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perseids

Its the annual Perseid meteor shower tonight and tomorrow, if you're lucky.

Topic by steveastrouk    |  last reply


RIP Sir Patrick Moore

The greatest British populariser of astronomy and space science, Sir Patrick Moore died today at 89. I would suggest that nearly 100% of British astronomers were influenced by Moore and his TV programme, The Sky at Night - of which, Sir Patrick was the longest serving presenter of any TV series anywhere. It is hard to imagine any more iconic figure in science media than Patrick Moore. A great loss.

Topic by steveastrouk    |  last reply


Watch out for falling satellites

Watch out for falling satellitesWith no one at the wheel, should we be worried about the large US spy satellite now headed for a crash landing?US spy satellite 193 is predicted to de-orbit less than gracefully in Feburary or early March. The chances of it actually hitting a populated area are exceedingly small, but perhaps you can catch a few micrograms of it using Kiteman's How to catch a star Instructable.What is happening?An out-of-control US spy satellite will crash to Earth in the coming months, government officials say. The satellite is large enough that remnants are likely to survive atmospheric re-entry and strike the Earth, sometime in late February or early March, says Gordon Johndroe, a spokesman for the National Security Council.Is that normal?"This is relatively routine in that satellites de-orbit all the time," says Johndroe. Pieces of uncontrolled debris heavier than two tonnes -- mostly discarded rocket stages -- crash to Earth as often as once every three weeks, says Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer and launch observer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts.Many discarded pieces retain some power, so that controllers on Earth can guide them to a point far from human habitation, usually using a final dive into an ocean. In 2001, Russian space officials broke up the old Mir space station in this way over the South Pacific. That's not the case for this US one, however."Obviously, we want to take a look at the potential for it to land in a populated area," says Johndroe.What are the chances of it crashing through my roof?Exceedingly slim, says McDowell. Remember that some 70% of the Earth is water, and most lands are void of people. "There is no reason for people to get alarmed about it," he says.According to the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office, there have been no confirmed instances of serious property damage or injury caused by crashing debris in 40 years.

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply


LED Meteor Rain Light

How to make these at home as they will look awesome in my bedroom ceiling..... plzz answer Thanks in advance

Question by adarshnarsaria    |  last reply


Meteor Shower in late April

Upcoming shower:Day: April 21 - 22Constilation/type: LyridsFrequency: 16 - 30 per hourIllumination: 5.4%For the meteor shower calender, check out these site I found:http://www.cultcase.com/2009/01/7-major-meteor-showers-you-can-expect.htmlhttp://theskyscrapers.org/meteors/index.php/year/2009http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy_calendar_2009.htmlhttp://stardate.org/nightsky/meteors/http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/highlights/36787804.htmlNotice: These are not my sitesNotice this also: Some info ranges, but the dates stay april 21 - 22 (Or just 22)

Topic by Flumpkins  


Catch a Christmas Present.

From my inbox this afternoon: GEMINID METEOR SHOWER: This weekend, Earth will pass through a stream of debris from extinct comet 3200 Phaethon, source of the annual Geminid meteor shower. Forecasters expect more than 100 meteors per hour to fly out of the constellation Gemini when the shower peaks on Dec. 13th and 14th. For most observers, the best time to look will be from 10 pm local time on Sunday night to dawn on Monday morning. Visit http://spaceweather.com for photos, a sky map, and live audio from a meteor radar. Sounds like a chance to arrange a unique Christmas gift for a loved one. Update: I've done a bit more reading about the Geminids, and they may not be suitable for collection by magnets.  It seems they are the rocky remains of a dead comet, so lack metallic iron. However, I have added a map so you can work out where to look.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


There's a shower coming.

From my inbox:The annual Perseid meteor shower peaks on Tuesday, August 12th. The best time to look is during the dark hours before dawn on Tuesday morning when forecasters expect 50 to 100 meteors per hour. Get away from city lights if you can; plan a camping trip! The darker the sky, the more meteors you will see. The source of the Perseids is Comet Swift-Tuttle, which has littered the August portion of Earth's orbit with space dust. The dusty zone is broad and Earth is already in its outskirts. As a result, even before the peak on August 12th, you may see some "early Perseids" streaking across the night sky. Photos of these early arrivals will be featured in the days ahead on Spaceweather.com as part of our full coverage of the Perseid meteor shower.Being on holiday, I will be spending most of the shower either under city lights or in the wettest (and hence cloudiest) part of Britain, and unable to lay out large tarpaulins to catch rainwater.So, I won't be able to go fishing, or get time out to watch them. I wonder - will you?EDIT: I have, as predicted seen nothing. Rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain ...

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


what do you qualify as your "wierdest word?"

What would you say is your wierdest word ever? mine would be.. Floccinaucinihilipilification meaning te depreciate an item (or somthing simlar) asymptote chicxulub the supposed place where the meteor that killed the dinosaurs landed

Topic by ich bin ein pyro    |  last reply


?Sky watchers calendar"

Hello everyone... A whhile back I stumbled upon a website that would allow you to enter in your location information and do a search based on "celestial events" "IST fly-over times" satellite locations, meteor shower events, eclipses etc... I recently bought a DSLR camera and a telescope with camera mount. My Son is very much into astronomy and I would love to encourage this for him... The telescope is nothing special, it is my, as well as his first telescope. I would like to capture photos of this up and coming eclipse in April, as well as some star systems and meteor shower events with some long exposure. :) anyway... Does anyone here know where I can find this type of calendar.. I have spent much of the morning Googling, but I am coming up short in finding this... Thanks in advance Matthew

Topic by SlickSqueegie    |  last reply


My Blender physics simulations!

Just for fun, I created a few physics simulations in blender, All of them of a building getting knocked down with various objects(meteor, plane, car, spheres). Here it is Here is my first one, It is older And included is a screenshot of the second simulation! :D Tell me what you think :) Thanks ~ReCreate

Topic by ReCreate    |  last reply


Fireball over Colorado

What are the odds? On Oct. 28th at 7:29 pm Mountain Daylight Time, a random meteoroid hit Earth's atmosphere and disintegrated with the luminosity of a full Moon. The impact, which could've happened anywhere, took place directly above an all-sky video camera in Guffey, Colorado. "I've received more than 100 eyewitness reports," says astronomer Chris Peterson, who operates the camera as part of a nightly fireball monitoring program. Combining the data at hand, he estimates that "the meteor had a ground path about 170 miles long and traveled from east to west at 34 km/s (76,000 mph).""I was lucky enough to see it myself from inside my house through a window," adds Thomas Ashcraft. What's amazing about that is he was located 300 miles away in New Mexico. "It was brilliant turquoise and green and lasted more than nine seconds." Ashcraft is an amateur radio astronomer and his receivers picked up echoes of distant TV transmitters bouncing off the fireball's ionized trail: listen.Using a computer model of Earth's meteoroid environment, Bill Cooke of the Marshall Space Flight Center calculates that fireballs this bright come along once every five months or so. Rarely, however, are they witnessed. About 70% of all fireballs streak over uninhabited ocean while half appear during the day, invisible in sunny skies. To catch one in the crosshairs of a meteor camera on a dark albeit cloudy night is good luck indeed.Cloudbait SkycamOther observers caught video of the event, and recorded the radio noise it made.You could have recorded the event yourself, if you had followed this Instructable.Updates at SpaceWeather

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Wrapped project on Probotix 4th axis for guitar neck

How many of you use a Probotix CNC? I have one and trying to cut out bodies and necks. Working great for the bodies but I also bought their 4th axis for the guitar necks. So far I have a 3d image worked up in aspire and next going to see about wrapping it on the 4th axis. I am still in the means of learning the methods on my cnc. I have the 4th axis on my probotix cnc. Listed here. http://www.probotix.com/CNC-ROUTERS/METEOR-CNC-ROUTER

Topic by ClintonT  


is this a real meteorite?

I found this out in the desert on one of my visits to arizona from vegas. I found this rock during thanksgiving weekend where my dad and I park at his little ranch which is very clean, no rocks at all. we spent the night at kingman for thanksgiving and on our way back to vegas we stop at our little ranch to drop some stuff off when we park I got out and found this rock in a small crater in the dirt. obviously to my surprise I think its a space rock. its heavy for its size and a little larger than a golf ball you'll see the picture. so yeah theres my back ground story of it so let me know what it is. thanks!

Question by capt. caveman    |  last reply


bike powered wheat grinder

Any one with a food storage probably has wheat, i'de guess that 50% of those people don't have wheat grinders and if they do its either a puny hand grinder that would take 3 days to grind enough wheat for one meal, or an electric grinder and their assuming there will be electricity after every major disaster. there are plan's over the internet for hooking up bikes to hand grinders most of the plans i found require you to send money to the creator and they will send you plans so any ways i'm cheap and this sort of info would be to important to cost money if something bad happens (i mean really BAD like meteor showers, nuclear war, gamma bursts any thing like that) so what i'm wondering is there any plans on instructables for making a bike powered wheat grinder

Topic by clasic_traveller_diehard    |  last reply


Lighting powered by an AC to 12V DC 4pin Molex adapter?

Hello  I'm making a gift out of a traffic light that I'm going to snazz up (paint red, replace lenses with stained glass, new lighting) And I'm going to use computer case lighting as I am familiar with it. As I don't want to use a psu just to power molex connectors I'm going to use this www.crazypc.com/products/7410.html AC to 12V DC 4pin Molex adapter I'm going to have a set up something like this; adapater-www.pctoys.com/840556088547.html molex on/off switch-www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx molex splitter-www.crazypc.com/products/neon_wire_red-8430R.html Red EL Neon Wire-www.crazypc.com/products/82520U.html LED Meteor UV lights-and another light of some kind maybe a liquid cold cathode www.crazypc.com/products/8230B.html I believe the adapter will be able to power this, however I'm not sure as I've never used one before so any input is greatly appreciated. I also need to know whether the on/off switch will be able to control the whole string? Thank you

Topic by suitaroh  


What would you do?

In 1908, a meteor the size of a truck obliterated 2000 square miles of Russian countryside. Over a populated area, that would have incinerated a city the size of modern New York.The next major threatening event could occur in less than 20 years. Asteroid Apophis is due to pass close to the Earth and analyses suggest a one in 45,000 chance of a collision, and an impact one hundred times more destructive than the Tunguska event. Overall, major impacts occur on average every thousand years or so.Although the chance is, on the face of it, quite small, that is just the risk of one particular, known Near Earth Object ("NEO") hitting us on the next pass. There are hundreds of other rocks out there, large enough to cause significant damage, and we don't know where all of them are.UN scientists are calling for proper, internationally-concerted preparations to prevent such a collision.Of course, any plans made so far are pure hypothesis, blue-sky thinking of the most literal kind. They range from gentle nudges with solar sails, to whole-scale nuclear obliteration.So, Makers, what would you do?How would you avert disaster?How would you detect and track dangerous rocks?How would you prevent them causing damage? Deflection? Destruction? Or would you exploit them somehow?Post ideas, sketches, wild suggestions or sensible plans. Association of Space ExplorersNASA's NEO pagesNASA Flash animation

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply