How does this 5 pole switch work?

I took apart a broken DVD player. I wanted to possibly use the tray mechanism for a project. It appears that the DVD player uses a 5 pin pcb mounted switch to reverse polarity for the motor. I can of however figure out how to wire this and make it work. How does this 5 pin swith work to switch the polarity of the motor?

Question by MDheliMech   |  last reply


Motor for ceiling mounted cargo box storage lift?

Hi there, A year or so ago, I purchased a Thule 571 Roof Mount Cargo Box Storage Lift and installed it on the ceiling in my garage.  The ceiling in the garage has a fairly high ceiling though and using the crank that came with the lift is a bit cumbersome to say the least.  I usually have to stand up on a tire of the car in order to reach the crank to turn it efficiently. So the idea popped into my head that wouldn't it be really cool to connect a reversible electric motor to the lift so I could just flip a switch to lift it and then toggle the switch down to lower it.   Here's a link to the specific product I'm using, which I think Thule has discontinued because I couldn't find it on their website tonight:  http://www.overheadgaragestoragesolutions.org/thule-571-roof-mount-cargo-box-garage-storage-solution/ My questions: 1) What size/spec motor should I get? 2) Where can I get the motor from? 3) I'm assuming that any electric motor can be reversible just by swapping polarity in the switch? 4) Do I need a belt to ensure that the motor doesn't spin the worm gear too fast or should it just be a direct connection? 5) Any other thoughts/ideas? There's an open 110v outlet in the ceiling of the garage where the garage door opener is installed, so I could run a power cord to that outlet and then I presume I'll need to run a wired switch down to the wall of the garage where I want to be able to control the lift. Thanks in advance for your time and consideration.  This would certainly make my life a bit easier to be able to quickly and easily raise and lower my ski box onto and off the roof of my car.   Regards, David

Topic by dtepper 


Making a solar compass

I realized a while ago that if you put something on a rotating  mount inclined to your latitude and adjust up or down for the inclination of the sun (up or down from its equinox path) for that day of the year, you have a compass. For instance, today the sun is just over 23 degrees off its equatorial path. So you have a stick pointing straight out from the mount at a right angle and you just angle it down by 23 and a half degrees. So you tighten it in place at that angle.   Next you combine rotating the entire thing on the ground (keeping your latitude angle correct) and you rotate the mount itself until the stick points straight at the sun.  At this point, no matter where you are on earth, your mount is inclined in line with north/south.  I have 2 little test compasses to try this but it was fully cloudy all day  so I cannot try it out. One uses a Fresnel lens and the other uses a magnifying glass to line up the sun. Just wondering if anyone else has done something like this?  Solar compasses did exist and I had a look today.  They do not look like my thing at all.  They look really complicated! I will post a year of inclination data shortly. Thanks Brian

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply


DIY WiFi Helical Antenna impedance Problems

First off, I live in the states, but I absolutely hate the imperial system of measurements. I will try to use the metric system as much as possible.I have been attempting to follow hanzablast's Helical WiFi Antenna, but have run into a few snags. I have most of the parts and have a few problems concerning it.1. Instead of a Type N connector my USB card has a RP-SMA connector. Do I have to do anything special (buy a special panel mount/ reverse the connections along the wire) because it has reverse polarity or does it not matter?Edit: I feel foolish, Doing a quick wiki search on Reverse Polarity SMA I found out what it means. Turns out WiFi companies reverse the gender of the inner pin in their connectors. So either I have to find a RP-SMA panel mount jack, or buy a RP-SMA Male to N Male Adapter and a N Female Panel Mount. The latter of the two seems more efficient.2. I understand that having too small of wire can have a detrimental effect on efficiency, but what about using a much larger wire (instead of AWG 16 gauge wire using AWG 4 gauge wire)?Edit: Answered By NachoMahma3. I am having trouble locating a SMA right angle 4-hole solder point panel jack mount other than in bulk buys. Does anyone know where to purchase one separately? Edit: Answered By NachoMahma, but has become a null point.4. I am having a problem with the impedance matching. I have seen several different ways to connect the antenna (142.68ohm impedance) to the SMA Jack (50ohm impedance). I've seen half and quarter circumference turns, quarter wavelengths turns, and triangular strips of copper. Which is best?Edit: I did the math and read my friend's ARRL handbook. Supposedly, a 1/4 wavelength turn of a metal strip with an impedance of 84.463 ohm is what I need. Using TraceSim I figured that I can use part of the copper plate with a size of 12.79033mm in width, 30.775mm long (1/4 a 2.437GHz wavelength), and 0.406mm (.016") thickness placed 8.03mm (1/4 distance between coils) above the reflector plate will give me the exact impedance I need.

Topic by AllAgainstPaul   |  last reply


how do you pick up the signal from the chest strap of an un-coded heart rate monitor?

I've got a Polar heart rate monitor, which includes a chest strap and a watch. The strap sends out an RF pulse for each heartbeat it detects. These pulses then get counted and then displayed by the watch on your wrist. I would like to be able to intercept this RF pulse and do my own thing with it. My initial idea is a treadmill-mounted device that displays the current heart rate and at least some sort of min/max display, indicating when you are in the ideal HR zone. I think I know how to build the device, but the first step of intercepting the pulses has got me stumped. Anybody know the specifications of the strap and how to get the signal? Thanks!

Question by dmeierhofer   |  last reply


Model a heliostat with a drill press, laser pointer and mirrors?

Mechanical Heliostats were important scientific instruments over a hundred years ago and one mirror heliostats were often used to focus sunlight on an experiment. Better mirrors became cheap and 2 mirror heliostats replaced them. Then electric light killed off both types.But now, solar energy is becoming important again. Big fairly low efficiency mirrors can be made with mylar stretched across a frame. Perhaps now is the time to get 1 mirror heliostat research going again! (With low efficiency mirrors, 70% efficiency becomes 49% if you use 2 mirrors to reflect the light) So you get less efficiency for twice the expense if you use 2 mirror heliostats!But first we need to model the process. It just takes too long to test your ideas outside! Here is the start of my model of mirrors on an equatorial mount (also called a polar mount) and the sun moving on the celestial sphere. I think that it will end up being very useful. I just gotta find the right mirrors and the right laser pointer. A heliostat with the mirrors moving at one rotation every 2 days, can do this perfect reflection but it is limited to certain angles because the mirror must be upright on the mount.In my model, I have left out the earth's surface for them moment. So we will just model the suns movement, the heliostat mirror movement and have a target to see how much the reflection moves too.Brianhttps://www.instructables.com/id/S1QAZI9FS8O1X6Z/

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply


Solder-It-Yourself LED Board Kit

Hello all, I'm here to offer my LED board kit. You may be familiar with it if you saw my Ready, Set, Go! Lights Instructable. They were originally a product I was making to light up Hyundai Tiburon's but that ultimately did not pan out and now I have quite a few spare parts.I will be selling these at cost in an attempt to make back a portion of the money I spent designing them. (AKA need money for new projects! :P )You get everything you see in the picture:(1) blank LED board PCB(10) Super-flux 'really bright' LEDs (1 extra)(6) 1/4W surface mount resistors (3 extra, they are notoriously small and easy to lose)(1) 1N4001 diode for reverse polarity protectionAvailable colors are white, blue, and red (custom combos are available)Price is $3USD per kit, shipping to North America is $2.50USD (Canada Post Light Packet) up to 6 kits.$1USD soldering fee for those not comfortable soldering.Paypal is the preferred payment method.Check out some pics of finished boards: http://www.rumblerobotics.com/tiblights

Topic by travis7s   |  last reply


brushed induction motor confusion? [answered] Answered

My father and I are currently restoring a metal-working lathe, however, we do not have 3 phase power to power the original 0.5HP 3 phase motor. We do, however, have a slightly smaller 0.25HP motor. At first appearance, it seemed to be a simple AC/DC brushed motor with a field and winding on the armature. There was no wiring diagram supplied with it, but in one configuration (what appeared to be the ameuture and field coils) are wired in parallel for 120V operation. This did not seem right, since the field coils will be simply shorted across the mains, but I assumed that since we are dealing with AC and inductors, this is OK. It works flawlessly, but reversing the polarity of either the fields or armature would cause the motor to sit and buzz. If started manually, it took off slowly but sounded awful. I need the motor to rotate in both directions and do not have enough materials to do this mechanically. On closer inspection after dismantling the motor, it appears there are 4 brushes, connected together in 2 pairs. They are not directly connected to anything. The 4 wires coming out seem to be just for wiring both field coils in either series of parallel for 110V and 220V operation respectfully. Perhaps even more strange, the 4 brushes are mounted on a centripetal switch, which disengage the brushes from the armature. I was able to make out on the rust that it said "revolution induction motor." So I reasoned out that after the fields are energized, it will induce an electrical current in a few of the coils on the armature, and the energy would flow to the other 2 sets of brushes, causing a different set of coils on the amature to energize and this would initially start the motor. After it gets going, the switch disconnects all the brushes and the motor operates as a simple induction motor. My father used to rebuild motors for a small company, and this is in fact one of the motors he repaired. Although he is skilled at this practice, he does not understand the operation of induction motors and can only figure out wiring by strictly following a diagram or trial and error. I am curious about what this type of motor even is, and how it works! In th meantime, I will research induction motors and how they work, and see what I can learn.

Question by -max-   |  last reply


Question on using a Peltier/TEC device for air temperature control - Help please.

I want to have some control over the temperature inside the Orchidium I'm designing and I thought it might be cool :) to use a Peltier Device (device aka module) (Peltier aka TEC or Thermoelectric Cooler). I find I need a lot of help! (Please!) Alright, this isn't a completed Instructable, it's a plea for help, and maybe if the subjects lie in some of your fields of knowledge then we can all enjoy and learn from it. So, the Orchidium I'm designing is an acrylic case 24"W x 18"D x 30"High. It's to grow species orchids indoors in a microclimate, with LED grow lights, proper humidity, air movement and temperature control. (Of course, other critters would like the case, too: poison dart frogs, newts, carniverous plants, etc.. But I'm going to call it the Orchidium.) I've got it all pretty well planned out so that it can be built for a very reasonable price (yes, including the LEDs) and still be aesthetically pleasing and real purdy, too. All planned out EXCEPT FOR THE TEMPERATURE CONTROL. I was looking for some way to cool my case and I stumbled across Peltier devices in eBay. They are CHEAP, costing about $5 or more, depending on the Wattage, etc. The eBay sellers intimated that all you have to do is plug them in and the device gets ice cold. Later, with diligent web-study I learned that actually ONE SIDE of the peltier gets cold, while the other side gets hot. Also, you MUST attach a heat sink and fan to both (?) sides of the peltier. Also, that these devices are not ready to be plugged in; you must attach a DC power supply to them. Oh, another trick that these miraculous devices do is reverse their hot & cold sides when you reverse the polarity of their juice. Ideally, I would like a Peltier device with heatsinks, fans, a thermostat and a DC wall transformer attached... the Peltier/heatsinks/fans would measure about 2" x 2" x 6" and would be mounted in the sidewall of the Orchidium. When the temperature is 65-85F degrees the orchids are happy and the device is Off. But when the thermostat senses the internal temp going over 85F it turns on the Peltier, cold side inside, and so the inside of the case doesn't go up to 90-95F like mine does now; it cools the case a little. Conversely, for someone with chilly orchids or sneezing newts the thermostat would switch the Peltier to hot-side-in to heat the Orchidium a bit. The retail cost for us to buy a Peltier device, 2 heatsinks w/fans and a DC transformer is cheap... roughly $30. The thermostat might be cheap, but I don't know enough about what's needed. If it's too expensive then the Orchidium can do without it. I was hoping I could find an off-the-shelf Orchidium cooler/heater. No such luck. These miraculous Peltier devices are still practically undiscovered -- relatively speaking. People want to use them to cool their computer chips but are hampered by condensation; my orchids welcome condensation. Pathetically, it seems the most common use for Peltiers now is to cool/heat the little boxes on your car seat... they plug into your cigarette lighter and keep your 6-pack cold. Come on! You folks at Instructables can surely help me figure out how to best make an Orchidium cooler with this barely-discovered and poorly-utilized device. I started out a few weeks ago writing to many of the Peltier manufacturers around the world in hopes they might help me in choosing which of their modules I might purchase for my Orchidium. None of them was any help. They wanted to know how many million Orchidiums I planned per year. They told me my basic plan was hopeless or inefficient cost-wise. A Swedish company wanted $800. An American company wanted $500. Some other company wanted $5,000 to $8,000. I wrote back and said I could get a Peltier on eBay for five bucks. The Swedes snottily claimed that their Peltiers were very high quality. No. No way is any svensker Peltier $795 better than ANY other Peltier in the known universe. They both get cold and grow ice crystals on one side. I just need to cool the case A LITTLE BIT, like from 90 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. I am not trying to make a refrigerator or freezer. The case (Orchidium) is large, at about 7.5 cubic feet, and there is practically no insulation. Acrylic provides a little insulation, that's all. The temp of the interior of the case is derived from the ambient room temperature of your house... and the lights... which is why I designed it with LEDs. There is a constantly-operating muffin fan inside the case to provide air movement for the plants, but it does not provide any evaporative cooling since it's a closed case. So, first off what size Peltier do you recommend... do you think a 40 Watt would be enough, or what? Next, the placement. I envision the Peltier device mounted vertically through a hole in the side of the case. It might be a plan to mount it in the ceiling, but remember that the LEDs take up most of the ceiling. Next, the heatsinks. I confess I'm not totally clear on this, but I "think" that 2 heatsinks-with-fans may be needed, with one sticking out the outside and the other inside the case. I went ahead and got 2 heatsink/fans from Newegg for supercheap ($1 after rebate), but they aren't really what I want. They're actually shaped to fit some AMD chip. What I think I need is a copper heatsink with a flat bottom a little bigger than the Peltier, and fins... and a heatsink fan attached... and some way to attach it to the Peltier, and through the case to the other heatsink. See? Simple... well it should be but I can find nothing. Next, the power supply. I know it has to be DC, but I don't know which brick to get. I did find a bunch of DC or AC Wall Transformers for sale at alltronics... around $10 or so. All that stuff would be enough... at least to test the cooling power. But if we want to go whole hog then the icing on the cake would be thermostatic control of the Peltier. Well, I throw that out in case one of you is sharp in that field.

Topic by Knuten   |  last reply


Magnetmotor - really impossible or just supressed?

When someone starts talking about a so called magnetmotor than most people judge right away.Laws of physics, perpetuum mobile is impossible, magnets are static....We all know the limitations nature puts on us... That however did not stop quite a few people since the 1950's to build working magnet motors. Or, to be precise: To make the claim, show them and then somehow disappear. A few though seem to have survived and even claim to make good business. Securely closed machine, stellite tracking and 24/7 online monitoring. Either just a bad and long running hoax or a real attempt to keep a secret secret. Even the somewhat famous Yildiz motor showed off around the world only to disappear.Some like them, some don't. Either way all this sounds like the perfect conspirary theory LOL So lets take a look on what is fake and what might be real but missing some vital clues. You can find several good Youtube channels created by people trying to build a working magnet motor. Some of them have no problems to admit failure and still keep trying and updating their projects. Did long enough and you see two outcomes. The first is giving up or "realising" that it will never work. The second often seems like a user is getting some relly good results and is really close to keep the magnetmotor running. Both disappear without and updates or traces. Now of course this is just confirmation that it will never work, but then again: What if it did already quite a few times? Even Tesla had patents for a magnetmotor and so far none of his patents were a hoax. Although none of his patents allow to actually build a working devices without some additional info and knowledge. And that is the key that I am trying to get: The lost knowledge.How can a magnetmotor never work? That one is quite simple from the start. If a linear model won't work no matter where you start then a rotary version will fail as well. And if a linear version works, it has to do so far at least 5 segments and with preferably increasing or at least constant speed. Having said that and assuming you know a little bit about magnetism: Ever wondered about shapes of magnets?? The common types are block, round like a bar and those disk like ones, some even with holes. A less well known version is the ring magnet. You can look them up as well as their corresponding magnetic field geometry - or what is assumed to be the right geometry. To give you a clue: All those floating spinning toys use a ring magnet in the base and onother one in the spinner. In the center is a dead zone for the magnetic field that is far lower than further out on the ring. And the strnger outer fields also reach further - giving the entire spinner a bowl like area to float on, the spinning just stabilises it like a gyroscope. A similar flat disk magnet wouldn't have this indentation in the field but rather a dome like sphere. The ring just kicks a dint into this sphere if you don't mind the simpification. Similar changes in the field structure happen when you combine two or more magnets. One example we all know is stacking identical smaller magnets. And often we are suprised how much stronger two thin disk magnets are compared to a single. Distance however sets a certain limit. And take those hook magnets... Just a small ring magnet in a metal pot with core. Remove the magnet and just by itself it is far weaker. Why? Quite simple.... The same way a transformer core directs the magnetic flow, the metal part of the hook magnet provides a shortcut for the magnetic field - and in return all is much stronger ;) Now you have some more clues, but still there are tons of options for failure... The most common is the sticking effect. No matter how well you planned and designed in most cases you linear or rotary prototype will stall sooner or later. Even if started manually at high speeds some seem to run very long but once they slow down and stop it is obvious they always stop where the magnetic field won't allow the binding effect to be overcome.Wouldn't dare to say that I have a working magnetmotor, but I might have some clues you want to try if you decide to give it a try yourself. So how COULD a magnetmotor actually work? Like in the Perendiv examples all over the web, you could aloow a moving responder to the rotor. Like a piston the responder will be lifted in areas it would otherwise limit or reduce the speed of the system. Well designed only a few mm would b required but it also means wasted energy to move the responder. Then there is the nice way of modifying fields by adding magnets in different angles and polarities. Lets say towards the end of your stages on the linear model it is hard to overcome the binding effect from the end of the previous stage. The perendiv model would now somehow change the distances. But you can also add magnets to lower the binding effect ;) Like a ring or hook magnet you can shape the field and offer a stronger repulsin field or a lower binding force. Last but certainly not least is the option of adding magnetic metals like iron or somehow weirder ones like bismuth. So, do we have any examples of something very common utilising any of this? We sure do :) Take a speaker apart and you end with the cage, the membrane, the actual work coil and the magnet. We don't need anything but the magnet so take a good and very close look. What in the audio world is called a shield to prevent the magnet from messing with things close by is exactly the same as on a hook magnet ;) Only difference is the tiny gap for the coil. The magnetic field is directed into two paths, one by the metal core, the other by the inner enclosure of the magnet or the magnet itself. The coil operates in the area of maximum flux.Last hints... If you take two identical and strong magnets with north or south facing up then it is quite hard to push them very close together. But check what happens if you try the same wen both soth poles (or both north poles) are placed on a magnetic surface - if in doubt your standard fridge door. Suddenly you can move much closer together with the same amout of force (not considering the added friction!). And similar story for opposing configurations. Where in free air or on a table the magnets would just jump together, on a metal plated you can move them much, much closer before this happens. Copper pipe and magnet fun :) Ideally you would have a straight copper pipe and a cylindrical magnet that has a loose fit in the pipe. Aluminium pipe work too or even a roll of aluminium foil if you have nothing else. A magnet in the pipe will travel very slow down the pipe, friction is not an issue here. So what is slowing it down? The magnet creates a field in the pipe and through that the pipe generates electicity. And funny enough this electricity creates an opposing magnetic field in the pipe - the magnet slows down. Even if you glue it onto a wooden stick it won't rush through it. Trying to push it by hand and you feel the created resistance. The faster you push, the harder it is to push! If you made it all the way down here with the reading then I have to assume you fit into one of three of my categories. a) You are a total sceptic and just read it for your amusement. If so, then please don't post a reply with usual negative feedback, instead see it as the same fun you had reading it ;) b) You are at least curious and like to play with magnets. In this case take the above as inspiration to explore more ways to have fun with your magnets! c) You are more or less frustated because you wasted a lot of time and some money to build a magnet motor that just won't work. A and B might go on and enjoy the fun, C however might want to read very attentive now ;) If you take some indicator sheet for magnetic fields, like these funny green ones, and play with moving magnets then you see a very interesting effect on the "screen". The otherwise static field lines change chape and sometimes even seem to disappear or shrink. With a small rotor assembly it almost looks like flashes when the magnets move past each other. This effect is often totally neglected and to be honest I overlooked it for a long time as well. Being able to see how the magnetic field changes gives the thing an whole new dimension so to speak. Creating a magnet with a complex shape is difficult to say the least. Only ferrite or ceramic ones can be used and you would cut of machine them according to your desired shape and with regards to the orginal center of the magnetic field. So most people revert to the classic way of shaping by adding magnets of various types, sizes and amounts. Modern neodymium magnets make this trial and error process easier as there are many sizes and strengths available. Add a detector shield of suitable size and you have hours of fun time ahead of you. But doing so in any rotary assembly is next to impossible. So what did Yildiz differently and what was missed so many times? Yildiz took it a step further and not only provided "shunts" to create very strong magnetic field from the generated electricity but also a second rotor. Since we all start small lets focus on the basics first. Remember the hook magnet and speaker or the copper pipe? Some examples for shape shifting your otherwise static magnetic fields: 1. A magnetic metal "connection" from one (low in the armature) pole to an opposing (high in the amature) pole with cause the field from the "high" pole to "bend" towards the connected magnet. 2. A magnet with an orientation of 90° to the last magnet is the sequence will severely influence the field of this last magnet! This goes for either orientations! 3. Adding a non-magnetic "shield" around a magnet, like a piece of copper pipe, will not affect the static field of the magnet. However it will severely alter the field of the enclosed magnet when another magnet passes it! It will also affect the overal field during the passing as the moving magnet will also induce a field in the copper by affecting the field of the enclosed magnet! Thickness and lenght of the shield influence the strength of these effects. 4. In a simple perendiv motor design the bar that creates the attraction for the spinning part is a magnet too. Either a long bar type or two small ones with an iron or nickel rod between them. There is no need for a piston or something that drives the bar up or out of the way ;) Just use the right magnet at the right spot on your rotor to repell the bar ;) Mount the ar with suitable springs and you suddenly can have multiple stages on your rotor instead of just the usual one! Don't forget the moving magnet on the opposing side of the segment in question though as otherwise you still will get stuck. (Hint: You can place a small but powerful magnet in the center of the opposing bar ;) Just make sure you limit the springs movement so the bar won't be pulled closer)Ok, hold on now! Does a magnet motor actually work or not? I can only give hints and say the laws of physics as we know them apply to magnetmotors the same way as everything else. Unlimeted motion without supplying energy is not possible. Limited motion with adding or using energy however is still possible and real. The same is true for being able to machine, 3D print or otherwise manufacture at very tight tolerence and accuracy levels. This includes bearings or bearing systems with very little friction losses. Just check these floting and rotating magnet toys that look like a spindle. Only a tiny needle like pin makes contact with a glass surface - next to no friction loss. A proper and supposedly working magnet motor should provide more energy than what it uses - one way or the other. No law of physics lets us get around the fact that such a motor could only keep spinning if the produced power or motion energy is at least the same as what is required to make it move. Magnets lose their strenght over time, they are like a very slowly depleting battery. So, isn't it funny that all magnet motors so far that claimed to work also had the requirement to replace the magnets once the things fails to work or start? And if you leave a very strong neodymium magnet shielded from outside fields or magnetic stuff than your grandkids will still find a quite strong magnet. Do a little performance test with your new magnets, like how much force is required is required to lift them off a steel plate. Make the same test with the magnets once you played around extensively with them in your motor. Now take a spare magnet that was never used from the orginal batch and compare both against each other ;) If the motor would not use energy then why are the magnets depleted to a certain degree, realted to runtime and usage time? Wait a minute! Does that now mean it actually works? Lets just say energy is certainly used. We only know similar effects from electromagnetic systems. But did anyone ever really check how much actual energy is in magnetic field generated by a non electric magnet? Get a good sized N52 neodymium magnet and check how much force is required to pull it off a steel surface. Now try to get the smallest sized electromagnet capable of that force and check how much energy it consumes at the level that equals the pulling force of the N52 magnet ;) Makes no sense to even try to compare these you will say now. I just say energy is energy and we were formed to only think in certain ways and don't even try silly things like this ;) To keep the fun up let us imagine we would actually have a similar energy available than what our electro magnet would require. In reality more because we wouldn't have electrical or flux related losses in the metal around the coil. Or is the imagined reality, no clue ;) If true it would mean even a motor with very bad efficiency would be able to create huge amounts of torque. Well, torque is basically acceleration. Which would mean our motor would not just be happy to spin, it would speed up until the bearing fail or the thing is ripped apart. Imagine a dental drill of that size and weight suddenly falling apart at full speed... Every example of motors claimed to be working, that are not fakes, seem to be happy no matter what the load is. It the thing turns a generator than it would have to slow down a bit with the increased load but they don't. With no limited factors otherwise this makes them a fake. Even a perfect motor would have to react to load changes.... Don't we agree that the stronger the magnetic force or field in a conductor the stronger the resulting magnetic and opposing field of the conductor? We use the difference to either drive a motor or take out electricity... But if you take the "open" shielding of a magnet in a changing field than the influence of the shield on the overall field gets stronger with stronger field changes. And properly desinged and orientated they would actually double as a natural limiter for the rotation speed. Once the electrical energy in the shield becomes too strong it will be able to cancel out the field of the enclosed magnet...If we assume a magnet motor is really possible and works with the intended output to keep it spinning or even take energy out: Then what would be possible downfalls that stop this thing happening in everyones garage? We can explore the stars but so far no one bothered to invent anything to visualise magnetic field in a 3 dimensional way other than by simulation. No realtime and true observation like this. The few working technologies that exist rely on sensors, interpretaion and filling in gaps. But imagine something like a detector shield as cloud! And then even better with selctive spacing to get a realtime view of where exactly the field lines go. All we can do is forget our teaching and try it out anyway ;) If by some mistake a magnet motor would really work right away, then chances are high the inventor would wonder why that thing takes off like mad and how to stop it. Unless well prepared it would certainly end in the destrution of the motor. But the inventor would know what to look for in the next prototype. The logical conclusion would be to the couple the energy taken to the speed while physically limittin the free load speed. The other one would be the design the electrical generator around the and within the motor. To even get close to this point you would have to spend endless days and nights working on finding a solution. The closer you get the more disappointment when the final model still fails to keep spinning for more than a few hours. Most people will then accept defeat and move on... Still not saying it actually works but if you made it to this point in time where it could be easier to move on and do other things:Ever wondered what would happen if you "shield" a magnet with a coil? Of course nothing would happen as we know. But try this in some fixed assembly that allows you move another magnet through the field of the shielded one. Perferably witha force gauge or some option to read out the energy required to move it through the various stages of the field. See what happens if you short the coil or add a resistor to it ;) Now if this coild is able to produce electricity then the more we use the more the effects on the required force would change. What do you think would happen if you combine common coil relations of electric motors to a "coil shielded" magnet motor? Right, all these coils would interact with the magnetic fields of the coils they are connected to... And through that with the overall field surrounding the enclosed magnet..... I leave up to you to imagine how these interacting coils could provide "resistance" or "acceleration"/"surplus electricity"...Like they say: You can only find out if you try ;) To keep up the positive thinking: A permanent magnet just sticks to any magnetic surface and does so with the same force. But the real energy loss in terms of getting weaker can almost be neglected. Any electromagnet capable of the same holding force woul require ongoing energy supplies to keep it up. It is using energy the same way the permanent magnet does! The difference is the permanent magnet is not seen as anything that would provide us with energy.... And if it can't provide energy other than passing through coils then why the heck does it keep sticking to the fridge year after year? It does require energy to keep this weight up doesn't it, even if you add a thin teflon disk and oil to reduce friction? ;) No magic, no "free energy" bogus, just plain physics viewed from a slightly different angle than what we learn in school ;) Have a good laugh and a good beer, then read it again and just consider some of the things here that are not mentioned in any literature about magnetism that we commonly use. Now I got you thinking, didn't I ? ;)

Topic by Downunder35m   |  last reply