Making Photographic Film

Hi, how could I make photographic film at home without using chemicals or substances like silver halide crystals,potassium dichromate etc. as the sensitizer solution. Does anybody know of a more natural replacement? .

Question by bendow1 


Developing Pinhole Film?

So i want to put peices of 35 mm film that i cut into pinhole camera to take photographs. Would this work? And if it does, how can i get them developed? is there any way i can do it myself without any fancy equipment?

Question by Brockley 


Handmade Nation Film

Buying local for many means buying handmade objects that are designed and fabricated with ingenuity, grit and love. Handmade Nation documents a movement of artists, crafters and designers that imbue traditional handiwork techniques with a punky do-it-yourself ethos informed by modern aesthetics, politics, feminism and art. The film explores the burgeoning art community of indie crafters that is fueled by creativity, determination and networking. First-time director Faythe Levine traveled the U.S. to capture the tight-knit community, conducting interviews in the studios and homes of noted and independent artists. Levine also details how Web sites, blogs and online stores have spurred a once underground movement and how crafts have expanded to connect with the greater public through boutiques, galleries and fairs.Following the screening there will be a discussion with Lisa Congdon, owner of retailer Rare Device; Derek Fagerstrom, Craft and DIY Co-editor at design*sponge and co-owner of The Curiosity Shoppe; Natalie Zee Drieu, Senior Editor of Craft magazine; and Stephanie Syjuco, fine artist and professor.Selling their work will be the following artists and vendors: Dutch Door Press, Diana Fayt, Cara Lyndon, Miss Natalie, Mittenmaker, Nous Savons, Sharon Spain, Woolly Hoodwinks, Zum, The Curiosity Shoppe, Little Otsu, Needles & Pens and Rare Device.March 11, 2009, 7:30 pmMezzanine, San Francisco, CAPhotographed by Micaela O'Herlihy. (65 min)Tickets are $8 for SFFS members and $12 for non-membersHandmade Nation San Francisco Film Society

Topic by noahw   |  last reply


Help With Film to Digital Conversion

Could someone tell me how to photograph negatives, and then process them into positive images? This is the best I can do, and when I invert the colors, it does not look right. (Ctrl-Alt-Cmd-8 on a mac) Any help would be appreciated, preferably with camera settings rather than computer adjustments. Second image is original print, I would prefer not to have to get expensive prints.

Topic by ItsTheHobbs   |  last reply


what do i need to know to photograph pictures or objects in black light?

Certain type of film? exposure time?

Question by sherkahn666   |  last reply


The Coronet Midget - 'Not as long as a cigarette'

The last few weeks I've been helping my colleague sell some items before he retires. Yesterday he gave me this as a thank you.This tiny film camera is from the 1930's, its a great example of early plastics (Bakelite). At the time they came in 7 different colours, its just like the iPod all over again! You can see how small the item is from the photographs (usb/penny to show size).The main sales line for the camera was,Its not as long as a cigarette Which at the time was the main pocket sized item you would compare something to.The camera itself took a 16mm photographic paper, and its lens could focus from anything from 5ft - infinity. Included in the images is one of the original leaflets selling the camera in the US (points to whom can pick out the physical impossability).Also included is a PDF of the original manual that I found images for on the internet then cleaned up and pushed through quark.Now, you might be asking yourself, what is gmjhowe going to do with it? Well, I intend to use it as its meant to be used. So Ive ordered myself some 120 camera paper (which can be cut down to the 16mm paper I need.) along with some chemicals.No doubt I will put up an instructable for it! My aim is to carry it around everywhere, so as to catch that artistic photo. Of course I will make it a nice little leather case to protect it, the item itself is valued at about £70!Anyone got any suggestions? Or, is anyone else into B&W; photography and want to share there thought/advice?

Topic by gmjhowe   |  last reply


Does anyone still use 35MM film?

Does anyone still use 35mm film, or is it dead? I find shooting with film is enjoyable. I was out today photographing what insects i could find with my 35MM SLRs. I used both a Minolta MAXXUM SPxi and a Canon EOS Rebel G, both with 80MM lenses. Used 400 speed film. Coencidentaly, while looking through a local bookstore today, i found a copy of "pocket guide to 35MM photography" By kodak for 50 cents.

Topic by ScubaSteve   |  last reply


Making a Micro Film Camera / Burner Answered

I'd like to get a roll of 16mm silver emulsion camera film and then transfer a HEAP of digitised documents to it for storage in hard copy, in the micro film format. I know how to do it, but doing it is a different thing. In fact I'd like to make the whole system, from scanning on a desk top scanner, and or, perhaps photographing documents directly. I'd like to be able to record digitised documents onto film and film to digitised documents. But the real need is to convert scanned in documents to microfilm - so we can forget the rest for the time being. I'd like to do just the conversion of digital documents to microfilm - but on the cheap, and I'd be prepared to compromise a bit of speed and other factors as long as the imagry was up to a reasonably high standard for documents. I will read up and contact these people and Kodak etc.. but I am also looking to improvise as I am on a limited budget and I guess it's really a case of finding a USB type projector with the lighting and the lensing that instead of putting it up on the big screen, shrinks the image to fit in a frame on 16mm film. That may require specialist imaging equipment, parts and very accurate adjustment. So if anyone knows how to do this on the cheap, it would be appreciated. Here is the more or less cashed up way of getting it all done, this covers it in a nutshell: http://imagescan.com/daw/index.htm Digital Document Archival to Microfilm    The Digital Revolution Digital imaging has revolutionized document management. Imaged documents occupy almost no physical space, can be easily secured, searched for content, or made centrally accessible to an office PC. With a proper backup schedule, digital documents can be safely stored for years. Digital Memory Loss Digital documents also introduce a number of new problems. Hardware, encoding and software obsolescence loom over any digital collection. Obsolete hardware can prevent access to the data itself. Digital document also require software to read, interpret and render documents in a meaningful way. Your ability to manipulate your documents could be tied to a proprietary file encoding which leave you few options if the software company goes out of business. Even migrating from one system to another creates the possibility of data loss. Digital Archival to Microfilm How do you save your digital documents from potential oblivion? Simple; convert them to microfilm. Microfilm has been a mainstay of librarians for the last century. Documents are eye-readable and have a shelf life of at least 500 years. Compare that to CD's which degrade after as few as 5 years or hard drives and DAT tapes that can degauss after only 20 years. With our digital archival services, you can have the best of both worlds; Instant access and long-term storage. Benefits of Digital Archival:     Eye readable with simple magnification     Archival longevity     Easily re-digitized http://imagescan.com/canon/dr5060f/dr5060_whitepaper.pdf info@imagescan.com

Question by Wroger-Wroger   |  last reply


Lomography on the hay-penny?

Does anyone have an ideas or instructables about lomography on the cheap side? Or techniques for creating artsy, interesting, experimental photographs with a 35mm film or a digital slr?

Topic by iamthemargerineman   |  last reply


Eye-fi Eye Films now a Thanksgiving contest prize

Instructables just received some beta Eye-fi Eye-Film cards. These amazing little devices are SD-memory-card-shaped packages that go in your camera and wirelessly upload images. Right now, the awesome people at Eye-fi have a few of the major photo-sharing and photo-storing sites integrated with their service.I took a picture of numberandom in the shop, and before I got back to my computer, the image had been uploaded here to my Flickr account, geo tagged, and placed on a map. Holy cow that's awesome! Now, I will admit that right now the integration with Instructables is quite lacking (I had to download the image in this post from Flickr and reupload it to Instructables!). However, I'm sure everyone can see the direction this wonderful piece of hardware moves us in -- one step closer to the Memex! "One can now picture a future investigator in his laboratory. His hands are free, and he is not anchored. As he moves about and observes, he photographs and comments." More here and here.In the near future, you'll be able to just take pictures and have them automatically appear on the web ready for use. Anyone remember developing film pictures (and maybe scanning them)? Hopefully, uploading will soon go the same way. We have three of these that we're giving away as Grand Prizes for the Thanksgiving contest. So, if you want to take your documenting and picture taking to the next level, you'll really need to take Thanksgiving to the next level.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Prop Building Guidebook

I have a new book out that should be of interest to prop makers, cosplayers, and anyone else interested in learning more about this type of fabrication. The Prop Building Guidebook covers materials and methods such as carpentry, metal work and welding, plastics, molding and casting, sculpting, fabric and sewing, painting and more, along with safety procedures, shop setup, planning and budgeting. At 383 pages, with over 575 color photographs and illustrations, it is the most comprehensive guide to prop building ever published, and it does so using professionally-produced props from well-known films and theatre productions. Nonetheless, it presents techniques usable for all skill levels and budgets. The book's webpage, http://www.propbuildingguidebook.com, has information on where you can buy it (you can get it online at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and most other major online retailers). The website also has how-to videos and bonus chapters, all of which is free to view and read even if you do not buy the book.

Topic by Eric Hart 


I work event photography and can't get people to stop photographing the kiosks w/camera phones Any ideas? LED? Software?

There must be something someone can come up with. I can't police every screen. It's hurting business by @20% let alone what the economy is doing to me. I use touchscreens for some systems and laptop screens for others so It must be universal. Some kind of anti photo film? would probably affect the touchscreen? Please help. Thank you for your ideas.

Question by jhelmphotos   |  last reply


Secret To Slithering Is In The Scales

Secret To Slithering Is In The ScalesTalk of the Nation, June 12, 2009 -- How do snakes slither on smooth surfaces? Mechanical engineer David Hu, of Georgia Tech, filmed snakes slithering up inclines, outfitted them in jackets and photographed them through jello to better understand snake locomotion. The researchers published the study in the early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week.NPR's video that accompanies the article has some amazingly fun shots of snakes slithering in place on surfaces too smooth for them get any traction.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Alternative Photography Project

I am currently in the Advanced Photography class at my high school. One of the assigned projects is simply titled "Alternative Photographic Technique." Basically, we have to create an image without using 35mm film (not digital, either). The specific techniques that he recommends are:Photogram-arranging objects directly on the photo paper, without using a camera at allHolga- The teacher has a few Holga cameras with 120 film for class use to take artistically lousy imagesPinhole Camera- If you don't know what this is, you probably can't answer my question anyway.Cyanotype- a special emulsion is painted on watercolor paper, then exposed in sunlight under a large transparency. Search "cyanotype" to see what it is.Polaroid image transfer- an image taken with a Polaroid Two-Step camera is transferred from the film to watercolor paper-looks cool, but expensiveCan anyone suggest other interesting ideas? I'd like to keep it simple and inexpensive, and I have to have 8"x10" total printed image.Weissensteinburg? Are you there?Edit 5-12-08: I have printed some 5x7s with my cool new technique. I matted them today, and I turn them in on Thursday.

Topic by CameronSS   |  last reply


Lomography Konstructor - World's First 35mm DIY SLR

Analogue photographers rejoice! Today, Lomography is proud to announce the world's first 35mm do-it-yourself SLR camera, the Konstructor. Demystify the inner workings of a SLR camera by building the Konstructor yourself. Assembly takes about an hour, and can be customized with fun stickers after to personalize your new camera. Not just a simple kit, the Konstructor boasts different shooting modes, a tripod, and an uncoupled shutter release to easily produce multiple exposures. The Konstruktor produces wonderfully sharp and vibrant photos which capture the joyful essence of photography. "Through the fantastically fun process of assembling this beautiful machine, you’ll learn the essence of photography and be able to shoot wonderfully sharp and vibrant analogue photos. It’s time to take the next step on your exciting photographic adventure and boost your creativity to the max." TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS 35mm (135) Film Detachable 50mm f/10 Lens Shutter Speed: 1/80s with multiple exposures Focus Distance: 0.5m – Infinity Dimensions: 121 × 33 × 65mm Ready to get your own and start building? Head over to Lomography!

Topic by lomography   |  last reply


Solar Filter for Telescopes

Having seen some predictions of increased solar activity over the next two years, I decided to make a filter so I can check it out with my trusty telescope. To start out, I constructed the rig shown in photo A, and practiced with it by cutting disks of plain glass. Make a table like that in photo C so you can make a continuous score on the glass, without stopping. Put oil on the wheel of the grass cutter. Be sure that the surface you work on is flat. You can skip this if you want a square filter. After scoring, your glass should look like that in photo B, with a uniform and even cut. Next, put the scored glass on a soft surface like a mouse pad, with the scored surface wetted with water and face down. Press on the back of the score with a dull nail to start a crack. By continual pressing you can watch the crack propagate all the way around. Then, make 8 radial scores from the circle to the edge of the glass and propagate those cracks in the same manner as the disk. When you do it right, you get a result like photo D, where the pieces were separated for illustration. When you get good at this with regular glass, you can cut the mirror into a disk. With the mirror, you score the glass on the side that has the metal coating. Or, you can just cut the mirror in a square instead of a circle. Photo E shows an uncut and a finished cut mirror. The mirror came out of the back of a discarded projection TV. Some of the mirrors are plastic films, some are second surface, some are first surface glass but the metal coating is too thin. There are many variations, but you need to find a first surface glass mirror that reduces the light level by 12 stops (as measured by a LunaPro SBC light meter). Photographically, this is like reducing the light level from F1.4 to F64. This level of light reduction will be hard to find. WARNING: Use of a mirror with a thin reflective coating can result in eye damage if used to view the sun through a telescope. I have access to a smaller commercial filter to use as a guide. This filter produced a bright blue image of the sun, so I added a red filter at the eyepiece. This combination produced a normal yellow image of the sun. There were no significant sunspots visible, so I didn’t bother taking any pictures. The Filter is mounted to a screw-in lens cap.

Topic by ShutterBugger   |  last reply


Still More DIY Open Studios in Sheboygan!

Fabulous DIY Open Studios continue at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. The open studios are part of our continuing series of Do-It-Yourself (DIY) program series. Ages 13 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. Cost: $5.00For more information, visit http://www.jmkac.org/DIY.Enjoy a fall Saturday making art, browsing our intriguing exhibitions, walking through our colorful gardens and taking a break with a delicious meal or drink in our ARTcafe. We are located within walking distance of some great shops and pubs in downtown Sheboygan, plus just blocks away from the beautiful Lake Michigan beach.Saturday, September 20, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.Workshop: MYOB (Make Your Own Bag) Open StudioLocation: John Michael Kohler Arts Center, SheboyganBetz White, artist and author of Warm Fuzzies: 30 Sweet Felted Projects, recycles wool sweaters to create felted pillows, baby blankets, felt-covered journals, bags, and more. She is passionate about recycling, specifically of plastic bags. In the open studio, White will teach participants to make reusable bags using an endless variety of recycled materials including plastic disposable bags, sweaters, sheets, jeans, juice pouches, Tyvec mailers, vinyl banners, and anything else participants have on hand. See the photo of White's You Know...For Kids bag made of Capri Sun drink pouches.Saturday, October 4, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.Workshop: Handmade Nation Embroidery/Applique Open StudioLocation: John Michael Kohler Arts Center, SheboyganPhotographer, entrepreneur, artist, and prominent figure in the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) ethic indie craft movement, Faythe Levine will share her unique embroidery/applique techniques along with her savvy marketing skills and knowledge of the emerging self-reliant movement during her residency. A twenty-minute preview of her film Handmade Nation: The Rise of DIY Art, Craft, and Design, will be featured at the open studio and a discussion session on how to market your newfound DIY talents. Saturday, October 18, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.Workshop: T.O.M.T. (The Other Man's Treasure) Open StudioLocation: John Michael Kohler Arts Center, SheboyganArtist Rodney Allen Trice created T.O.M.T. with the vigilante mission to recover and reassign the purpose of objects considered too difficult to recycle. This open studio gives you the opportunity to save your own trashed or forgotten objects or anything else you might throw away or overlook in your garages, pantries, and other storage spaces, and give them new life. See the photo of Trice's Tri-Bulb Hoover Floor Lamp.For more information, phone the Arts Center at (920) 458-6144. See you soon!

Topic by Kohler Arts Center 


Circus Tent

Greetings again, Sorry I didn't photograph all I went through to create this miniature circus tent that is my stage for a movie I'm making. It was a difficult project as i work without any idea of how it would work. I just knew that I wanted it to look like what one would think a circus tent would look like. I can give descriptions of how I made it: The tent material is kite fabric that I bought online from kitebuilders.com. I also bought two rolls of double face tape from them. There is the cheap one that worked great for piecing the tent pieces together and one that costs about $16 that I used to add in the roping that ties fabric to the tent poles. For the tent main support poles I bought 2 3' pieces of 1/2" aluminum from Home Despot. Here's how it went together: I made two semi-circle pieces out of triangle pieces of red and yellow fabric. The main tent poles are embedded in a 1" piece of flake board. In order to hold up the tent while I pieced other parts to it I made two circles of 1/4" board with 1/2" holes drilled so they would slip over the aluminum pole and held them up with clamps until I got them to the proper height. The tent towers cam next. These were made with smaller triangle pieces to make a full circle. As the top of the tower would be holding up the entire structure so I used a 2" metal ring at the top. To attach I cut slices at the top and folded them over ring and used the double face tape to secure. So now I've got the two ends of the tent and the two towers but nothing is holding them together. And there is still the center section that has to be made. My next step was to add tent poles at the corners and other strategic positions. I jury rigged all connections with paper clamps, tape and what ever else I could thing of to hold the thing together long enough to force fit. From here I did a rough markup of where I thought the tie down roping should be. I then used some cotton rope (3/16" approx). Once again, simple slices in fabric turned under and held together with dbl face tape worked. I must say I worked through three different ways of doing this until I got something that worked. I left a lot of extra rope between the arcs so I could attach to the tent poles. These poles are just pieces of 5/8" dowels. The towers and the main tent pieces were also connected with dbl face tape. I made two circle frames out of 1/16" steel cable (@ 10 cents a foot) and used a swedge connector on each. This gave me a way to alternate tower and main connections that pull against the cable and not the fabric. Worked great. The last part was to fabricate pieces to add between the towers to complete the tent. You will notice that one side is completely open. That's were I will film from. The last thing I added was a large lazy-susan bearing so the entire stage can revolve as needed. I have also created a stage that fits inside the tent. And, lighting and back drops. I'll show those at a later date. There will be a YouTube video in a few days. I'm editing it right now.

Topic by kentek   |  last reply