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ibles in a museum

You may or may not be aware that one of our members is actually a world-famous museum (it's real, I checked).The individual who actually produces the projects is Lao Jianhua - a real live artist-type-person.Anyhoo, what this ramble leads me up to is this;What Instructables projects would you put in a museum?Unrepeatable one-off projects, easily-copied classics and anywhere in between - what projects do you think should grace the galleries of a museum of modern art, design and lifestyle?Maybe you can think of a set of projects that logically go together, even if the connection is tenuous or surreal.V&A; Collections

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Mugshot Museum

It currently only has 13 entries, but the Mugshot Museum is a website to bookmark and check back when you're bored. This is True collects bizarre stories from the world's news media (there's a newsletter - I suggest you sign up), and sometimes the stories come with mugshots of the perps. The site's author realised that the mugshots were popular, so he gave them their own site.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Could a Change of Plaques at a Museum Help Engender True Philosophy?

I visited a famous museum of art a while back, and was awed by the breadth of their collection.I spent most of a day there, and as I walked through, something occurred to me; the historical plaques I read only told the story of our current understanding of history. They did not mention how our ideas of, for example, 12" Egyptian stone carvings, have changed from thinking they were idols to something like spirit "vessels" for the departed. This one-sided view gave the impression that we knew all about Egyptian culture. Yet, our understanding changes all the time. Translations of the "Book of the Dead" from 1930 hardly resemble recent translations.I wonder, if we mentioned on a plaque how a particular artifact changed our views of ancient cultures, and did this for several artifacts, or even mentioned briefly some key research along the way, we might jog the minds of museum goers a bit more. Maybe get them thinking that the world is more open than presumed. Thus some visitors might get excited at the unanswered questions and have a desire to do further research in a topic on their own.If a change of plaques could tell a larger story of how our ideas and "what we know" is challenged and changes all the time, then perhaps . . . it might even jog the visitor to challenge some of his or her own ideas, thus beginning to inspire true philosophy.

Topic by royalestel    |  last reply


The Power of Making: V&A Museum, London

"Making is the most powerful way that we solve problems, express ideas and shape our world. What and how we make defines who we are, and communicates who we want to be... Many people think that craft is a matter of executing a preconceived form or idea, something that already exists in the mind or on paper. Yet making is also an active way of thinking, something which can be carried out with no particular goal in mind. In fact, this is a situation where innovation is very likely to occur. Even when making is experimental and open-ended, it observes rules. Craft always involves parameters, imposed by materials, tools, scale and the physical body of the maker. Sometimes in making, things go wrong. An unskilled maker, hitting the limits of their ability, might just stop. An expert, though, will find a way through the problem, constantly unfolding new possibilities within the process." I just found out about an exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London; The Power of Making. The V&A; and Crafts Council celebrate the role of making in our lives by presenting an eclectic selection of over 100 exquisitely crafted objects, ranging from a life-size crochet bear to a ceramic eye patch, a fine metal flute to dry stone walling. Power of Making is a cabinet of curiosities showing works by both amateurs and leading makers from around the world to present a snapshot of making in our time. The exhibition showcases works made using a diverse range of skills and explores how materials can be used in imaginative and spectacular ways, whether for medical innovation, entertainment, social networking or artistic endeavour. Making is the most powerful way that we solve problems, express ideas and shape our world. What and how we make defines who we are, and communicates who we want to be. For many people, making is critical for survival. For others, it is a chosen vocation: a way of thinking, inventing and innovating. And for some it is simply a delight to be able to shape a material and say ‘I made that’. The power of making is that it fulfills each of these human needs and desires. Those whose craft and ingenuity reach the very highest levels can create amazing things. But making is something everyone can do. The knowledge of how to make – both everyday objects and highly-skilled creations – is one of humanity’s most precious resources. Items on show include a life-sized crocheted bear, an electric guitar worn on a high heel, extreme cake decorating, and our old friend the Makerbot. The show also includes a Tinkerspace - meet designers, and see Making in action

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Have you heard?

There's this "make fest " coming very soon to the Henry Ford museum. Those that live near Detroit or in it and love making things may want to visit. They have all kinds of people making things, demos and more. Here's the link for those that are interested.   http://www.thehenryford.org/events/makerFaire.aspx

Topic by Treasure Tabby  


Oakland Museum White Elephant Sale

This year's White Elephant Sale to raise funds for the Oakland Museum of California is coming up!  The 2010 event runs March 6-7, 10am-4pm, at 333 Lancaster Street in Oakland near the Fruitvale BART. It's billed as "the biggest, the best, and certainly the most enjoyable rummage sale in Northern CA," and while I haven't attended too many other rummage sales, this doesn't sound far fetched.  The (carefully vetted) pile of goods absolutely stuffs the 96,000 square foot warehouse, which is sorted into themed departments.  It's insane, and an excellent place to find weird and wonderful items for your next project.  Pro Tip: If you go near the end of the day on Sunday, you'll find discounts on the remaining stuff - some departments will charge a flat fee for everything you can fit into a paper grocery bag. Bonus:  all proceeds go to help the Oakland Museum, which is currently undergoing renovation.  I'm a huge fan of their natural sciences exhibit, which features some excellent dioramas showing California birds, reptiles, and mammals in their native environments.  Truly good stuff.

Topic by canida    |  last reply


Mounting Science Museum Walkie Talkies to bikes

Hello, I have two Science Museum Walkie Talkies and I was wondering if anyone had any ideas for mounting them to bikes?

Topic by ShaunHill    |  last reply


UK Residency Opportunity (Engineers, Makers, Designers)

The Victoria & Albert Museum have announced a residency programme that might be right up your street: We have just issued a new open call for a one year residency targeted at UK based engineers, makers and designers who wish to develop their practice by responding in their own way to the rich engineering heritage of the Museum – from the Collection’s origins in the Great Exhibition of 1851 and architectural history of the site, to the pioneering engineering systems at work in the Museum’s ongoing Exhibition Road Building Project.   We are ideally looking an engineer and welcome applications from practitioners from a variety of engineering disciplines (structural, civil, mechanical, engineering design, electrical, biological etc.) but we also welcome applications from makers and designers with a demonstrated interest in engineering. The resident should be interested in engaging with an operational building site and live architecture project. At the same time, he/she should be keen to develop public programmes with a range of different audiences linked to the Museum’s 2016 Engineering Season. We are therefore looking for practitioners who want to use this residency to create, build and present their work to the public while allowing museum visitors to follow their work in progress and understand their creative process through open studios, workshops, talks and other participatory programmes. http://www.vam.ac.uk/blog/artists-residence-va/new-open-call-exhibition-road-engineering-residency Information for applicants Residency period: April 2016 – April 2017 Bursary: £10,000 for twelve months (subject to tax and national insurance) Studio at the Victoria & Albert Museum in South Kensington An additional budget for production of public-facing activities or displays Deadline for applications: midnight, 17 January 2016 Interview date: 26 January 2016

Topic by Kiteman  


Maker Space Educator Workshops

Hey everyone,  I'm the Director of Education at Children's Museum of Illinois in Decatur, Illinois. We have hired a permanent Make Space Coordinator and are going though some transitions with our older Make Space Educators. I'm searching for Make Space inspired trainings for informal educators preferably in the Midwest and under $500.  If you host any trainings or know of any organizations that do, please contact me at akoester@cmofil.org Thanks! Abby Koester

Topic by Steamworks13  


Game: what the heck is this!? Round 2

What the heck is this? In this case, I know exactly what it is. Here's a hint: The pictures were taken at the Harvard Natural History Museum.

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply


Need Ideas for Fun, Cheap Projects for Families to Do on Museum Visits

I work at a science center (www.lsc.org) and need a variety of projects guests can do that are CHEAP, fun and provide a take-home object. I love the water bottle speakers, but they involve expensive parts. Ditto for the jar that glows at night. Any thoughts about a project for all ages that won't cost more than about $2-3 per person using mostly recycled parts? We get about 1,500 people a day, so any dontaed parts would also be appreciated.

Question    |  last reply


Parsererror during image upload

When I try to upload images to an instructable I'm working on, I'm receiving a "parsererror" and being logged out of the system.

Topic by Childrens Museum of Houston    |  last reply


Potenco's Human Power Generator at MOMA

A friend snapped this picture of the OLPC with Squid Labs spin-out Potenco's generator at the MOMA. It's always sweet to see your work professionally displayed in a museum! via Perlick

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply


Indiana Jones Archeological Sand Toys

Does anyone know how to make sand stick together like the archeological sand toys from museums?  I'd like to bury items for a camp and let them dig in their individual sand cakes with popsicle sticks.?

Question by angelbaby1    |  last reply


UK Mini Maker Faire - The Derby Silk Mill - New Poster to Share!

Seems that the folks at Nottingham Hackspace (Nottinghack) and some new folks called Derby Makers are putting on a Mini Maker Faire bang in the middle of the UK, on Sunday the 3rd of June. We've just put up some cash to help things along and will be attending. Who's with us? The Mini Maker will be held at the Silk Mill, which is reputed to be oldest factory in the UK, and up until recently was an industrial museum. It's still part of the museums trust and has some fantastic exhibits inside (Rolls Royce Merlin engine is my favourite!) which will be nestled alongside all manner of makers. So are you coming? If not why not? http://makerfairederby.wordpress.com/

Topic by phenoptix    |  last reply


Manchester UK Mini-Maker Faire in July

News of another Maker Faire in the UK. The big Newcastle event has been postponed until next year. Its being held at the Manchester Museum of science and industry http://www.mosi.org.uk/whats-on/manchester-mini-maker-faire.aspx

Topic by steveastrouk    |  last reply


Is it in bad taste or against the rules to enter a documented slide show in a contest? Answered

I built a life sized audience controlled animatronic salmon complete with night vision eye cameras for a local museum a couple years back.  Thought if this was allowed I could enter it in the kinetic contest.  Video to follow

Question by iminthebathroom    |  last reply


director coach outlet online

To protect show the city has higher profile than off the project as primarily ningbo intangible cultural heritage demonstrated center. The center on June 7, 2008 world heritage day celebration, located in yinzhou area should be under the village streets west of the ancient village bay, beautiful scenery, elegant environment, use the ancient village west of of primitive simplicity elegant traditional building, will the bay tourist culture and the testament mulberry traditional culture, and the combination of colliding promote each other, coordinating development. Protection exhibition center on ningbo city range about more than 60 have higher popularity and influence the programs, page display, visual illustration and field sales. Protection show center is located in a traditional siheyuan inside, indoor display surface by approximately 2200 square, outdoor available area is 1000 square, of medium professional exhibition hall, divided into sequence hall, a layer of exhibition hall, 2 hall and outdoor interact area four parts. Sequence hall to the form of layout is introduced, showcase ningbo city within the scope of the national, provincial, municipal gave the project, a layer, second floor for crafts exhibition hall hall, ZhuJin paint woodcarving, elder Mosaic, the paper-cut, root, about 30 items on display in this, outdoor interactive area is for the demo project activities sites, a stage. (2) have yinzhou district main intangible cultural heritage project of ningbo (yinzhou) museum. The museum is located in yinzhou district government south side, cover an area of 60 mu, with a total construction area of 27000 square meters, invest 250 million, 5 December, 2008 officially opening, the central, provincial and other leaders DuoCi visit the museum, the library intangible cultural heritage project elder Mosaic, ZhuJin paint woodcarving, such as gold and silver has open special exhibition hall. (3) to protect national the testament ZhuJin list show mainly paint woodcarving ZhuJin paint woodcarving gallery of art. The museum is located in the beautiful scenery of the yinfeng our lucky HengXi town south, covers an area of 8 acres, the total investment of 1000 yuan, exhibition since Ming and qing dynasties to today's ZhuJin paint woodcarving collection, the art of more than 1000 pieces. ZhuJin paint woodcarving art museum director Chen is GaiHong state-level non-material cultural heritage representative inheritance.http://www.coachoutletonlineshopping.net

Topic by luckywoyao    |  last reply


We should have known the Swiss were just copying...

Thanks to the great folks at MAKE for letting me stumble across this! The Fitzwilliam Museum at Cambridge has a 2300 year old Roman multitool, with eating utensils, picks, and the same sort of unidentifiable weirdities the Swiss are famous for.

Topic by kelseymh    |  last reply


Marbles in a funnel?

Does anyone remember the museum piece that described angular momentum or some such thing? It looked like a large wooden funnel with marbles that were augered up from below and let loose to roll around and down, spinning up the lower they got? Has anyone made a home version of this? Can something like this be made into a coffee table?

Question by javajunkie1976    |  last reply


Maker Faire In Gainesville Florida! 2012

Greetings everyone! I am Patty Lipka with the Cade Museum for Creativity and Invention located in Sunny Gainesville Florida! We are hosting our first annual Maker Faire on Saturday April 21, 2012 at a HUGE facility!  We will have plenty of room, indoor, outdoor, water, electricity, state of the art in every aspect!  Most important, PLENTY of parking too! We are on the lookout for Makers, Creators, Inventors, Artists, Crafters, Chefs, Food innovators and ????  If you would like to be on our email list and receive our event updates, and application please drop me an email and I will be sure to get you on our E-List for our Maker Event! Welcome to sunny Gainesville Florida! Cheers! Patty Lipka Program Director Cade Museum for Creativity and Invention plipka@cademuseum.org

Topic by P. Lipka    |  last reply


Audio

Looking for some help with an audio issue in a museum kiosk. I have a small 10 watt stereo amplifier running a single 8 ohm speaker. My audio source file is in mono and need to keep the single speaker. Using shielded stereo audio cables. There is a faint amount of static coming from the speaker. Is there a way to reduce this noise/static?

Topic by jimboothdesigns    |  last reply


StyroBot

Check out this excellent StyroBot that Kevin Kelly of Geekdad built from five years' worth of accumulated styrofoam packaging.The project was inspired by Michael Salter's museum pieces, and proves that just about anyone can make awesome giant robots -- it's just a matter of imagination, and collecting enough styrofoam.Anyone up for a styrofoam robot build night?

Topic by canida    |  last reply


I Have My K'nex Back!

Well, I've got some explaining to do.  It turns out my K'nex was never actually sold.  My parents hid my K'nex from me, telling me they sold it, only to give it back to me extremely recently under one stipulation: I can't build guns anymore, unfortunately.  Trust me, I'm not complaining; I'm just ecstatic that I can build with them again.  I'm sorry for the huge lack of activity lately, but I haven't had that many ideas before I got my K'nex back.  My first K'nex creation in a while is this really cool compact lock.  Being K'nex, of course, I wouldn't advise that you lock anything with it, but it is nigh on impossible to open with force unless the button is pushed, or you deconstruct the lock itself.  It is powered completely by tension, and doesn't need any rubber bands or power source other than the K'nex from which it is made.  It is also extremely fun to mess around with, and I could spend about an hour just fiddling with the mechanism; such is my attention span.  I'm thinking about working on instructions, but I wanted to see what you guys thought of it first. The second thing I'd like to share with you all is this 3D Owl I printed over at Fab Lab in Chicago at the Museum of Science and Industry.  I would like to sincerely thank Matt Chalker, the head executive of the Museum of Science and Industry's Fab Lab, the museum itself, and all that make Fab Labs possible for such a wonderful experience.  Along with this owl, we made many things out of wood via the wood laser engraver, and finger puppets for each member of my family, depicting our faces, of course. (I have more pictures of both the owl and the lock.  If anyone is interested, I could post them in the comments.  They're pretty much the items on different backgrounds, though.) Enjoy! -DarkOwl

Topic by DarkOwlProductions    |  last reply


Existing Crocheted Instructables

I know there are so many cool instructables already out there about crocheted things. Anybody want to share any for inspiration for the contest? I love my muppets: https://www.instructables.com/id/A_Crocheted_Tribute_to_Dr_Teeth_and_the_Electric_/ They're actually on display at the American Textile Museum right now. And I did make Animal, I just haven't photographed him yet.

Topic by domestic_engineer    |  last reply


Help with graduate research project about teaching young makers

Hi everyone, my name is Andrew. I’m a graduate student at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, and I teach at our local science museum. I need your help for my graduate research project! I am getting people from the DIY/craft/art/maker/hacker communities to fill out a short (5 minute) survey about their habits surrounding creative projects. The results will help teachers, like me, who want to do hands-on projects with their students. Plus, filling out a survey enters you into a draw for a $150 Amazon gift card! Here’s a link: https://fluidsurveys.com/surveys/makingmakers/diycommunityresearchsurvey/ This research was inspired by my work at the museum running an after-school program where high school students work on their own creative projects. Once all the data is collected I will be happy to share the results. Thank you for your help! Andrew

Topic by amilne    |  last reply


Collaborative design lab survey

Hello, My name is Dan Streelman, I am a graduate student studying Museum Exhibition Planning and Design at University of the Arts in Philadelphia. I am currently conducting a survey for my graduate thesis concerning the development of an interdisciplinary collaborative design and prototype lab for museums. This prototype lab would emphasize building, tinkering and learning by  doing. As creators, builders and tinkers, I would greatly appreciate your input. This survey should take about 5 minutes, and your responses will be extremely valuable to my project going forward. Please feel free to forward this to any colleagues you feel may be interested. Survey Link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/PVDYPNS If you would like to contact me directly about my project, I'd love to hear from you. I can be reached at dstreelman@uarts.edu Thank you for your time and participation. Best, Dan Streelman

Topic by dstreelm    |  last reply


Can't Decide Which Zippo

I cant make up my mind between these two Zippos'Hidden Dragon''Patriotic Version'What do you think?What would you get?OrIs there a different zippo you would get?below are images from zippo case museum (offical websight)update i go the Patriotic version and i love it. added some pics

Topic by i make shooting things    |  last reply


Welding and Machinist Classes

Hello I am an exhibits designer and builder for a museum. I weld and do some machining every week. I would like to take formal classes here in Philadelphia or the surrounding area but I can not find a single program! One would think that in a major city there would be something but no luck so far. Does anyone know of a school. New Jersey would be ok too. Thank You Montrose

Topic by Montrose    |  last reply


Fake X-RAY Exhibit

Hello all I wanted to know if anyone has an idea about cameras that have an X-RAY application. I am building a kids hospital for a museum and we want a play X-RAY machine. I thought that there may be a camera with an app that you can take a picture of someones hand, leg, face ect. and then it would alter the photo to look like a bone visible photo. Any ideas? Thanks

Topic by Montrose    |  last reply


Horsepunk Exhibit

Steampunk may be in love with brassy steam-powered devices, but what about the horses? How would the modern world be if everything was still horse-drawn? That's a question that a group of SVA students tackled and will be showing off in an exhibit in the Long Island Museum in Stony Brook, NY. Can someone please stop by to take some more pics when it opens Feb 2? I'd love to see more of this. Horsepower Exhibit linkvia Core77

Topic by fungus amungus  


Maker Faire: Call for Entries

Maker Faire is holding auditions for Maker Faire on March 8. Have something you want to show and haven't already submitted it? Try wowing the Maker folks in person in San Jose. See also: Call for Makers Calling All Makers - Auditions for Maker Faire 2009 to be held on Sunday, March 8 In preparation for this year's event, a team from MAKE magazine (www.makezine.com) will be scheduling 15-minute appointments at The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose, March 8th, from noon to 4pm, to preview, and meet with, potential makers, crafters and inventors from the area. "We're looking for anyone who has something fun to share, something they've made with their hands," explains Dale Dougherty, Publisher & Editor of MAKE magazine. "It can be practical or impractical--it could be something simple like a creative costume or maybe some handmade jewelry. Or it could be something wild like a bike with ten wheels, or a dog-powered lawn mower. Whatever it is, the more creative and imaginative, the better!" Audition Details: When: Sunday, March 8th, 2009 (noon - 4pm) Where: The Tech Museum of Innovation 201 South Market Street San Jose, CA 95113-2008 (408) 795.6225 Admission: FREE Contact for Auditions and to schedule a 15-minute appointment: Sherry Huss, (707) 827-7074 or sherry@oreilly.com

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


Ideas for how to make a kinetic pin wall door

Http://youtu.be/F88D-eQMC9c The concept was to take the pin walls that you see at museums and science centers and make a kid's bedroom door out of these push pins.   From talking to manufacturers it appears to be a pretty pricey proposition (.25 cents per pin / approx 55,000 pins per 4x4 area). I was wondering if anyone had any ideas how to make this more economical?  Or if it had already been done and there was an instructable already out there? Thanks!

Topic by msmith94    |  last reply


What is this plastic tubing called? Answered

Hi all, I came across these woven plastic tubing which when squeezed on either end turn into toy rockets in a science and technology museum and I was wondering if anyone could point me in the direction of where I could source more of these things. I recall they were named 'boone rockets' but that's been a fruitless internet search. I would love to apply this product to jewellery/sculpture so it would be good to know what the process/technology is called. Cheers!

Question by jarris    |  last reply


Back from the Big Peach

Back from Ole Southey, The Sweaty Apple, Ted Turners Bidet. Yep, talking about Atlanta Ga. and thanks to the interweb I can annoy millions with my travel log.If you like you can check out my pix, I took over 1400, but didn't put all of them online, sorry about the low quality and the image tag, I get tired of finding my pix on other's pages.So my wife and I stayed in an inexpensive best western in midtown, alright hotel, great location, thin walls.We visited the Ga Aquarium, we were underwhelmed, perhaps spoiled by multiple trips to the Shedd Aquarium we were disappointed in that it took only three hours to tour the whole facility, TWICE. The whale sharks are cool, but the cafe is to be avoided, the "burgers" I ordered still had ice in the middle.The Atlanta Botanical Garden is an absolute jewel, I've visited dozens of gardens and this one tops the list, the highlight being the Fuqua Conservatory where you share the environs with poison arrow frogs, along with an outstanding orchid house.The High Museum, is hard to judge, we visited the special exhibits only, it was interesting to see a Rembrandt in person, and the Annie Leibowitz gallery was nice.The Fernbank Museum of Natural History, this one I sadly say, pass on. I LIKE dioramas and natural history museums, but without the Imax movie, it would have taken 45 minutes tops to see the whole thing.Finally the Zoo, a must visit, be sure to visit on a week day, Atlanta seems to be populated entirely with soccer moms witha sense of entitlement and double wide strollers. The zoo has pandas, but the red pandas have greater charm and charisma to them, and you don't need a special ticket.FoodThe only restaurant we dined at worth noting was the South City Kitchen, the food was so good you'll mourn that you will never eat that good again, the She Crab Soup and Catfish Ruben are delicious.And Weissenheimer hambergerler, PM me, Okay ?

Topic by Tool Using Animal    |  last reply


I'm back!

In the past month I've been scratching my itch to travel. I've been hiking in Japan, exploring Morocco, and relaxing in Parisian cafes and museums. So if you didn't see me around these parts it's because I wasn't around these parts. No new trips coming up, but getting outside of the US is always fun and I hope to do it again soon. But now I'm back! I'm looking forward to digging through what's been going on here in the past couple weeks and finding new things to make or do.

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


The Largest Parsons CDT Thesis Show Ever!

If you're in New York be sure to check out the BFA thesis exhibition for Parson's graduating Communication, Design and Technology class. There is sure to be some amazing computer-based art (and other strangeness that defies explanation). This is not to be missed!Opening:Wednesday, May 14, 2008: 6:00 - 8:00 p.m.Chelsea Art Museum556 West 22nd StreetHours:Tuesday through Saturday,11:00 AM-6:00 PMThursday,11:00 AM-8:00 PM

Topic by randofo    |  last reply


Babbage Difference Engine No. 2 On Display

"Charles Babbage (1791-1871), computer pioneer, designed the first automatic computing engines. He invented computers but failed to build them. The first complete Babbage Engine was completed in London in 2002, 153 years after it was designed. Difference Engine No. 2, built faithfully to the original drawings, consists of 8,000 parts, weighs five tons, and measures 11 feet long....An identical Engine completed in March 2008 is on display at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California until May 2009." - http://www.computerhistory.org/babbage/

Topic by NachoMahma    |  last reply


LEGO Difference Engine

 Babbage never got a chance to build his difference engine. Ironically it is considered one of the most advanced and is arguably the most famous of these old mechanical computers. One was eventually made in 1991  for the Science Museum in London. Don't live in London? Too far to drive? Well, no worries, Andrew Carol has built a working difference engine from LEGO's and with a kind donation of server space from Steve Wozniak, he's posted a very detailed explanation of his project so you can build one too! acarol.woz.org/

Topic by Culturespy    |  last reply


Giant Robot Architecture Talk by Greg Lynn in Berkeley

Here is an interesting talk from the Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium of the Berkeley Center for New Media...Giant Robot ArchitectureGreg Lynn, UCLA & Angewandte, ViennaMonday, Feb 4, 7:30-9:00pm- Note Special Location: Berkeley Art Museum Theater- Enter on Dwight Ave: http://bampfa.berkeley.edu/visit/visitor- Lecture is free and open to the publicAbstractRobots. In my office, my staff keeps asking for more new machines, and every time I get a new machine, I fire two or three people. By extrapolation, in the next few years I will be sitting in an office by myself with a bunch of robots. We have is a very large CNC (computer numerically controlled) cutting machine, a laser cutter, a 3d printer, and soon we will have a robotic articulated arm. All of these things let us do studies of models, which are very important to architects, but what they also let us do is learn machine language. We spend more and more time talking to machines; speaking their language. It is very easy for us to go to any country that has an automobile industry or an aircraft industry and give their machines instructions and do things with these large machines at an architectural scale that is very perfunctory and affordable. The spread of machine language and programming is more significant than the Anglicization of the world. Learning to talk to robots is very important to my field of design.Speaker BioGreg Lynn is a leading pioneer at the intersection of computing, design, and architecture. His architectural designs have been exhibited in both architecture and art museums including the 2000 Venice Biennale of Architecture where he represented the United States in the American Pavilion. His work is in the permanent collections of CCA, SFMoMA, and MoMA and has been exhibited at the Pompidou, Beyeler, Cooper Hewitt, MAK, MoCA, NAI,Carnegie, ICA and Secession museums among others. In addition to his architectural work, his Alessi "Supple"Mocha Cups and his Vitra "Ravioli" Chair are in production and have been inducted into the Museum of Modern Art's Permanent Collection. He received the American Academy of Arts & Letters Architecture Award in 2003. In 2002, he left his position as the Professor of Spatial Conception and Exploration at the ETHZ (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich) and became an Ordentlicher University Professor at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna.He is studio professor of Architecture at UCLA and the Davenport Visiting Professor at Yale University. Greg Lynn holds degrees in architecture and philosophy and received an Honorary Doctorate degree from the Academy of Fine Arts &Design; in Bratislava. In 2001, Time Magazine named him one of 100 of the most innovative people in the world for the 21st century. In 2005, Forbes Magazine named him one of the ten most influential living architects.http://www.glform.comMore info on the colloquium here.

Topic by noahw  


Oh Crikey!

These guys may not have thought of everything but I can't think of anything else you could add to it right now. http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/video/2012/mar/28/science-kinetic-sculpture-video It's over 9 minutes long. From a duck to a skeleton to a robot dinosaur: scientists created this fabulous kinetic sculpture, called On the Move, to demonstrate to children the concept of energy transfer. The Launchpad team at London's Science Museum and Engineered Arts Ltd created this cause-and-effect chain of events in a warehouse in Cornwall. No soft toys were injured in the making of this film L

Topic by lemonie    |  last reply


Make your own slot machine - advice from a real Maker

I was looking for something else, and found this site by local (he lives about twenty minutes from me) Maker Extraordinaire, Tim Hunkin. He has a main site, as well: http://www.timhunkin.com/ .Tim is best know in the UK for an old TV series "The Secret Life of..." (In which I once saw him record his own voice on stickytape), a similarly-themed exhibition he did in the Science Museum in London, and for his newspaper cartoons called The Rudiments of Wisdom.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Giant pin impression panel

My son has one of those multi-pin impression toys where you press your hand on one side and the pins move and you see your hand impression on the pins on the other side.  He loves it.  I've seen some large ones at Childrens Museums but it seems like there needs to be an instructable on how to make your own, preferably a giant one. I've found some steel sheets online that would make good holders but couldn't come up with possible items for the 'pins'.  What are your ideas? Mazelady

Question by mazelady    |  last reply


School/Work fun?

Have there ever been a moment for you when oh so boring work/school is actually fun? I have one. This is the only one there is from me. OK, so our school is going to a museum. I came across a very cool shop that sells weapons. I am not only allowed to buy one, my school's best teacher ever Mr.Andy actually bought it for me. ( quite expensive, $75 ). In case you are wondering, the weapon is an ancient native Australian club. It's very strong. I kept smashing stuff with it and it hardly even dent. So, that's my story. What's yours?

Topic by Camisado    |  last reply


Calling all American Makers

American Maker is an event sponsored by Make and Craft to showcase the work of people just likke you! It is scheduled to take place at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago on September 20th, 2008. The deadline to sign up is September 13th, so it is still not too late to sign up to present (but time is running out). Each Maker that signs up will get a chance to present in front of an audience and panel of judges. The Maker choosen at the end of the day to be best will win $500. Even if you have nothing currently to present, you should go an watch, because this sounds like it will be great fun. (full flier details below)

Topic by randofo    |  last reply


water table/play area

So I recently took my 3 year old to the children's museum in Indianapolis, which was great, but what really stuck out for him was the water table/play area. I think he would have been happy chasing boats around that table all day. But it got me to thinking that i could build one of these in the backyard (scaled down, of course!). I've been looking for plans to accomplish this, but everything I find is basically an elevated tub or plastic tote. The project I'm envisioning would be on an incline so the boats could follow a set path. Initially, I was thinking it would be shaped like a ring, so he could climb under it to be in the middle, but I think a rectangle would be simpler (and walking around the table would be good exercise for him!) The path would (on a gentle incline) circle around the perimeter of the rectangle, so boats would eventually end up near the starting place. He could then pick up the boats and set them on another circuit. Probably would need a pump to pull water from the end back up to the starting point, which would provide a current to help the boats along.  Any ideas or suggestions that could help this project along? Potential issues? One thing I'm not sure about is how to handle the water depth on the incline. I forsee the water rushing down the incline to quickly, leaving just a trickle to attempt to carry the boats along, leaving the boats "beached." Maybe there should be no incline at all and rely on the pump to provide the current? I'll attach some images of the super fancy versions we've encountered in museums, just as example of my inspiration.  

Topic by gharper1    |  last reply


Chasing circle of LEDS...?

I'm in the process of making a UFO model for the local Railroad museum's model trainset.  What I want to do is have the standard disc shaped UFO with embedded LEDs on the edge.  I would like the LEDs to chase around the edge repeatedly while the display is on.  I've looked into using Arduino, but size is a factor.  The UFO is going to be about 6" across.  As far as I can tell, I can use a 555 and 4017 to work it out, as but that limits me to 10 leds, right?   If it can be worked out, having counter rotating circles would be great... But that would be duplicating the circuit and reversing the 4017 pin outs... AND...where is a good place to buy small quantities of LEDs and ICs?  My local Radio Shack has nothing in stock

Question by athos76    |  last reply


Babbage difference engine No. 2 now operational

Moon-mad steampunk engineers have constructed Charles Babbage's Difference Engine No. 2 from the master's original plans. It is now on display at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif., after being completed last month. "The first complete Babbage Engine was completed in London in 2002, 153 years after it was designed. Difference Engine No. 2, built faithfully to the original drawings, consists of 8,000 parts, weighs five tons, and measures 11 feet long. We invite you to learn more about this extraordinary object, its designer Charles Babbage and the team of people who undertook to build it. Discover the wonder of a future already passed. A sight no Victorian ever saw."Online Exhibit

Topic by laminterious    |  last reply


Steampunk and robots and gears, oh my

Dark Roasted Blend is always full of fascinating shiny wonderful things. Following links there led me back to this older post collecting links to Nemo Gould's art robots, steampunk spiders, gorgeous mechanized beetles, and minature recycled hot-rods. Even if you've seen it before, it's worth revisiting, and Dark Roasted Blend does, as advertised, provide a daily dose of the weird and wonderful. Today's batch also included links to Takeshi Yamada's Museum of World Wonders exhibit, which includes "over 500 post-super-realism and neo-taxidermy artworks simulating the treasures of the cabinet of curiosities" along the lines of an old-school Coney Island sideshow. Enjoy!

Topic by reno_dakota    |  last reply


CLEAR FILM that is archival, pigment inkjet compatible, and in of itself can be a final product? Is there such a thing?

Problem: I've been calling art stores as well as photography stores, paper stores, film manufacturers, printer companies -- nobody seems to know if there is such a thing as printing onto clear plastic film as a final product. Everyone says their products are meant for transferring or negatives etc. (I tried printing on non-coated Mylar D, and the ink just beads off.) goal: What I have been creating are art pieces on clear transfer film and selling them. I print on them, I paint on them, I apply reflective & dichroic materials on them, and layer them on top of each other; I manipulate the art pieces in every interesting way I possibly can. My collectors and potential clients want to be assured that my pieces will have a long lasting quality to them. I want to be able to give all of the correct information rather than "I don't know". my materials: I use a canon ipf8400 with archival fine art pigment inks. I just need a clear film that is also archival. Or something as close as possible to being the most durable, long lasting material available that is inkjet compatible. There has to be something out there? Or at least a protective clear spray or finish? I can't be the only one interested in creating artwork with transparent qualities? I have been using transfer film, 4ml thick. Does anyone have any tips at all to help me think in the right direction?  question: Is there such a thing as a Clear Film that is archival, pigment inkjet compatible, and in of itself can be a final product? Or what is the closest I can possibly get to that?

Question by LindsayR3    |  last reply