran-2(5H)); cumin also. So my question is:  has anybody here discovered any other foodstuffs that do the job? This is the level of excitement that I'm living to at the moment. ps I've just read that fenugreek is used to turn sugar syrup into fake maple syrup.

Question by FriendOfHumanity 8 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Flame broiler Magic sauce

I go to a place in Southern California called flame broiler,they have the best teriyaki sauce(they call it magic sauce).Im very picky when it comes teriyaki sauce,i dont like the alcohol in it and it needs to be sweet and viscous like maple syrup.Im trying to make a copycat recipe of the magic sauce if any one can help.

Topic by cyzco 6 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Which would be better for insulating a box, duct tape, foil, card stock material, or heavy construction tar paper?

This is a project in school, we are working on Thermochemistry. Trying to figure out which would be the best insulator for a barrier box.(built from maple wood) The box is a model of a thermo-barrier system. We have to keep the temp. of the box above 0 degrees celsius for 15 min. and below 100 degrees celsius for over an hour.Any help, yea its alot, but i rlly need info and opinions.

Question by ME is the best 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Laser etching photos on wood

I am using an epilog 40 watt laser to etch photos of animals on 4 x 6 pieces of wood such as cherry, maple, and bamboo. In the final product the image lacks luster and the "wow" look I am wanting.  If anyone had advice as to improving the processing and post processing, please let me know.  If I need to apply a coating in post processing, please recommend one.  I tried Olde English but wicking became an issue and the image became too dark.   Any advice will be appreciated!

Topic by mjones0731 1 year ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Cool Quotes Game

Here's what you do: post a random quote from absolutely anything, but do not say where its from. See if anyone else knows where it is from. If you see a quote that you know, tell whoever posted it!  Try these: "Do thou amend thy face, and I'll amend my life"                    "Fool, you know better than to pick up a duck in a dungeon!"                     "The maple- kind, ya."                     "That was nothing like the ride at Disney World!"                     "I'm the best at what I do, and what I do best isn't very nice,"

Topic by VerendusVir 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Another Baby Bear knife

I found some more metal and decided to make a third Baby Bear knife. Thanks to Alan Folts for the original design. He sells these now and I did not like the price, so I decided to make my own. Here is a picture of the semi-finished knife. It has curly(flame) maple handles that I found in the wood pile. I would like to make a Kydex sheath for it, but have not found a source that will let me buy a few or one sheet  at a good price. Still looking. Anyone know of a good source please let me know. I only need a few sheets to start with. Carbon graphite looks cool.

Topic by triumphman 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Square tubed sign post with holes?

Hey all, I'm in warren Michigan area. I found a great place for some decent sized scrap hardwood like maple, oak, cherry. Sometimes walnut or other more exotic types. North of warren in Fraser there is a cabinet company called audia, in the back they have a large amount of 1-1/2" wide X20' lengths! Also, a place called laired plastics has an assortment of different color, sheet plastics various thicknesses as well as blocks of white plastics. In the back they have several bins with different material in each one...  Now, i need a place to get square tubing with the holes in them. I need about 12' of it but i don't need any piece longer than 1' anyone know of the business types that would specifically deal with this stuff? I see them knocked down by cars very often, i can work with those! Lol i just need to know where to look to find them. Google has an overwhelming amount of suppliers, but i don't need long sticks i just need some scraps... Call me cheap, buti would like to find them for as free as possible!

Topic by SlickSqueegie 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


I made pine sap plastic...what do I do with it? Answered

 I went out to my woods are got a huge lump of pine resin. I melted it in a steel tin, and fished off the top layer of woodchips with a nail. After that, I made what looks EXACTLY like maple syrup...so I poured it onto a parchment sheet. After it cooled, it looked like amber! I seems to shrink a microscopic bit as it cools, so it practically fell off the parchment sheet as a rock hard lens. At this point, it's an amber colored plastic lens. It's hard as a rock, and chips if you drop it. I put it in warm water...AND IT GETS AS SOFT AS PLASTICINE! It has a fantastic texture...like taffy. It's hard to resist the urge to eat it...it looks like candy! Anyway, I shaped it into all kinds of things and let it cool down (in like a second, it's hard again) When it's cooled, it has a mild tackyness to it. I made a marble out of it and put a tiny bit of lip-balm on it. Not sticky anymore! This material has OBVIOUSLY been discovered before, so does it have a name? Amber gum? tar? -Nepheron

Question by nepheron 9 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


8/10/25mm Construction Kit

I would like to propose a standard for the design of an "Erector Set" type construction kit based on a standard 10mm thick by 25mm wide rail with 8mm holes spaced 25mm apart.  The metric sizing would insure a global participation in the design process.  The main construction rails could be built from any smooth grained hardwood such as hard maple in North America or several other species I have seen used in Europe or ABS plastic, Aluminum, etc. Alternatively, a 5/15 - 3/8 - 1 inch format might find greater acceptance in the US which would allow for use of many standard components such as skate board wheels which use a 5/16 shaft for bearings, etc. Given a standard hole size, thickness, and spacing, a variety of 3D printed components could be designed by the community as add-ons to the basic kit.  Ideally such designs would be done in Autodesk Inventor based on PARAMETRIC MODELS that could be adjusted for say both a mm and inch standard. Laser cutting at TechShops, 3D printing, and other simple home shop built components for connectors, etc., as well as suggestions for utilizing other standard building components such as say plastic tubing for spacers, and other standard hardware components, would greatly expand the features of the construction kit. Ideally Makers, TechShop members, home woodworkers, etc. would produce kits and make them available to "young inventors and engineers" in our school systems as a community project. While I have suggested the above mentioned dimensions, these and other basic considerations should be vetted in a crowd sourced forum before any standards are set.

Topic by astroyny 5 years ago


How to make cuts for a child's jigsaw Answered

Greetings from a new Instructabler: I'd like to make some wooden blocks as well as some jigsaw puzzles and perhaps a lockbox for my daughter.  (She's six months old now so I have some time to figure this out.)  I'm thinking something like this for the puzzle (simple shapes and pegs for her to grab onto), and something like this for the lockbox.   I'm trying to figure out what is the fewest number of saws I have to buy to make all these things.  Seems like I'm going to need a band saw for the wooden blocks, but I'm wondering if I might be able to get away with it on the scroll saw?  This extremely helpful site describes using a band saw with a circle cutting attachment for arches and triangles.  Do I need a band saw for cutting 2 3/4" hard maple?  I'd likely have to just not make the 5 1/2" triangles if I went this route (which wouldn't be the end of the world). I'm a bit puzzled (as it were) regarding how to make the puzzle pieces and also the doors for the lockbox.  I imagine that if I didn't need the puzzle piece itself and just needed the outline then I could drill a hole in the piece, thread the scroll saw blade through, and cut the shape.  How do I make the cut that preserves both the puzzle piece and the surrounding wood?  Do companies that make these toys make the puzzle pieces (and doors) separate from the puzzle outlines (and lockboxes), or do they use lasers or something else? Your guidance would be greatly appreciated!

Question by statestraveller 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Wild Boar Hunt

This past weekend, Christy and I went a on wild boar hunt near Red Bluff, CA. We used a local guide called Catch 'Em Outfitters, and had one of the best weekend-vacations in a long time. In the end, we came home with over 100 lbs of wild pig meat. Christy had a blast gutting and field dressing all the animals -- surprising the guides -- and we've spent the past few days processing the meat ourselves making hams, chops, and sausage. There will definitely be a few new wild boar recipes, but probably no how to hunt or how to field dress a pig Instructables, unfortunately. Since most of our friends have read Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma and paid special attention to his description of a boar hunt, they have already started begging for meat. So far, I've made wild boar maple sausage, which, despite my feeling that it was a little too one-note with just maple syrup, still received a review of "I was not ready for how good that was going taste."There are more pictures of the hunt on my flickr collection of the weekend, but be aware that they show the full process of converting an animal to meat on the table. What follows below is my Yelp review of the hunting guide, and the experience in general:Catch 'Em Outfitters is a hunting guide service, and because of the extraordinary work of its owner, Jasen Mead, I brought home over 100 pounds of wild pig meat.I chose Catch 'Em because of Jasen's excitement to take a novice hunter out, and his willingness to let me use his rifles. I've hunted birds before, but for my first wild boar hunt, it was important for me to go with someone who was interested in teaching. Additionally, he encouraged my wife to come along as a non-hunter, and she ended up gutting the animals. He offered my choice of spot and stalk hunting -- where one tries to locate hogs with binoculars and local knowledge of where they might be feeding and bedding down -- or fair chase -- using well-trained dogs to find, flush out, and potentially hold down pigs. During my hunt, I had opportunities to fire at large boars using both methods.Catch 'Em offered as many as two morning hunts and one evening hunt for me to get a pig. As a novice, it took me all three times, but Jasen and his assistant, Ron Stone (who is also a fishing guide) never lost enthusiasm, and I'm pretty sure they stayed out longer and worked harder because they were so determined for me to have a successful first hunt. However, they were very clear in their understanding of the law, and had a firm set of ethics around hunting and conservation in general, so I felt comfortable that we were always doing the right thing from a variety of different perspectives. Bear hunting is Jasen's primary guiding business, and apparently his favorite type of hunt, but you'd never know it by the way he threw himself into my pig hunt. It's clear he just loves hunting, and teaching new people.Obviously, much of the preparation for a hunt like this falls on you: taking the hunters safety class, learning to handle firearms safely and accurately, getting all your documents in order (I bought two pig tags, and was glad I did because I used them both), and being prepared to run full-speed through ankle-deep mud in head-high tule marshes. Finding a good hunting guide is definitely chief among those set of preparations, and Catch 'Em totally delivered for me.

Topic by ewilhelm 10 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


The Torrefaction Process... Anybody know how to cook wood?

For anyone out there who is not yet familiar with Torrefaction, it is a process of "baking" wood in an over between 200 and 320 degree Celsius (392 - 608 F), in the absence of oxygen. Don't quote me on those temperatures btw... I got them from Wikipedia, and they sound way too hot based on other articles I've read. The idea is, wood contains a lot of biomaterials like sugars, resigns, tar, and water. After you cut down a tree, these materials begin to vacate the wood through evaporation, sublimation, and all the other _'ations...It takes 100 years or so, but eventually, they all are gone, and the wood is super stable, and no longer expanding, moving, contracting and changing. This old wood is also extremely rot resistant and can withstand the elements. For this reason, Torrefied wood is used for decking and outdoor projects mostly. However, the guitar industry has also started to adopt using it, because you have basically aged the wood 100 years in the course of a few hours. You have also increased the price of the damn guitar to the, "your firstborn child" level. I build guitars, and I cannot believe that it can be too hard to bake some wood myself. Here are the variables that I see...1. Vessel: How to create an environment that can be brought to a specific temperature (~350-400 d F), but has also had all oxygen removed? Even if you welded together a steel box that could be locked down air-tight, and had a valve that you could pump all the air out, if you could figure out a way to heat that box to 400 d F, the water inside the wood would def. begin to boil and I imagine would be re-introducing O2. I guess you'd have to re-pump the air out every so-often until all the water was gone. 2. Temperature: Torrefication is also the exact same process that is used to turn ordinary hardwood into charcoal. I have no idea what the temperatures are, but lovely baked spruce for a guitar top has turned a slight aged tan color. But if you cranked the temp, it would eventually turn into pure carbon and be jet black like charcoal. I have no idea how to tell what temp achieves what I want. 3.) Time: I always read that Torrefied wood is baked at these temps for "several/many" hours. How would I ever know?4.) Pressure/Flames/Bomb: I know from watching YouTube videos, that when charcoal is made, wood is superheated in an oxygen-free env. until the volatile oils, resins, etc ignite and burn off, thus leaving Charcoal. I do not want to weld together a heavy steel box that becomes a high temp pressure cooker, that blows my kitchen apart when the oils in the wood inside of it ignite. Does anyone know what I am talking about and/or have any suggestions?

Topic by Dolmetscher007 7 months ago