Patenting an Instructable?

Hi, I'm new to Instructables and I have always wanted to know whether Instructables provides patenting services for the inventors who want their instructable to be patented. Thanks Shoukei

Topic by Shoukei   |  last reply


Tesla's patents?

I've done some searching on the net and other references, to no avail. Are his inventions public domain? If not, who owns/controls them?

Question by IS777   |  last reply


No patent on this one.

I have an idea. It could be a good one, and it could be a useful one. It could even be a money-spinning one, but I want to spread it instead of earn from it.What I'm thinking of was inspried by potato cannons:Imagine a combustion chamber of reasonable size, say a gallon volume. Cylindrical, it is domed at one end t withstand internal pressure, but the other end tapers to a narrow outlet.The idea is that an explosive mixture in the chamber (anything handy, but gasoline/air, ethanol/air and butane/air are the most likely) is ignited by a spark, just like a potato cannon. There is no ammunition, though.The tapered pipe (I hope) concentrates the blast to release a "bullet" of rapidly-moving gases.The whole cannon points down at the ground, the muzzle only a few inches from the ground. The detonation is triggered via a long cable (metres long). The "gas bullet" hits the ground with a large enough force to simulate the step of a human or animal, or the passing of a tyre. This triggers the landmine left months ago under the soil.My idea is, in effect, a low-tech device, capable of being built and repaired by semi-skilled locals, from scavanged materials, in war-torn areas. With a bit of training, a small team could use one to safely pound a mine-field hard enough to trigger the mines and make the area safe to live in. The cannon would be damaged by explosions, but not so badly that it would need repaired after every use, and it could be easily fixed with scrap from the nearest wrecked landrover.Would this work? Or would they need solid ammunition, say lumps of timber or rocks wrapped in rags to make a seal? That would need a staight (not tapered) barrel, but it's the same idea.I don't have the space or equipment to make one myself, and land-mine charities won't tell me how much force is required to trigger a mine, but most of you reading this are in the US, and it seems you have an easier time finding this kind of thing out.Run with the idea, chaps. Build one if you can, and ship it to somebody who needs it, or come up with better plans than my rough idea, and post them to those who need them.

Topic by Kiteman 


No patent on this one.

I have an idea. It could be a good one, and it could be a useful one. It could even be a money-spinning one, but I want to spread it instead of earn from it.What I'm thinking of was inspried by potato cannons:Imagine a combustion chamber of reasonable size, say a gallon volume. Cylindrical, it is domed at one end t withstand internal pressure, but the other end tapers to a narrow outlet.The idea is that an explosive mixture in the chamber (anything handy, but gasoline/air, ethanol/air and butane/air are the most likely) is ignited by a spark, just like a potato cannon. There is no ammunition, though.The tapered pipe (I hope) concentrates the blast to release a "bullet" of rapidly-moving gases.The whole cannon points down at the ground, the muzzle only a few inches from the ground. The detonation is triggered via a long cable (metres long). The "gas bullet" hits the ground with a large enough force to simulate the step of a human or animal, or the passing of a tyre. This triggers the landmine left months ago under the soil.My idea is, in effect, a low-tech device, capable of being built and repaired by semi-skilled locals, from scavanged materials, in war-torn areas. With a bit of training, a small team could use one to safely pound a mine-field hard enough to trigger the mines and make the area safe to live in. The cannon would be damaged by explosions, but not so badly that it would need repaired after every use, and it could be easily fixed with scrap from the nearest wrecked landrover.Would this work? Or would they need solid ammunition, say lumps of timber or rocks wrapped in rags to make a seal? That would need a staight (not tapered) barrel, but it's the same idea.I don't have the space or equipment to make one myself, and land-mine charities won't tell me how much force is required to trigger a mine, but most of you reading this are in the US, and it seems you have an easier time finding this kind of thing out.Run with the idea, chaps. Build one if you can, and ship it to somebody who needs it, or come up with better plans than my rough idea, and post them to those who need them.

Topic by Kiteman 


help with patent and prototype

I have been working on an invention/idea for the past year now. I can make a prototype if I really wanted to, if i did it would look like crap, and no one would buy it. Plus, I was told you do not need a proto type to sell an idea. It's a simple invention that you can use small plastic parts, and can be used in everyhouse hold. I have went to places like invent help and others, but no real help. They just want a lot of money to market it for you, and help you get a patent. I have no patent because, I have about 6 different models and don't really know which one is best for marketing, selling, things like that. I don't really know anyting about computers and the internet. I paid a lawyer to look up my ideas/inventions and so far there is nothing out there that is close? Looking for help or different ideas to market and patent my ideas?? any info would help, a lot of web pages for help costs thousands of dollars, which I do not have. I am a Plumber by trade from chicago, and I think it should be in every bathroom,I just don't know where to start. Email daaabears@yahoo.com Thanks nick go bears!!

Topic by daaabears   |  last reply


microsoft's 235 patents ...

Microsoft claims the opensource community (mainly Linux) violates up to 235 of their patents. Though, as Microsoft don't provide any list of these patents, some says it's just a campaign of fear and destabilization ... Do you know some examples of Microsoft's patents that are actually violated by Linux ?

Topic by chooseausername   |  last reply


Licence = Copyright and Patent?

I have a few projects that I plan to place up, but I want a little bit of assurance that my ideas will be safe in general from people that might want to copy. I sometimes use the by-nc-nd as a way to keep my ideas up, but I was wondering if the idea can be kept in my ownership. I know that pictures have copyright protection (along bottom of pictures if clicked to see single pictures), so it might mean that it's protected in a way. Does this seem confusing? To put everything down shortly, does placing Instructables up provide copyright protection and/or patents when using the right license? Thanks, username252

Topic by username252   |  last reply


Patent Free Protection?

Hello: I have an idea that I wish to keep free for all to use. Does publishing on Instructables count as Prior Art to the US Patent Office? Does the Patent Office check Instructables in patent searches? I check Patent Free on all my Instructable ideas, so is this enough? Thanks, Carl.

Question by carl5blum   |  last reply


Can Technology be patented?

Can Someone patent a Technology ? i.e. the way a machine works? so that no one can use that procedure to make a machine work ?  I saw a machine , did research and found the way , it works, and i want to make it open source, not by using the same logos , all I want to do is to make the tech open source . can I ? if no, then Why ? and How can I ? I mean what minimum changes do i need ?

Question by _Boltz_ 


Patent law, Prior Art

I am somewhat familiar with patent law.   One of the details of law that I like is the idea of "prior art"  Basically if you publish an idea, someone else can't come along at a later date and patent it.   You have established "prior art."    This may and may not aid you in patenting the idea yourself, but at least someone else can't patent it and shut you out of the market.   A full blown patent may cost 1000s of $, but publishing is a different matter. At least that is my understanding. Does stuff published online (thru instructables, for example) count as "prior art."   ? Also do you personally retain all rights?  or does the website?  Some of both   ? Y? N? M?

Topic by Toga_Dan   |  last reply


Does anyone have any information on patenting fashion accessories? Answered

Some details, links, recommendations, and insight will be great.

Question by ShootingStars   |  last reply


World's youngest inventor - holds patent for new broom.

A boy of five is thought to be the UK's youngest person to patent an invention after coming up with a labour-saving broom to help his father sweep leaves.Sam Houghton, of Buxton, Derbyshire, was just three when he came up with a double-headed broom to collect large debris and fine dust simultaneously. Sam, who was inspired by animated inventors Wallace and Gromit and Archie the Inventor from TV series Balamory, said: "I saw my Daddy brushing up and made it. There are two brushes because one gets the big bits and one gets the little bits left behind."I don't know if I want to be an inventor when I grow up but this was fun.""I was swapping from one broom to the other and he asked why. When I said it was to pick up the different leaves and twigs it must have got him thinking."He got a large elastic band from the shed and put it over the two brooms, holding them just the right way to use both together. He then called me and announced that had had made up an invention." The broom works with the coarser brush at the front to pick up larger objects and the finer brush at the back.Sam's invention has been taken up by the UK-IPO, which is hoping to use it to encourage other youngsters to come up with inventions through an initiative called "Cracking Ideas".BBC StoryCracking Ideas websiteIntellectual Property Office

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


what is the difference between trade mark and copyright? Answered

Title says the first question but also i want to know where and what i would do to establish a company name and also where i could get a patent and what a patent protects you from in terms of copying because i have a very broad motorized skateboard idea and want to know if its even worth getting it patented since there would be tons of ways to probably get around it 

Question by BIGHAIRYDUDE   |  last reply


Super-fast kite-surfing

A new kite-board patent was published in August: a hyrofoil board.A curved hydrofoil lifts the whole board out of the water, cuts friction dramatically and gaining massive amounts of speed.Apparently.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Overview of License on Publish page

I often get questions about copyright, licensing, patents, and publishing an Instructable.  In an effort to help clarify, we're going to put an overview of the license on the Instructable publish page.  We'll also link to a forum topic where users can ask questions and discuss edge cases.  I'd love your feedback, suggestions, and question on the proposed text that will appear on the publish page where you choose a license: Here's a brief overview of how the license works: By publishing your Instructable, you give Instructables.com permission to republish your Instructable on our website, or on a partner's website or other media.  We always try to get your Instructable seen by as many people as possible, and usually our goal is the same as yours.  For more information, see our Terms of Service. The license you choose below informs third-parties how they must treat your Instructable.  If you choose our default license, Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike (by-nc-sa), any website may republish your entire Instructable in a non-commercial venue under the same license, provided they attribute it properly -- by citing your name, linking to your website, your userpage on Instructables, or the original Instructable.  If you choose to reserve all rights, no entity other than Instructables.com may republish your exact text or images.  If you choose Public Domain, you are explicitly abandoning all rights. For the purposes of news reporting, pieces of your Instructable may be republished regardless of their copyright under the fair use exemption. More information can be found on the Creative Common website. The ideas or methods described within your Instructables are not protected by copyright.  Copyright only applies to original works of authorship that are fixed in a tangible form of expression; for the purposes of your Instructable, that includes your text, images, and any files.  If you'd like to protect the idea or method of your Instructable, you'll need a patent.  Patent law is more complicated than we have space for here, but the good news is that in the United States, you have a year from first publication to file a patent application.  So, if you think your idea is patentable, you can publish a form of it as an Instructable, get constructive feedback on the idea, and still be able to apply for a patent.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Creating and Registering a Trademark

Does anyone know and understand the process of creating a trademark? As best as I can gather creating a trademark is as easy as putting TM after what ever you would like trademarked. However, if you wish to register your trademark so you can have the R behind it that is where the line starts to blur and become a little more fuzzy. There are some fairly expensive fees as well as quite of bit of research that you first must do or face losing your $300+ fees.  So if anyone has had anything registered with the Us Copyright and Trademark office please share your experience. 

Topic by xtreker15   |  last reply


30 minute DIY AM particle-acceleration

Last fall, I verified an initial relationship of resonance between two bifilar wound wires (of any length). The predictable sequence resonates at the following levels - 20 Hz, 30 Hz, 50 Hz (and all multiples of these 3 frequencies). I used a Parallax Propeller Board - with PGEN 2.0 software from Innovationshop in Germany.   This software allows for a waveform built of 32 stacked frequencies to be created and amplified.   I have used it to successfully break the bonds of distilled water - as one of my earlier videos shows 2 years ago. JL Naudin calls it a "GEGENE machine" - but it is a simple, tabletop, particle accelerator.  His results can be found here:::  http://jnaudin.free.fr/wfcbooster/indexen.htm One of my earlier videos from May 2013 - can be found at YouTube - I just want to show people how this works.  It is a 4 minute explanation of open-sourced Patent 512,340.:::   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHxK1VWrXcM The materials:: 1 - 1800 watt induction cooktop (iron, copper, or 3-ply stainless cookware is required on these types of devices) 2.  50 feet of 14 AWG speaker wire 3.  2-10 count of 500-watt halogen lightbulbs. 4.  wire, solder & connectors for the wire-ends. 5.  1 stainless-steel HHO DC electrolyzer tank.  6.  Cooking Pan - or light fixture (to hold light bulbs). 7.  High Voltage diodes (500 Volts or higher)

Topic by jabel4   |  last reply


WHERE CAN I PATENT THIS???

WHERE CAN I PATTENT THIS???

Topic by Waldemar Sha   |  last reply


questions about patents in illinois

I have been working on an invention/idea for the past year now. I can make a prototype if I really wanted to, if i did it would look like crap, and no one would buy it. Plus, I was told you do not need a proto type to sell an idea. It's a simple invention that you can use small plastic parts, and can be used in everyhouse hold. I have went to places like invent help and others, but no real help. They just want a lot of money to market it for you, and help you get a patent. I have no patent because, I have about 6 different models and don't really know which one is best for marketing, selling, things like that. I don't really know anyting about computers and the internet. I paid a lawyer to look up my ideas/inventions and so far there is nothing out there that is close? Looking for help or different ideas to market and patent my ideas?? any info would help, a lot of web pages for help costs thousands of dollars, which I do not have. I am a Plumber by trade from chicago, and I think it should be in every bathroom,I just don't know where to start. I really like to meet someone, who knows about patents, marketing, sales, and an engineer. that can help me make and market and patent my new plumbing ideas. I know they would work. I know they will sell. I am a union plumber of 7 years from chicago. Anyone around Chicago, that wants to meet up somewhere with me to see if they can help would be great. Email daaabears@yahoo.com Thanks nick go bears!!

Topic by daaabears   |  last reply


Should (or can) I get a patent on an arduino based project? Answered

I really don't know if I should get a patent or even if my latest "invention" could be patented. This topic will be a bit specific to my project, sorry :(I've posted an instructable of it here (vote it on the arduino contest while you're there!)The first problem is that, almost everything in the project hasn't been invented by me. I didn't invent drums, nor the idea of hitting some sort box or drum to produce sounds, and most certainly not the arduino. Autonomous musical instruments or robot musicians are not new either. Both the electronics circuits and the code might be patented somehow, but anyone with the required skills and with an intention to ignore my patent, could achieve the same results as I did but with a different circuits/code. Which brings me to my second question:Is this really something to worry about? is that common that people get their inventions stolen by big evil corporations? could you realistically win a legal battle against such corporation?... I've been checking a few videos and articles on this topic, including some written by instructables founder ewilhelm saying how he had never heard of this happening. One thing that does worry me is someone taking my project and claiming it as their idea. But I think being featured on this site and on the arduino.cc site too, should be a safe way of claiming authorship.Thanks.

Question by FrancoMolina   |  last reply


Invention without a patent, what happens if someone steals it??

Ok, I've got a really cool invention. My oldest boy came up with the idea like 6 years ago. I can't afford to patent it. If I used the idea in an instructable, would the date on the ible help prove that the idea was ours? (Or would it just prove how stupid I am by letting the "cat out of the bag"?) I don't mind other people making their own, that's what Ibles are about. I just don't want someone to run patent it, and then commercialize it unfairly.

Topic by skunkbait   |  last reply


Does anyone here have a patent?

So i've had an idea...and everyone i've talked to loves it. So I want to see about getting a patent for it, but have no idea about getting a patent. I think i remember someone here is a patent attorney? Are there any age requirements? Fees? What do i need to do? Thanks

Topic by Weissensteinburg   |  last reply


How do I patent my invention? Answered

I want to patent one of my biggest inventions but i don't know where to start

Question by Waveform19   |  last reply


Patent Files: Method of exercising a cat (5,443,036)

PatentA method for inducing cats to exercise consists of directing a beam of invisible light produced by a hand-held laser apparatus onto the floor or wall or other opaque surface in the vicinity of the cat, then moving the laser so as to cause the bright pattern of light to move in an irregular way fascinating to cats, and to any other animal with a chase instinct.Discuss!

Topic by trebuchet03   |  last reply


i am making an airsoft flame thrower from halo3 should i try to get a patent?

This is going to be full size should i make a patent

Question by thecrow117   |  last reply


ørst electrical conductor? Answered

Ørst electrical conductor can anyone tell me what this is. Google no help. The phrase comes from a patent application: https://www.google.com/patents/WO2010123903A1?cl=en

Question by rickharris   |  last reply


Is building a wormhole generator possible?

I have read an interesting patent on a "magnetic vortex wormhole generator"and I think it could work. Before you start discrediting and "debunking" this patent or idea check the patent out. http://www.scribd.com/doc/25112/Magnetic-Votrex-Wormhole-GeneratorPlease write constructive and helpful comments. Also if anyone happens to build one based on the patent and experiments with it successfully, make an instructable; share the information. I just want to know if its possible.

Question by    |  last reply


Hidden Belt Weapon

I was looking in google patents and I found this http://www.google.com/patents?id=13lQAAAAEBAJ&printsec;=abstract&zoom;=4#v=onepage&q;&f;=false  I'd love if someone made it.

Topic by jacker234   |  last reply


THE DRUGGIST'S GENERAL RECIPE BOOK, PATENT AND PROPRIETARY MEDICINES 1878

Http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015066542062 recipe the below is OCR text. There is a PDF on the link, to read on line only. THE DRUGGIST'S GENERAL RECEIPT BOOK COMPBISING A COPIOUS VETERINARY FORMULARY HUMEBOUS EEC1PES IN PATENT AND PROPRIETARY MEDICINES DBUGGISTS1 NOSTBUMS, ETC. PERFUMERY AND COSMETICS BEVEBAGES, DIETETIC ABTICLES, AND CONDIMENTS Trade Chemicals, Scientific Processes AND AN APPENDIX OF USEFUL TABLES XY HENRY BEASLEY ®igl;tj1 PHILADELPHIA LINDSAY AND BLAKISTON 1878

Topic by Lateral Thinker 


I need a computer controlled milling machine built for patent

I need a computer controlled milling machine that will be about 2'x2' frame and would be portable and able to be attached to a piece of metal sheet and capable of cutting plastic material. What I need it to do is duplicate a profile that a metal sheet has to plastic. To be able to attach this to a panel take a tracer that can copy the profile. I would like to ether partner up with someone or I would gladly pay for you to produce this machine. Please contact me at DMARR35@AOL.COM for more info

Topic by dmarr35   |  last reply


Tesla's human powered helicopter possible?

I know he was a smart dude and he went out of his way to patent this. Was it ever built? Could it be built and work? I don't understand the propulsion system. Is it like a bicycle or is it something else? I need one of these bad to deliver free fruit to people everywhere. My car keeps getting stuff in traffic. I don't know where all these cars think they're going, but I've got places to be and the road just isn't cutting it anymore for me. And dangit the uploader isn't working. Here's a link to the patent description and images: https://www.google.com/patents/US1655114 Well, not a link. A  URL. I dont know how to do a hyperlink without the- nevermind. sort of figured it out. Click below: https://www.google.com/patents/US1655114

Topic by avocadostains 


I patented a New LED great for home projects and display cases

I have spent three years doing this but here it is. This is a new LED and I actually patented it. Its a screw in unit that has a chip mounted directly onto a solid brass core that takes heat away far better than any circuit board. In addition it screws into any m10x1.5 hole, if you use a flat plate on the front a small insulator and a heatsink or metal on the back with the M10 thread all you need do is make an electrical connection to the plates and you can screw any colour you want into the heatsink. It comes in every wavelength from 380 (uv right up to IR at 1040nm) Ill be adding pics shortly of acrylic displays the 180 degree one is absolutely perfect for these i use frost spray on edges i want to illuminate and leave clear other bits the effect is amazing even masking a flat acrylic and putting two tone pictures using the spray is awsome. iv also designed an off the shelf PCB up to 60watts it drives any series parallel circuit, all you do is program it with the wattage of the whole array. If you program say 15watts in an array with several LED's it powers the array with the exact forward voltage required and alters realtime so the light output is near constant. Also have a patent pending on this as well. I have lots of time and plenty of these available if anyone is interested I am now running a small business based around it and have done some really nice hand crafted kit. More pics to follow all questions welcome Thanks all

Topic by L.E.D Guy   |  last reply


Nine Points to Consider in Licensing University Technology - A nicer way to patent

Earlier this month, a group of 11 research institutions signed a pledge to take a different approach to licensing intellectual property, titled "Nine Points to Consider in Licensing University Technology". My read of the whitepaper amounts to this: Universities are realizing that their aggressive licensing behavior comes at a cost, and they're toning it down. However, of the nine points, absent in my mind is consideration of the students involved in any licensing deal. For many, graduate school gives the first meaningful introduction to the patent system, and often the first introduction to the system of licensing intellectual property. When a research project turns into a patent, and a patent turns into a startup company with a student in a founding position, the alignment between the student and the university, particularly with what's often called the technology licensing or transfer office (TLO or TTO), ends. Knowing the high failure rate of startups, it's the TLO's job to immediately extract as much value from the startup as possible.During my time there, MIT was no different in this regard, and I went through this process personally with a company based on some of my research as well as seeing the same thing happen to friends. The TLO would approach the negotiations in the same way it would approach negotiations with an established IP giant, like IBM or Intel. The burdens placed on nascent companies were incredible, and included things such as direct cash payments -- things that can increase the chance of failure or require the founders to give up more control to VCs into return for badly needed cash. So, while the whitepaper discusses costs that are, in general, more societal, the aggressive behavior I've witnesses also comes at a cost. My propensity to give to the endowment has been severely impacted. The licensing offices must know that second-time entrepreneurs have a higher success rate, so maximizing the TLO's return comes at an overall cost to the university. My choices in what projects Squid Labs pursued were also impacted. Colin, Saul, and I were all in the same research group while at MIT, so one might think Squid Labs would have pursued projects in printed electronics -- something we spent a combined nine years working on. Not so. Knowing the roadblocks that the TLO would put in front of getting access to those patents, we intentionally went after ideas out of MIT's control. Good thing we did, otherwise I might not have a place to share these thoughts with you!Here's the original article, forwarded to me by my Mom, that brought this to my attention:A Nicer Way to PatentBy Eliot MarshallScienceNOW Daily News7 March 2007Universities have plumbed a rich source of cash in recent years by aggressively patenting and licensing faculty inventions, but some schools now want to set limits on the practice. An elite group--11 top research institutions and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC)--have signed a pledge to take a kinder, gentler approach to licensing intellectual property. Yesterday, they released principles on the sharing of patented discoveries, urging other universities to follow their lead.The manifesto, drafted at a meeting last year at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, makes nine key points. First on the list is that universities should not agree to deals that would curtail access to new technology by researchers at nonprofit institutions. In the past, for example, biologists complained that Harvard University granted a company too much control over its patented "oncomouse," an animal designed to be cancer-prone (Science, 17 May 2002, p. 1212). This impeded its use in research, some claimed. In other points, the guidelines say that universities should steer clear of deals that give one licensee highly exclusive control of a discovery; that they should avoid making claims on "future improvements" of a discovery; and that they should take into consideration the special needs of "neglected patient populations or geographic areas." The specific issue that led to the drafting of these principles, according to physicist Arthur Bienenstock, former dean of research at Stanford and an organizer of the Palo Alto meeting, was a flurry of concerns about license restrictions on the use of human embryonic stem cells from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The university's technology manger, the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) initially required some university-based researchers to take out a restrictive commercial license. After many objected, WARF dropped the policy (Science, 26 January 2007, p. 449).WARF's director, Carl Gulbrandsen, acknowledges that the stem cell licensing requirements caused a backlash. But he says Wisconsin has never sued a university or a researcher over a patent license disagreement. And he praises the new Palo Alto licensing guidelines--which WARF itself has endorsed--although he notes they are "very broad" and nonbinding. Gulbrandsen adds: "We have been following most if not all of these policies" for many years.What impact will the new document have? AAMC Senior Vice President David Korn, who helped draft it, concedes that the guidelines are "a bit arcane" but hopes they create "a buzz" among university patent officers at their annual meeting in San Francisco this week. Korn says the position statement will remind everyone that university licensing deals should "always be guided by the public interest."

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


IP and licensing on Instructables

There have been some interesting discussions in the Forums about intellectual property, Creative Commons, open-source hardware, and patent law- hopefully you've noticed and chimed in already. I sent a synthesis of the discussion out to friends, bloggers, and journalists earlier this week, and have gotten some good responses. People are excited to see Instructables users actually testing out theories of open source design, and will be following our progress to see what solutions we find.What do you think? The main discussion is on the mirror post in the Forums.Instructables is a leader in user-driven innovation, as discussed last Sunday in the New York Times, and we'd like to share the ideas and trends we're seeing with you so we can get your feedback. Intellectual property (IP) rights are a hot-button issue among all creators, but few understand the legal details. Those who create music, text, and images can copyright their work under the Creative Commons and similar licenses, but no such equivalent exists for patentable ideas. Instructables users may choose to license the copyrightable portions of their Instructables under any of the available licenses, but the problem remains- what of potentially patentable IP? Current patent laws are geared toward large corporations- the law has been written to accommodate and reinforce the needs and goals of corporations and their lawyers. Individuals rarely have the time, money, and legal knowledge to file well-written patents, much less defend them- and a patent is only as good as the legal defense mounted in its support.Given these systemic problems, what should an inventor do with his or her idea? It turns out that one of the best things to do with a new, good idea is to share it. Instructables is a great forum to publicize your idea, whether you're interested in pursuing a patent or not. Under US patent law, one has a year after publication of an idea to file a provisional patent. Publishing an idea on Instructables provides exactly that stake in the sand, and can bring plenty of discussion about prior art and potential modifications to the original project.That year can be a valuable time to test the waters. The Instructables community can help identify potential collaborators or business partners, and investigate the appeal and potential commercial viability of an idea. At the end of that year, you're more likely to know whether it makes more sense to apply for a provisional patent, or to simply let your idea pass into the public domain. This idea is then unpatentable by others, so the idea will be available to other inventors to use, build upon, and remix without restriction.Instructables users are on the forefront of this discussion, testing the viability of these new models. For more information, check out Instructables founder and CEO Eric Wilhelm's Forum posts which cover these issues in more depth, and particularly the user discussions in the comments. Open Source Hardware and the Creative CommonsThe value of sharing patentable ideasThe cost of aggressive licensing of University patentsOpen-source design of a keyboard systemWhat do you think should be happening in these areas? How do you see these developments affecting the individual inventor? We'd love to hear your thoughts via either public or private channels. Feel free to contact me at canida (at) instructables.com for more information.Dan Goldwater wrote about some of these same issues a while back in the old Squid Labs blog: Advice for the budding inventor and Open Source Hardware and Industry.

Topic by canida   |  last reply


IP and licensing on Instructables

There have been some interesting discussions here in the Forums about intellectual property, Creative Commons, open-source hardware, and patent law- hopefully you've noticed and chimed in already. I sent a synthesis of the discussion out to friends, bloggers, and journalists earlier this week, and have gotten some good responses. People are excited to see Instructables users actually testing out theories of open source design, and will be following our progress to see what solutions we find.What do you think?Instructables is a leader in user-driven innovation, as discussed last Sunday in the New York Times, and we'd like to share the ideas and trends we're seeing with you so we can get your feedback. Intellectual property (IP) rights are a hot-button issue among all creators, but few understand the legal details. Those who create music, text, and images can copyright their work under the Creative Commons and similar licenses, but no such equivalent exists for patentable ideas. Instructables users may choose to license the copyrightable portions of their Instructables under any of the available licenses, but the problem remains- what of potentially patentable IP? Current patent laws are geared toward large corporations- the law has been written to accommodate and reinforce the needs and goals of corporations and their lawyers. Individuals rarely have the time, money, and legal knowledge to file well-written patents, much less defend them- and a patent is only as good as the legal defense mounted in its support.Given these systemic problems, what should an inventor do with his or her idea? It turns out that one of the best things to do with a new, good idea is to share it. Instructables is a great forum to publicize your idea, whether you're interested in pursuing a patent or not. Under US patent law, one has a year after publication of an idea to file a provisional patent. Publishing an idea on Instructables provides exactly that stake in the sand, and can bring plenty of discussion about prior art and potential modifications to the original project.That year can be a valuable time to test the waters. The Instructables community can help identify potential collaborators or business partners, and investigate the appeal and potential commercial viability of an idea. At the end of that year, you're more likely to know whether it makes more sense to apply for a provisional patent, or to simply let your idea pass into the public domain. This idea is then unpatentable by others, so the idea will be available to other inventors to use, build upon, and remix without restriction.Instructables users are on the forefront of this discussion, testing the viability of these new models. For more information, check out Instructables founder and CEO Eric Wilhelm's Forum posts which cover these issues in more depth, and particularly the user discussions in the comments. Open Source Hardware and the Creative CommonsThe value of sharing patentable ideasThe cost of aggressive licensing of University patentsOpen-source design of a keyboard systemWhat do you think should be happening in these areas? How do you see these developments affecting the individual inventor? We'd love to hear your thoughts via either public or private channels. Feel free to contact me at canida (at) instructables.com for more information.Dan Goldwater wrote about some of these same issues a while back in the old Squid Labs blog: Advice for the budding inventor and Open Source Hardware and Industry.

Topic by canida   |  last reply


The "Truth" about Tesla?

These guys at www.lindsaybks.com/gallery/teslamyth/ttesla1.html say that Tesla didn't invent the Tesla Coil, radio, or AC power. Now, I'll admit that I didn't read all of the arguments completely. I did, however, read the Tesla Coil page in its entirety. One claim is that the Tesla Coil was predated by one Elihu Thomson's patent  "Method of and means for producing electric current" (number 500,630). This patent was filed in 1893 - while Tesla's earliest patent on the Tesla Coil, "System of Electric Lighting" (number 454,622) was filed in 1891. Nice try. They are definitely correct, however, in saying that many parts of Tesla's history has been overly-dramatized. For instance, there is a claim that Tesla's remote controlled boat used a primitive form of voice recognition to take spoken commands from his audience. Obviously, it didn't, and the patents show nothing of the like. Do the other claims on their website have any merit?

Topic by ElectricUmbrella   |  last reply


What is an Arduino? Answered

I see a lot of instructables in witch they use arduino but I can't figure out what it is! can you help me?

Question by Patented   |  last reply


Open Source Question

I have something I would like to release open source to assure it will not be patented. How do i go about doing this? Thanks, C.A.

Topic by gtfoxy   |  last reply


How do I prevent my great solar idea from being patented?

I have solved the solar energy crises by connecting linkages on the ground in a matrix pattern with a mirror on each small  plastic linkage, that all move in the same fashion. 30x30 m grids can focus all their energy on a single thermal element. My problem is that I don't want to publish this only to have  some company patent the idea and deprive humanity of energy. What now? 

Topic by tom321   |  last reply


Where and How to approach my ideas to advertisement companies? Answered

Where and How to approach my ideas to advertisement companies without taking patent or copyright on them?

Question by noquery   |  last reply


Which license would you recommend?

I have a new patented item that I would like to publish here. I need to know which license would protect my interests though and since I am new here, I would like to ask you seasoned vets. This is a color coded tool labeling system that will label your wrenches, sockets, drivers and extensions both standard and metric for quicker more precise size identification in all situations. Which license would you recommend?

Topic by toolman58   |  last reply


I need some help

While riding home from the golf course this morning i came up with a great idea,(no details) but i cant do anything with it because you have to be 18 or older to patent and i need a lawier and all kinds of stuff that i cannot possibly acheive. if anyone can help me please do. if i can publish it it'l sell awesome with the current "energy crisis" but as i said before, i cant do anything with itfor three more years and by then surely someone else will already have it patented. thank you for reading rocketkid

Topic by rocketkid   |  last reply


IP protection for open source hardware?

If my solar condenser ends up working I'm wanting to make it open source. I realise that this means effectively giving up all ownership of it, and that's fine, but the last thing I want is for someone else to go and patent it and stop anyone else from using it. What protections are available for this kind of thing? Patents obviously, but is there anything a little less intensive? I'll be looking into copyleft and creative commons and all that, but if someone can point in the right general direction first it'll save me some time.

Topic by SolarFlower_org   |  last reply


Open-source Hardware License - creative commons-like license for stuff

Here on Instructables we offer authors the ability to wrap their Instructable with a variety of licenses, most notably the Creative Common Licenses (check here for your default license). These licenses only apply to the Instructable itself as a work that can be copyrighted; they do not apply to the idea presented in the Instructable. Under current law, the only way to protect the idea presented in the Instructable is through a patent. While we've toyed with the idea of a "publish this Instructable and apply for a provisional patent" button, patents are expensive and time-consuming. I have a few myself (through MIT and Squid Labs), and can say with some authority that getting a patent through the application process, defending it, and possibly licensing it is a game for corporations and is out of reach for most individuals. Roey asked me about this issue in regards to his Universal Nut Sheller (from here):"So we've figured out a way to make cheap molds anywhere in the world for the Universal Nut Sheller, https://www.instructables.com/id/EPNPAI9025EVYDUURQ/ our of concrete I'll be posting things as I go along. By the by, I was wondering if you guys had fully explored the legal issues dealing with these creative commons licences and technology. According to everything I'm aware of Creative Commons only applies to works that can be copyrighted. According to How Stuff Works: http://www.howstuffworks.com/question492.htm (admittedly not the best source) Copyrights are: Literary worksPictorial, graphic, and sculptural worksMusical worksSound recordingsDramatic worksPantomimes and choreographic worksMotion pictures and other audio-visual worksArchitectural worksand patents are: "any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof" I spoke to Jamie Love ( http://www.cptech.org/jamie/ ) about this and he told me that we need to get in contact with the folks that run Science Commons http://sciencecommons.org/ . Apparently their executive Director John Wilbanks also works for MIT. I've been trying but so far no luck. I'd be interested in hearing what you know about this area. I would love be wrong, it would be great if licencing our technology is as easy as picking a CC Licence, I'm just not sure that it is."I forwarded the question along to Eric Steuer, the Creative Director of the Creative Commons, who said:"A CC license can apply to the drawings and possibly the 3D shapes to the extent that the copyrightable elements are separable from the functional part, but there is no copyright in utilitarian designs - that stuff is better protected as a design patent (if it meets the threshold) and then he could apply a CC-like license to it...although given you only have patent rights by applying (as opposed to copyright that applies automatically) he could just not patent it and then everyone can use it..."Recently, people over at tapr.org released drafts of open-source hardware licenses. I got the following message from Jonathan Kuniholm at Duke asking for comments on the drafts: "I have spoken with each of you regarding our interest in the infrastructure for the sharing of hardware designs. An organization with its roots in amateur radio and open source software has released a draft of two open hardware licenses ( http://www.tapr.org/OHL ). I believe that the inspiration is primarily electronic hardware, but the concept addresses issues we have encountered in our work with The Open Prosthetics Project and its parent organization, the newly incorporated Shared Design Alliance. We have been interested in the ways that we might protect those who choose to share designs for public good from the possibility of having those designs patented out from under them or otherwise removed from the public domain, as well as helping them avoid the cost and time delays of patent protection for efforts from which they are not trying to profit. These draft licenses also address liability issues, which are another can of worms. I would be interested to hear thoughts from folks more knowledgeable than I about the effectiveness and potential pitfalls of such measures, given the difference between the issues surrounding physical designs and patents (for which there is currently no open license option outside of patent-related measures), and those surrounding items traditionally protected by copyright, which can currently be released under Creative Commons or GNU licenses ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ , http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html , http://www.fsf.org/ ). The TAPR folks have invited comment on their draft, and I think that this is as good an effort as I've seen so far. If you have interest or expertise in this area, please submit comments through the TAPR site, and please forward this to anyone else you know who may be interested."This is obviously an issue at the very core of open-source hardware and Instructables, so I encourage you to take a look and tell us what you think.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Instructables

I have set myself a challenge of running a pocket radio on the power from one candle alone. I think it is possible but have found no patents or other attempts on the internet. I wondered if it might be suitable for an instructable competition.

Topic by T0BY   |  last reply


Can i include logo pictures in my ible?

I was reading through the tech contest rules and saw this. My question is can i include picture such as this one in my ible if its entered in a contest? Also i my most current ible is a race car and all race cars have to be sponsored. so i was going to but hobbyking decals on it but I am not sure if doing so will disqualify me from the contests? Entries must not contain anything that is or may be: protected by copyright, trademark, patents, utility models, design patents or other proprietary right without the express prior written consent of the owner of such right.

Question by Team Dogoman RC   |  last reply


help with my invention

I came up with a great idea about one year ago. The outcome was 3 inventions all related. I am a union plumber from Chicago. My ideas are plumbing related, also with water saving. Inventions has no patent. Looking for someone to help me patent,prototype,market,and find a investor. Also must believe in my idea as much as I do. I feel this idea should be in every home and office. I am a plumber, I think this should of been out 20 years ago. Looking for someone in the Chicago land area, that can help me market my inventions from step 1. daaabears@yahoo.com

Topic by daaabears 


The Copyright FAQ for Knitters

The Copyright FAQ for KnittersI've been trying to work up a human-readable description of copyright and patent law, as it applies to Instructables. In my research, I found this really interesting resource for those looking to better understand copyright law, and to see how it differs when applied to various crafts. Some highlights:A knitting pattern is by default copyrighted, but utilitarian items (clothing, for example) are not copyrightable. You can make and give away items made from a copyrighted pattern. You may not make and sell items made from a copyrighted pattern. A recipe is a process and cannot be copyrighted; only the expression of the recipe can be copyrighted. A patent is required to protect a process.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


i want something to build!!!

I would like to build something for some one!! anything reasonable! i do make and forge custom knifes. i will soon begin construction on many projects, but i just like to build stuff and do a pretty good job of it....     i won't do it for free, but i'm not trying to make a gross profit it's more for the challenge. oh one last request, please don't have me make anything you intend on patenting, unless i get to have a share of the patent lol!!

Topic by sciman1   |  last reply


CO2 hydrogenation (CO2 + hydrogen = methanol) how to ?

I am wondering if methanol production (as a byproduct of CO2 and hydrogen) would be possible as diy project  . I have been reading about CO2 hydrogenation that (as topic mentioned) would lead to methanol production. Methanol would be easier to store than hydrogen ,no needing special equipment (refrigerated containers ). Anyone familiar with this ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methanol One of the patents available: http://www.google.com/patents?id=mTI5AAAAEBAJ&pg;=PA7&dq;=co2+hydrogenation&hl;=en&ei;=J0PuTeT6KseD-wbZ_cX6Bw&sa;=X&oi;=book_result&ct;=result&resnum;=6&ved;=0CDIQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q;=co2%20hydrogenation&f;=false

Topic by gabdab   |  last reply