How can I make a wire frame paper lantern?

Does any one know how to make a lantern with a wire frame. Additionally does any one know how to stretch the paper over a complex frame?

Question by puregoldner 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Paper airplane videography

Allow me to share the methods I used to make my video. I hope this will help somebody out there do it even better. First, was the problem of capturing the plane in flight. I had chosen to make a fast model. A bad choice, from the point of filming it fly. If I stand back far enough to catch the entire flight, it becomes just a dot and you cannot tell whether it is a plane or a stone inside a ball of paper. If I stand close enough so that it fills the frame, then it just ... is gone. My solution was to get the best of the flights I could grab, and fill in the rest of the time with the process of construction. You can see in the video the paper apparently folding itself. It isn't. You are seeing it being unfolded, pulled by fine wires, played backwards. I have tried to edit out the wires, but in some frames the results are glaringly obvious. The movie itself was captured by a camera pointed downwards and the plane being launched into its field of view. Seen from the side, the plane is just not discernible as a plane. So I had to get a view from the top or bottom. If the camera is pointed upwards, the bright sky obliterates everything else. I used Fast Movie Processor, VirtualDub and Irfanview as detailed in my instructable on Time Lapse Movies. And the still images were captured by my scanner. Using the scanner is not my idea, I learned it from Don Lancaster at www.tinaja.com Hope this helps, or is of interest to, somebody out there.

Topic by neelandan 11 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Creative framing / mounting photos

So I have some photos that I would like to print out and mount similar to the way they are in the attached image. Any ideas or advice on how best to do so? I'd like them to be on solid blocks of wood, and kind of like, sealed in and to the wood. Very sturdily mounted, almost like wheat-pasted. The only thing I've thought of so far was using casting resin, but I'm afraid it would eat thru the ink and paper... Also, any other ideas for mounting and hanging photos that are beyond actual 'frames'?

Topic by dozen 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Using an LED to write or draw onto paper?

Last night i went to a bar in brixton after seeing massive attack. In the bar there were frames on the walls with white paper inside and we were given LED torches similar to these LED Torch. When the torch is on you can use it to write or draw onto the frame and it leaves a glowing trail which slowly fades. I really want to know how its done, as it was very entertaining and quite trippy and i want to make one myself. If anyone has any ideas please reply.Cheers

Topic by jacknaz 12 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


What Adhesive and or Sealant to decoupage a car with fabric, paper, & ...?

Hi Guys, Maria in Florida here. Bought a 2013 Honda Fit which I love but is all black. Did I mention I live in FLORIDA? It would have to withstand relentless Sun & Water, dry slow enough so that I can manipulate materials and remove air bubbles before they harden, be flexible enough to accept movement within the frame and dry hard as diamonds.  Oh, and if it could take a coat or two of wax so I can keep up the shine that´d be great too. I don´t plan to put anything 3-dimensional so at least there´s that?! Many thanks for any suggestions. Cheers and Can´t wait to hear from all you brilliant ¨Instructablers.¨ :)

Question by lasuperchica59 1 year ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Does anyone know how to make "tie-dyed" looking paper using paint, word, publisher or some other free graphic program?

I want to create a tie-dyed mat and/or background for some pics I am framing without having to buy some "specialty" papers or using dyes, inks or shaving cream.

Question by rpawlowski 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


The Fail Poster

Really digging this poster about failing and moving on to failing better. It's from a quote by Samuel Beckett and it's letterpressed onto recycled paper. Still trying to decide if it's worth the $46  to have it shipped to the US and then a little more to have it framed. Hmm. Fail Better Poster

Topic by fungus amungus 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Modeling 2D Life-Size Files on the Computer

Hey community! I have a slight dilemma! So say I want to make my own laser cut frame, and I have paper designs, how do I transfer my paper designs to a computer? What (free :) program can I use to make a lifesize model? Like for instance, if I have a 4x4" square in the program when I send it to print after it's printed it's exactly 4x4". Also, do I need to do anything extra for sending it to a laser cutter? Will Adobe Illustrator work? Thanks!

Topic by HavocRC 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Ultra cheap RC quadcopter (preferably using brushed motors)

Hey everyone.... :) I'm organising a camp to encourage high school students to take up STEM courses..... and I'd like to have them build their own RC quadcopters. I want the course to have a minimal fee.... so the quad should be INSANELY CHEAP. The quad should be able to do just one thing:FLY. Also, durability is not an issue.... just one or two flights should be sufficient. 1)Can someone please suggest a design using brushed instead of brushless motors? (Simply because they're cheaper) 2)If there's any way I can build a flight controller using off-the-shelf components.... please share your ideas.. 3)I have no idea about how to make the remote control/ RF transmitter....... is it the same as that of an RC toy car remote control? 4)I've come across some lovely designs where the frame is made out of paper or cardboard.... so that's not an issue.  Help in any form is welcome.... I'd love to hear from y'all....  Thanks in advance...:)

Topic by afshaanmaz 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


miracle in my dorm room?

Ok i'm no genius, so this might be a stupid question i goto to boarding school, and i have one of those plasma globes with the electricity inside, and when you touch it the electricity move to your fingers anyway, my roomate has this lamp, and i swear to god how it works is beyond me the lightbulb sits in the bottom of a tall metal box frame , the sides of which are covered with lampshade paper and the top of which is open it has three intensity settings, and to switch it through the three you lightly rap on the metal of the frame with your finger BUT: it doesnt work if you shake it, and if you tap it with plastic, metal, or a magnet nothing happens in addition to all that, if i sit the plasma globe near it and flick it on or touch it, the jesus lamp switches up to the next intensity (after the third it turns off) i think it might be a midget in my desk drawer, but if anyone knows better PLEASE enlighten me as to whats going on...

Topic by sethex 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


What should I do with surplus Vacuum Motors?

I buy and sell vacuums and parts. I end up with an endless supply of vacuum motors and abs plastic frames. These are mostly all Shark Navigator UV440 or Shark Rotator UV560 Vacuums (Grey, White, Clear, and Burgundy ABS plastic) I recently got a 3-d printer, and I re-purposed a heavy duty paper shredder into a nice plastic shredder based on this: https://www.instructables.com/id/50-Plastic-Shredder-Grinder-Recycler/ I am now building a filament extruder to recycle the vacuum frames into filament. Can I/how would I use a vacuum motor to make the extruder? Any other ideas for vacuum motors? I literally have an endless supply, and it would be great if I could do something with them other than make my weekly trip to the recycling center.

Question by slappo 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


Flight controller for basic RC quadcopter using brushed dc motors

Hey everyone.... :) I'm organising a camp to encourage high school students to take up STEM courses..... and I'd like to have them build their own RC quadcopters. I want the course to have a minimal fee.... so the quad should be INSANELY CHEAP. The quad should be able to do just one thing:FLY. Also, durability is not an issue.... just one or two flights should be sufficient. 1)Can someone please suggest a design using brushed instead of brushless motors? (Simply because they're cheaper) 2)If there's any way I can build a flight controller using off-the-shelf components.... please share your ideas.. 3)I have no idea about how to make the remote control/ RF transmitter....... is it the same as that of an RC toy car remote control? (how do I encorporate controls for four degrees of freedom?) 4)I've come across some lovely designs where the frame is made out of paper or cardboard.... so that's not an issue. 5)Since a number of kids are gonna be flying their quads in close proximity to each other, should I allocate different frequencies? (in order to avoid interference) Help in any form is welcome.... I'd love to hear from y'all.... Thanks in advance...:)

Question by afshaanmaz 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Cheep High speed video camera Answered

I am a science teacher that needs a "cheep" high speed video camera for a project we do as part of our forces and motion unit.  The students build carts out of paper and straws, then race them down an incline.  I videotape them and then analyze the video and the students determine the speed of their cars. (see video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqI5H8d4r7M). As you can see from the video, the slow motion video is very blurry.  the frame rate is okay (they are only traveling at 2-4 meters per second, which means about 8-12cm per frame, perfect for the save we are using)., but the initial position and final position is just an estimate due to the blurry car. Maybe I am not using the right terms, I do not know a lot about film/photography, but i need the individual shots to be clearer. I currently use a Flip video camera, which is good because it is super easy to download the videos for student anaysis. What kind of camera will suit my purposes, without spending more than $400? Thanks, Covo

Question by Covo 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


I need to make fake hipster glasses

Hello.  In two weeks, I need to look something like this guy: http://dsc.discovery.com/fansites/mythbusters/meet/gallery/mythbusters-adam-savage-bio-2-324x205.jpg I've already got someone doing Jamie Hyneman.  The only problematic bit for me is the glasses.  See, I already wear glasses, and my frames aren't that thick.  So, in maximizing authenticity, I'd like to do a DIY-conversion for my glasses to make them look like Adam Savage's hipster glasses.  Here's my working hypothesis.  I get some kind of thick, lightweight, cut-able material and cut it into two parts, with a groove lining the inside.  Then I glue the two halves together, fitting around the frames of my current glasses. I'm thinking my best option for a material is thick posterboard - the stuff that's sort of foamy in the middle, with card paper on either side.  The foamy bit would make it easy to carve a groove and fit it around my glasses. Here are my current blueprints: Would love to fish for a few more ideas, though, before I dive headlong into this.  Are there any other materials that might do me better, or a better method altogether?  Input of any sort is appreciated!

Topic by Histidine 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Basic lighting set-up

I apologise in advance to all you keen photographers for my Absolute Novice status. I need to take photo's for my Instructables which are usually small-ish desk top items. Currently I am having problems with a dark (black paper) drawing in a glass frame, how do I get the details in the image without it bleaching out or flaring on the glass? I have a spacious work desk under a window, two cantilever lights, a centre room light, etc. I can only use whatever's available in my house because I never take pictures for any other reason. Any tips for a very grateful novice would be very welcome.( I'm a blank slate)

Topic by craftyv 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Tips on building a model Sumerian boat?

For a school project, I'm building a model of a Sumerian boat, about 3-4 feet long. (some quick background: the Sumerians created one of the earliest civilizations, and one of their inventions was the boat) Google Images can provide some images to base a design off of: http://images.google.com/images?q=sumerian%20boat It doesn't need to actually work or float, nor be very accurate. As long as it's not too fragile and has the general shape of the boat (which apparently resembles a canoe), it's okay. It should also be made from cheap materials so that it won't cost too much to make. Any ideas on how to constuct it? My idea is to make a wire frame, and wrap that with paper or cardboard, but as I have little experience with this, I don't know if it'll work.  Please help! 

Question by MePerson 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Gift Exchange

My skills include: Cardboard, papiermache, reuse things marked with recycle logo What I'd like to make for someone: photo frame or pen stand or something like that I'd be willing to make this size gift package for someone (choose all that apply): S,M I'd be willing to receive a smaller or larger size gift package from someone than the one I make for someone else: OK What I like: All most anything What I don't like: Nil I absolutely can't have: Nil Type of thing I'd love to receive: Paper art Would you be willing to ship to an address outside your own country: No, I can ship within India Confirm that are at least 18 years old or, if not, that you have the approval of a parent or guardian: I am 32 years old.

Topic by artworker 8 years ago


Knex Review: Longbow SR-L Crossbow

Creator: DJ RadioLink: https://www.instructables.com/id/Knex_Longbow_SR_L_crossbow_The_offical_sniper_remi/Area Overviews:Comfort: 9/10Range: 8/10 (50ft)Power: 9/10 (i can get it through 3 sheets of paper)Gun Strength: 6/10 (may break with too many bands)Gun Overview:Stock: 7/10Handle: 9/10Barrel: 8/10Trigger: 9/10Comments: a pretty cool crossbow. it fires well but may misfire sometimes. the bow does bend quite a lot so dont make unless you dont mind bending a few rods. the trigger is reliable and the handle s pretty comfy. the stock is comfortable but doesnt look the best.Verdict: the body could do with a kool looking frame and filled in stock etc. a new bow that doesnt bend could do no harm. but overall a pretty good crossbow!

Topic by statified 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Desk mounted hifi amp? Answered

So I've just moved back from uni, and have encountered a couple of relocation problems - my beloved turntable won't fit on my shelves. So I'm planning on keeping it on my desk, but there's another problem, the amp that goes with it (Technics SUZ11) is shallower than the turntable, so if I stack them, the turntable is very prone to skipping from vibrations in the table (even if I just move my laptop a bit). So what I was thinking, was put the turntable on the desk, mount the amp underneath, have a joyously neat workspace? :)  I was looking at this instructable:. There are vents on the top and bottom of the amp, so airflow shouldn't be a problem, but I am worried about the weight (and ripping the mounting screws out of the table). I'd probably be sticking it on a cheap IKEA desk, which is made like this: Table top: Height 4cm Top: Fibreboard, Acrylic paint Frame: Particleboard, ABS plastic Filling material: Paper Bottom: Fibreboard Is it likely that I would encounter any problems? Or are there any other suggestions on how to do this? I've seen some CPU racks which  hold the unit in place with heavy duty straps, but these all seem inordinately expensive...

Question by clairey 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


I need a TEEPEE cover 18 ft. high by 50+ feet in circumference! I am going to make my own!s How much canvas will I need?

Help, my TEEPEE was destroyed by the last storm. I need a suitable  inexpensive cover for the poles that are 18 ft. 4in.,  tall and has a circumference of 50 ft.+.  TYVEK is no good, too costly, too short, and really rattles in the wind! Anyone got any good ideas out there? The original one cost me a bundle and I don't want to go there again! I wish the Buffalo herd was nearby, good meat and great Teepee covers. I think I was born in the wrong century. I keep honing my Mountain Man skills.  Thanks, as ever, Triumphman (aka Mountain Man)!                                                                                                                                                                                                     *                                                                                                                                                                                                             *                 I have finally come to the conclusion that I have to make my own teepee cover!    I will have to buy some canvas by the yard! Does anyone know how much canvas I will need for an 18 ft. tall by 50 ft. circumference teepee frame ? If the canvas comes in 3 ' width or 5 ' width . I have made a paper half circle teepee model, but the numbers evade me! Thanks.

Question by triumphman 7 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


What's your Science Fair project?

So, this is how our science fair project for the elementary school science fair turned out. Everyone should be encouraged at a young age to have an interest in science. As they say, "If you ain't having fun in science(or any other subject), you ain't!" This was crafted from paper mache(monocoque nose shell over a cardboard superstructure), laminated cardboard eyeglass frame, and homemade science fair display board.We thought about everyone wanting to touch the display so we put black yarn in the open nostrils below to simulate nose hair if someone decided to pick this nose. We couldn't add slime. Gross-out factor is high in the fun quotient. Remember, you can pick your friends; you can pick your nose; but you can't pick your friend's nose... It would be great if we could see what everyone else worked on. Of course we need ideas to top this one for next year's project! Edit 5/20/08Yay! Caitlin was co-winner for first place in the Fourth Grade Science Fair at school. The other girl won for testing to see if different strengths of Listerine actually helped kill germs in the mouth by doing swabs and cultures. Congrats to the young ones.

Topic by caitlinsdad 11 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Moss Wall Hangings?

There are patches of that verdant velvet known as moss all around my neighborhood and I'd like to propagate some of it indoors. I was wondering if I could make some kind of wall hanging on which to grow moss. Here are some of the ideas I've brainstormed without a lot of details because I haven't got them. That's what I need you for. Please respond with your suggestions. 1. Cover a frame (I have one that I took a canvas off of) with pond liner (or waterproof roofing paper if I don't have to buy a lot of it), laying channels of organic peat or coir fiber (coconut peat) on top of it and laying a mixture of cheap driveway sealant and the same peat on top of that (with just enough sealant to hold it together, with one end of the channels exposed for watering. 2. Some kind of hypertufa wall hanging that is waterproof on the back with hollow channels inside for watering. I'm not too keen on this idea as making hypertufa seems like a long and difficult process, what with all the drying and curing. Also cement isn't very environmentally-friendly. 3. Some rocks, peat, coir, mulch or some combination thereof sandwiched between a layer of wire mesh and some kind of hard waterproof (or waterproofed) backing. I could start this out horizontally if need be so the moss would help to hold it in.

Topic by vegagitator 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Build a Catapult, Mario Wii, Make a Knife...

Sign-up for our newsletter here. Mar. 13, 2008 Mouse Mouse is missing! While we were at SXSW someone walked off with our dear little mouse mouse from our display table. If you have any information, please let us know! No kidding, only one was made and we'd like to get him back. OK, back to the regular Instructables news... Today we are launching the Pocket-Sized speed contest. Make something cool that fits into a regular pocket, then enter it to win some sweet prizes! This is the last weekend for the Toss It! paper airplane speed contest. Enter your favorite paper airplane design and win an Air Instructables Pilot's License. The winners for the Anti-Yo Worldwide Video Yoyo Contest have been announced. See the video that won the $350 yoyo! Check out these cool instructables! How to build your first robot Use this walkthrough to make an autonomous, self-exploring, "own-mind" robot in a few hours! posted by fritsl on Mar 12, 2007 How To Make Delicious Scrambled Eggs A simple and quick recipe for great tasting scrambled eggs! posted by Brennn10 on Mar 9, 2008 Industrial Picture Frame Make industrial-style metal picture frames without spending loads of cash. posted by mada on Mar 6, 2008 Super Mario Bros Inspired Wii with USB base Decorate your Wii with some old-school graphics, and give it a couple of cool add-ons in the process. posted by BeerBellyJoe on Mar 9, 2008 How To Build A Catapult Launch stuff 100 yards with your very own siege weapon. posted by T3h_Muffinator on Mar 12, 2008 How to pill a cat, the easy way. When you need to give your cat some medicine you might need to be a little creative to get her to take it. posted by sunitgir on Mar 7, 2008 Pocket-Sized Speed Contest One trick ruledthem all What do you do for your pet? How To Teach Your Dog Some Important Tricks (And Some Not So Important Ones) Learn some basics of teaching your dog a couple new tricks. posted by Gjdj3 on Mar 10, 2008 How To Make an Applique! Jazz up an old piece of clothing with a funky bit of fabric to give it a whole new life, and live in style! posted by threadbanger on Mar 6, 2008 The 10 Minute Laptop Stand A quick trip to the hardware store + a little bit of work = your own laptop stand. posted by johnbot on Mar 9, 2008 How to Build a Knife Making a knife isn't easy, but this guide will get you started on the skills you'll need to make one yourself. posted by Basta on Feb 26, 2008 AC White LED Circular Magnifier Work Lamp Use bright LEDs to replace fluorescent circular light in magnifier work lamp.Let there be light! posted by arcticpenguin on Mar 11, 2008 How to "Salt Out" Salting out is a process that can be used to dehydrate Isopropyl alcohol, i.e., separate it from water in an azeotropic solution. posted by thinkahead on Mar 3, 2008   Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric

Topic by fungus amungus 11 years ago


Good Soundproofing and Deadening materials and any other tips?

Hey guys, so I'm involved in the biggest project I've embarked upon yet.  Shack studios.  I do some work with a sound company, the owner of which is a good friend, we're building a recording studio, along with practice rooms, photography/graphics dept and CD printing etc. Essentially a one stop shop for bands and musicians to go from songs on paper to an album...  Anyway, we have pretty much all the recording equipment and all the amps, PAs etc for the practice rooms.  However the construction work, which consists of walling off two sounds booths (small dead rooms, one vocals the other for drums/amped instruments) and walling out two large practice rooms, the front of which is the main recording area, overlooked by the control room has to be done on a shoestring budget, we've just got in the boards and supplies for framing up the walls and though we've culled good dense foam from some industrial generator packaging and elsewhere we need good suggestions for cavity filling.  The cheaper the better - No practices will be going on while recording, it needs to be deadened to the outside world and sound proof enough for practices to go on simultaneously.  We've been looking at different ideas but it's more just good sources of material anyone can think of...  Oh and while that's going on I'm trying to get a ton of things off the ground as well, while being what can only be described as embarassingly broke... 

Topic by killerjackalope 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Scholarship Idea

I've put a lot of thought to the whole robot 'thing'. My immediate instinct in reading about this is an art making robot. I can easily see why there's so much interest in 'what can a robot do FOR me?' (hauling things for you, cleaning up, fetching) but I'm more interested in 'what can a robot do WITH me?' Printers are great, but they're still just a static digital output of art. And they (primarily) print in ink on paper. That is a very tiny sliver of the art making world. I spent some time searching for robots that make art and didn't really come up with much that seemed to take full advantage of what is possible. Hektor is great, but well beyond what most people are willing to even attempt (the documentation implies that it was months of full time work and even speaks to the complications of programing it) and only works in spray paint. There are various other 'snippets' of work made by robots around, but nothing that seems to be more than a proof of 'hey, I can program a robot'. There doesn't seem to be much interest in making a series of really beautiful finished artworks, but rather a collection of demonstrations from trade shows and videos of robots at work. I'm very confident that I can program the iRobot to travel in some great looking paths. It appears to be more than capable of beautiful curves, spirograph like spinning and sharp corners. I'd really like to work a lot with setting the iRobot up to use lots of different mediums - more than just dragging a pencil or marker, or just spraying spray paint. There are many options for mediums, including: pencil, marker, pen (as mentioned above) paint with a brush paint dripped or squeezed from a tube or syringe (similar to how the Fabber and other "3D printers" work) spray paint charcoals and pastels pure pigments rolling paint (similar to how wall paint is applied) Each of these would require a different method of attachment to the iRobot. Focusing on this would allow me to turn it into a very versatile piece of equipment where I would be able to program a path, choose a medium and go. Another benefit to working with the iRobot over a printer is that it can run over a number of different surfaces in many sizes. Printers are primarily limited to paper that's less than a foot wide for home printers, and less than a couple feet wide for most commercial printers. A robot could apply medium to any size space (theoretically), and that surface could be paper, canvas, wood, metal, or anything else it could physically move over. This literally allows for infinite combinations, and allows for layering of different mediums/colors in ways a printer could never achieve. I definitely intend to work on programing the robot start and stop applying mediums in addition to just dragging them, but I don't want to commit to doing with within the 2 month time frame. I definitely would NOT intend to stop work on the project just because the contest ends. My end goal would be to modify an iRobot to: hold and apply a variety of mediums (ideally in a quick-change way) travel on a variety of carefully planned and adjusted paths, taking advantage of straight lines, curves and corners and, potentially, program it to start and stop applying a medium Here's an idea that I'm not really interested in working on that I wanted to share anyway: Start with a vacuum style Roomba, attach some sort of cat attractant (feather, mouse, catnip, etc) to it, and set it up to run from the cat. That would allow the cat to get some fun exercise during the day (when there's likely no humans to entertain it) and it would help keep up with the cat fur vacuuming. I would probably buy something like that.

Topic by technoplastique 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


[newsletter] Flux Capacitor, Bike Blender, Grow a Pineapple...

Sign-up for our newsletter here. June 5, 2008 Welcome back! We launched our Lonely Planet Travel Tips Contest. Share a great travel tip and win some fantastic photo books as well as guidebooks, phrasebooks, and t-shirts! The Discover Green Science Fair for a Better Planet Contest closes for entries this weekend! Submit your Instructable soon to win the Celestron SkyScout. The voting has closed for Park Tool Bike Month. Check back later today to see who won! Check out these cool Instructables! DIY Flux Capacitor Get ready to go back... to the future! 1.21 gigawatts not required. posted by sponges on Jun 3, 2008 How to create a bike blender for less than $25 When the love of biking and the love of smoothies come together it can be a beautiful, and tasty, thing to behold. posted by I_bike on Jun 1, 2008 The Conetenna - a wi-fi antenna The quest for improved wi-fi continues with this massive cone variation of the cantenna. posted by Shadetree Engineer on Jun 1, 2008 How to Grow Pineapples Pineapples are easier to grow than you think. Get a pineapple and some dirt and you're most of the way there! posted by woofboy111 on May 30, 2008 Japanese lamp from recycled materials A cheap but attractive paper "shoji" style lamp that uses mostly recycled parts and is easy to put together. posted by PKM on May 29, 2008 How to make an Iron Man Mask Whether you're stuck in a cave or have some time at home to build, these instructions will help you get that superhero look. posted by msraynsford on May 30, 2008 Repainting an Old Bicycle Want to keep your old frame looking good as times and styles move on? A new paint job is likely in your future. posted by Dr.Paj on Jun 1, 2008 Etching brass plates Adding some brass adds a bit of class to your project. Learn to etch and you can include a sweet custom finishing touch. posted by gotang on May 27, 2008 Win amazing LED POV kits! What have you done for robots lately? Closes for entries this weekend! Handy Bike Mods and Projects This collection of things to do to and with bicycles will provide plenty of ideas for your next two-wheel project. posted by TimAnderson on May 30, 2008 Illuminated Keyboard Hack Turn your ordinary keyboard into an illuminated one for under $5. This is an easy keyboard mod that takes about a half hour to do. posted by Kipkay on May 30, 2008 Bike Generator Attach a generator to the rear wheel and power up both the front and back lights. Never worry about the batteries dying again. posted by dbc1218 on Jun 1, 2008 Zigzag Pop-Up Here's a quick pop-up that only takes a few minutes and has a nice effect. All you need is a printer (preferably color), paper, and something to cut with. posted by fungus amungus on May 30, 2008 Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago


An alternative to expensive grinding stones

For some people buying a decent grinding or honing stone is a lifetime investment.Prices of over $500 for a single stone of a very fine grid are not uncommon.But what about the average Joe who just needs to sharpen a knife or tool every now and then?If slicing and dicing is not your living than investing in a set of diamond plates might be better than getting a set of stones.But there are limitations, firstly their size and then how long they last.The later is really important if not used correctly as even diamond toold can be ruined quickly.In some case these small sharpening tools are hard to handle.The bigger plates can still be a pain if they don't come with a proper mount.Well, and if you forget to clean them after use and put them in a dry place it will be quite hard to remove the rust.A nice alternative I found is sandpaper, specifically sandpaper on a glass plate.Good wet and dry sandpaper is available from almost gravel to a 10.000 grid, above that you might have to make a special order.In general the finer the grid the more you pay due to the ingredients.I use a glass plate from and old scanner as they are both heat proof and really strong, window glass is not recommended here.The glass is covered with strips of kapton tape for the ease of later cleaning.The tape is then evenly covered with a contact glue, preferably the spry king to get an even cover.Same for the sheet of sandpaper.I try to get the glue over the glass edge a bit and to have at least two sides of the sandpaper going over an edge.Just to have an area to work close to the edge without risking to lift the paper off.Once a sheet is too worn I place the plat in the oven for a few minutes so the glue softens and peel the sheet off.If too much glue remians on the tape I replace it before I put a new sheet on.Of course you need a bunch of plates although it works fine with two different sheets halfing a plate.The thing works best under slow running water, so use your tinker skills to come with a suitable frame and water supply ;)But even with just a spray bottle it is a cheap way to replace a costly stone, especially if you do require a bigger surface area.

Topic by Downunder35m 6 months ago  |  last reply 6 months ago


[newsletter] Light Bulb Lamp, Predicting the Weather, Chocolate Speed of Light...

June 19, 2008 Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup1","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); } Welcome back! Want to put some insanely cool, lights on your bike? Then enter our Let It Glow! Contest. The prizes are super sweet and blinky, so enter before the contest closes this weekend! RoboGames 2008 is over for this year, but you can still enter our Robot Contest to win a trip to RoboGames 2009! Air fare, hotel, and entry fee are included!Winners have been announced for the Discover Green Science Fair for a Better Planet Contest. See who won, and bookmark some Earth-friendly summer projects! Check out these cool Instructables! DIY Vinyl Wall Art Liven up your apartment, without risking your deposit, by putting up some slick-looking ConTact paper designs to decorate your walls. posted by britsteiner on Jun 17, 2008 How To Measure the Speed of Light... Using Chocolate! Enjoy some gooey warm chocolate and learn some science at the same time! posted by bradpowers on Jun 13, 2008 Building Small Robots: Making One Cubic Inch Micro-Sumo Robots and Smaller With only cubic inch, you'll learn to be efficient in your robotic design. posted by mikey77 on Jun 12, 2008 How to make a piano keyboard Build piano keys from raw materials and make a piano you can truly call your own. posted by threesixesinarow on Jun 19, 2008 Steampunk Style Fan Cool off in neo-Victorian style with a custom built fan. posted by reluctant_paladin on Jun 13, 2008 Steel Centipede Turn that scrap metal and chain into a unique sculpture with nothing more than a welder and a bit of creativity. posted by Mikey D on Jun 15, 2008 LED matrix using shift registers Play with patterns of light and display messages on a custom LED matrix. posted by barney_1 on Jun 15, 2008 Predicting the Weather with Clouds Learn to understand what the sky is trying to tell you. posted by randofo on Jun 12, 2008 Instructables Robot -- Paper Model Print and cut out this template to make a papercraft robot of your very own! posted by =SMART= on Jun 13, 2008 Central Vacuum Retrofit Install a central vacuum system in an existing house to have quieter vacuuming and an external exhaust. posted by a.doovz on Jun 13, 2008 Rock Band Guitar Stand/Drum Support Tidy up your virtual rock star gear and keep your drums steady with this PVC setup. posted by evilbunnee on Jun 12, 2008 Win great books for your travel tips! Closes on June 29! Winners are up! Animating Multi Layered Engravings Take glowing etched acrylic to the next level with animated frames. posted by japala on Jun 18, 2008 10-minute electronic leather band Enhance a leather bracelet with a flashing light that can record and play back patterns. posted by craft-tech on Jun 14, 2008 The Lucid Dream Machine Control of your dreams with the power of flashing lights. posted by guyfrom7up on Jun 18, 2008 SketchUp, Inkscape, and Ponoko Laser Cutting Install this plugin and you'll have a free way to design in 3D and export your files to be laser cut! posted by flightsofideas on Jun 19, 2008 Light Bulb Lamp Put your dead bulbs to use by turning them into stylish oil lamps. Just be sure to put them in a safe place. posted by CYNICALifornia on Jun 14, 2008 Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup2","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); }

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Instructables Book Contest Winners

Instructables is happy to announce the winners of the Book Contest. All of these Instructables will receive a mention in the Best of Instructables Volume 1 and the authors will receive a copy of the book when it comes out this fall.Some of the Instructables here have also been selected by O'Reilly editors to be fully reproduced in the book as well.Congratulations to all the winners! Thank you for making great Instructables that inspire everyone else.InstructableAuthorLED ThrowiesQ-BranchInvisible Book ShelfdorxincandelandLaser Flashlight Hack!!KipkayMintyBoost! - Small battery-powered USB chargerladyadaDIY Compact Survival KitledzeppieHow to make a cardboard costume helmetHonusturn signal biking jacketleahbuechleyAudio Visual Art....FOTC Stylescooter76Wall-E Robot4mem8Paper WallettheRIAAScreen Printing: Cheap, Dirty, and At Hometracy_the_astonishingMunny Speakersfungus amungusKnex Heavy CannonI_am_CanadianHow to Make Playdough (Play-doh)canidaLED Chess SetTetranitrateSew your own Instructables Robot Plushie!jessyratfinkDIY Vinyl Wall ArtbritsteinerBluetooth Handgun Handset for your iPhone: iGiveUpManaEnergyPotionEasy to Build Desk Top 3 Axis CNC Milling MachineTom McWireBuild Your Own Butler Robot!!! - Tutorial,Photos, and VideoErobotsHow to build a 96-Volt Electric MotorcycleKentucky-bumHow To: Make Bath BombsSoapyHollowSteampunk Dystopian Sniper Rifle (Mercury Bow)gmjhoweSave $200 in 2 minutes and have the worlds best writing penkingantConcrete Lightbulb Wall HookwhamodyneLight Bulb LampbumpusLightbulb "green"houseLinuxH4x0rInstructables Robot -- Paper Model=SMART=How to Build a Robot - The BeetleBot v2 ( Revisited )robomaniacWallet made from a computer keyboardzieakhow to add EL wire to a coat or other garmentenlightedGandhi: 17' Tall Cardboard AvatardelappeTure Trigger, 10 Round, Auto-Loading, Knex Concept Rifle, by bannana inventorbannana inventorHow to build your own Jet EnginerusswmooreShake it like a Tic-Tac!MrMunkiCyber/Steampunk Futuresque Sci-Fi Hand GungmjhoweHow to Make a Marshmallow Gun or Marshmallow ShooterewilhelmHow to build a 72Volt electric motorcycleStrykerFriends Are Easy To MakecuteaznprincesssBuilding Small Robots: Making One Cubic Inch Micro-Sumo Robots and Smallermikey77Portable 12V Air Conditioner --Cheap and easy!CameronSSHow to Make a TRON Style Lamp: The MADYLIGHTGreg MadisonGiant MatchTetranitrateMagnetic Rubik's Dice CubeburzvingionHow to build a wood fired hot tubveloboyIron Man HelmetpmaggotHome-made Sun Jarcre8torGrow Your Own Bioluminescent Algae ScaryBunnyManConstruction of Two Portuguese Style Dinghies (Small Boats)rook999Uni-Directional WIFI Range Extendertm36usa"1UP Mushroom" Mushroom Burger!momo!Open Any PadlockTetranitrateCoilgun Handgunrwilsford07Electroforming an Iris Seed PodMaggieJs100 Ways to Reduce Your ImpactBrennn10Lego USB StickianhamptonSolar Powered Trikedpearce1How to Make a Three Axis CNC Machine (Cheaply and Easily)Stuart.McfarlanAirgun with eXplosive air-Release ValvechluaidChapStick LED FlashlightBCatAwesome led cubeAlexTheGreatBarbie Doll Electric Chair Science Fair Project!jessyratfinkDIY 3D ControllerkylemcdonaldThe Stirling Engine, absorb energy from candles, coffee, and more!thecheatscalcBuild a World's Smallest Electronic Shocker!PlasmanaSimulated woodgrain for metal boxesamz-fxHow to Grow Pineappleswoofboy111Creating a 3D effect with image editing software (GIMP or Photoshop)Andrew546S.P.R.E.E. (Solar Photovoltaic Renewable Electron Encapsulator), a Compact, Durable, and Portable Solar Energy GeneratorcharlitronHow to get a Tshirt for GoodHartRocketScientist2015Grow a square watermelonwatermelonBuild a 4 Color T-Shirt Printing PressProgfellowElectromagnetic FloaterJ_HodgieThe accidental pocket jet engine...killerjackalopeDigital Picture Framemicahdear

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Circus Tent

Greetings again, Sorry I didn't photograph all I went through to create this miniature circus tent that is my stage for a movie I'm making. It was a difficult project as i work without any idea of how it would work. I just knew that I wanted it to look like what one would think a circus tent would look like. I can give descriptions of how I made it: The tent material is kite fabric that I bought online from kitebuilders.com. I also bought two rolls of double face tape from them. There is the cheap one that worked great for piecing the tent pieces together and one that costs about $16 that I used to add in the roping that ties fabric to the tent poles. For the tent main support poles I bought 2 3' pieces of 1/2" aluminum from Home Despot. Here's how it went together: I made two semi-circle pieces out of triangle pieces of red and yellow fabric. The main tent poles are embedded in a 1" piece of flake board. In order to hold up the tent while I pieced other parts to it I made two circles of 1/4" board with 1/2" holes drilled so they would slip over the aluminum pole and held them up with clamps until I got them to the proper height. The tent towers cam next. These were made with smaller triangle pieces to make a full circle. As the top of the tower would be holding up the entire structure so I used a 2" metal ring at the top. To attach I cut slices at the top and folded them over ring and used the double face tape to secure. So now I've got the two ends of the tent and the two towers but nothing is holding them together. And there is still the center section that has to be made. My next step was to add tent poles at the corners and other strategic positions. I jury rigged all connections with paper clamps, tape and what ever else I could thing of to hold the thing together long enough to force fit. From here I did a rough markup of where I thought the tie down roping should be. I then used some cotton rope (3/16" approx). Once again, simple slices in fabric turned under and held together with dbl face tape worked. I must say I worked through three different ways of doing this until I got something that worked. I left a lot of extra rope between the arcs so I could attach to the tent poles. These poles are just pieces of 5/8" dowels. The towers and the main tent pieces were also connected with dbl face tape. I made two circle frames out of 1/16" steel cable (@ 10 cents a foot) and used a swedge connector on each. This gave me a way to alternate tower and main connections that pull against the cable and not the fabric. Worked great. The last part was to fabricate pieces to add between the towers to complete the tent. You will notice that one side is completely open. That's were I will film from. The last thing I added was a large lazy-susan bearing so the entire stage can revolve as needed. I have also created a stage that fits inside the tent. And, lighting and back drops. I'll show those at a later date. There will be a YouTube video in a few days. I'm editing it right now.

Topic by kentek 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


History of Printing Mesh

Sit in on a trade show seminar or visit an online forum, and you'll encounter countless debates about the "right" type of mesh to use. The truth is, while there are some guidelines to follow, the best way to determine what's right for your shop is by trial and error. Only problem is, who has the time to experiment? There are literally hundreds of mesh types out there. Trying to choose the best one can seem like an overwhelming task, but by following some general rules of thumb, you can narrow down your mesh choices to a dozen or so. Then testing each kind won't seem so unmanageable. Specs. It may look like the screen on your back door, but screen printing mesh isn't the same kind of material. The biggest difference is that unlike what keeps bugs out of your house, this type of mesh is made from fabric, not wire. For this industry, monofilament polyester is the most frequently used mesh material. When you start shopping for mesh, you'll also need to determine the weave, count, thread diameter and color that's best for your shop. The type of weave is a no-brainer. When researching mesh, you may come upon the terms plain-weave and twill mesh. The difference between the two is how the threads are woven to create the mesh pattern. Make sure you purchase plain-weave mesh instead of twill mesh, which can cause moiré problems, especially in the high mesh counts. Mesh is often referred to by its mesh count – i.e. 120 mesh, 230 mesh etc. – representing the number of threads per inch. The lower the count, the bigger the mesh openings. Low mesh counts are commonly used with specialty inks such as glitter and puff to allow big ink particles to reach the substrate. High mesh counts are mainly used to print fine details and halftones. Printing through high mesh counts also produces a thin layer of ink on the garment, creating a soft hand. Mesh with a count that falls somewhere in the middle is what most screen printers rely on for their basic, everyday print jobs. The last factor you'll need to decide on is thread diameter. Until a few years ago, terms such as S, T and HD were commonly used to refer to thread diameter. Now, however, a more universal method of referring to the diameter number (in microns) helps keep consistency throughout the industry. While there's no standard thread diameter for each mesh count, there's generally a heavy-duty and a light version for each mesh count. The thinner the thread, the better the detail, but the weaker the fabric. The mesh manufacturer or your local distributor will help you weigh the benefits of each and determine what's right for your individual shop. As you shop for mesh, you're sure to come across different colors. Mesh is typically offered in white and yellow, although orange is available from some manufacturers. During exposure, a white mesh will refract the light similar to the way in which a fiber optic cable works. The light travels down and out, affecting edge definition and quality. This isn't as important with lower mesh counts, but when you're doing a lot of fine detail and halftone work, such slight adjustments will show up in the final print. For this reason, many printers stick with white for lower mesh counts, but use yellow or orange for higher mesh counts. Assess Your Need. Everyone has a preferred type, but there are some general guidelines to go by when you're in the market for mesh. Look around your shop and you'll find clues to what type of mesh counts you should be printing with. The three factors to base your decision on are the type of garments you're printing on, your ink type and the kind of frame system that you use on a regular basis. You'll also need to take into account the type of print jobs you typically do. For most screen printers, T-shirts are the order of the day. They can probably get by using a middle-of-the-road mesh count such as a 110 mesh. However, if you print a lot of athletic numbers and use thick ink to withstand the rough treatment jerseys encounter on the field, you'll probably need a coarser mesh count to allow the thicker ink to reach the material. In such cases, it's not necessary to use a high mesh count. On the other hand, if you do a lot of halftone and fine detail work, you'll need a higher mesh count to retain the minute details in the design. Also let your distributor or manufacturer know what type of frame system you use, as some types require sturdier mesh (and higher thread diameters) to withstand repeated use. In general, most screen printers find that a 110 mesh count will work fine for most jobs. The key word here, though, is "most." Don't rely on 110 mesh for each and every single job. Instead, try out different mesh counts with different print jobs, and keep a record of your production results. Note the mesh type, screen tension, type of ink and whether the print job is multicolor, process color, etc. Also note the garment type: Are you printing on a nylon jacket or a cotton T-shirt? Regularly reviewing your records will help you see a pattern, and decide which mesh tends to work best with a particular ink and design combination. You'll be surprised by the varying results between your "everyday" mesh count and one that's a little higher or lower. If you want to experiment with different mesh counts, start with the coarsest mesh and work your way up to the higher numbers, noting how the print looks with each version. Hit the Trail. Most screen printers have an established local distributor that they order supplies from. Others may prefer to order directly from the manufacturer. To find a list of mesh distributors and manufacturers, check out IMPRESSIONS' 2003 Sourcebook. Decoding the Salesspeak. The world of mesh can get a little technical. Here are some key terms to help you navigate the terminology: Low-elongation (LE) mesh – Most monofilament polyester fabrics are low elongation. The term refers to the mesh's ability to retain its tension level. In the past, stretching screens required tensioning the mesh to say, 25 N/cm, letting it relax to a lower tension then repeating the process. Today's low elongation mesh typically only requires one go-around. Monofilament polyester mesh – Some printers who've been around for years still use multifilament polyester mesh. However, the majority of the industry has switched to monofilament. Although it must be abraded for good emulsion adhesion, monofilament mesh tends to stretch, hold tension and print better than multifilament mesh. Plain-weave mesh – Almost all mesh for the textile printing industry is plain weave. The term refers to the method by which the threads are arranged to create the mesh openings. Warp – The threads that run the length of a roll of mesh. Weft – The threads that run the width of a roll of mesh. The Numbers Game. Mesh is typically ordered by the roll, usually in yards. The price depends on the width of the roll (40", 50", 60" wide, etc.), the mesh count and the color. White mesh is not quite as expensive as yellow or orange mesh, because it doesn't go through the dying and rinse processes. Setup Surprises. Be careful how you open the packaging surrounding your new roll of mesh. Avoid using a knife if possible – mesh can be damaged just by being carelessly opened. Once you've opened your new mesh, store it someplace out of the traffic flow. Try hanging it on a wall like a paper towel roll. Getting it up and off the floor can prevent accidental damage. Keeping the roll visible also allows staff to monitor the supply. Don't wait until the last minute to order mesh – you may not be able to get a new supply in time for that next rush job. Care and Feeding. Once you stretch your screens, what can you do to keep the mesh in top shape? For one thing, be careful with your screens. While coarse mesh can withstand more wear and tear, high mesh counts can be easily damaged when moving them around the shop. To extend the life of your mesh, try stretching your screens so that the squeegee stroke runs parallel to the warp. After several print jobs, who can remember what the mesh count is on a particular screen? To help keep confusion to a minimum, consider writing the mesh count number directly on the screens or frame. Or, color code your stock: white for lower mesh counts, yellow for the more detailed work. So while there's no hard rule for what mesh counts to use, knowing what to look for can help you find what's right for your shop. – CW from Internet

Topic by sharefilters 10 years ago


Field report: Mads Hobye as an Artist-in-residence at Instructables

Mads Hobye was granted an artist-in-residence at Instructables for September 2012. Instructables is a web-based documentation platform where passionate people share projects they do, and how to do it. Because of the creative nature of the website, Instructables also have lab facilities for their own co-workers and for artist-in-residences. During September, Mads had the honor to use their lab to build and document multiple prototypes to be shared on their website. I choose to put my focus on building interactive noise machines, since this ties into my PhD and my interest in creating non-trivial internal complexity. I have been working long into the night most days and it has been really interesting to have the chance to focus on one thing at the time. Although the primary purpose of the stay was to explore the potentials of designing interactive sound machines, a couple of other side outcomes were also planned. First, to see how Instructables organized their creative workspace and get inspiration for organizing the upcoming Connectivity Lab at Medea. Second, to see if Instructables would be a suitable platform for documenting the creative practices at Medea. Take aways from Instructables as a creative workspace Although Instructables primarily is a company running a website, they have quite extensive lab facilities. This consisted of a small lab at the office (sewing, electronics and woodwork) and two blocks down they had a whole space filled with laser cutters and 3D printers. This is located right beside the Techshop, which is a full-fledged lab for everything from metal to 3D printing. I have picked up the following things that struck me as really good ways of structuring lab work: Documentation table: A documentation table with lamps, camera and a white sheet of paper as background enables people to quickly document their projects with a nice white background. It was interesting to see how this improved the overall quality of the documentation. Suddenly a breadboard and some wires became a piece of art or a pedagogical platform for show and tell instead of an unfinished project. Show-and-tell meetings: Twice a week they meet at two o'clock to do a show and tell. Here they take a round and everyone says what they are working on in one or two sentences. This is a really easy way to get everyone updated and it takes no time at all. If you are not present you can email out one sentence telling everyone what you are doing. Once a week it is about the specific day and once a week it is about the coming week. Have everything in the same lab: The separation between the labs has confirmed to me the importance of having everything in the same space. It takes time to walk two blocks to lasercut which limits the creative process of iterating between e.g. lasercutting and soldering. Instructables as a workspace was one of the most easy going creative loving workspaces I have ever had the chance to be a part of. Although I never got to know the formal rules, you had a clear sense that people had the freedom to prioritise their own work day and combine it with creative side projects (as long as they documented them of course). Instructables as a knowledge sharing platform for the Medea Connectivity lab Instructables works well for sharing individual recipes for others to use, but what came as a surprise to me was the ability to create groups as individually branded websites. This enables a group of people to collect their recipes under a common theme or brand. We will use this as a common platform to share the knowledge created in the Medea Connectivity Lab. This way people can get an overview of the projects done in the lab. This will become a mandatory part of using the lab in the sense that students and co-workers will be encouraged to document their projects and publish them in the group. So far my experience with posting instructables has been quite interesting and overwhelming. Where projects normally ends as interesting portfolio documentation, the detailed documentation of the build process enables others to recreate your designs or their own versions of them. So far this has resulted in multiple people making their own version. One example is the Arduino implementation of the touche shield (https://www.instructables.com/id/Touche-for-Arduino-Advanced-touch-sensing/). This was published in May 2012. As of now, I know of ten people who have recreated the design and just as many has made suggestions for improvement. Another project has been rewritten by an enthusiast in Dubai. It now runs faster and uses less memory. You can find the preliminary group for Medea connectivity lab here. Non-trivial-internal Complexity as facilitator for curiosity = making noise machines As a part of being an artist-in-residence at Instructables, I took it upon myself to build of couple of noise machines / music boxes. My interest was in designing objects that would enable people to explore the world of sound synthesis and for me to get a better understanding of how the different interfaces enables different interactions and sound qualities. This is a part of an ongoing investigation on creating interactions for curiosity. It has been an intense experience. Trying to build as many interfaces as possible within one month. I have tried to make all of them stand-out as finished, while still being hackable pieces. Everything I have done is published on Instructables for others to experiment with. All of the projects consist of a few basic components: An interface and sometimes a screen or a led matrix. The basic sound component is either a Gameduino or a software synth written for the Arduino platform. You can find an overview of the results here and I will introduce them in this article as well. Although arduinos are good for simple action <-> reaction interactivity, there are a limited amount of examples that work with more complex interactions. Here I mean beyond game design’s way of working with narratives, but more in the sense of adding personality to your projects. Personality not as much in the way of looks (e.g. putting an Arduino into a teddy bear), but more in the way of complex interactions that makes you curious about its devices potential possibilities. My interest as an artist-in-residence at Instructables were to design different machines that would spark the user’s curiosity. Here, simply put, curiosity lies between the extremes of chaos and predictability. Where chaos becomes uninteresting (from an interaction design point of view) because of its uncontrollable nature and order becomes so predictable that the interaction itself slides into the background of the end-product of the interaction itself. One such example is the light switch. As an adult you usually do not notice your interaction with it. The core question then became how to make people who are interacting with it drawn by their own curiosity of not being able to decode the interaction pattern, all at the same time having a sense that their actions are the main contributor to the sounds. Most of these machines would have been simpler to make as software programs on a computer or even as multitouch applications on a smartphone, but I wanted to have an aesthetic criteria as a frame for my experiments: I wanted to create simple tangible interfaces that would inspire curiosity. The objects themselves should welcome the user to try out and explore their interfaces. Last, I wanted each experiment to be self-contained. Instead of them becoming interfaces for a laptop, they should be the ones who created the music. The end results are still crude and mostly serves as interaction enclosures with future potentials, although they do hint at different interesting interaction qualities. You can find an overview of the boxes here. The singing plant plays with a classic trick of sparking people’s curiosity by adding unconventional interaction qualities to a familiar object. The Kaosduino serves as a platform to explore the complexity of touch on x-y surfaces. The Matrix machine serves as a platform to explore the potential of emergent sound patterns converted from particle systems. The algorithmic noise machine serves as platform to explore the boundaries between chaos and order through complex bit shifting algorithms. Better ways to debug the internals of the Arduino board As a side project, I decided to improve on the debugging capabilities of the Arduino platform. This was in line with working with internal complexity which can be hard to comprehend as the code grows. The program enables you to visualize realtime data on the Arduino board. You are usually stuck with the standard serial output. As the complexity of your Arduino code grows, this makes it impossible to comprehend what is actually going on inside the board. To solve this I have created a little library that will enable you to create your own custom GUI for your Arduino projects. Watch this video to get a demonstration of a basic hello world with a potmeter and a diode: The following are a few key features of the tool: Custom design your interface from the Arduino board: You define which sliders, graphs and buttons you need for your interface. You do this in your Arduino sketch which means that the GUI program acts as a slave to the sketch. All information is stored in your board. Visualize and manipulate realtime data: Whether you are making an RGB light controller or a robot arm, getting a graphical feedback is crucial to understand what is going on inside the board. This enables you to understand whether it is your hardware or the code that is causing problem. Further, the sliders and buttons enable you to tweak the individual parameters in realtime. This way you can see what effect different thresholds have on the interaction. Use the same app for all your Arduino projects: I have made tons of small apps for different projects. My problem is always to find them again a year later. Because we save everything in the Arduino, I only need to keep one app around the Arduino and it will automatically configure the app for the current project. Prototype the interface before you turn on the soldering iron: Because you can design the GUI as you like it (within reasonable limits), you can prototype the interface before you have made a physical interface. This also enables you to divide the tasks between multiple people, e.g. one person is working on the hardware and another person is working on the code. When you have made the physical interface the Guino will integrate seamlessly. You can find the instructables for the Guino interface here. About the author Mads Hobye (b. 1980) is a PhD student in interaction design at Medea Collaborative Media Initiative, Malmö University, Sweden, and co-founder of the Illutron collaborative interactive art studio. He focuses on how digital material can be used for exploring social transformative play situated in the context of everyday life. He has done several large-scale installations and working prototypes, which he is using as a basis for his PhD research. More information is available on Hobye’s work at www.hobye.dk.

Topic by madshobye 6 years ago


Funny Labels

These are hilarious!!! There all REAL funny product lables that people have found. Here's the link to where I got them: http://www.rinkworks.com/said/warnings.shtml Product Warnings: • "Do not use if you cannot see clearly to read the information in the information booklet." -- In the information booklet. • "Caution: The contents of this bottle should not be fed to fish." -- On a bottle of shampoo for dogs. • "For external use only!" -- On a curling iron. • "Warning: This product can burn eyes." -- On a curling iron. • "Do not use in shower." -- On a hair dryer. • "Do not use while sleeping." -- On a hair dryer. • "Do not use while sleeping or unconscious." -- On a hand-held massaging device. • "Do not place this product into any electronic equipment." -- On the case of a chocolate CD in a gift basket. • "Recycled flush water unsafe for drinking." -- On a toilet at a public sports facility in Ann Arbor, Michigan. • "Shin pads cannot protect any part of the body they do not cover." -- On a pair of shin guards made for bicyclists. • "This product not intended for use as a dental drill." -- On an electric rotary tool. • "Caution: Do not spray in eyes." -- On a container of underarm deodorant. • "Do not drive with sunshield in place." -- On a cardboard sunshield that keeps the sun off the dashboard. • "Caution: This is not a safety protective device." -- On a plastic toy helmet used as a container for popcorn. • "Do not use near fire, flame, or sparks." -- On an "Aim-n-Flame" fireplace lighter. • "Battery may explore or leak." -- On a battery. See a scanned image. • "Do not eat toner." -- On a toner cartridge for a laser printer. • "Not intended for highway use." -- On a 13-inch wheel on a wheelbarrow. • "This product is not to be used in bathrooms." -- On a Holmes bathroom heater. • "May irritate eyes." -- On a can of self-defense pepper spray. • "Eating rocks may lead to broken teeth." -- On a novelty rock garden set called "Popcorn Rock." • "Caution! Contents hot!" -- On a Domino's Pizza box. • "Caution: Hot beverages are hot!" -- On a coffee cup. • "Caution: Shoots rubber bands." -- On a product called "Rubber Band Shooter." • "Warning: May contain small parts." -- On a frisbee. • "Do not use orally." -- On a toilet bowl cleaning brush. • "Please keep out of children." -- On a butcher knife. • "Not suitable for children aged 36 months or less." -- On a birthday card for a 1 year old. • "Do not recharge, put in backwards, or use." -- On a battery. • "Warning: Do not use on eyes." -- In the manual for a heated seat cushion. • "Do not look into laser with remaining eye." -- On a laser pointer. • "Do not use for drying pets." -- In the manual for a microwave oven. • "For use on animals only." -- On an electric cattle prod. • "For use by trained personnel only." -- On a can of air freshener. • "Keep out of reach of children and teenagers." -- On a can of air freshener. • "Remember, objects in the mirror are actually behind you." -- On a motorcycle helmet-mounted rear-view mirror. • "Warning: Riders of personal watercraft may suffer injury due to the forceful injection of water into body cavities either by falling into the water or while mounting the craft." -- In the manual for a jetski. • "Warning: Do not climb inside this bag and zip it up. Doing so will cause injury and death." -- A label inside a protective bag (for fragile objects), which measures 15cm by 15cm by 12cm. • "Do not use as ear plugs." -- On a package of silly putty. • "Please store in the cold section of the refrigerator." -- On a bag of fresh grapes in Australia. • "Warning: knives are sharp!" -- On the packaging of a sharpening stone. • "Not for weight control." -- On a pack of Breath Savers. • "Twist top off with hands. Throw top away. Do not put top in mouth." -- On the label of a bottled drink. • "Theft of this container is a crime." -- On a milk crate. • "Do not use intimately." -- On a tube of deodorant. • "Warning: has been found to cause cancer in laboratory mice." -- On a box of rat poison. • "Fragile. Do not drop." -- Posted on a Boeing 757. • "Cannot be made non-poisonous." -- On the back of a can of de-icing windshield fluid. • "Caution: Remove infant before folding for storage." -- On a portable stroller. • "Excessive dust may be irritating to shin and eyes." -- On a tube of agarose powder, used to make gels. • "Look before driving." -- On the dash board of a mail truck. • "Do not iron clothes on body." -- On packaging for a Rowenta iron. • "Do not drive car or operate machinery." -- On Boot's children's cough medicine. • "For indoor or outdoor use only." -- On a string of Christmas lights. • "Wearing of this garment does not enable you to fly." -- On a child sized Superman costume. • "This door is alarmed from 7:00pm - 7:00am." -- On a hospital's outside access door. • "Beware! To touch these wires is instant death. Anyone found doing so will be prosecuted." -- On a sign at a railroad station. • "Warning: do not use if you have prostate problems." -- On a box of Midol PMS relief tablets. • "Product will be hot after heating." -- On a supermarket dessert box. • "Do not turn upside down." -- On the bottom of a supermarket dessert box. • "Do not light in face. Do not expose to flame." -- On a lighter. • "Choking hazard: This toy is a small ball." -- On the label for a cheap rubber ball toy. • "Not for human consumption." -- On a package of dice. • "May be harmful if swallowed." -- On a shipment of hammers. • "Using Ingenio cookware to destroy your old pots may void your warranty." -- A printed message that appears in a television advertisement when the presenter demonstrates how strong the cookware is by using it to beat up and destroy a regular frying pan. • "Do not attempt to stop the blade with your hand." -- In the manual for a Swedish chainsaw. • "Do not dangle the mouse by its cable or throw the mouse at co-workers." -- From a manual for an SGI computer. • "Warning: May contain nuts." -- On a package of peanuts. • "Do not eat." -- On a slip of paper in a stereo box, referring to the styrofoam packing. • "Do not eat if seal is missing." -- On said seal. • "Remove occupants from the stroller before folding it." • "Access hole only -- not intended for use in lifting box." -- On the sides of a shipping carton, just above cut-out openings which one would assume were handholds. • "Warning: May cause drowsiness." -- On a bottle of Nytol, a brand of sleeping pills. • "Warning: Misuse may cause injury or death." -- Stamped on the metal barrel of a .22 calibre rifle. • "Do not use orally after using rectally." -- In the instructions for an electric thermometer. • "Turn off motor before using this product." -- On the packaging for a chain saw file, used to sharpen the cutting teeth on the chain. • "Not to be used as a personal flotation device." -- On a 6x10 inch inflatable picture frame. • "Do not put in mouth." -- On a box of bottle rockets. • "Remove plastic before eating." -- On the wrapper of a Fruit Roll-Up snack. • "Not dishwasher safe." -- On a remote control for a TV. • "For lifting purposes only." -- On the box for a car jack. • "Do not put lit candles on phone." -- On the instructions for a cordless phone. • "Warning! This is not underwear! Do not attempt to put in pants." -- On the packaging for a wristwatch. • "Do not wear for sumo wrestling." -- From a set of washing instructions. See a scanned image. ________________________________________ Assurances: • "Safe for use around pets." -- On a box of Arm & Hammer Cat Litter. ________________________________________ Small Print From Commercials: • "Do not use house paint on face." -- In a Visa commercial that depicts an expecting couple looking for paint at a hardware store. • "Do not drive cars in ocean." -- In a car commercial which shows a car in the ocean. • "Always drive on roads. Not on people." -- From a car commercial which shows a vehicle "body-surfing" at a concert. • "For a limited time only." -- From a Rally's commercial that described how their burgers were fresh. ________________________________________ Signs and Notices: • "No stopping or standing." -- A sign at bus stops everywhere. • "Do not sit under coconut trees." -- A sign on a coconut palm in a West Palm Beach park circa 1950. • "These rows reserved for parents with children." -- A sign in a church. • "All cups leaving this store, rather full or empty, must be paid for." -- A sign in a Cumberland Farms in Hillsboro, New Hampshire. • "Malfunction: Too less water." -- A notice left on a coffee machine. • "Prescriptions cannot be filled by phone." -- On a form in a clinic. • "You could be a winner! No purchase necessary. Details inside." -- On a bag of Fritos. • "Fits one head." -- On a hotel-provided shower cap box. • "Payment is due by the due date." -- On a credit card statement. • "No small children." -- On a laundromat triple washer. • "Warning: Ramp Ends In Stairs." -- A sign, correctly describing the end of a concrete ramp intended for handicap access to a bridge. ________________________________________ Safety Procedures: • "Take care: new non-slip surface." -- On a sign in front of a newly renovated ramp that led to the entrance of a building. • "In case of flood, proceed uphill. In case of flash flood, proceed uphill quickly." -- One of the emergency safety procedures at a summer camp. ________________________________________ Ingredients: • "Ingredients: Artificially bleached flour, sugar, vegetable fat, yeast, salt, gluten, soya flour, emulsifier 472 (E) & 481, flour treatment agents, enzymes, water. May contain: fruit." -- The ingredients list on a package of fruit buns. • "100% pure yarn." -- On a sweater. • "Some materials may irritate sensitive skin. Please look at the materials if you believe this may be the case. Materials: Covering: 100% Unknown. Stuffing: 100% Unknown." -- On a pillow. • "Cleans and refreshes without soap or water. Contains: Water, fragrance & soap." -- On the packet for a moist towelette. See a scanned image. ________________________________________ Instructions: • "Remove the plastic wrapper." -- The first instruction on a bag of microwave popcorn; to see the instructions, one first has to remove the plastic wrapper and unfold the pouch. • "Take one capsule by mouth three times daily until gone." -- On a box of pills. • "Open packet. Eat contents." -- Instructions on a packet of airline peanuts. • "Remove wrapper, open mouth, insert muffin, eat." -- Instructions on the packaging for a muffin at a 7-11. • "Use like regular soap." -- On a bar of Dial soap. • "Instructions: usage known." -- Instructions on a can of black pepper. • "Serving suggestion: Defrost." -- On a Swann frozen dinner. • "Simply pour the biscuits into a bowl and allow the cat to eat when it wants." -- On a bag of cat biscuits. • "In order to get out of car, open door, get out, lock doors, and then close doors." -- In a car manual. • "Please include the proper portion of your bill." -- On the envelope for an auto insurance bill. • "The appliance is switched on by setting the on/off switch to the 'on' position." -- Instructions for an espresso kettle. • "For heat-retaining corrugated cardboard technology to function properly, close lid." -- On a Domino's sandwich box. ________________________________________ Requirements: • "Optional modem required." -- On a computer software package.

Topic by LoneWolf 8 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago