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Will low e windows effect plant growth in a greenhouse?

I have a bunch of low e, argon filled double pane windows that I want to build a greenhouse with. Will the plants inside the greenhouse be adversely effected by this type of glass? I am not a "sciency" type - please advise me.

Question by Taskar    |  last reply


Websites that give you info about the care and growth of many plants.

I need a list of websites that give the following info about a few plants (mostly veggies and fruit.) 1) zone 2) uv light needed 3) water needed 4) growth period and some care tips Thank you in andvance

Topic by crc09  


Scholarship Robot Proposal: Plant Gardener

This robot would tend to a high value plant. The plant would sit atop the robot and the robot would seek to maximize light during the day. It will slowly rotate on itself to allow all sides of the plant equal sunlight ensuring an even growth. It will slowly travel accross the room seeking sunlight from other windows as the day progresses. Finally, it would detect people walking by and wuold warn them when the plant needs watering. Simple idea with achievable goals. Thanks for your consideration!

Topic by loubard    |  last reply


Indoor LED plant lights

I am new to posting in the forums, and actually am not even sure if this is being posted in the right area. My name is Ryan, and I need some help. I have been growing spices/herbs for my own recipes for a couple years, and have always used artificial lights. I use a whole wack of those spiral florescent lights (The 23watt ones to replace a 100watt light bulb), and it works alright. I now want to create a panel of LED's so that I can increase my lumen count, and therefore increase the rate of growth. I need help with how to use resistors to get the power to what a 50 LED panel would need. LED: wattage: 1 watt Forward Voltage : 2.1V~2.3V Forward Current: 300mA. ATX Power Supply: Wattage: 250 Normal 120 volt Canadian power I want to make a panel that has 50 1watt LED's in it, power it from a modified 250watt ATX power supply, and if possible, power more than one from a single PSU (Power Supply Unit) (Something like a quick connector setup, have all resistors panel side, and have cords running to the PSU where it uses quick connectors) I want to use the PSU because I have three at my disposal. I was thinking that it would only need 50 watts or something, and I could wire it in series, however I don't know what resistors to use, or where to use them, to make the power work for the LED's. I can wire thing together, solder, and have a basic understanding of circuitry (Like power flows this direction, and this will do that...... don't know numbers)

Topic by MaXoR    |  last reply


automated hydroponic system ?

Hello, I want to make automated hydroponic grown plant system that will sense condition and provide sufficient Mineral Nutrients for growing hydroponic plant.  we place the seed into water, seed grow into water , growth should start after 2 or 3 weeks.we don’t feed fertilizer until the first set of true leaves appears When seeding develop their true leaves and roots. Its time to feeding fertilize.we need to provide right fertilizer for good growth Most common fertilizer is NPK, after two or three weak or after the first set of true leaves appear we need to fertilize plant. Fertilize approx every two weeks Automated system (small and low cost system) Parameter – conductivity Project part list Electrodes probes Micorcontroller Amplifier or filter Resistor A to D converter Ic Volve or relay Automated system that Add more or less fertilizer into water ,that maintain conductivity range Best time to fertilize plant Time- fertilize plant after their active growth ,after two or three weak or after the first set of true leaves apper we need to fertilize plant ADD small value of NPK into water because small plant take less fertilizer After two weeks Add large value of NPK into water because large plant take large fertilizer Provide enough NPK to complete their life cycle we can measure conductivity of whole solution. how to make Automated system that will Add more or less fertilizer into water on basis of conductivity If plant need more or less fertilizer system  will adjust itself

Question by vead    |  last reply


how much potassium nitrate should i use to speed growth of watermelon seedlings?

Hi, I have several KG's of potassium nitrate, and am currectly growing watermelons, among other plants, however my concern is mostly with the watermelons. I live in mackay, tropical queensland, the sun here is very harsh, and when the wind blows, well, its pretty hard. i have only a limited amount of time before these seedlings use up all the nutrients in their dirt, (they are currently in an egg carton filled with dirt), and each their maximum size before they start to starve. I want to know, how much potassium nitrate i can use to boost their growth to get them as big as possible for when they go outside. Where i live, the house is pretty aerodynamic, you exprenice windyness from all four sides, so i need them as strong as possible for that time that i plant them outside, in large individual pots, until theyve grown enough to be planted around my spoon drain. Anyway, i need to get them to grow ALLOT, and i have the potassium nitrate, however, nitrate is toxic to plants, so i need to know what a safe quantity might be. im not asking for the exact best value, but just anything that will aid in boosting growth before they get repotted would be great. thanks. also, my tomatos, black russian and some random huge tomato, is growing very slowly, would nitrate help them also? and pumpkin, when the seed sprouted, part of the seed was dead, and so two starter leaves were bound together, and died, leaving it leafless. new leaves are starting to appear, but not fast enough as its turning yellow, again, would nitrate help?

Question by oldmanbeefjerky    |  last reply


I have glucose tabs (for diabetics), which I think are much more pure than sugar, would this help my plants grow better?

I am trying to grow citrus seedlings and have been finding mixed reports about the affects of sugar water (instead of just using regular water). I was wondering if glucose tabs, being more pure than sugar, would help my citrus plants grow.

Question by ralegg    |  last reply


Tomorrow

Tomorrow is the Science Fair at my school and I'm not finished yet. My aim is, Will Climate Change Affect The Growth Of Grass In The Next Ten Years? I've done the testing and I'm writing the conclusion. I need to know some plants that are sensitive to temperature changes. I have already searched and can't find any (I must have very bad searching skills). I also need to know what kind of chemicals that plants use. I'm kind of panicking right now!

Topic by DELETED_Gavabc123    |  last reply


How to identify mushroom / fungus growing in watermelon pot.?

  The medium used is coco peat from south India. The fertilizer used is organic seaweed imported from South Africa. I want to know whether its an infestation or beneficial for my plant growth? THE PIC:http://www.freeimagehosting.net/uploads/f6196f211f.jpg

Question by charmneo    |  last reply


Is corrugated plastic (the type commonly used for signs) a good covering for a greenhouse?

I'm in the planning phase of a greenhouse next spring and I'm wondering if the corrugated plastic that you usually see election signs made of would be good for a greenhouse covering. Has anybody tried this? If so, could you post your results? Here's some information I've come up with already: 1) Corrugated plastic is relatively cheap as dirt compared to glass and corrugated polycarbonate panels marketed under "Palruf" and "Suntuf". 2) There is a greenhouse covering marketed as "Solexx" that appears to be nothing more than corrugated plastic and is claimed to be superior to glass and polycarbonate panels. It's also very very expensive. 3) Solexx panels are claimed to diffuse the light coming into the greenhouse. This is supposed to be better for the plants than direct light from glass or polycarbonate. Below is an excerpt from the Solexx website: "How does light diffusion affect plant growth? Plants create food from light so the type of light they receive is important. Plants exposed to direct light (no diffusion) produce a majority of their food from the top leaves facing the sun. The select leaves absorbing the sun energy do most of the work while the shaded leaves do very little. Direct light also creates excessive heat which causes plant stress. When a plant is immersed in diffused light, all the leaves can photosynthesize resulting in more food production and healthier, fuller plant development. In addition, the upper leaves of the plant receive less intense light which means they will not suffer from plant stress caused by sun burn and excessive transpiration. " Again ,if anyone has tried using corrugated plastic as a covering for a greenhouse could you please share your results? If anyone has their own comment or prediction please share it. If not, I plan on conducting an experiment to test the performance of different greenhouse materials on plant growth. I may have to use artificial light instead of sunlight however, since the growing season here is coming to an end.

Question by EcoMotive    |  last reply


Plants slowly dying in an odd way, any gardeners out there who can tell me why? Answered

I have an aerogarden with some strawberries.  They started just fine but they recently ran into some trouble.  The leaves started yellowing.  I did a little research and it seemed to match the symptoms for magnesium deficiency.  I switched nutrient mixes, thinking that might help, but it seems like it isn't getting any worse or better.  It's looked like this for about a month, not much growth, not much die off.

Question by finfan7    |  last reply


What is this green globby goo in my driveway? Answered

What is this stuff?? I noticed this green slime in my driveway one day. It's sorta gel-like, has some air bubbles, and is centered around greenery. I can sorta pick it up with a stick and it jiggles and doesn't really come apart. It reminds me of seaweed kinda. It was mainly located in the center of my driveway where we have weed growth. The appearance happened to coincide with a long bought of rain (nearly several weeks). I also noticed some in areas of our lawn and near the edges of our gardens. This is in Northeastern Vermont, photo taken this summer, '09. PS--I apologize if this is too picture heavy. Please let me know if it is. I just like sharing all the neat photos of this strange substance that looks like Slimer from Ghostbusters!

Question by Pompom    |  last reply


Bacon Jalapeno Poppers, Lady Gaga Hairdo, DIY Diamond Ring

Bacon Jalapeno Poppers Lady Gaga Hairdo DIY Diamond Ring Amazing Tesla CD Turbine Yip Yip Costume Glowing Birdcage Necklace 5 Vinegar Secrets Cloth-Covered Cables English Breakfast Pizza LED Plant Growth Light Wooden Puzzle Cube RFID Projects DIY Barbecue Vodka Infused Gummis Low Carb Pizza

Topic by randofo  


temperature contral Via thermal cupplers

I am just starting out I have built several Bio stoves in the past few years .  The cost of fuel wood,wood chip, saw dust ,grass leaves , brush paper all house hole wastes but plastic bone and metal . are the fuel's it will cook . In the end you are left with Bio dust charcoal and it is a 100% natural soil additive that improves plant growth . No green house gasses . and just a little ash from the fire retaining feeder. Any way I need to control at lease 4 to 5 temperature . all are inter related . all temp. feed backs will control digital speed controls to maintain temp.

Topic by OldManRobbie    |  last reply


Cultivating blackberries - works for roses too!

Although in many regions (wild) blackberries are considered to be a pest, in our gardens they can be delicious.I don't mean the wild variety here but the cultivated ones with big fruits and no thorns on them.And if you ever tried to successfully save money by just buying one and using cuttings from it for the new season you know the troubles....Creating cuttings from blackberries is quite easy if done the right way.But there is an ever easier and simpler way if you don't mind doing your pruning a bit later than usual.Once the harvest season is over and all berries are gone you see that the blackberries still keep growing before they finally start dropping their leaves.And if all went well then your blackberries have grown in long "snakes" supported on a vertical structure - like long bows.During a good season this bows get so long that they almost reach the ground at the end of the season.All you have to do it to free your snkes so you can places their ends into the ground, preferably out to the side so you can start a new row of blackberries with enough space between them.Use some soft cord and weights to keep the ends in the ground and fill the hole.Only water once when done otherwise let nature take care of things.In a very dry climate or season you might want to water a bit once a week though.When leaves start to drop in big numbers cut the above ground bits off with about 10 to 15cm left standing.Prune the big ones as you always do to get them ready for the next season.And when the next season starts you will see that most of your little "cuttings" take off like mad.They had the mother plant until it was time to go dormant, so no extra energy was required to stop a dying cutting from going dry.The end of the plant realised it is under ground and for that reason it is time to grow roots.Then suddenly it is time to hibernate and all energy is left in the remains, ready for use in the next spring.It is no problem to get over 15 new plants from a single one this way for the next season.It also works quite well fo roses.Although here you might need to create a podest or similar to place pot on.And the season for it is different too ;)It all starts with your pruning at thend of the season.All parts that did not produce flowers, those "wild" stems need to be fully removed.Those who produced good are cut back so you are left with 3 to 5 "eyes" - these tiny pimple where the new shoots come out.Pay attention to their location as it determines the direction of the new shoots ;)Don't have too many facing inwards.When the rose starts growing again in spring you should prepare your stand for the pot.The new shoots are quite flexible and can be directed to grow where you need them for the pot by using bonsai tape or wire - just be gently with them!Once long enough that the end can be placed about 5cm deep into your pot with good potting mix or the good soil from your garden:Place the pot so that the end shoot is held in the soilwithout force - if in doubt let the shoot grow a bit longer and form it donwards with wire.You want to bury it only when there is new growth going out if it but not of the end currently only has the leaf(s) showing.These fresh end shoots should point downwards into the soil.Cover it all and keep the soild moist at all times but not soaking wet.It really helps to have the pot shaded.You can use small seedling pots and check for roots a few weeks later or just wait till the end of the season.Either way a root should form in the pot and once strong enough you only have to wait and look out for eyes forming on the stem.If the do you can cut the stem so you have enough eyes on the potted stem.Be aware though that this will only result in a strong and healthy rose if the mother plant is not a hybridised clone.For the later it is best to transplant and eye onto a donor bush or wild rose.

Topic by Downunder35m  


Advice needed on nearly complete instructable

Sorry this is a bit long, but there is an actual question at the end, honest! Every morning at work I walk past a table at the end of our mailboxes that people put give away items on. Its usually a catalog of some form but for a long time now there's been a stack of empty CD spindles and a sign beside them that reads "free to good home." I could have taken them and sorted the mountain of CDs in my office or used them for small parts bins, but to make it areally Good use of empty CD spindles I had to ask myself "IS there an instructable in this?" There are some good ideas for using CDs and a few for the spindles, but at the moment what interests me is hydroponics. So using CD spindles or more exactly the plastic covers they come with I built the basic part of this excellent instructable: http://alturl.com/oa2qt    and I learned a lot of stuff about water pressure and such and once I had built the 2liter bottle method described above I decided to try sealing one of the CD cases and use it for the water container at the bottom of the stack. That took about 4 sticks of hot glue and a couple of burnt knuckles to get a good seal. Turns out there's holes in the center spindle too but I didn't notice them till I had hot glued the container closed. Also ignore the bit of blue air hose inside the container, I was up way too late and flipped the CD spindle 'right side up' which caused me to attach the air hose to the wrong outlet and basically made it useless. I thought I'd need a lot more water in the system than I do so I chose to use a 100ct CD spindle instead of the 50 ct spindles you see on top. (Thanks to all for the ideas on how I could have done it easier!) So far this part of the project was just overlaying the ideas in the excellent instructable above onto the materials at hand. So what I ended up with is an air pump from a fish tank pumping air into the bottom chamber. (the clear hose in center of picture.) This builds up enough pressure to push water thru the blue hose and up to the top CD spindle. I've cut holes the diameter of the air hose into the base of the spindle and this lets water slowly trickle into the Perlite growth medium. When the water reaches the bottom it goes out similar holes in the clear plastic CD cover and starts to pool up a bit to start the process all over again. There is just enough lip on the lid and the bottom of the next spindle to keep it from spilling down the side before this happens. It helps to use the same brand CD spindle all the way up. The clever part of this instructable is that each CD spindle easily stacks in place and you can remove it or change the order without having to dig up or harm the other plants. The base is very stable with several ounces of water in it and I'd imagine you could put 4 of these in a stack and happily swap plants in and out all summer long. The height of the stack depends on how strong your air pump is. I tested two different ones and both were capable of lifting water over 4 feet  up the air hose. Caveat: I haven't actually grown any plants in this yet, so your mileage may vary. Using the stack of CDs for use as apartment planters or sprouting medium would have satisfied the original curiosity for what to do with all those left over CD cases, but in absence of glowing blue LEDs or CO2 lasers I thought Hydroponics would be a great way to sex up the overall idea. I imagine you could use spanish moss or bedding in place of the Perlite, or even soil if you used a coffee filter to cover the holes till you were ready to stick a seedling thru it. This Instructable isn't quite finished as presented. There's a small problem. As you can see in the photo there's a half height (25ct) CD spindle between the water container and the stack of planting modules. Remember that hole I mentioned in the end of the CD spindle? I closed that with a bit of plastic and hot glue, but it made me wonder, COULD I put some sort of check valve here to allow unused water to trickle back into the holding tank YET not lose the hard fought air pressure that's pushing the water to the top of the column in the first place? Since I'm re-using all this old aquarium tech I thought I'd try one of those tiny check valves that keep water from backwashing into the air pump when its off. I'm not sure if it will work in this application or even how much air pressure it will tolerate. This will require some disassembly of the CD hydroponics tower and I thought I'd ask here for suggestions before heating up the glue gun again. So what do you guys think? This has been a lot of fun to think about and I can't wait to bring the media guy  around into my office to see how I've re-purposed the spindles. Just this one last step away…. cheers, flashj  

Topic by flashj  


UV filtration in your fish tank or small fish pond

Year after year the topic "I have a fish tank" seems to go more out of control. What was once a hobby just to have some fish can now be a design feature both in your home and inside the tank. Realistic looking lasdscapes, optical illusions that make you think the tank is much bigger and the list goes on. But one thing that now always pops up is the must have thing of UV filtration. Or to be precise: UV-C sterilisation! Now, if we trust Wiki and our big water suppliers then UV-C will literally kill anything alive that comes into contact with. So of course it would be a good thing to have for your tank - or not? UV-C is very dangerous for your eyesight and quite harmful for your skin! Looking into a proper UV-C lamp without protection means you can go blind! Even good sunglasses might not have enough protection in the UV-C range, so only use them for additional protection but never without and glass between you and the lamp! Don't be a fool! Treat UV-C seriously! You would not look into the full sun with your sunglasses and would not expose your eyes or skin to a powerful laser, UV-C is to be treated the same way! Let's start by using some boring text to explain the concept a little bit. On a large scale special and quite powerful systems are used to treat our drinking or pool water. Here special UV-C lights with a wavelenghts of 260nm or below are used to shine through the water passing by. There are two key factors here. a) the wavelenght b) the water flow rate and the corresponding time the water is in contact with the UV light To ensure all bacteria, viruses, algae and other harmful organics are dead the water must circulate for long enough so even the last water molecule had a few seconds of exposure. All this only works good with "crystal clear" water for obvious reasons as otherwise the UV has to be even more powerful to pass through. Single cell organisms literally crack into pieces similar to being exposed to gamma rays, more complex cells like algae have their cell membranes damages and the DNA suffers as well causing reproduction loss and early death. Even some chemicals break down, most importantly here chlorine based substances. Differences within the UV-C range! If you bothered to check Wiki about the topic of UV-C you will already know that only certain wavelengths within this spectrum will actuall be powerful enough to do what we want it to do. And here is the first problem for us hobby users. Most cheaply advertised "sterlisation lamps" you find in places like Ebay are actually totally useless. Stating to be selling a UV-C light to sterilze your water in such a case is still not considered to be fraud though. Simply because it still does what it supposed to do, just very slow and with very little effect. Only the so called "short wave" UV-C range is powerful enough! To avoid loosing business during the times of the biggest hype in 20 years no seller will actuall state the available wavelengths. That means without this info anywhere you can be certain the advertised lamp is of little to no use. Even those advertised to be short wave UV-C might not be the real deal. However, if a decent manufacturer is behind the actual lamp used it is possible to check the datasheet for these performance figures - but again most cheap systems come with no-name lamps inside. Check the prices for a reputable UV-C light with the same lamp fitting, e.g. G23 and you will see it might cost more than your entire system. Ok, you have a poper short wave UV-C lamp or consider getting a canister filter with one in it.... Never, ever test your lamp without proper protection!!!!! UV-C will damage your eye within seconds! If you system or lamp does not provide a viewing port or shine through area then you have to place a piece of glass between you and the light! UV-C won't be able to penetrate normal window glass but will pass through quartz glass. Place the lamp in a box and cover with the glass. How make proper use of UV-C sterilisation... The replacement lights are quite expensive, so let's see how to get the most out of them. As said before exposure is the key factor so the flow rate of the UV system must match tank size and flow rate of your filter system. Canister filters with a build in lamp should be designed to match but I will tell you later what to look for ;) Most of us will prefer to have a in-line system if there is already a good canister filter at work, so I will focus on those and rop in solutions. If you compare in-line system you might notice that some quite small and low power units claim to allow for the same flow rates as for example 40W units. Some are fraud and just want to sell while others use simple physics to make the claim true. A good system will utilise an auger like "ramp" that forces the water to circulate around the tube many times - causing up to ten times longer exposure rates. Others create this sprial effect more like a vortex with some diverters and modified inlets. The later seems to be less efficient though with low power lamps. An in-line system should be on the outlet side of your canister filter so the best quality water will pass through it. A drop in solution should be used alone and without the existing normal filter pump you might have in there. Ok, got it, but how do I actually use it now? Despite common thinking a UV-C system should not run 24/7 like your normal filter. You really only need it to solve problems you should not have in a healthy tank! It is not a magical solution to make your underlaying problems go away ;) Let's start with the most common reason someone buys a UV-C system: An algae or bacterial outbreak causing greenish or milky water. If that developed slowly over a period of weeks then you would be better off to do a good clean of the tank and filter plus a decent water exchange. A few drops of meds will do the rest. And if you constantly get algae growing on your glass, ornaments and plants then your nutrient levels and water quality is not right anyway and needs a good check. But of course there is also the problem of light - too much for too long and unwanted gree appears everywhere. If in doubt reduce the light power, shade out natural light or reduce the on time for your lights. Having said that we now face the problem of a sudden outbreak after introducing new fish or plants. If you don't have a quarantaine tank chances are that sooner or later you get unwanted or even harmful guest into your tank. Here the UV-C will be beneficial, which is why a canister filter with build in light should have a seperate switch or power supply for the light. After an outbreak or while introducing new life into your tank the UV-C will remove a lot of the things that we don't want to bring along. For new life I leave the light on non stop for a week, that is for a small 4ft tank with 200 liters. To control an outbreak it depends on how bad it is. I assume here you can still see the back of your tank  but that the water either appears greenish or slightly milky from bacteria. As a personal thing I prefer to to remove and clean my filter material before treating a severe outbreak. Once done I fill the filter with a mix of activate carbon material and fine filter wool. Reason for this quite simple: The outbreak causing stuff is already in your filter material and will be a constant source of re-infection. And since breaking down all this bad stuff causes even more bad stuff to be produced as biological waste we want to discard it properly once done. Using just fine filter wool and activated carbon also reduces the flow rate bit if compacted ;) Now we can turn on the light and pump and forget about it for a while. It is not recommended to run UV lights on a timer as you want them on all time to prevent short lifespan and have ongoing treatment of the water. Good idea to take a picture at the same of a day from now on to compare and check results. After 3 days the water should definately be clearer, if not then either your filter material is packed too losse or the lamp is no good. Once the water appears to be clear do a readin test - take a newspaper behind the tank and check if the text is clear - blurry means the water is still not clean. You will reach a point where the water quality will not further improve as much as in the days before. This is the time where you discard or clean out to dry your filter material and put the original stuff back in. The activated carbon should be discarded of course. You cleaned filter material will now need a certain time to grow enough good bacteria to go back to the old performance. During this time you should still leave the light on. In most cases with enough fish and plants in the tank a week should be sufficient. After that you can leave the light off and keep the tank fit and healthy. Special case: Algae everywhere! Especially after getting a new plant you can end up with quite pesty algae growth. Be it these long ghost hair types or in a bad case the black stuff growing on plants, ornaments and the glass. I have even seen tanks with algae covering the entire bottom of the tank causing the gravel to look like carpet. Here I can only advise to set up a quarantaine tank for your fish. Then remove all infested material for manual removal and cleaning. Infested plants should be cut clean and what can be boiled should be boiled in water for a few minutes. Now start scrubbing in the tank with ongoing water replacements. I prefer to let everything settle over night without any bubbler or pump running. This way I can suck up a lot of sediment the next day. If you can remove all plants and fish you can now use hydrogen peroxide and add it to your tank water. But this is only feasable for small desktop tanks. Before using the UV as above to cure an outbreak you should consider all water one last time. Allow at least 2 weeks with ongoing water checks before adding plants back in and another week before placing your fish back in the tank. The week before adding fish should be used to monitor the plats for any signs of algae you might have missed - if you find any remove it! A week after the fish is back in you can turn off the UV light. Underwater UV-C light!? In most online stores you will find quite cheap UV lights to be advertised as underwater or in tank use. Although it might sound tempting you should be well aware of the dangers of using them. The glass of your tank will block the harmfull UV rays but the water surface won't, so either don't ever look at it or use proper sunglasses with real UV protection. Apart from the dangers to you these lamps are not just cheap in price but also cheaply produced. That means there is no way of telling how much or how little UV-C is produced. If they are good then you still need to know in what type of tank setup you can use them. As plants can tolerate a bit of UV a placement as far away from the nearest plant should do, especially if you can place a bubble wall betwenn light and plants. The fish is another thing as some seem to be unaware of the danger in their tank. This means they can get too close to the light but I have not found any articles explaining how harmful UV-C is to fish or their eyesight. I guess once your fish starts to bounce into everything you know... ;) My advise is to stay away from the idea of hanging a UV-C lamp in your tank, the risk for you and your tank is just not justified. If you need to go cheap then get two or thre of these lamps so you have spares. But use them externally ;) Meaning: Take a UV proof plastic container of small size and place the light in there. To be really safe tape the lid and all holes for the hoses with black tape. Place the container above the water level of your tank and if you only have an internal filter pump push a suitable sized hose into the outlet to feed into you canister. Check how high you pump can make it and place the outlet or overflow slightly below this level. When to change the light? If you made it all the way down here then you might already had the benefit of using light to "cure" your tank. Now we are faced with the high replacement cost for the lamp itself. Ususally only flouroscent tubes are used. It is always good to check after purchase what type of lamp and manufacturer (if there is one) was used. In some cases the system itself is like an inkjet printer: Just a cheap way to make you buy the consumables. Let's say you new in-line filter was priced at $100 to have a nice round number, some are cheaper some much more expensive. The lamp used might be an exotic type and not even be available easy, so before you buy your system check where you can get spares, not just the lamp of course. A replacement lamp can be as ceap as 20 bucks or cost even more than your system if you need to order it elsewhere. The quartz glass sleeve can break too meaning you then need a lamp and cylinder. Going with a reputable brand and paying a bit more certainly helps to get spares in the future. Let's just assume you either got your system in bulk due to the price of replacement lamps or can get them at a reasonable price. UV-C lamps are not like your normal flouroscent light tubes you have around or maybe even on top of your tank. Consider them like the tubes used in the now unhealthy tanning beds. After a certain amount of time they no longer produce enough of the short wave UV light that we need. As you can't see it and most of us won't have the means to specifically measure it we have to trust manufacturers recommendations. For most good brands the numbers are the same: 8000 hours max. Considering the costs it does make sense to keep written track of the usage. Not too hard since we won't use them like normal lights but instead have them on for a week or more without turning them off. I recommend to have a replacement at hand long before you need it. A lamp can fail premature, crack or simply burn out. The 8000 hours are based on 24 hour usage, so one day on, one day off. This could mean for us the lifetime can be slightly longer but I would not go over 9000 hours. As a rule of thumb: If the water does not show good signs of getting clear on day thre the lamp is due.

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


Intel® IoT Invitational

**UPDATES!!** 12/18/15  Thank you so much TO ALL OF YOU for your patience during this process, it means the world to us that everyone has participated in this Invitational. Everyone has worked so hard on their IoT projects, and we have enjoyed all the stories about bringing these creations to fruition. <3 After a long wait, we are finally sharing the finalists with the Instructables Community. Hoping to announce winners Monday or Tuesday! 12/1/15 Hey guys, Just wanted to update everyone as to what is going on with finalist selection and announcing winners. You guys have been so patient in this process, and we are so proud of every project the Instructables.com community has shared using their Intel IoT Edison development kit. The Intel Team is still reviewing projects and code, and will hopefully have their ultimate finalist selection done soon. It has been so hard choosing projects to be considered for the awards as they are all so wonderful! Again, thanks for your patience, and feel free to reach out to intel@instructables.com if you have additional questions. -Audrey 8/17/15 Hey guys! I am so excited to finally set launch dates for the Intel IoT Contest!!! We have a few more packages waiting to be received by Instructables Authors, but then we are good to go. To have your project considered for some of the AMAZING PRIZES just publish your Instructable that includes an Intel Edison between 8/31 and 10/26 and add it to the Intel IoT Invitational Contest Page. With all of our logistics and shipping pretty much wrapped, we are finally getting to review all the project ideas from people who already have Edisons and Galileos submit - you will soon get an email from myself, or Penolopy Bulnick (who is coming back to Instructables to help with future giveaways like this!), approving your idea. I have to say, I am so proud to be apart of such a wonderful community that has been understanding of our delays, and collaborative in helping one another troubleshoot their projects. I can't wait to see what everyone is going to make :) Beaming! -Audrey _________ Here at Instructables, we’re so excited to have a continued partnership with the Intel® IoT Developer Program to celebrate the bright ideas that the Instructables.com community has come up with for the Intel® Edison platform. We’ve been sharing some of the best IoT stories on our site, and are astounded by the growth and creativity blossoming from the Intel Edison Ecosystem. To further encourage great IoT projects being shared to Instructables, we are offering even more Intel® Edison Boards and Intel® IoT Developer Kits to you! We believe in your awesome creative potential, and your devotion to share what you make and learn with other makers and tinkerers. Furthermore, we are so excited to announce the Intel® IoT Invitational!  Intel IoT Projects published from June 8 - August 7, 2015 will be considered to win a Canon 7D mk ii, a Sony Action Cam, an Oscillisoscope, a Sparkfun Giftcard, a Shapeways Giftcard, and More!! WE ARE SEEDING THE INSTRUCTABLES COMMUNITY 300 INTEL® EDISON BOARDS and SPECIALTY INTEL® IoT DEVELOPMENT KITS.  We want to hear what you want to make with the Intel Edison Board. If we like your idea, we will send you a kit! Keep in mind, the kits we are creating during this Invitational differ from the commercially available Grove Starter Kits. It will likely take additional components and ingenuity to make great IoT projects for the Intel IoT Invitational. These are the kits and bundles we are making: Home Automation Kit This kit is designed with home automation and safety in mind. There are 9 sensors in the kit that can detect things like moisture, temperature, flames and gases. There’s also a speaker to sound alerts and a relay to turn something on or off. This kit could easily be extended with additional sensors for the ultimate home automation or safety sensor array. Included in this kit: Grove Air quality sensor Grove Encoder Grove Flame Sensor Grove Gas Sensor(MQ2) Grove Infrared Temperature Sensor Grove Moisture Sensor Grove SPDT Relay(30A) Grove Speaker   Environmental & Agriculture This kit is designed with agriculture in mind.  The 7 sensors in this kit can help you determine light, UV and dust in the environment and based on that information one could rinse a plant off with the water pump and/or water the plant and not waste any water because a flow sensor is included. There is an LED bar for visual output and a dry reed relay to turn things on and off. Included in this Kit: 6V Mini Water Pump G14 Water Flow Sensor Grove Digital Light Sensor Grove Dry-Reed Relay Grove Dust Sensor Grove Gas Sensor(MQ5) Grove LED Bar Grove Moisture Sensor Grove UV Sensor Grove Water Sensor Transportation and Safety This kit is designed with vehicle safety in mind. These 6 sensors can help you keep from getting lost, tell you if you have pulled forward far enough in the garage and even keep your garage from accidentally closing on you. In addition there is an alcohol sensor to determine if you have had too much fun. Included in this Kit: Grove Alcohol Sensor Grove GPS Grove I2C Touch Sensor Grove Infrared Reflective Sensor Grove IR Distance Interrupter Grove PIR Motion Sensor Robotics Create the next robot overlord or at the very least a cool vehicle. This kit has 2 motor drivers and 4 planet geared motors—you supply a chassis.  There are also a few items to determine distance and track a line.  This kit will likely require the most additional items from the maker, but it also provides some useful pieces to get started exploring robotics. Have other ideas—maybe a quad-copter we are eager to see what you create! Included in this Kit: Grove 3-Axis Digital Compass Grove Hall Sensor Grove I2C Motor Driver Grove IR Distance Interrupter Grove Line Finder Grove MOSFET Grove Nunchuck Grove Single Axis Analog Gyro Grove Thumb Joystick Grove Voltage Divider Planet Geared Motor F280 By no means are you limited to just using the parts in these kits, they are just meant to help you get started. Add more sensors, components, and hardware to make the IoT machines of your dreams! This product offering is limited to 300 people who state their case as to why we should send them a board and development kit. USE THIS FORM TO APPLY TO THIS PRODUCT OFFERING This application will close May 25, 2015. ____ Already have an Intel® Edison board from our last promotion? Recently participated in an Intel® IoT Roadshow? Or did you buy your own Intel® Edison kit? You can participate without receiving a board from us, sign up here!   This application will close July 20, 2015. This application will guarantee you a spot in the Intel IoT Invitational. ____ Ready to get started with the Intel® IoT Invitational? Be sure to check out the Intel® XDK IoT Edition as a resource. This will help you create, test and deliver awesome IoT solutions.

Topic by audreyobscura    |  last reply


Canada Set to Ban "Weed-n-Feed" Products

Re-evaluation Note REV2010-01, Uncoupling of Fertilizer-Pesticide Combination Products for Lawn and Turf Uses 2 February 2010 HC Pub: 100037 ISBN: 978-1-100-14700-0 (print version) ISBN: 978-1-100-14701-7 (PDF version) Catalogue number: H113-5/2010-1E (print version) Catalogue number: H113-5/2010-1E-PDF (PDF version) Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose 2.0 Scope 3.0 Background 4.0 Regulatory decision 1.0 Purpose This document is to communicate to stakeholders the decision to uncouple fertilizer-pesticide combination products intended for lawn and turf uses. 2.0 Scope This regulatory action is focussed on the lawn and turf uses of fertilizer-pesticide combination products on the following types of turf: Lawn turf planted in or around residences, as well as public and commercial buildings including schools and cemeteries Sports and recreational turf such as turf in parks, playgrounds, golf courses, zoos, botanical gardens and athletic playing fields These types of turf are collectively known as fine turf, which may be maintained by homeowners or by professional applicators. This regulatory action does not include agricultural uses of fertilizer-pesticide combination products (turf farms), or products that have a single active material with both fertilizer and pesticidal properties. 3.0 Background Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) regulates pesticides under the Pest Control Products Act including those intended for lawn and turf uses. All pesticide products that are registered for use and sale in Canada have undergone rigorous health and environmental risk assessments including the pesticides present in fertilizer-pesticide combinations. Pesticides are often combined with fertilizers and sold as fertilizer-pesticide combination products, which are regulated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency under the Fertilizers Act. When pesticides are combined with fertilizer such that the two components can only be applied at the same time and to the same area, the delivery mechanism for the pesticide component is brought into question. The very nature of combination products removes the flexibility of applying the pesticide as a spot application due to the need to accommodate the fertilizer, which is designed for broadcast application to the entire lawn surface at specified times of the year. Pesticides should only be used when and where there is a need. Broadcast applications of pesticides over the whole area are warranted only for severe pest infestations that are widespread. As pest infestations are typically patchy, spot applications of pesticides to those areas are most often sufficient to ensure adequate control in turf. To be effective, fertilizers and pesticides must each be applied at the appropriate timings, which typically do not coincide. Fertilizers are most often applied in spring or early summer, and/or in late summer or fall. A spring-applied lawn fertilizer results in increased tillering and rapid growth as temperatures increase, resulting in turf of increased density. A fall-applied lawn fertilizer also results in increased tillering and may result in increased winter hardiness. The majority of pesticides found in pesticide-fertilizer combination products are broadleaf herbicides belonging to the synthetic auxin group of chemicals. This group of chemicals only controls broadleaf weeds that have emerged and are actively growing in the lawn. These herbicides are not preventative in that they will only control weeds that have emerged and they do not prevent weeds from becoming established in the lawn. Further, this group of chemicals is not long lasting in that they do not persist in the soil to prevent future weed infestations. Combination products have been purchased for their convenience and ease of use as a two-in-one product to address separate lawn maintenance issues (for example, nutrient deficiency and various pest infestations) with a single application. However, these products are unsuitable as a delivery mechanism because they support broadcast application of the pesticide when this might not be warranted. Ultimately, fertilizer and pesticide applications should be based on need. Fertilizer should only be used if the turf will benefit from additional nutrients, and pesticide should only be used as a broadcast treatment if the pest densities are sufficiently high across the area to be treated. Targeted, well-timed liquid formulations of pesticides minimize pesticide use on the lawn and turf sites. 4.0 Regulatory decision Based on consultation with the provinces, experts and registrants, the PMRA has concluded that fertilizer-pesticide combination products for lawn and turf uses do not support the goals of best practices for pest management in turf. The PMRA, in conjunction with Canadian Food Inspection Agency, is taking action to uncouple the fertilizer-pesticide combination products intended for lawn and turf uses. A date of last sale of 31 December 2012 for fertilizer-pesticide combination products for lawn and turf uses has been set in order to allow for replacement products to be made available where needed. Should situations arise to warrant the use of a fertilizer-pesticide combination product for lawn and turf uses, the PMRA will assess combination products in terms of the timing of application and flexibility to apply as a spot treatment, as well as potential risks to human health and the environment. The PMRA decision to uncouple fertilizer-pesticide combination products is not based on the health or environmental risk assessments but rather the nature of combination products. Combination products remove the flexibility of applying spot applications of the pesticide due to the need to accommodate the fertilizer, which is designed for broadcast application to the entire lawn surface at specified times of the year. Turf fertilizers will continue to be available for broadcast application when needed. Pesticide-only products will also continue to be available for lawn care use to homeowners and commercial applicators for either spot treatments of localized weed patches or for use as broadcast applications to severely infested turf areas when warranted. Although more time consuming, pest control in lawn and turf can be achieved with careful pesticide spot applications that target only the pests that are present and separate broadcast applications of fertilizers. Now if only the US were to follow suit...

Topic by AngryRedhead    |  last reply