Philosophy experiment

I came across an experiment in a text on the Philosophy of Science, and I would like to test the results, if I may. Consider this scenario:Linda is is 31 years old, single, outspoken and very bright. She majored in philosophy (it's an American text). As a student, she was deeply concerned with issues of discrimination and social justice, and also participated in anti-war demonstrations. Given this background, which of these statements do you consider to be the most probable? You do not have to justify your statement (though you may if you wish), simply post the letter of the most probable statement: a) Linda is a teacher in a primary school. b) Linda works in a bookshop, and takes Yoga classes. c) Linda is active in the feminist movement d) Linda is a psychiatric social worker. e) Linda is a member of the League of Women Voters f) Linda is a bank clerk g) Linda is an insurance salesperson h) Linda is a bank clerk, and active in the feminist movement. If you are feeling particularly helpful, you could rank the statements in order of probability (most likely to least likely). Thank you in advance. >K< Update: The answers: There isn't a "right" answer. The point is that (h) was consistently given a higher average probability than either (c) or (f).  There was no statistical difference between the results of a group of undergrads with no training in statistics, students who had taken basic courses in probability as part of their main subject (eg medicine) or even graduates of Stanford Business School who had taken courses in advanced probability and statistics.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Could a Change of Plaques at a Museum Help Engender True Philosophy?

I visited a famous museum of art a while back, and was awed by the breadth of their collection.I spent most of a day there, and as I walked through, something occurred to me; the historical plaques I read only told the story of our current understanding of history. They did not mention how our ideas of, for example, 12" Egyptian stone carvings, have changed from thinking they were idols to something like spirit "vessels" for the departed. This one-sided view gave the impression that we knew all about Egyptian culture. Yet, our understanding changes all the time. Translations of the "Book of the Dead" from 1930 hardly resemble recent translations.I wonder, if we mentioned on a plaque how a particular artifact changed our views of ancient cultures, and did this for several artifacts, or even mentioned briefly some key research along the way, we might jog the minds of museum goers a bit more. Maybe get them thinking that the world is more open than presumed. Thus some visitors might get excited at the unanswered questions and have a desire to do further research in a topic on their own.If a change of plaques could tell a larger story of how our ideas and "what we know" is challenged and changes all the time, then perhaps . . . it might even jog the visitor to challenge some of his or her own ideas, thus beginning to inspire true philosophy.

Topic by royalestel   |  last reply


Ship of Theseus - Philosophy of Identity

This past saturday there was a show on TV about the advancements in the field of prosthetics and human augmentation. I only watched less than half of it - but the timing was interesting. I came across an article about the Ship of Theseus (from Greek Legend) and have been reading quite a bit about "identity" and similar topics. This is philosophy - so there's really no right answer, but I have found it very interesting to think about and thought I'd share and see what others think.The gist of the story: Say we were to preserve Theseus' ship. As parts deteriorated and rotted away, we replace them with new (better/stronger) parts. Eventually, we replace each part with a new one. The question now is - Is it still the same ship? I'm willing to bet most of you will say yes.Now lets say that instead of replacing the ships components with new ones - we take all of the parts from the warehouse (where the parts are being stored) and reconstruct the ship from these new/better parts. Which ship has the "identity" of Theseus' ship? This is an interesting question because I'm again willing to bet that the "first" ship mentioned is your answer. But why? The parts would have gone to the "first" ship if not into the "second" ship. Why should this be different?Third Case:We take Theseus' ship and we tear it completely down in dry dock. In its place, we reconstruct using new parts. Is it still Theseus' ship?Now lets look at a digital device - my laptop for instance. Let us say that I have an "identical" machine (spec wise) and I cut and paste each file from this hard disk to the "new" machine. Does this "new" machine take the "identity" of the "old?" Can we say this "new" laptop (ship) is in fact Theseus' laptop? Talking with my colleagues - their answer (unanimously) was no - it is not the same.So here is where I get to the human side of things... Biological process have our bodies continuously replicating cells. In about a year, roughly 90% of the cells in your body will die. But no worries - they are continuously replaced with new ones. So, does that mean we are a different person compared to 12 months ago (I've read this question from several sources)? How about amputees? Today, prosthetic limbs can allow them to do what many of us choose not to do - run marathons. Are they any less of what they were before? <-- I know that sounds "wrong" - put put "political correctness" aside (but by no means am I putting down the situation of an amputee).Again, I'm willing to bet many will say yes - we're the same person. One argument is that our memories make our "identity." Fair enough. Now lets entertain the future. We now have the technology to save your memories digitally. We can digitize the human brain preserving its intelligence and thinking ability. Just entertain this idea for a few minutes. So if my brain (and its memories) are now digital and I copy it to another vessel. Is it still me? Do "I" still have the same identity? I'd like to think yes, but what was your answer about copying a laptop's memory (was it no - they are not the same)? Why should my digitized memories be any different than that of a laptop's digitized memory?At this point, my colleagues were floored. They figured out where I was going a few sentences before I said it. That's what makes the topic so interesting (in my opinion).If anyone has ever heard of HAL-5 - you already know what a feat it is. HAL-5 (yes, that's a play off of a space odyssey) is a human exoskeleton designed to assist those whom otherwise would be unable to walk for long periods of time. The user can lift heavy weights (80kg - say a dishwasher) among other helpful tasks. How does it know to move? Sensors on the skin detect electrical impulses in the brain that tell the muscle to react. Those signals are processed and turned into mechanical motion. All of this happens before the muscles have time to move. That is, the machine is moving before you even do.So if we replace our bodies and even our nervous system with mechanical devices - what makes us the same person? AND, are we the same person if we can simply copy ourselves to a new body?So last point - and it's not even my own. One of my colleagues brought this to the table today (literally at the lunch table) :P We were talking about the advancements and the potential/reality of human augmentation. Then he says something that makes complete sense to me. He said that we are at the point where our brain is evolving at a rate faster than our human bodies are. Just give yourself a minute to contemplate and wrap your head around the potential of that statement. To a degree - we have already done this (just not internally). Why else would we fly in a plane or drive a car? Well, I for one sure can't fly or run at 70+mph.1. I apologize for the length.2. I'm curious of your thoughts -- if you have another aspect of this, please do post.3. Remember there is no "correct" answer, this is just philosophy.4. There will always be more question than answers on this subject (at least I think so).HAL-5: http://www.engadget.com/2006/10/29/hal-5-robotic-suit-ready-for-mass-production/HAL-5 (mountain climb): http://www.engadget.com/2006/08/08/hal-robot-suit-almost-summits-with-quadriplegic-man-in-tow/

Topic by trebuchet03   |  last reply


What is your winning slogan?

E.g. "It's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done."or "Never, ever, bloody-anything, ever."What's yours?L

Topic by lemonie   |  last reply


1,574 (large) Gin and tonics

This has been troubling me a bit: After watching Comic Strip Presents - Complete Collection [DVD] (I got it from HMV) I wondered about a segment from Mr Jolly Lives Next Door - In the film, the pair Mayall & Edmonson order 1,574 (large) Gin and tonics in a "traditional old-English illegal-drinking establishment" called The Neon Tee Pee. (Script can't be found, or un-blocked video clips any more) The thought occurred to me "How much did one large G&T; cost then?" We know that they had no money at all before receiving a brown envelope stuffed with bank notes. The brown envelope should have contained £3000 and I'll assume that it did. In being exact about the quantity of G&Ts;, I conclude that they knew exactly how much money they had, and how much the drink cost. If follows that all the £3000 was counted, why leave any in the van if you're going for that much alcohol? Later the £3000 is acknowledged, but 2 pound notes remain. At a maximum of £2998, 1574 G&Ts; work out at £1.90 each which sounds reasonable for 1983. But that leaves £7.40, and the £2 of course. What did they do with the £7.40, what was the £2 for, why did they not ask for 1578? Cigarettes? And if so, how many? Or is there some special significance to 1574? L

Topic by lemonie   |  last reply


Sharing my blog, on all kinds of stuff

Well, this forum is to "share your blog post with the community." I don't see that happening here tons, so here is my blog, and it's three posts so far. I haven't worked on it in a while, but I plan to. Topics blagged about are science, the world, philosophy, music, and interesting things. There is some strong language. http://ruralnerdofthought.blogspot.com/2012/01/greetings-to-readers-and-friends.html

Topic by ilpug 


Existentialists, how do you find a meaning for life? Answered

Lately (and by lately I mean for a while now) I have been experiencing existential/nihilist/teen angst. I'm totally detached from reality, especially the future which is what I'm supposed to care about, what everyone cares about. I think that life is essentially meaningless, it came to exist because of a fluke, and it continues to exist because perpetuates itself (evolution). So I've been trying to make life matter to me, existentialist style. But I can't seem to get the knack of it. I don't know what I want out of life, I'm not clear on what exactly there is to want....I'm not even sure that anything is real except me. Lately I've taken to telling myself that things are meant to be, and there is a greater purpose, I just can't comprehend it yet.....which may be the most ridiculous thing I've ever told myself..... I know most people think this stuff, but don't take it seriously. They just go on living. But I just can't....perhaps because these abstract thoughts seem as real to me as everything else (not very)? Sorry if I'm totally incoherent.... HELP. please?

Question by november21   |  last reply


Can being emotionless be considered good? Answered

Consider this: is an individual person better of with emotion, or with pure logic and a strict moral code? I mean, lots and lots of bad things in the world originate from emotion. People hurt others because they are angry, or because they are sad and want to feel better, or sometimes even for pleasure. Others' are moderately to seriously impeded by fear ( like phobia), by guilt, depression, anger;  revenge and pleasure (STD's, for example). Do the positive sides outweigh those? And before you answer, think this: people say sociopaths and psychopaths are emotionless, and therefore kill. but those merely suffer a lack of empathy and concience, and do bad stuff to satisfy their pleasure. Because, is there any logical reason to hurt or kill another human? And think about the Star Trek: The Next Generation character "Data" (if you know him). Emotionless, but the last person (or android, for that matter) in the galaxy to hurt another person without reason.

Question by necropolian   |  last reply


A Modern Ancient Philosopher.

It's about time we had some intelligent, thoughtful input to the forums, instead of arguments about the way that the rate of global warming correlates directly with the number of threads about K'Nex (see, I knew I could find something to blame them for!).So, I present for your edification, enlightenment and enrichment, the thoughts of Phistophocles: Book TwoBook ThreeEnjoy, and contribute your own favourite philosophies.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


INSTRUCTABLE COMMUNITY! see if one of your instructables can help someone in a developing nation. Building for a good cause!

I saw this website called honeybee, Anyone who likes to solve problems using everyday things or inventing new things. Check this out This is a list of problems people have in developing nations they need help building constructing and recycling tools and machines to help them in there everyday lives, I have read them and i think the inscrutable community could really help there cause. take a look see if you made something that they need. http://www.sristi.org/hbnew/seeking_solution.php video about it http://www.ted.com/talks/anil_gupta_india_s_hidden_hotbeds_of_invention.html here's there about us   WHO ARE WE? Honey Bee Network is a crucible of like-minded individuals, innovators, farmers, scholars, academicians, policy makers, entrepreneurs and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). A Network having presence in more than seventy five countries, what has made Honey Bee Network tight knit and efficiently functional is its philosophy. Honey Bee signifies a philosophy of discourse, which is authentic, accountable and fair. The Network has been woven around three basic ideals. The Network believes that a knowledge system in order to become sustainable has to be both just and fair. Hence, while collecting knowledge from the knowledge holder, the Network has made it a norm to acknowledge the knowledge provider with name and reference, if otherwise not desired by the knowledge provider. This particular practice has come handy in protecting the IPR of the knowledge provider. In the second place, the source of knowledge i.e. in the case of Honey Bee Network, the traditional knowledge holders and grassroots innovators must be acknowledged, if otherwise desired so by the knowledge holders themselves. Finally, any proceed that accrues from the value addition of local traditional knowledge and innovation; a fair and reasonable share must go back to the knowledge holders. These have been the guiding principles of the Network, which are fundamental to the functioning of the network and constitute the major non-negotiable for the Network. WHAT ARE WE DOING? Over the last sixteen years or so, the Honey Bee Network has lived the very spirit of the philosophy that it holds so dearly. Moreover, the actions that have followed the philosophy have grown and matured over a period of time and their trajectory of maturation has been based upon the strong realization of the essence of the philosophy. ‘Honey Bee’ Newsletter, the creative mouthpiece of the network, is published in seven Indian languages (Hindi, Gujarati, Tamil, Kannada, Telugu, Malayalam and Oriya) other than English. The very logic tells that any documentation and dissemination of local and traditional knowledge and innovations in English, certainly connects us globally but alienates locally. Living out the concern, the regional language versions reach out to the thousands grassroots knowledge holders, who otherwise would have been alienated from the benefits of knowledge, they themselves contribute in the first place. Acknowledging the very source of the traditional knowledge, the Honey Bee Newsletter and its regional versions carry stories of the local ingenuity with the consent of the knowledge holder. Another source of acknowledging the local genius has been preparing the database of the traditional knowledge and grassroots innovations and Honey Bee Network, over the last twenty years has documented more than 1,00,000 ideas, innovations and traditional knowledge practices. Honey Bee, true to its metaphor, has been the source of pollination and cross-pollination of ideas, creativity and grassroots genius, without taking away the nectar from the flower for ever.

Topic by LoganMackey   |  last reply


Best tools for Instructables authors? Answered

What should a basic generalist workshop contain?  Say you were starting your workshop from scratch and, knowing what you do now, had to purchase new items to kit out the space. What would you avoid? What would you insist upon?  I'm looking more for general philosophies of tool-buying than outright brand names, but I'll entertain the notion of brand fidelity as a heuristic for purchasing trustworthy tools. I intend to use the answers given here to help purchase prizes for upcoming contests.

Question by wilgubeast   |  last reply


Eyebeam Fellowship Program

Eyebeam, renown for projects such as LED Throwies and The MintyBoost!, is seeking fellows for their 2007/2008 Fellowship program. Fellowships will be offered in the R&D; OpenLab, the Production Lab and the Education Lab. The focus of the Fellowships varies depending on the tools and skills available and the creative objectives and philosophy of each Lab. Up to five Fellowships will be granted for 2007/08.For all of the Fellowships we are seeking applications from artists, hackers, designers, engineers and creative technologists to come to Eyebeam for a year to undertake new research and develop new work. The ideal Fellow has experience working with and making innovative technological art and/or creative technology projects and has a passion for collaborative development. Fellows will bring this experience and working approach to their own independent projects, projects initiated by other Residents or Fellows and projects conceived collaboratively during the Fellowship period.More info here.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Who would a god be without believers?

You could also ask "What would a god be without believers?" (because not all gods are human-like). Lots off people all over the world believe in one or more gods. But what if (and I say if because it isn't very likely) all human beings on this planet would stop believing in there god (or gods)? What or who would a god than be? Would a god than be a funny drawing on a wall or just some guy in a book? Perhaps the new neighbours, the mailman or the birds in your garden were ones your god, until  you stopped believing.  Think, philosophies and give your opinion about this question! I'm curious who or what a god would be without believers according to you.

Topic by theexternaldisk   |  last reply


Upcoming Site Changes!

Hey folks, You may have noticed the new look on our homepage and header - I just want to let you know there are more exciting changes coming! We try to do small site updates about every two weeks, and now that the development team is a bit bigger we'll be able to stick closer to that target schedule. The one constant in a healthy website is change, and our philosophy is to test and modify based on actual results: it's incremental, hypothesis-driven website design of both function and aesthetics.  Lots of small, frequent changes help us evolve the site at a comfortable pace. So stay tuned for new features, design updates, bug fixes, and other good stuff coming your way!  We'll keep working to make Instructables a better place to visit. Christy (and the rest of the Instructables team)

Topic by canida   |  last reply


Collection of books taken to preserve human knowlege

What books file would you take to preserve most of the knowledge of the human race? You have a 64 GB flash drive and durable, waterproof laptop capable of getting power from an hand crank used to view files. What would you put on it? My list: Wikipedia and wikimedia stuff. 10 GB Bible and Collections of various philosophers   Korean, Eastern philosophy and major literature Native American culture and method information Database of major languages, dictionary, and grammar rules Instructables, selected ones Some major works of literature from project Gutenberg Songs from Beatles, Micheal Jackson, Elvis, Queen, ABBA Selected Movies Scientific Data, and other information vital to rebuilding society, such as designs for factories and computer chips.  Pictures of major works of art That's my list, what's yours?

Topic by starwing123   |  last reply


FIRST Robotics Competition

Has anyone heard of the FIRST Robotics Competition? It was started by Dean Kamen. Instead of me repeating what their philosophy is, check out their website: FIRSTI'm on the first team from Nebraska, and this was our rookie year. We just finished up our regional competition in Kansas City, MO, and it was a blast. It is one of the only programs that I have found that encourages involvement in science and technology. The build process is almost similar to an engineering internship.If you happen to be in high school (or not yet there) or you are a professional engineer, electrician, programmer, or hobbyist (basically anyone who uses Instructables!), I strongly encourage you to get involved. Find a team in your area and contact them. There are over 2000 teams in the country, so there may be one near you.If you are already involved, let me know! I am interested in hearing what people have to say.

Topic by intoon   |  last reply


Why participate in Pepsi greenwash?

I don't know about the rest of Instructables community, but I am extremely reluctant to contribute anything to Pepsi's latest (https://www.instructables.com/contest/pepsirefreshproject/)  greenwash campaign, well, anything except criticism. PepsiCo (PEP) is a company that produces semi-addictive, food-like consumables that, in the aggregate, are actually harming people's health. They're also littering the world with PET plastic bottles. Previous Instructables alliances with companies that make tools or building supplies (Black and Decker, Leatherman, Gorilla Glue), these alliances made sense to me since these companies actually make products to help people to build things. PepsiCo is essentially a manufacturer of recreational over-the-counter drugs, similar to beer, liquor, cigarettes.  Thus alliances with entertainment industry (e.g. ball games, car racing, crappy pop musicians) would make sense to me, but not an alliance with Instructables.com, whom I like to think is doing something more noble than just crass, brain-numbing entertainment. If you'd like to see PepsiCo's official explanation of this "Refresh the World" business, but without being tracked by DoubleClick, the direct link is: http://www.refresheverything.com/how-it-works Pepsi says they want to change the world, but I think they just want to sell more soft drinks.  I don't see them as a serious agent for change in the world.  IMHO, the revolution will NOT go better with Pepsi! Update:  Many of people responding to this topic seem to think that I'm lobbying for the prohibition of soft drinks, but this is not my goal. In truth I wish more recreational drugs would be allowed to have the same legal "white market" status that sweetened drinks and snack foods enjoy. The point I was trying to make is that Pepsi is an inappropriate choice for an Instructables alliance because the basic values of the two companies are so different. Pepsi does not embody the DIY (do it yourself) philosophy. Rather the values of PepsiCo are convenience and instant gratification. This is essentially a SEDIFY philosophy (somebody else do it for you), the polar opposite of DIY. The reason I mentioned harm to the heath of people and the planet, is just to demonstrate that Pepsi does have cause to want to improve, or greenwash, their image, which is I suspect the point of their "refresh project", not just pure philanthropy.

Topic by Jack A Lopez   |  last reply


Reduced Instructable Pages!

We need to be able as a community reduce the amount of pages each project uses. This kind of goes against the stub philosophy, but imagine if you could reduce an Instructable to a single page or even multiple projects per page. If not 1, why not 2, or 3? I see some projects that are overwhelming with information at times. This could also add even more features such as un-selecting the steps that you don't need and poof, gone! There is also the potential for yet more ad views (which means everyone wins) with this service | 1. ads on the service page, 2. ads on the finished page. I've been considering this for years in all documentation that I do, how to reduce pages. However, this will be impossible without the staff at Instructables support and willing to adapt and grow. I also know paper is not the issue it used to be, but that isn't exactly the point I'm trying to reach; for instance sometimes more is really too more. Also, I know I'm new but focusing on that goes against my belief in working agile. Hi everyone!

Topic by philandy   |  last reply


It is not advisable to copy the activities shown in this video.

The Modified Toy Orchestra have a philosophy of performing everything live with a collection of re-purposed children’s toys.., converting abandoned playthings into exotic new musical instruments, and then exploring the latent potential and surplus value inherent in these liberated circuits. Guided by this hidden world they seek to make a form of music devoid of personal narrative or autobiography, instead they ask bigger questions about our relationship with “the next new gadget” the desire for the constant upgrade, and the possibilities for problem solutions hidden from our gaze by perceptual habit. The result of this on going investigation has been called cinematic, dark, joyful and life affirming. It is rare to hear an electronic live performance that has no midi, no sampling, no synthesizers, no laptops, in fact no conventional instruments of any kind. MTO have live dates coming up: 8th September at Birmingham Town Hall 10th September at Manchester Bridgewater Hall Hey, what about the title of the topic? Oh, that's from the band's appearance on the BBC website.  After all, these AA batteries are dangerous... Freeno & Olaf from Modified Toy Orchestra on Vimeo.  

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Competitor's lost touch?

So I've known this for awhile and to be honest it doesn't bother me to badly but my Zip series is much more popular than my Competitor series. The first Zip has more views than my first Competitor which has been out for months, but I do realize the philosophy out with the old, in with the new so I could see the original Competitor collecting dust, after all, it doesn't even have a mag lock! Anyway the main reason I'm starting this forum topic is to find out what you like about the Zip series. Has it been the concepts I have been applying in each pump action model? Was it the styling, which was more spontaneous and sci-fi? Maybe it was a hidden preference for the ergonomics of pump action. The truth is, I don't know and I want you knexer's to tell me what you like or dislike about my Zips and Competitors. Using this information I will be able to build a better Competitor or maybe just refocus on building Zip4.

Topic by JonnyBGood   |  last reply


What NOT to do.

Not sure whether this is a contest idea, or just a philosophy, but the idea that we learn more from our mistakes rings true.  Although it might be tediously long at times, I'd kinda like to see some -ibles that include the messy details of attempts that didn't quite work, what was learned, and how. Sometimes tangents xyz come out of an attempt to acheive abc. y'know- the happy accident.  Examples?: I was annoyed with Apple for making a keyboard with light grey lettering on white keys. I like to dim the lights, and am not really a touch typist. So, I photocopied the keyboard, increased contrast, and printed this onto transparent sheet with adhesive backing (available at a photocopy place. Fed-ex, kinkos, i don't recall)  Turns out that the ink on those copies is on the top surface of the plastic. After cutting out my qwerty stickers, I found that the ink wears off the surface.  Not only that, but after peeling the stickers off, the goo remains. (sigh)   So, if u use this technique, put clear tape over the clear photocopy. I just bought a microwave with grey on black keys. I may havta explain to the copyshop why I'm photocopying my microwave. ;) Any other examples?

Topic by Toga_Dan   |  last reply


I know the subject of backpacking as a sub-topic has been broached, however...

I don't, 'camp.' I backpack. There's a clearly distinguishing difference between what most people call camping and what I do. What many do. Most people who camp don't bother to build stuff from cans and twigs and bottle caps to shave grams. Most people who camp don't seek out a murky pond as a possible water source. Most people don't have to dig a cat hole. Most people don't have to hump in gear. For those of us that do, we tend to have a knack for ingenuity, craft, innovation; and style, if it happens. Backpacking is a philosophy -- the study of the art and science of living as comfortably as possible, with as little as is reasonable and as often as possible, in a place that wants to kill you. Camping is a vacation. I recently posted an instructable for an ultralight backpacking kitchen. I posted it for the sake of people who do what I do, not someone who sleeps in an Eddie Bauer sleeping bag on a Coleman double-wide air mattress. Not that there's anything wrong with that... It just ain't my bag of pool balls. It should follow that 'backpacking' be a sub-category of 'camping.'

Topic by chokapi 


Motorcycle Helmets | Motorcycle accessories | helmet stickers | motorcycle decals | sticker printing

Buy Motorcycle Helmets was founded with the commitment to provide Quality Products to the Motorcycle enthusiast. Our philosophy is that true motorcycle enthusiasts only want the best when it comes to their accessories - especially helmets. Unlike our competition, we do not “cut corners” and use cheaper materials to reduce cost because it also lowers quality. We want our customers to be satisfied with their purchase because it makes good business sense. Let us take you through how our helmets are manufactured and you will understand what makes our helmets the BEST! We have best Quality Motorcycle Helmets, Motorcycle helmet, Motorcycle accessories, helmet stickers, motorcycle decals, Custom decals, sticker printing, Custom t-shirts, Paint Protection, Clear Bra, Novelty discount Helmets, Chrome Helmet, Custom Air brush Helmet, Novelty Motorcycle Accessories, Wholesale and Retail Motor Gear

Topic by alexscott97   |  last reply


How much would you sacrifice...

...to do what's right? ...Would you walk everywhere to boycott an unfair bus system? (let's assume we all ride the bus) ...Would you take on the position of leading a movement for democracy in a country that you could could easily be assassinated in for doing it? ...Would you give up everything to fight for what is right? People who have answered yes to questions like these have gotten the modern world to where we are today. People who have answered yes to questions like these are improving the undeveloped world. Would you? If the occasion came that you were best fit to take on a position like Martin Luther King Jr. did, would you accept? I like to think that I would - I hope that I would. --ChaosCampbell put it well: "so... simply put, you are asking; would you stand up for yourself. eve at the sacrifice of your life. I think our world as we know it shows the majority answer of... yesthe question that would bring a majority ... no answer, even if we cannot admit it to ourselves would be; would you be willing to sacrifice everything to resolve an injustice committed against a fellow man, if your sacrifice would bring a group further at the detriment of your own existence. meaning doing nothing would allow you to live a merry life, or sacrificing would allow a larger group to have a better life at your expense"

Topic by Weissensteinburg   |  last reply


"Your Environmentalism Sucks!" Says WIRED

The cover story of WIRED this month has been published online and you can read their 10 "heresies" about the environment. They're clearly trying to shake things up by telling people stuff that sounds so wrong, but is obviously right according to them.The gist of WIRED's philosophy is that it's all about the carbon dioxide emissions and that every discussion should be framed entirely by this. After that setup, each article is a quick hit against some supposedly sacred cow.The full list of articles is below and here's a response from ecogeek that continues the discussion. So what do you think?Live in Cities: Urban Living Is Kinder to the Planet Than the Suburban LifestyleA/C Is OK: Air-Conditioning Actually Emits Less C02 Than HeatingOrganics Are Not the Answer: Surprise! Conventional Agriculture Can Be Easier on the PlanetFarm the Forests: Old-Growth Forests Can Actually Contribute to Global WarmingChina Is the Solution: The People's Republic Leads the Way in Alternative-Energy HardwareAccept Genetic Engineering: Superefficient Frankencrops Could Put a Real Dent in Greenhouse Gas EmissionsCarbon Trading Doesn't Work: Carbon Credits Were a Great Idea, But the Benefits Are IllusoryEmbrace Nuclear Power: Face It. Nukes Are the Most Climate-Friendly Industrial-Scale Form of EnergyUsed Cars - Not Hybrids: Don't Buy That New Prius! Test-Drive a Used Car InsteadPrepare for the Worst: Climate Change Is Inevitable. Get Used to ItCounterpoint: Dangers of Focusing Solely on Climate Change

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


Off To College

Greetings fellow iblers! Well, the summer has come to a rapid close, and in 4 days (!!!) I am going to be off to the University of Rhode Island, studying the arts of Mechanical Engineering, Philosophy, and the Spanish language.   First off, I want to thank this awesome community (new members and old) for an awesome 4 year experience.  Despite some drawbacks, this is a community that has greatly matured as mechanical designers, and more importantly, as members of a team, throughout the years, and I am proud to have been a part of it.  Now, although I won't have access to K'nex, I will have access to a computer, to a pencil and paper, and to the resources that will strengthen and broaden my understanding of mechanical functions.  This is not goodbye quite yet.  I will still be very active among the community with comments and plan to continue my "Guide to the next generation of K'nex Guns" as long as I can find the time.  I will also be thinking up new mechanisms and concepts (that's going to be my job in college anyways) and will post designs as much as I can.  And who knows, I might just surprise you guys with something over Christmas break. *hint hint* I am going to try and get instructions up for my improved Kinno-2 within the next couple days.  It now holds 8 shots, has a locking mag release, and will feature a much better bullet mag, so keep an eye out for it. Again, thanks to everybody who has made this such a great experience, and while my methods may change a bit, I will keep working to engineer a stronger community, no matter where I may find myself!

Topic by Kinetic   |  last reply


Tim Anderson

Meet Tim Anderson! He's the co-founder of Z-Corp 3D printers, host of the Know How Show, author of the Heirloom Technology column in MAKE magazine, and the most prolific Instructables author with 222 projects and counting! So, besides teaching you how to get a free yacht and how to fly a hydrofoil, what is Tim doing for the betterment of humanity?  Here's how he describes it in his profile: Tim's philosophy involves building minimum-consumption personal infrastructure from recycled scavenged materials.  Redirecting the waste stream.  Doing much with little.  A reverse peace-corps to learn from poor people all over the world. In practice, this means traveling the world documenting traditional Pacific Island sailing canoes, collecting handy tricks from Australia, Guatemala, Indonesia, and the US, and teaching us how to repair or reuse almost anything.  (When you're done with the Handy Tricks series, check out his Instructable showing How Not To.)   You can also learn how to move a tree, or keep an old truck running. He's a believer in Garbage Santa, who leaves "trash" treats for creative people to find and repurpose, and can do almost anything with recycled bike innertubes.  He's also an enthusiastic sailor, bicyclist, and kiter who builds all of his own equipment - check out his ice gear in this video: So, are you inspired yet?  Do you believe in Garbage Santa?  And which Tim Anderson project are you most likely to try? This post has been sponsored by Pepsi. The Pepsi Refresh Project celebrates the people, businesses, and non-profits with ideas that will have a positive effect on our world.

Topic by canida   |  last reply


A convention, festival, fair, thing. Please read.

Hello, I've never put anything on the forums before, but I really want to get my idea out there if I can't make it.   I have this idea for something like a convention, fair, etc.  However it will be full of classes, and talking areas, I want it to be cheap and for all ages and backgrounds.   Each booth will be a class, they'll be able to talk/teach about anything: physics, folklore, robotics, animation, painting, dog training, baking, history, biology, ghosts, philosophy, anything!  You can go to these classes and take notes, if you find out you hate the subject or teacher you can leave to go to another class.  In the talking areas you can trade notes, share your own ideas, or just chill out.  I want most of the classes to be free (If a teacher charges money then they need to be the ones to keep people out) but they can charge for materials,(like a CD with references, or a program they use, or a book) or products,(like a cake they just baked, or a drawing they drew) or you can give them donations, and they can give you a business card if they have classes outside of the place.  You may have to organize the booths by loudness, or maturity (with the teachers being able to teach anything, some classes might be bad for kids to see.)  I don't know what this event would be called, it's not quite a convention, or festival, or school, It could happen indoors or out.  This is my main issue; I don't know if I would need permits for it, or what else I should get for it (also I'm broke).  I've been researching for a few weeks now, and I have a few ideas, but incase I fail then maybe someone on here can do it.  Thank you for reading.

Topic by WanderThroughGore   |  last reply


&quot;Unextract&quot; Converted Batch Files

Have you ever wondered how to do something in batch that someone has already done and wrapped it nicely in a little .exe file? Some people like to keep their batch programming secrets to themselves, and don't want to share, so then convert their batch file to .exe. But you can't discover their secrets if they have converted it to .exe, because all you will find is gibberish. Before I will tell you how to "unextract" an .exe, you must now how ".bat to .exe" programs work. What they basically do is "wrap" a batch file with an executable; think about a Christmas present. Pretend the gift inside is the secrets of the batch file, and the wrapping on the outside is like the executable, which prevents you from "seeing" the secrets inside. But this is no ordinary present, the wrapping on the outside can not be torn or opened, you must press a button in order to to "unwrap" it. But when it "unwraps", it shows you what it is, but hiding the secrets. If you couldn't fully understand that, here is what actually happens. Try to compare the two.Batch files in executable form cannot be viewed as the batch language. If you open it in notepad, you will get a whole bunch of symbols. In the philosophy above, pressing the "button" is the same as opening the file as an executable. It opens just like a batch file, but if you try to edit it, you won't be able to read it. What the executable does, is temporarily extracts the batch file within it, to a temp folder.Now to the "how to" part. Here is where that "temp" (temporary) folder is: %userprofile%\Local Settings\TempNow all you have to do is copy and paste that into a windows explorer address bar. You will now be in a temp folder where the batch file will be dumped. Now you have to run the .exe file. But now you do have to get your hands dirty (virtually!). Search in each folder till you find a batch file, most commonly called batchfile.bat. Simply right click, press edit, and your in!So that's how to "unextract" a converted batch file! (note: I didn't make it an instructible because, well, no one likes a one step instructable!)Good Luck!

Topic by Arbitror   |  last reply


Make Your Own Fuel from Wine

Mark Armstrong's Alternative Fuel PhilosophyIf you don't like the vehicle or the fuel it drinks, make some of your ownIt's on every billboard, bumpersticker and street placard: Let's Green This City! Urban Streets Greening Project! Each election ushers in new green initiatives, task forces, and elementary school awareness fairs. Another press conference, another earthy guy in an organic-cotton denim shirt and red Crocs stands in front of City Hall pointing an accusatory finger at the uninspired plebes who won't join us, who won't dare follow San Francisco on the righteous path toward a greener tomorrow.Meanwhile, eco-conscious drivers can't get a drop of biodiesel in city limits, while Berkeley, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa and other surrounding cities offer it at public pumps. (In June 2007, city authorities closed the San Francisco Biodiesel Co-op, for - get this - having too many members.) Not one public pump in San Francisco sells ethanol. The few electric car-charging stations that remain are defunct, rundown or hidden in corners of musty garages, forgotten relics of a well-intentioned but poorly executed past. Our performance so far in fostering alternative fuels - the keystone of the green movement - is not just ironic; it's shameful."You know the easiest job in the world is to be a cynic," says Mark Armstrong, lifting his head from the hood of an electric-powered 1980 Plymouth Horizon. "In order to be successful you have to do absolutely nothing." Armstrong brushes his oily hands against his oily jeans and walks to the back of a cavernous concrete-floored warehouse, through a maze of Frankensteinian inventions: an electrolyzer that splits hydrogen and oxygen fuel, junky gas cars that run on golf-cart batteries, gutted petrol engines that gulp alcohol and a Mercedes motor that bakes bread and spits out edible olive oil."What I'm trying to do here is teach people to quit complaining about what they can't get," he adds, pushing his 6-foot-2-inch frame beneath a gutted 1976 Porsche 914 that he and his students are converting to a hydrolic hybrid. "I say if we really want alternative fuel vehicles, let's get off the couch and start making them."Step 1: Build a Carmore

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Throwies reimagined - Really I did tried :) :| :/

Seeing other forms of making interactive throwies, eg using microchips impresses me.However i think it is important that we try parts of the B.E.A.M philosophyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BEAM_roboticsNamely keeping things simple, and avoiding the use of microprocessor.The component of a interactive throwie is that it has1. Power storage2. Trigger3. Circuit4. LED5. (optional) Power collection of radiant energy.I like to see more suggestion on ways we can address each issues.But to kick start the issue, can you see if my idea is feasible.essentially for my prototype not-yet throwie, I used a circuit from http://unconventional-airsoft.com/2003/11/16/momentary-fan-switch/#more-21to create a throwie that on sensing motion, doesn't flicker but turns on for a while.By ensuring that i use few and simple componants, i hope to keep cost per throwing down.Unfortunately my problem is that using a resistor to keep the capacitor from draining too fast from the base, actually decreases the voltage drop to an unacceptable level at the led.On my end it is unsolvable for the moment. Maybe you can work out how to make a cheap throwie, that can still do these functions or more.Any ideas how to solve this?Other Ideas for throwies1.Open and attach a switch to a barometer, to have a air presser passive trigger.2. A leave shaped pad with two conductors that do not touch, to act as rain sensors. (Resistance increase when leaf dries)3. Is sensitive to infrared radiation from side, so that the throwie is trigger-able by other activated throwies. (As well infrared devices)4. Has a short loop of coil to recharged capacitors, by outside induction.5. If activated rarely, uses a tiny single solar cell to charge capacitor.6. Has a hook to be easily collected for recycling. (Using a simple loop of wire on a pole [Like a dog catcher pole] )7. A single thermistors in series with led.8. A tricolour LED, and a Two light resistor. One LDR acts to sense if it is day an night, if night a low power light is activated. Only when an object strays near, and reflect light into another LDR, does the throwie get triggered at all.9. A throwie triggered by vibration.10. A throwie that responds to radio waves.

Topic by akimbo m   |  last reply


Thin edge of the wedge in Texan education?

Any Texans out there? Did you know what (revisionist?) plans were afoot in your education system? Even as a panel of educators laid out a vision Wednesday for national standards for public schools, the Texas school board was going in a different direction, holding hearings on changes to its social studies curriculum that would portray conservatives in a more positive light, emphasize the role of Christianity in American history and include Republican political philosophies in textbooks. There have also been efforts among conservatives on the board to tweak the history of the civil rights movement. One amendment states that the movement created “unrealistic expectations of equal outcomes” among minorities. Another proposed change removes any reference to race, sex or religion in talking about how different groups have contributed to the national identity. - A greater emphasis on “the conservative resurgence of the 1980s and 1990s.” - A reduced scope for Latino history and culture. - Changes in specific terminology. Terms that the board’s conservative majority felt were ideologically loaded are being retired. (The new recommendations stress the need for favorable depictions of America’s economic superiority across the board.) - A more positive portrayal of Cold War anticommunism. Disgraced anticommunist crusader Joseph McCarthy, the Wisconsin senator censured by the Senate for his aggressive targeting of individual citizens and their civil liberties on the basis of their purported ties to the Communist Party, comes in for partial rehabilitation. - Language that qualifies the legacy of 1960s liberalism. Great Society programs such as Title IX—which provides for equal gender access to educational resources—and affirmative action, intended to remedy historic workplace discrimination against African-Americans, are said to have created adverse “unintended consequences” in the curriculum’s preferred language. - Thomas Jefferson no longer included among writers influencing the nation’s intellectual origins. Jefferson, a deist who helped pioneer the legal theory of the separation of church and state, is not a model founder in the board’s judgment. ... Heavy emphasis is also to be placed on the founding fathers having been guided by strict Christian beliefs. - Excision of recent third-party presidential candidates Ralph Nader (from the left) and Ross Perot (from the centrist Reform Party). - A recommendation to include country and western music among the nation’s important cultural movements. The popular black genre of hip-hop is being dropped from the same list. None of these proposals has met with final ratification from the board—that vote will come in May, after a prolonged period of public comment on the recommendations. Still, the conservatives clearly feel like the bulk of their work is done; after the 120-page draft was finalized last Friday, Republican board member Terri Leo declared that it was "world class" and "exceptional." First paragraphs from New York Times Headline paragraphs from Yahoo News It occurs to me that it may be appropriate for some members to have a rather forceful word with their elected representatives - at all levels - about the damage these proposals will cause in the American education system...

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Giant Robot Architecture Talk by Greg Lynn in Berkeley

Here is an interesting talk from the Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium of the Berkeley Center for New Media...Giant Robot ArchitectureGreg Lynn, UCLA & Angewandte, ViennaMonday, Feb 4, 7:30-9:00pm- Note Special Location: Berkeley Art Museum Theater- Enter on Dwight Ave: http://bampfa.berkeley.edu/visit/visitor- Lecture is free and open to the publicAbstractRobots. In my office, my staff keeps asking for more new machines, and every time I get a new machine, I fire two or three people. By extrapolation, in the next few years I will be sitting in an office by myself with a bunch of robots. We have is a very large CNC (computer numerically controlled) cutting machine, a laser cutter, a 3d printer, and soon we will have a robotic articulated arm. All of these things let us do studies of models, which are very important to architects, but what they also let us do is learn machine language. We spend more and more time talking to machines; speaking their language. It is very easy for us to go to any country that has an automobile industry or an aircraft industry and give their machines instructions and do things with these large machines at an architectural scale that is very perfunctory and affordable. The spread of machine language and programming is more significant than the Anglicization of the world. Learning to talk to robots is very important to my field of design.Speaker BioGreg Lynn is a leading pioneer at the intersection of computing, design, and architecture. His architectural designs have been exhibited in both architecture and art museums including the 2000 Venice Biennale of Architecture where he represented the United States in the American Pavilion. His work is in the permanent collections of CCA, SFMoMA, and MoMA and has been exhibited at the Pompidou, Beyeler, Cooper Hewitt, MAK, MoCA, NAI,Carnegie, ICA and Secession museums among others. In addition to his architectural work, his Alessi "Supple"Mocha Cups and his Vitra "Ravioli" Chair are in production and have been inducted into the Museum of Modern Art's Permanent Collection. He received the American Academy of Arts & Letters Architecture Award in 2003. In 2002, he left his position as the Professor of Spatial Conception and Exploration at the ETHZ (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich) and became an Ordentlicher University Professor at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna.He is studio professor of Architecture at UCLA and the Davenport Visiting Professor at Yale University. Greg Lynn holds degrees in architecture and philosophy and received an Honorary Doctorate degree from the Academy of Fine Arts &Design; in Bratislava. In 2001, Time Magazine named him one of 100 of the most innovative people in the world for the 21st century. In 2005, Forbes Magazine named him one of the ten most influential living architects.http://www.glform.comMore info on the colloquium here.

Topic by noahw 


How to Go to Maker Heaven

Dear Pier 9, You are a place like no other, and I’m so glad you came into my life.  I was a full time Artist in Residence at the Pier for 4 months, and I doubt I have ever been so simultaneously intellectually stimulated, inspired and intimidated at any other point.  When I came to the Pier I had been living in New York for 8 years, and I had just decided to make a permanent migration back to my homeland on the West Coast.  I’d heard rumors about the rampant culture of innovation in the Bay Area, but I was still totally unprepared for the explosion of creative energy and excitement that is the nerdy artist heaven called Pier 9. Maybe I’m just getting older and less jaded… but in the last few years, I have felt a change in the world, a shift in attitude from angst to optimism, from critique to creation, and I think places like the Pier exemplify this new positive force.  The fact that a multinational corporation like Autodesk has allocated a significant amount of resources to giving the imaginations of a bunch of madcap inventors, artists, engineers and other creatives free reign in a beautiful lab with a bunch of cutting edge machines… well, to me that says good things about the direction of the world.  But what really makes the Pier special, I think, is the fact that all the creativity taking place there is fundamentally motivated by the philosophy of Instructables; by the idea that knowledge should be shared.  I have never encountered a group of people so willing to share their ideas and skills, and so excited to help make other people’s dreams a reality.  And the feeling was really infectious!  Everyone was so ridiculously helpful, that on the rare occasion I had the opportunity to teach someone else a skill, it felt like a treat. That’s not to say that my experience at the Pier was all sunshine and roses.  It was exhausting and draining, and very ego challenging.  When I first arrived I was incredibly overwhelmed by all the new information I was intaking.  I had projects in mind, but those ideas were quickly swept away in the tide of new ideas that arose with every fascinating technology, and possibility I encountered.  Having nearly unlimited options can be paralyzing, and I fell pray to this paralysis many times at the Pier.  One of the pitfalls of having so many amazing minds in one place is that someone always has a new idea that will either revolutionize the project you are working on, or cause you to completely change direction and start working on something new.  That can be great, but if you aren’t careful it can cause acute artistic ADD. I think most creative journeys have a similar arc.  When you are learning new skills, it can take a while for the quality of the work you are producing to catch up with your creative vision.  I definitely felt that way at the Pier.  During my time there, my work ended up going on a journey from two dimensions to three dimensions.  I started out by experimenting with laser cutting.  I am a costume designer, and was interested in creating a wearable mechanical flower that would illuminate and open and close in response to its environment.  My first attempts to create this form felt very flat and lifeless to me, so I stepped away from the flower project and focused on figuring out how to create something much more three dimensional with the two dimensional process of laser cutting.  The result was a costume constructed from laser cut leather and el wire.  After that I decided I was ready to tackle 3D modeling and 3D printing, so I went back to my flower idea, and spent the rest of my time at the Pier testing and developing this form.  It was a really new and interesting process, 3D modeling and prototyping with the amazing Objet printers.  It also gave me the chance to work closely with two other awesome Artists in Residence, Paolo Salvagione and JoeJoe Martin.  It really underlined for me that the most important resource at the Pier is the people.  No matter how many incredible machines you have under one roof, they are only as good as the minds running them.  Noah Weinstein and the other amazing innovators who run the Pier have done such an incredible job of gathering together a diverse, brilliant, exciting, and truly kind-hearted group of people… the place practically buzzes with welcoming creative energy as soon as you walk through the door.  Also, putting relatively self-actualized creators in an environment where there are so many options and resources results in some incredibly interesting glimpses into individual human passion and curiosity.  I might not have fully understood why some of my fellow AiRs were so fascinated by stacking tetrahedrons, drawing graphically detailed pictures of intestinal parasites, or creating physical bodies for virtual bots, but witnessing each artist’s commitment to their singular pursuit was in itself a fascinating and beautiful experience. So much of our lives are spent trying to make practical things happen, it’s an rare opportunity to get to spend a dedicated amount of time just exploring the potential of creative ideas.  I really think that is what Pier 9 is about, providing a place that nurtures our human desire to create, explore and learn… with a kick ass set of resources to facilitate that exploration.  Honestly, during my time there I wish I had been able to let go and enjoy that process more.  It’s not always easy to escape the concepts of deadlines and expectations, but sometimes freeing yourself from those constraints is the only way to create anything truly new.  I very much believe that what is growing at Pier 9 is a new and exciting kind of creative ecosystem, and I hope it will inspire the creation of many more similar environments.  I feel incredibly lucky to have gotten a chance to be an explorer on the frontiers of Maker Land.  Thank you so much Noah and Vanessa.

Topic by MikaelaHolmes   |  last reply