New Scientist

I'm sure people are aware but http://www.newscientist.com/In this weeks issue:Someone in China has spent some time analysing the US power grid, and figured out that it could be collapsed by taking-out a lightly-loaded sub-network. The US department of homeland security is apparently looking into this. However, Prof Ian Fells (a jolly chap with a beard) of Newcastle University UK says "they only need a bunch of guys with Semtex to blow up the gridlines near a power station"The Mythbusters are interviewed, but even they don't know why thermite on ice explodes, do you?And Richard Dawkins has a new book out, from the review:"Implying that your audience is stupid does not qualify as a great new angle. Yet this is precisely what Dawkins does"."It's really kind of comical. If "spot the condecensions" is a new drinking game, then bottoms up! There's one in just about every chapter"LThere's much more, but I mainly wanted to post the Mythbusters link, and the Dawkins review.(There is an article on Velociraptors)

Topic by lemonie   |  last reply


An Instructable in New Scientist!

Instructables member XenonJohn has had his Self-Balancing Skateboard featured on New Scientist TV, using video taken at the UK Maker Faire. I had the pleasure of meeting John at the Faire, and I can safely say that this world needs more like him. Kudos, John.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Instructables on New Scientist TV

Instructables "artist in residence" Mikeasaurus has had his magnetic silly putty featured on New Scientist TV. Kudos, Mike!

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Time Travel Contest (with actual prizes!)

Fancy winning a few goodies?From the New Scientist magazine:Our theme this year is time travel. When the Large Hadron Collider at CERN was about to go into operation, some physicists speculated that it might attract visitors from the future (New Scientist, 9 February, p 32, and Feedback, 5 April ). For our competition, we ask you to imagine three such visitors arriving, each bringing glad tidings and bearing a gift from the future. What would the gifts be?Ten lucky winners will each receive a copy of Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration of the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation and Time Travel by Michio Kaku. They will also receive a selection of New Scientist goodies - including books from the Last Word series and a pen-drive.You may enter the competition online. You can also enter by email - with "Competition" in the subject field, please - or by fax or post.The competition closes on Monday 1 December {a significant date} and no entries will be accepted after that date. The results will be published in the 20/27 December issue of New Scientist. The editor's decision is final. Happy imaginings!

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


What would you ask Terry Pratchett?

Next week, (New Scientist are) going to interview Terry Pratchett, author of the enormously successful Discworld series of books - or rather, you are. Tell us what questions you'd like to put to him in the comments below. We'll run the interview in a forthcoming issue of New Scientist.Remember, the more original your question is, the more likely it is we'll pick it - which means "Where do you get your ideas?" is out, for a start. And bear in mind we cover science and technology, not writing or publishing.Thinking caps on, then. Or should that be pointy hats?You must be able to do better than "Is it hard being so awesome?"!Link to article and comment boxNote "Next week" was written on 25th September 2009 - if you are reading this some time in 2016, you're a bit late to contribute...

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Instructables in the News

Instructables seems to be finding its way around the news media. Here are links to the mentions I know of. If you see any others, leave a note in the comments, or post a forum topics and I'll add a link to it here. If you're from the press and would like to arrange an interview, please contact me here. See the most current news about Instructables with a Google News search for Instructables. The Top 100 Websites of 2011 - PCMag Share What You Make with Instructables - Forbes Autodesk 2011: On Autodesk Acquiring Instructables - Core77 Eric Wilhelm featured on NPR discussing DIY "Sous Vide" cooking techniques Maker Faire and the Growth of Do-It-Yourself - Entrepreneur Autodesk Buys Instructables; Design Software Giant in Consumer Marketing Push - Xconomy Instructables, A Mecca for Makers, Reflects Eric Wilhelm’s Passion for Building Stuff and Telling the Story - Xconomy Autodesk Acquires Instructables and What it Means for Makers - MAKE eBook Evolutions: Instructables - Forbes Blog Eric Wilhelm discusses high-tech Halloween projects on NPR's Science Friday 2010-10-22 New York Times - Bamboo Bicycles New York Times - Growing Vegetables Upside Down DIY Green Projects - ABC News Instructables in the Daily Green Taking an Open-Source Approach to Hardware - Instructables in the WSJ FYIs for the DIYers - Instructables in the Sacramento Bee Do-It-Yourself Guru Makes Treasures From Trash - Tim Anderson Profiled on NPR's Weekend Edition Instructables on WGHP Fox 8 - Paper Wallets and Marshmallow Shooters "It's not like everyone who does DIY is a communist!" - Instructables in the Financial Times Instructables in Inventors Digest - Five Questions with Eric Wilhelm Instructables on KSL5's Studio 5 How to make your own high-tech Christmas gifts - Instructables in New Scientist Build It Yourself at Instructables.com - Instructables on ABC's Ahead of the Curve DIY Holiday Gift Ideas - The Best of Instructables on NHPR's Word of Mouth Instructables on NPR's Here & Now 11/24/2008 Instructables on NYC's WCBS-AM 880 Monday Eco-nomical: Homemade Gifts -- Instructables Mentioned on NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday 2008-11-23 Instructables on NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday - 2008-11-22 Homeowners go greener with do-it-yourself jobs Faberge Egg Contest Round-up by Forbes Dry-Ice Martini and Electric Cake - Hungry Scientist and Instructables in the NYT Leah Buechley and Instructables Written Up by Forbes: "A Blinking Fashion Statement" Instructables Part of PC World's 100 Incredibly Useful and Interesting Web Sites Customers increasingly drive firms' innovations Netting circle - The crafting and DIY crazes are catching on with websites such as Etsy and Instructables Eric Wilhelm wins Technology Review's Top Innovators under 35 Award Tiny Talents - Learning Bar Tricks in the New York Times Magazine How To Fix The World & Grassroots Innovation Takes Root - Instructables in Forbes My Belt Sander Can Beat Your Circular Saw - Instructables in the New York Times 3 How-To Projects In 60 Seconds - Eric Wilhelm of Instructables on the Forbes Video Network Eric profiled by Technology Review in "Instructables pioneer loves to kite-surf" This, From That - Maker Faire and Instructables in the New York Times Instructables on NPR's Talk of the Nation April Fools' Day 2008 - The Top Five Office April Fools Pranks Instructables on NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday March 9th, 2008 Innovation: 'How-To' Web Sites Let You Learn Just About Anything - Instructables in Fox Business News Arts and Crafts Find New Life Online - Instructables in BusinessWeek Instructables in SmartComputing Instructables on LA's KROQ Instructables in the Telegraph -- Weird and wonderful inventions The How-Tos That You Do: Instructables Keep People In Step After Step After Step. - Instructables in Helio Mag Instructables in the New York Times -- Romancing the Flat Pack: Ikea, Repurposed Instructables in the New York Times - In a Highly Complex World, Innovation From the Top Down Mouse Mouse in FHM-Germany Instructables and Squid Labs featured in Tech Closeup's April 2007 Show Instructables in the New York Times - How to Improve it? Ask Those Who Use It Instructables wins the 2006 WIRED Rave award for Industrial Design Instructables in World Changing Instructables mentioned in Jane Mag Instructables in the Sydney Morning Herald PodTech Network Instructables team interview: Eric and Leah Instructables in FHM-Netherlands Laser Cutter Origami - Squid Labs in the New Yorker Instructables in Trendwatching Instructables in Edutopia Instructables in The Village Voice Instructables in Network World, January 2006 The Dream Factory - Instructables debuts in WIRED, September 2005 Squid Labs profiled in WIRED news, September 2005 More cool stuff about Instructables here at the guided tour.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


New Scientist recreates a robot made by the ancient Greeks

A friend forwarded this along:Ok, this was on slashdot, and it may be a little old, but it was the coolest thing I've seen today.If you can't watch the 2 minute video, the robot works by having a falling weight turn an axel. However, the real ingenuity of 60 AD shines from pegs that are put in the axel that the rope can be wrapped around in order to make the axel turn different directions at pre-programmed intervals.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Opinions please: EMS "Meggy Jr"

OK, I keep saying I ought to learn to solder properly. I ought to learn to programme chips. I ought...Well, you get the idea.So, I was browsing Evil Mad Scientist, and I came across Meggy Jr. It's a kit, you solder it, you can programme it. Ticks all the boxes, no?But, all I have to go on are EMS' own comments - looking for reviews, all I find are reports of its existence, plus silly comments from people who haven't used it. I haven't found any video of it being played, and I can't tell if it makes any sounds.Has anybody used it? Is it any good? Is it worth splashing out $130+? (This isn't an immediate purchase - probably in the New Year.)

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Fractal Snowflake Cupcakes

Evil Mad Scientist goes to the kitchen and again merges math with food. Their new sugary fractal creations are made with either fondant or marzipan. Check out their site for the full details on how to make one of these on your own. Fractal Snowflake Cupcakes

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Cardboard (expired)

Have a really good Instructable about cardboard? Want to win a spot in "The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Cardboard" Collection? You can submit your entry by commenting below and providing a link to your Instructable. The Mad Scientists will judge this contest and the winners will be announced shortly and will be included in the "The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Cardboard" Collection. All submitted Instructables must be cardboard themed. Users are limited to one Instructable per contest. They can be both new Instructables and existing ones. Good luck!

Topic by The Mad Scientists   |  last reply


Dinosaur Discovery

Exciting news from Utah: well-preserved dinosaur fossils, petrified trees, and other remnants of the time of the dinosaurs were found. This could help scientists get a better grasp of the plant life during the Jurassic era. Not that there's anything more to know--Jurassic Park and Dinotopia taught us everything there is to know about dinosaurs.LinkPlus, take a look at the video at the bottom of the page about dinosaur excrement. The expert's living room is something to be, well, admired.

Topic by joshf   |  last reply


The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Candy (WE NEED ENTRIES!!!)

Have a really good Instructable about candy? Want to win a spot in "The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Candy" Collection? You can submit your entry by commenting below and providing a link to your Instructable. The Mad Scientists will judge this contest and the winners will be announced shortly and will be included in the "The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Candy" Collection. All submitted Instructables must be candy themed. Users are limited to one Instructable per contest. They can be both new Instructables and existing ones. Good luck!

Topic by The Mad Scientists   |  last reply


Ask a Scientist Special Event: Phat Tuesday Physics Circus

Come join ringmaster Zeke Kossover and his crew of sensational sideshow scientists as they (and YOU) perform dazzling demonstrations that illustrate physical principles! Watch, and listen, as sound shatters a wine glass! Ride a hovercraft! Turn on an electric pickle! Try to look at invisible glass! Witness the stopping of time! (Ok, not time exactly, but the hands of a watch.) Zeke and his crew will astound, amaze and explain, every step of the way. Can you think of a more appropriate way to celebrate Mardi Gras, than sledgehammering a bed of nails into the chest of a physics teacher from New Orleans? I sure can't!RINGMASTER: Zeke Kossover, physics teacher at Jewish Community High School of the Bay.THE CREW: Tucker Hiatt, physics teacher at The Branson School and director of Wonderfest; Leif Steinhour, Constructor, One Off Shoppe.WHEN: Tuesday, February 5th, 7:00 pm WHERE: Axis Cafe, 1201 8th Street (btw. 16th & Irwin) Ask a Scientist recommends that you come early to make sure that you get a good view.http://askascientistSF.com

Topic by noahw   |  last reply


Dry-Ice Martini and Electric Cake - Hungry Scientist and Instructables in the NYT

The Hungry Scientist Handbook, Turkey tek, and Instructables were the topic of Dry-Ice Martini and Electric Cake in the New York Times:WHEN does a recipe become a science project?Is it when the compulsion to create an edible electrical circuit keeps a cook up all night, wrapping Twizzler string licorice in pure silver?Is it when a baker decides to bake 20 equilateral-triangle-shaped pecan pies for Thanksgiving, then attach them together with magnets to form an 80-serving icosahedron? (The recipe begins with 30 cups of flour and 2 large sheets of 24-gauge steel.) More news and press about Instructables here.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Scientists HELP!!! Ideas/Instructables for installation art celebrating chemistry, new elements, need models of atoms

I am heading a group of teens making ART to be installed in a park in Livermore, CA where the Lawerence Livermore National Lab has commissioned us to celebrate the discovery of the 116th element "Livermorium" - problem is, we artists need help VISUALIZING and making the esoteric idea of atoms into VISUALS that the lay person could enjoy and understand. We have a corner park. We need to make INTERACTIVE science displays that are hardy to the weather and to human touch. -- How to show (the latest ideas) of an atomic model for Livermorium?? -- How to explain/show what that element is for? -- How to display the dynamics of molecules, atoms, electrons, protons, etc. --what machines does a scientist use to discover new elements? Please reply with links to images, explain simply about the structure of atoms/molecules, IDEAS?

Topic by stinastar   |  last reply


Solar-driven Stirling engines for electricity generation

The "Picture of the Day" in today's New Scientist shows a solar power generation test using Stirling engines as the generators.

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


Are Science and Engineering skills are required?

First of all, hi everyone, I'm new to the forums and this is my first post so bear with me if my questions are strange! I've been taking glances at the projects in Instructables, and I am really happy to find a site that shared my passion in home science/technology/DIY projects! I am studying Physics (first year) at my city's University (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece) and I was always fascinated by science, technology and especially computers-electronics. Instructables' projects 'pushed' me to get some basic tools (A 25 W soldering iron, a soldering pump, a pair of 'helping hands' with a magnifying glass, screwdrivers, wire cutters, wire strippers, some other basic tools and recently a Dremel 300) and frequently, I've been trying some of the simpler projects. But, since science will be my future profession, I'm not content by just reading instructions and following through...I want to understand the principles behind the instructables (for example, electronics) and even make my own small projects at home. As I said, electronics/electrical engineering projects are kind of my favorite, and I often get frustrated by just blindly following through the instructable, and I ask myself 'how did he think about that' or 'how did he know how to build this circuit' or 'how did he choose his materials'. So, do you really have to be an engineer to plan the more advanced -electronics or not- projects or can anybody get a book/website and learn about those skills? I often get ideas about projects of my own, but I don't know how to choose materials for them...does this skill come from experience or gained by an engineering degree? Is Physics a good enough degree to help me with my projects? And another question that has been around my head for a while: do you actually get pen and paper, lay down designs and scientific formulas-calculations to build a more advanced project? Thank you!

Topic by loxagos_snake   |  last reply


How to make your own high-tech Christmas gifts - Instructables in New Scientist

How to make your own high-tech Christmas giftsIt's easier than you might think. The web has a swarm of sites that show you how to make this year's must-have gadgets from heaps of electronic components and old junk. So there is no excuse not to give your mum that digital photo frame she wants or your nephew a dancing teddy. Not only might you save money and keep tech junk from the dump, your friends and family are more likely to cherish a home-made present than something acquired with a wave of a bank card. At least, so says Eric Wilhelm, who has created Instructables.com, a website forum for people to share their home-made projects.While studying for a PhD in mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Wilhelm took up kite surfing. It was an expensive hobby, though, and Wilhelm couldn't afford to buy his own gear. So he began designing his own, hand-sewing the kites and building the surfboards. "Half of the equipment performed beautifully, half failed spectacularly," recalls Wilhelm, who began documenting his designs on his own website.Soon Wilhelm was inundated with notes from kite-surf dudes asking for advice, sharing their ideas and swapping photographs. Dealing with all the correspondence was time-consuming, and he realised that people like him needed a better way to share their projects online: Instructables was born.Today the site has step-by-step instructions for 17,000 projects, with as many as 20 new ones added each day. Here you can find out how to make a robot like the one in the movie Wall-E, a flashlight from a Chapstick and an iPod speaker from a tin of mints. More than 350,000 fans rate other people's projects, suggest improvements and add their own photographs and videos. The most popular projects have been compiled in a book, The Best of Instructables.More news and press about Instructables here.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


"D'oh!" or "Oh my God, we're all going to die!" ?

This article from New Scientist raises the question posted in the title. Which response is more appropriate?

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


Would you be in a new and virtually untapped green energy?

Hi I am developing a new concept for new in-pipe clean energy turbine system and looking for a mechanical electric engineer with skill in hydroelectricity. The patent has been already submitted, the proof of concept checked on a small scale prototype. I am trying to build a full working demonstration prototype. I am a scientist with good in design skills but limited electromechanical skills. I need a electromechanical engineer with computer fluid dynamics (CFD) skills to help me to build this prototype, interpret the data we will gather from the tests and find the best pilot test site. I am proposing a substantial part of equity of the company in exchange of this partnership. I'll ask you to sign an NDA before we get going. Please contact me here or at info at 100traffic dot com. Best regards, Herve

Topic by 100traffic 


Alice in Wonderland & maths?

In New Scientist No2739/40/41 (Christmas 2009) is an article by Melaine Bayley (DPhil Oxford) in which she explains how Lewis Carroll (Charles Dogson) is taking a stab at the new mathematics of the time in his famous work. For example, the Mad Hatter's Tea Party is related to Hamilton's maths. Interesing stuff (to me anyway...) Read here

Topic by lemonie   |  last reply


Do It Yourself Genetic Engineering

From New ScientistKATHERINE AULL's laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, lacks a few mod cons. "Down here I have a thermocycler I bought on eBay for 59 bucks," she says, pulling out a large, box-shaped device she uses to copy short strands of DNA. "The rest is just home brew," she adds, pointing to a centrifuge made out of a power drill and plastic food container, and a styrofoam incubator warmed with a heating pad normally used in terrariums.In fact, Aull's lab is a closet less than 1 square metre in size in the shared apartment she lives in. Yet amid the piles of clothes she recently concocted vials of an entirely new genetically modified organism....Read the whole article in New Scientist

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


Experimental drug reverses Alzheimer's

From BBC News US scientists say they have successfully reversed the effects of Alzheimer's with experimental drugs.Note that it says reverse, so people can get their memories back! Thoughts?

Topic by Keith-Kid   |  last reply


World's Largest Stop-Motion Animation.

From the people that brought you the world's smallest stop-motion animation, comes the world's largest - shot on a beach, some scenes covered 1000m2. New Scientist TV's video format won't embed here, so you'll have to follow this link.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Steampunk Gets Real

As reported on New Scientist today, the British steam-powered vehicle Inspiration broke the previous land-speed record for steam power, set back in 1906. The fastest of the two runs was 151 mph, set on a dry lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base.

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


Where's The Book?

This is actually my first post in anything (forums or the actual site). You guys mention a upcoming book in the group's intro, coming out in September of 2007. Well here it is in December and no book. Has it fallen through? Are you looking for a new publisher, cause I've notice that Reaganbooks hasn't had anything new in months. Plus, I've also noticed that the forums (for HSC) haven't been updated in over a year.

Topic by KRR 


3 D Printing of BODY PARTS !!!!!

Scientists Use 3D Printer to Create First “Printed” Human Vein   Brit Liggett Scientists Use 3D Printer to Create First “Printed” Human Vein by Brit Liggett, 03/22/10 filed under: Design for Health   3D Printing technology has recently leapt into a new realm — we’ve seen printers that can create entire buildings out of stone, delicious meals out of simple ingredients, and now — perhaps weirdest and coolest of them all — a printer that can build body parts from cells!   Body Part Printer LINK ANOTHER LINK to another more familiar site.... Picture

Topic by Goodhart   |  last reply


Looking For Game Show Contestants

DISCOVERY SCIENCE NOW CASTING A NEW GAME SHOW!!! The producers are looking for builders, scientist, inventors, engineers, carpenters, welders, mechanics, architects... who love to invent new gadgets; build robots; racing power tools; weld together bizarre machines that drive, fly, climb, shoot flames or launch projectiles... for a team challenge that will show off your handy skills such as: welding, knowledge of aeronautics, auto mechanics, hydraulics, carpentry, pyrotechnics, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, material science, electronics... If you, or someone you know, is a gonzo engineer/scientist or just a high-energy, creative, fun, builder Then email, your name and contact information to: icnbld@yahoo.com This Game Show is for thinkers, dreamers and doers, who are eager to let their inner Mac Gyvers be seen, and are ready to collaborate with a team of other builders to beat the clock in order to "SAVE" the BIG PRIZE!!

Topic by demolition399 


Anybody else got this problem?

I know that there are about 10 new instructables added every day, so I was surprised to see no new instructables going on today.Then I realised the view count wasn't rising.I had a look at my own stuff - my latest Be a Scientist offering says 200 views on the "Recent" list, but 382 views plus a rating when I look at my own list of published instructables via the "You" menu.Who's broken something, me or Instructables?

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


How to Knit a Brain

From New Scientist online:AS SOON as she saw her first images of the brain, Marjorie Taylor was spellbound. The vibrant pinks and blues, the intricate detailing - somehow they spoke to her. "I couldn't help but look at them with the eye of a quilter," says Taylor, a psychologist at the University of Oregon. "I thought the folds of the cerebral cortex would be great in velvet."Read the full article.

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


3D photo-tours of LHC and detectors on the Web!

New Scientist reported today on an online exhibit of 3D-navigable photographs of the LHC and associated experimental detectors. Very, very cool!Even more interesting are the bizarre anamorphic images which pop up when you navigate between the pages of the exhibit. These are apparently the originals from which the navigable pages themselves are generated.

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


Can a marble size glass bead be made and vacuum sealed with Hg Liquid Mercury in it? Answered

I'm in need of this one item if it is possible to produce according to goverment documentation discovered after world war 2 and from old experiments done by the captured scientist this is possible was originally intended to be the core of stage 2 anti gravity machine 1 sphear was found and the documents later backed up to be fact that hitler was ingaging in experimental space technology during world war 2 when a U-Boat was discovered with Hg Mercury and many more items relating to the project known as the bell do to the shape of the gravity machine i been researching this since i was extreamly young and recently found last piece i needed to my alchemic equation and i have begun working on a free energy reactor but i need a Marble Size Hollow Glass Bead Filled with Hg Liquid Mercury to be the core for the prototype will pay anyone to make the Glass Bead filled with Hg Liquid Mercury and Vacuum Sealed  for me because i am limmited as to what i can an can not have in the hospital also huge credit will be given to those who help when published It's finally Published here on instructables.com .

Question by maskofdarkness22   |  last reply


Press 'print' for a light-emitting T-shirt

From New Scientist magazine:ELECTRONIC displays that can be printed onto virtually any surface, including paper and fabric, are now a step closer, thanks to the creation of a light-emitting ink.Read the full article for all the details. Oh, and try reading the article before asking questions which are answered in the article text. Just a thought...

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


Carbon emissions still increasing despite recession

With the whole economic kerfuffle going on you would've thought that there would be less carbon going up into the air. New studies show that emissions continue to ride, however. The data is collected and analyzed by scientists from the Norwegian Polar Institute and Stockholm University. Researchers found that during the first two weeks of March, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rose to 393.71 parts per million (ppm), up from 393.17 ppm during the same period last year. John Stroem, a scientist with the Norwegian Polar Institute, told Reuters that looking back at data gathered since the 1980s, the increase in carbon concentration levels seems to be accelerating. Carbon Emissions at All-Time High Despite Economic Slowdown

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


Ratings are temporarily Funky

We have just released a new version of the site, with some changes to the way we rate instructables. Ed (our own fungus amungus) will be giving you all a bit more detail on that soon, but at the moment just know that there is Big Calculation going on behind the scenes, and ratings are going to be behaving a little weird for a couple hours. You may not notice anything but if you do, don't worry, it's Normal. Trust me. I'm a scientist.

Topic by rachel   |  last reply


Who wants to be on a Game Show?

I was just sent this link by a friend: Discovery Science Game Show Here is a brief description of the game show:Producers for a Discovery Science Game show are looking for contestants. Contestants can be a gonzo engineer/scientist or just a high-energy, creative, fun, builder!They are looking for garage warriors (builders, scientists, inventors, engineers, carpenters, welders, mechanics, architects, etc...) who love to invent new gadgets, build robots, racing power tools, weld together bizarre machines that drive, fly, climb, shoot flames or launch projectiles. This Game Show is for thinkers, dreamers and doers, who are eager to let their inner MacGyvers be seen and ready to collaborate with a team of other builders.It looks like it was made just for our kind!! Now, who is going to try to get a spot on this show? If you do, be sure to let us all know!

Topic by jeff-o   |  last reply


Voyager 2 probe leaves the neighborhood

Http://www.nature.com/news/2007/071210/full/news.2007.365.htmlOn 30 August, NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft -- which has been sailing through space since 1977 -- crossed the "termination shock", the boundary between the bubble in space dominated by the solar wind coming from the Sun and the transition region beyond that lies between Earth and interstellar space.Voyager 2's twin, Voyager 1, crossed this same boundary in December 2004. But Voyager 2 did it while almost 1 billion miles closer to the Sun, suggesting that something -- such as an interstellar magnetic field -- is compressing the bubble of the solar wind on that side. The twin Voyagers headed out of the solar system in different directions, with Voyager 1 taking a northern path and Voyager 2 a southern one."Now both spacecraft are in the final frontier of the solar system," says project scientist Edward Stone, of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "We've reached another major milestone in our 30 years of discovery." He and other Voyager scientists presented their findings on Monday at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Dilithium created and observed in the laboratory!

According to a news report in Physics Today, scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have confirmed the creation of element 114 first reported by Dubna physicists in 1999. As true afficionados may recall from the original Star Fleet Technical Manual (pictured), element 114 is dilithium, used to regulate the matter-antimatter reaction for warp propulsion. Unfortunately, with a lifetime of just a few hundred milliseconds, it's unlikely that crystals of element 114 will be produced any time soon.

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


Moray Eels' Alien-like double jaws

There are times when life imitates art. Then there are times when life imitates science fiction.One of the most famous monsters in film history is the extraterrestrial beast of the Alien series. It slowly opened its glistening fangs to reveal a second set of jaws that shot forward to kill its victims.Scientists have now discovered a fish that does the same thing. If the First Bite Doesn't Do It, the Second One Will at the New York Times.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Protein Folding - The Game!

Human VS Computers - an algorithmic competitionScience and technology have been mimicking nature for as long as human beings have been tinkering. Computer scientists have developed neural networks and genetic programming techniques to try to approximate the computational methods of nature. But here's something new:http://fold.itFold it is a game that takes advantage of unique human perspectives in problem solving and also the innate competitive drive to solve the insanely difficult problem of protein folding."Since proteins are part of so many diseases, they can also be part of the cure. Over the summer, we will add new functionality to the game to allow users to design brand new proteins that could help prevent or treat important diseases."-I think this is interesting, have you guy's tried this. I can't wait to see how we (as humans) pan out.BG

Topic by lamedust   |  last reply


Science and Spirituality -- not necessarily in opposition

There's a cute little article (blog entry) in New Scientist, about a collaboration between a Buddhist monastery in India and San Francisco's Exploratorium. Buddhism, especially under the 14th Panchen Dalai Lama, has had a very favorable and welcoming attitude toward science. Traditional Buddhist practice toward enlightment stresses observation, experiment, and reproducibility (all classic hallmarks of "scientific" investigation), and elevates personal questioning above outside authority (unlike traditional Judeo-Christian-Islamist "revelation").

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


How to dye ants

I ran across this today and thought it was worth sharing. I hope I can find ants with transparent stomachs to try this with this summer. It would take a lot of ant wrangling, but getting them lined up as a color wheel would be the coolest thing ever (I'm fighting the urge to just photoshop it.) Short story is that a scientist fed ants different color syrup and you can see it through their abdomens, pretty sweet... http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2022765/The-ants-multi-coloured-abdomens-exactly-theyve-eating.html

Topic by Tomdf   |  last reply


Americans avert energy crisis by dieting, study reveals...

Scientists at Cornell University, led by David Pimintel, have performed a meta-study and found that the easiest way for Americans to reduce, and even totally avoid, the looming energy crisis is to go on a diet.The average American consumes about 3747 kcal per day compared to the 2000 to 2500 kcal per day recommended by the US Food and Drug Administration. (This does not include junk food!)Producing those daily calories uses the equivalent to 2000 litres of oil per person each year. That accounts for about 19% of US total energy use.Pimentel estimated 6 kilograms of plant protein are needed to produce 1 kg of high quality animal protein. He calculates that if Americans maintained their 3747 kcals per day, but switched to a vegetarian diet, the fossil fuel energy required to generate that diet would be cut by one third.Pimentel calculates that the equivalent of 2100 kcal go into producing a can of diet soda which contains a maximum of 1 kcal. About 1600 kcal go into producing the aluminium can alone.Other suggested changes to the food production process range from replacing incandescent bulbs with energy-saving fluorescent ones, to using fewer machines, pesticides and fertilisers, and more human power on farms.Reducing the distance that food is transported could also cut energy costs: food travels 2400 km on average to its consumer in the US. This requires 1.4 times the energy actually contained in the food. Producing food locally would cut the energy expended transporting it by half.Implementing all the suggested changes would cut the US food industry's energy bill in half.New Scientist articleNew Scientist Environment Section, special report of energy and fuels

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Cell phone radiation boosts brain cell activity in brand new study

Brain cells are impacted by cell phone radiation in accordance with a recent study. The study detected an increase in the metabolism of brain cells. Brain cells were affected in the part of the brain near the antenna of the mobile phone. Brain cells are definitely impacted by cell phone use, according to the research, however further research is needed to discover out if that's a bad thing. Source of article - Cell phone radiation increases brain cell activity in new study by MoneyBlogNewz. Cellular phone brain cell research first done The first research undertaken to examining how electromagnetic radiation from cell phones impacts brain cells was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Tues. The research focused on how cellular phone use affects normal brain cell function, known as glucose metabolism. The rate of glucose metabolism in brain cells was increased more than researchers were hoping with cell phone exposure. When it comes to brain activity, the way it's done is with cells creating energy. This is done with glucose. The way brain cells work is that it is produced as necessary. The glucose is produce whenever it is needed by the brain. It's unknown if it's bad or not, however it was found in the study that glucose metabolism amounts are increased artificially with a mobile phone. Further research needs to be done though. How mobile phones affect the brain With all the phone calls going on, cell phone radiation has concerned medical experts. They have worried about what it's doing. The outcomes of previous tests have been inconclusive. A connection with brain cancer was found in famous cellular phone radiation studies. The proof that brain cancer was actually brought on by mobile phones in cell phone users was not there though. There are other things scientists have tried to ling cell phone radiation to. Such things as cancer or dementia due to brain cell mutation are examples. The effect of cell phones on children's brains has been a particular concern because children have thinner skulls, the radiation penetrates deeper and their brain cells metabolize glucose faster. Try to choose speakerphone In a statement responding to the cellular phone brain cell research, the Wireless Association said scientific evidence proves that cell phones, used within limits established by the Federal Communications Commission, don't pose a public health risk. The way cellular phone radiation affects the brain is nevertheless unknown really. Until more research is done, experts suggest Bluetooth earpieces and speakerphone should be used as often as possible. Information from CNN cnn.com/2011/HEALTH/02/22/cell.phone.brain.activity/ Web MD webmd.com/brain/news/20110222/cell-phones-affect-brain-but-does-it-matter?page=2 Wall Street Journal online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704071304576160652541652440.html

Topic by InigmaN 


pygmy tarsiers found alive in Indonesia!

Fox news " Mouse-sized primates called pygmy tarsiers, not seen alive in 85 years, have come out of hiding from a mountaintop in a cloud forest in Indonesia. Weighing just 2 ounces (57 grams), they resemble mini-gremlin creatures, as they have big eyes and are covered in dense coats of fur to keep warm in a damp, chilly habitat. Unlike most other primates that sport fingernails, pygmy tarsiers have claws, which scientists say might be an adaptation to grasping onto moss-covered trees. The recent sighting has conservation implications. And researchers said they hope that with new information about where the species lives, the Indonesian government will protect them from the encroaching development occurring in the animals' home range. Hide-n-seek The last sighting of this primate alive was in 1921 when live specimens were collected and processed for a museum collection. Decades went by without another sighting. And scientists thought the pygmy tarsier (Tarsius pumilus) had possibly gone extinct. Then, in 2000, two Indonesian scientists who were trapping rats on Mt. Rore Katimbo in Lore Lindu National Park in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, reported they had accidentally trapped and killed a pygmy tarsier. So Sharon Gursky-Doyen of Texas A&M University and her grad student Nanda Grow, along with a group of Indonesian locals, went looking for the teacup-sized primates on that same mountaintop. This past summer, the team trapped two males and a female. They placed radio collars on the animals for tracking. Since pygmy tarsiers can turn their heads 180 degrees, this process can be dangerous, as Gursky-Doyen found out. "I have the dubious honor of being the only person in the world to have been bitten by [a pygmy tarsier]," Gursky-Doyen told LiveScience. "My field assistant was holding the tarsier and I was attaching a radio collar around its neck and while I was attaching the radio collar he bit me [on the finger]." The female has since been eaten by a hawk, Gursky-Doyen said.

Topic by astrozombies138   |  last reply


Where U At?

I know that the USA, Canada, Mexico, Argentina, UK, Australia, and New Zealand are all represented on Instructables. What other countries are represented? Are we in all seven continents? (give or take Antarctica, since only scientists and penguins live there). How many of the states of the USA are here? What's our membership by country? Is our membership only limited to earthbound beings, or do we have any astronauts or other in the ranks? Are all of our members even human? You have answers, post 'em. Just put something like "Texas, USA, here", or "Gusev Crater, Mars, here".That way we know where we're at After that, plot your location on the membership map.

Topic by KentsOkay   |  last reply


Ten Years

It's been nearly ten years since a load of people got excited about the year 2000 and the 21st century, what did we achieve? Well Fox changed (the logo if nothing else) from 20th to 21st 2001 Wikipedia and iPod launched, World Trade Centre demolished (by uncertain contractor). 2002 The discovery of Quoaoar leads to Pluto being declassified as a planet 2003 Facebook launched 2004 Those robots land on Mars, Indian Ocean earthquake / tsunami 2005 Instructables launched YouTube launched, New Orleans drowns. Chas & Dave play the Holmfirth Picturedrome (img) 2006 (for the mathematicians) the Poincare conjecture is proven (right word?) MySpace launched (subsequently bought by Murdoch at what was definately much more than it's worth) 2008 LHC starts up 2009 LHC starts up again, Moon "bombed" What events the last 10 years mean something to you? *the basis of the list came from New Scientist No2739/40/41

Topic by lemonie   |  last reply


Robot Hall of Fame - UPDATE: nominate your own!

New Scientist magazine have updated their Robot Hall of fame - a mixture of real and fictional robots, eighteen in all, that have "marked or inspired technical breakthroughs in the field."My favourites in the gallery are Huey, Dewey, and Louie - not only are they the first robotic farmers, they got more genuine emotion onto the screen with a few clicks and wheezes than the whole mechanical cast of Star Wars.Of course, we'd have liked to have seen our own Robot up there, but are there any other robots you think should have been included? Why?UPDATEIf your favourite is missing, you can nominate one (thanks to Lemonie, indirectly, for the link).

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Want your own factory for $2400?

Article in this weeks's New Scientist - they've developed a desk-top fabricator:The standard version of their Freeform fabricator – or "fabber" – is about the size of a microwave oven and can be assembled for around $2400 (£1200). It can generate 3D objects from plastic and various other materials. Full documentation on how to build and operate the machine, along with all the software required, are available on the Fab@Home website, and all designs, documents and software have been released for free.Unlike commercial equipment, the Fab@Home machine is also designed to be used with more than one material. So far it has been tested with silicone, plaster, play-doh and even chocolate and icing. Different materials can also be used to make a single object – the control software prompts the user when to load new material into the machine.Article: http://www.newscientisttech.com/article/dn10922?DCMP=NLC-nletter&nsref;=Video of it in action: http://web.mae.cornell.edu/ccsl/temp/EvanMalone/FabAtHome/SqueezeBulbDemoMovie.wmvWhat would you build??

Topic by Kiteman 


Anti Gravity

SCIENTISTS in Finland are about to reveal details of the world's first anti-gravity device. Measuring about 12in across, the device is said to reduce significantly the weight of anything suspended over it.The claim - which has been rigorously examined by scientists, and is due to appear in a physics journal next month - could spark a technological revolution. By combating gravity, the most ubiquitous force in the universe, everything from transport to power generation could be transformed.The Sunday Telegraph has learned that Nasa, the American space agency, is taking the claims seriously, and is funding research into how the anti-gravity effect could be turned into a means of flight.The researchers at the Tampere University of Technology in Finland, who discovered the effect, say it could form the heart of a new power source, in which it is used to drive fluids past electricity-generating turbines.Other uses seem limited only by the imagination:Lifts in buildings could be replaced by devices built into the ground. People wanting to go up would simply activate the anti-gravity device - making themselves weightless - and with a gentle push ascend to the floor they want.Space-travel would become routine, as all the expense and danger of rocket technology is geared towards combatting the Earth's gravitation pull.By using the devices to raise fluids against gravity, and then conventional gravity to pull them back to earth against electricity-generating turbines, the devices could also revolutionise power generation.According to Dr Eugene Podkletnov, who led the research, the discovery was accidental. It emerged during routine work on so-called "superconductivity", the ability of some materials to lose their electrical resistance at very low temperatures. The team was carrying out tests on a rapidly spinning disc of superconducting ceramic suspended in the magnetic field of three electric coils, all enclosed in a low-temperature vessel called a cryostat."One of my friends came in and he was smoking his pipe," Dr Podkletnov said. "He put some smoke over the cryostat and we saw that the smoke was going to the ceiling all the time. It was amazing - we couldn't explain it."Tests showed a small drop in the weight of objects placed over the device, as if it were shielding the object from the effects of gravity - an effect deemed impossible by most scientists."We thought it might be a mistake," Dr Podkletnov said, "but we have taken every precaution". Yet the bizarre effects persisted. The team found that even the air pressure vertically above the device dropped slightly, with the effect detectable directly above the device on every floor of the laboratory.In recent years, many so-called "anti-gravity" devices have been put forward by both amateur and professional scientists, and all have been scorned by the establishment. What makes this latest claim different is that it has survived intense scrutiny by sceptical, independent experts, and has been accepted for publication by the Journal of Physics-D: Applied Physics, published by Britain's Institute of Physics.Even so, most scientists will not feel comfortable with the idea of anti-gravity until other teams repeat the experiments. Some scientists suspect the anti-gravity effect is a long-sought side-effect of Einstein's general theory of relativity, by which spinning objects can distort gravity. Until now it was thought the effect would be far too small to measure in the laboratory.However, Dr Ning Li, a senior research scientist at the University of Alabama, said that the atoms inside superconductors may magnify the effect enormously. Her research is funded by Nasa's Marshall Space Flight Centre at Huntsville, Alabama, and Whitt Brantley, the chief of Advanced Concepts Office there, said: "We're taking a look at it, because if we don't, we'll never know."The Finnish team is already expanding its programme, to see if it can amplify the anti-gravity effect. In its latest experiments, the team has measured a two per cent drop in the weight of objects suspended over the device - and double that if one device is suspended over another. If the team can increase the effect substantially, the commercial implications are enormous. Okay. lets throw down our ideas and see if we can figure something out... or not

Topic by RelyNupon   |  last reply