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Overused Words

This is to post your overused words. Interestingly, I definitely have to say interesting and definitely.

Topic by puffyfluff    |  last reply


overuse a cable (wire)? Answered

I was reading an online review for a $995 HDMI cable on bestbuy.com The guy said that the more you use a cable (i.e) the more electrons pass through it the more it degrades the cable. its this cable AudioQuest - Diamond 3.3' High-Speed HDMI Cable - Dark Gray/Black http://www.bestbuy.com/site/AudioQuest+-+Diamond+3.3%27+High-Speed+HDMI+Cable+-+Dark+Gray/Black/2383276.p?id=1218324437192&skuId;=2383276&st;=hdmi&cp;=1&lp;=3 Is that true or does he just want to justiy spending 1000 on a cable?

Question by thematthatter    |  last reply


Best Use of Autotune

By now everyone that listens to music has probably heard (or heard of) autotune. It's been used for years to polish up pitchy vocals. Now it's more recognizable for being used on a totally different level. Autotune is the effect that T-Pain, Hellogoodbye (and by now, way to many others) use. At this point most people agree that it's way over used and just plain annoying. I have a poll to take. What song do you think actually uses it well? What's your vote for the Best Use of Autotune in a song?Mine is Woods, by Bon Iver.

Topic by Gjdj3    |  last reply


is it true that microwave ovens are bad because of the radiation it emits into the food? Answered

I am afraid to use the microwave oven much because overusing it can possibly cause health problems in the future because of the radiation that emits into the food.  So I mainly use toaster ovens. should i be concerned, any experts in this field?  thank you.

Question by smaxx    |  last reply


DIY BlackLight Contacts?

I know you can use Tonic water to make Blacklight reactive ice, But can you use this same method on soft contacts? I have no idea on weather tonic water is bad for your eyes, even less whether soft contacts are saluble enough for this trick to work. I figure a mix of 2/3 contact solution, to 1/3 tonic water soaked overnight might be enough to give your contacts a soft glow under blacklight. But I just dont know!Anyone willing to try this with some "overused" contacts?Glow Ice, How-to

Topic by Green_Primus    |  last reply


Arm tendinitis, arthritis of the elbow....any advice ?

Hi all, I have been struggling lately with two problems:   #1: tendinitis of my lower right arm and wrist #2: arthritis of the right elbow.  The doc believes both are aggravated by overuse of the mouse (actually resting my hand on it an entire work shift, plus the time I spend on line at home).  The first thing I must do, of course, is unlearn the behavior and remove my hand when I am not actually USING the mouse.  This hasn't been very successful so far.  Does anyone have any further suggestion on how to "rest" the arm and still be able to go to work and work a bit at home?  Anything serious will be considered.    

Topic by Goodhart  


Most Superlative Object In the Office This Month: Bun B's Rap Coloring And Activity Book

Most objects are easily discussed. One simply drapes an adjective or three over it, and calls it well-described.  Occasionally, though, one comes across an object that can only be described as Superlative. Singularly Awful, Amazingly Awesome, Incredibly Unbelievable. Usually draped in exclamation points, often overused, and affective in the extreme, these Things Above Things are worth sharing with the Instructables Community in and of themselves. This week, the most Superlative Object we spy with our little eyes is a book brought to our attention by the mighty Wilgubeast. For those of us whose adolescent and teenage years were punctuated by the boisterous and boastful, rhythmically dense and ethically spare Music Known To Some As Rap, there can only be one gift to give one's favorite B-Boy or B-Girl: "Bun B's Rap Coloring and Activity Book". The Rap Game has more than its share of colorful characters, and this book describes them visually and textually with verve and humor—worthy of particular praise are "Brain Boxing With The Genius", "E-40's Word Bank", and "Match The Scarface". There are word puzzles, connect-the-dots, and of course, lots of opportunities to test your crayon skills. Should any of these challenges prove more than a reader can handle, our advice would paraphrase Ice T: "Don't Hate The Playa, Hate The Game".

Topic by craftclarity  


Just about done with this site

This site has jumped the shark.  It used to be a good place to find DIY projects of all kinds for all skill levels.  Over the past few years, it has changed in the following ways. - The majority of new instructables on the site involve elite technology - 3D printers, laser cutters, etc - that are too expensive or require a membership to Techshop or similar to have access to them.  In other words, they are mildly interesting to see what's possible, but of no use to the average person. - Many instructables are just implementations of things that can be commonly found on Pinterest and are being passed off as original ideas. - Drug content has started showing up as instructables.  While I understand that some states have legalized cannabis, not all have, and I don't want my family to be exposed to it. - "Collections" may be useful in some cases to pull together instructables on a common theme, such as photography or boat building, but they are overused so much that they clog up everything else on the site.  Again, it's an example of people posting without creating any new content. - I'm a non-paying member of the site and the ads and other "recommended links" have started taking over everywhere. For years I've been following the site and checking the recent instructables posts almost daily to see what's new.  The site continues to meet other's needs, and that's what's important, but I'm sorry to say that it's no longer worth my time.

Topic by webman3802    |  last reply


"Not liable" - Arrghh!

Is it only I that think that the Not Liable" category is somewhat overused? It seems like 30% of all instructables are tagged whith Not Liable...Ok, Instructables is a US site run by US citizens, and USA has enough slightly retarded individuals out of their 302 million citizens combined with a litigation-friendly juridical system to warrant labels on all goods to tell them that hot coffee can be hot, that you should not dry a cat in the microwave and that you should not iron your clothes whilst wearing them so maybe it's necessary to provide a Not Liable-category to keep our most excellent admins out of legal trouble.But can't that be printed in the footer of each page and in the TOS instead?For instance the instructable "make your own super pointer... for handhelds and tablet pc's" is classified as both "tech" and "not liable". Why o why? Is it because perhaps the spring in the pen might end up in someones eye while he's dismantling the pen and then the author and the entire instructables team together with the ISP's ( both the instructables ISP and the guy that got the spring in his eyes ISPfor not protecting and warning him for possibly bodily harm) will get sued for 47.11 millions of dollars in physical damages and mental anguish?Ay caramba! It seems that I've woken up in the wrong side of the bed today..... Disclaimer: I didn't mean you, you, you and you when I said slightly retarded, you know that, don't you? It's those other guys that I'm referring to... :-)And of course I deny any liability for the writing above. It is not the views of me nor my employer ;-)

Topic by matseng    |  last reply


need help connecting an led strip to a car speaker very confused!

Hi everyone i'm new to electronics so please bear with me. i have 2 led strips that i want to hook up to my car speaker . but idk how to hook up the leds to the speaker .i've seen plenty of tutorials about this but i am still confused. my led strips are rated for use only on 12 volts dc and are capable of 10 amps as it says on the sticker on the led strip. idk whether i need to build some sort of transformer or just simply hook up an led with a resistor. problem is i still cant figure out how to calculate the necessary resistor and ow much wat tolarance the resistor needs . my goal is to simply hook up the led to a toggle switch from radioshack and hook up the led so that it can pulse with the music and stay on forever as another option.but i dont want the leds to burn out from too much amperage or overuse with dangerous current to the leds. i also dont know about the transistor tip 31 i keep hearing about... and i keep hearing stuff that i need to hook it up to the car amp where do i find one in my vw passat and do i even really need to hook it directly to an amp i think i can just hook it up to a single speaker. dang some one please just help me sort out a way to hook my stuff up any information you need frome me dont hesitate to ask and im sorry  for any mispellings.

Topic by pandemicrazor    |  last reply


Born to Run the Oakland Marathon

On Sunday, I ran the Oakland Marathon, finishing in 3:54:29, and placing 215th out of 945 runners.  I know it's cliche, but I read Born to Run and got inspired me to run a marathon.  It's the best book I've read in years:  the characters (all real people!) are fascinating, the setting and story are fantastic, and it just made me want to get out and go.  Halfway through the book, I decided to run a few miles to the grocery store in the rain just to run out back, not because I needed anything. Prior to reading Born to Run, I had been running a 2-3 miles twice a week to vary my preferred morning exercise routine of biking or swimming (the kitesurfing season hasn't really started yet).  Running was something I did if I couldn't get to a pool or didn't have the time for a long enough bike ride; it was exercise I did while traveling and when there were no better options.  Born to Run made me question that assumption, and I decided to see how longer runs would feel. Over a year ago I read "You Walk Wrong", a New York Magazine article on going barefoot.  It convinced me that I should be able to go unshod, or at least with minimally foot coverings.  Why would 30 years of running shoe development be able to produce better results than millions of years of foot evolution?  So I bought some Vibram Five Fingers  to protect my delicate soles, and had been doing lots of hiking and a bit of running.  The difference between running in running shoes and Vibram Five Fingers was profound for me.  In running shoes, I typically stopped running because my knees and hips hurt, not because I was exhausted.  The Vibrams forced me to take smaller, faster strides without heel strikes, and suddenly I was getting closer and closer to being able to run long enough to catch exhaustion without any joint pain.  The concept of going barefoot was initially tough because of my flat feet and overpronation, and the possibility of re-dislocating a kneecap. I never went anywhere barefoot, and after I initially dislocated my kneecap in 2000, I was told by a sports medicine doctor that I should never walk without the aid of custom orthotics in my shoes.  However, barefoot websites and forums are full of stories about people's arches coming back, and how kids raised without shoes never have flat feet.  Amazingly, it's all worked perfectly for me.  I now run without my orthotics without any knee pain, and my arches appear to have (re?)formed.  After hopping out of the pool, I always inspect my wet footprints, and they now have distinct arches.  I wish I had taken photographs every day to plot progress. With the characters and race in Born to Run still fresh in my mind, I looked for nearby races to give myself some motivation and something to train for.  When I discovered that Oakland was holding its first marathon in 25 years, and that the route literally went through my neighborhood, I immediately signed up for the half-marathon and convinced Christy to do the same.  I researched training regiments online, and discovered many were 4 and 5 month plans; since I had 50 days before the race, I decided simply to run longer and longer distances at a comfortable pace, and not worry about a rigid structure.  I ran most of my miles on trails in the Oakland hills, and some on the streets, but all of them in my Vibrams.  During a practice run on the half-marathon course three weeks before the race, I completed the half in less than my target time for two hours and felt so good that I opted to do the full marathon. In the marathon, I ran with GEICO-sponsored pacers aiming for a 3:50:00 time (8:46 miles on the flats, and slower miles in the hills; course elevation PDF here).  Of the three pacers, one was running his 34th marathon, and the other two were ultra-marathoners training for a 200 mile race from Calistoga to Santa Cruz; their normal weekend run was 50 miles, so a marathon was like taking a break.  Running in a group is awesome and way better than running by myself listening to audio books.  On multiple occasions, I imagined that we were the hunters of a tribe out running down game -- water stations every couple of miles broke the illusion, but I still eagerly grabbed cups, and the community support was tremendous.  There were bands, drummers, DJs, and gospel choirs making music along the route; families with full brunch buffets setup in their front yards offering all the runners fresh fruit and homemade baked goods; and many people just thanking us for running in Oakland.  The second image shows all my runs in the 50 days leading up to the marathon.  The first 5-mile run on the chart was the longest I had ever run at that point.  While I was coming from something of a limited endurance background (I've biked 135 miles on a tandem from Boston to Provincetown in a single day), I didn't really know my limit.  At mile 23 of the marathon, I finally caught up to exhaustion, and fell behind the pace group.  The last three miles were painful, but in the last quarter mile, I couldn't stop grinning and felt like I might laugh and cry at the same time.  When it was over, I just wanted to sit down. I was aiming for a sub-4-hour marathon, and I'm really proud to have done that on my first try.  Everyone made fun of me for walking like a zombie the next day at work, and I have some pretty large blood blisters on my feet, but nothing that won't disappear in under a week.  Go and read Born to Run, it might inspire you, too. Christy says: I'd always had to run as cross-training for other sports (I swam competitively for 13 years) and ran when I needed quick exercise, but hated it - my joints hurt, and it just wasn't fun.  I was a distance swimmer and can hike nearly forever, but could literally swim farther than I could (or would) run.  The most I'd ever run before was about 4 miles.   I got my Vibrams with Eric, and really enjoyed hiking with them on my feet.  I hadn't run in nearly a year and a half (pregnancy loosens the joints, which made running feel even worse) so when Eric announced he was signing up to run 13 miles I was dubious.  However, I read Born to Run and was suitably inspired - I was in good cardio shape from swimming and stationary biking, and would happily hike 13 miles, so why couldn't I run that far?  I decided to go out for a 5k jog to see what running felt like in my Vibrams. Long story short, I accidentally ran 6 miles, stopping not due to fatigue or joint injury but because of a blister from a poorly-adjusted shoe strap.  I signed up for the half marathon that evening, and started taking increasingly pleasant runs through the parks and across the city.  I ran the half-marathon course with Corvidae in her jog stroller, stopping to feed her periodically.  Eric finished while I was on mile 8, so he backtracked along the course and met us at mile 10, by which time she was thoroughly done with this stroller nonsense and had migrated to the sling.  I left the two of them to their own devices and jogged the rest of the way to the finish, about 3:25 after I started in the morning.  Not terribly speedy, even given the breaks!  The next day the bottoms of my feet were sore, and one of my Achilles tendons was a bit inflamed - I'd describe it as having overused my springs - but even though I was limping, my muscles were still in good shape. My pace is still quite slow (I ran the half-marathon in 2:42, for roughly 12:26 mile splits) but it's frighteningly consistent - I negative split most of the race, and at the end discovered I still had plenty of energy to sprint past a dozen exhausted runners.  Clearly I didn't run fast enough or far enough, but I was specifically setting a pace I felt able to maintain indefinitely.  The weak link is still my feet!  While I had plenty of muscle and energy left at the end of the race, the bottoms of my feet were tired from use - more practice is necessary to balance out years of shoe-wearing.  However, I recovered much more quickly this time, and was able to run again by Tuesday morning.  No zombie shuffle for me!  Of course, this means next time I'll be running the marathon, and at a faster pace!

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply