What is this? For polishing? Answered

Anyone know what this is? I'm guessing that it's supposed to be powered by a drill and used with buffing compound for polishing. Thanks! Pictures: 

Question by Yonatan24   |  last reply


Polishing large stones

I am looking for some advice on polishing large stones. I am from New Jersey, and there is a plentiful supply of bog iron. I can't dig a hole in the ground in my yard deeper than 8 inches without coming across some of it. Some stones are small but most wiegh about 20 to 30 lbs. I have several that are at least 150 lbs. I have tried to use them in as many ways as I can think of to decorate my yard. But bog iron is not always an attractive stone. I have seen some small polished samples on the internet and I like the way they turned out. I would like to try and polish some of my larger stones. I could do it by hand but it might take months or even years. I'm not sure what a sandblaster would do to it, but I don't own one and am not looking to buy one. Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions for a faster way to polish a large stone. Thanks in advance.

Topic by feign   |  last reply



sword help

Hi all a friend has a toledo steel sword that needs help.  it looks like some one tried taking a dermel to it to sharpen it,  there is gouges/ groves in the blade.  i have a dremel and polishing stones, wheels and compound, but I have no clue how to use any of it.  any and all suggestions would be appreciated.  Thank you for your time.

Topic by denkeeper   |  last reply


French polishing a turned item.? Answered

Hello, How would I go about french polishing a turned item. The problem associated with it is that the sanding and polishing (assuming I polish on the lathe) will both be accross the grain which is generally considered the less preferable option. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Question by alexhalford   |  last reply


Creating Polish/Different Recipes

Hello Everyone...I would like to introduce a forum for leather polishes. Please send in any recipes, ideas or ingredients that you deem worthy for polishes.

Topic by dfunct 


What is the best polish available?

After I’ve done all the tool work to the parts I’ve polished, I have been doing a final coat by hand with wenol. i've used wenol for years on my motorcycles to keep them clean etc etc... i know that I’m very partial to wenol, but what does everyone else use after the initial polish to shine/clean the metal?

Topic by freck   |  last reply


scratches on polished marble,granite?

Hi, An electrician put a five gal. pail with tools on the tub surround and put surface scratches on it. The surface is polished to a shiny sheen.The marble co. I asked about the repair said they'd send a 2 man crew-I don't need the expense right now- Any suggestions? Thanks

Question by timesaverhandyman   |  last reply


Best to polish clear cast resin? Answered

My mum's in the process of making a lot of clear cast jewellery and is having trouble sanding imperfections down and then getting them back up to a good shine, as they're transparent it does need to be a good clear finish...

Question by killerjackalope   |  last reply


Sanding/polishing porcelain beads in a tumbler

I'm looking to tumble porcelain bisque (not the final firing, still soft enough to sand off impefections), and polish the final fired porcelain beads in a tumbler. See attached photos of a final fired porcelain bead for the scale. I'm wondering if you know what media, burnishing compound etc I should be using, and for how long.. I already have a 3lb capacity Lortone Tumbler with stainless steel shot currently for polishing metal. But I believe this tumbler also does rocks.

Topic by jarris   |  last reply


Rubbing compound, polshing compound and paste wax? Answered

I wanted to prevent rust buildup on some of my tools. Especially on my drill bits. I have been reading a few and mostly found out that Johnson's paste wax are what other people use to prevent rust. Does a rubbing compound alone will prevent rust or does it need to be finished with a paste wax? I do notice that the rubbing compound is mostly to level or smoothen the surface. Just wondering if it also has the ability to prevent rust. Thank you.

Question by Cozythrias   |  last reply


Sharpening knifes and similar tools

On the weekend a friend of mine asked me if I could get his 2 fishing knifes ready for the season.Being a nice guy I agreed as they were so blunt that you could sit on the knifes edge without even getting a scratch.Did just the usual, you know, cleaning it first, grinding a proper angle back on it with a very coarse stone, sharpening from a 300 grit down to a 1000 grit and then of course polishing and removing the burr.Was quite pleased with the result and decided to bring the finnished knifes back to my friend....There are several ways to check if a knife is sharp.Most know the newpaper cutting thing.Some dare to try if the knife i able to shave some hair off.And a few actually know that it is enough to check if it won't slip of your fingernail.My friend however was used to knifes that I would consider to be piece of steel with a rounded edge...Of course he had to try to run his finger down the blade and before I could stop him....He said "Feels nice and smooth but I think you ruined the edge with your polishing!".I only said "Get some bandaids before you check your finger and reconsider."Lets just say about 10 seconds after his test he started bleeding like a pig.He actually managed to get the cut about 5mm deep :(We agreed that it would be best to keep these knifes in the boat and to put a note on them so he won't check their sharpness again.There are tons of tutorials and videos showing various ways of sharpening a knife that can be used as a general reference.But if you already know all the basic while still struggling a bit to get the edge and sharpness you desire:The most important thing to know is what type of steel is used in your blade.I don't mean the grade or composition, just the difference between stainless steel and old style steel that is able to rust.You never want to sharpen a stainless steel blade with a stone that is well used on normal steel.If in doubt clean it out!The reason behind is that you cause the steel that is able to oxidise or rust to be worked into the stainless steel surface.In the worst case this can cause rust spots or smalle pits in your sharpened edge.When it comes to restoring the edge of a well worn knife some beginners and so called expert struggle to keep the angle and edge itself even and straight.Tools to overcome this are available, like these guides for a diamond stone on a stick where you cplamp your blade in.There are also "trolleys" that hold your blade at a fixed angle on the stone by means of small wheels.Both have their uses but also a lot of limitations, especially when it comes to the rounded parts of a blade, like the tip or filet knife that is generally curved a bit.Special knifes like the old Kukri knifes have a curved part that goes to the inside, these are a true pain with normal grinding and honing stones, so I will leave them out here, but feel free to ask in the comments if you need more info.The best way I found for restoring a rounded knifes edge without special tools is by using a long diamond file.Preferably with a quite long handle and not too wide.Like with the guide tools the key is to cheat your way through ;)But unlike most guide tools you will still keep the same angle in the curved parts ;)Here are the basic tool required:Long handled diamond fileSome wooden block or similar to get work platforms of different heights (lego blocks work too)A long enough clamp to secure your blade on the block(s)For the last you can also make a screw clamp like a hinge to hold the blade in place.You want to knife to be secured so it won't move and so that you can reach all parts of the edge with the file.Depening on what side you work on or what you prefer the file will rest with the handle either above or below the knife.With the length of the handle you can adjust the required angle, preferably in the 20-25° region.For the straight parts of the blade you work in overlapping sections.Rest the handl so it aligns close to the knifes handle and move the file along the knifes edge.It helps to use a permanent marker on the endge to visualise where you take material off and to check the work area creates a parallel area in the painted bits.When you see some material removed move the handle of the file a bit further towards the pointy bit and continue to create the parallel boundaries.Kepp going back and forth along the straight part of the blade until there is only a tiny area left on the edge where the marker stays visible.For the rounded tip part you place the handle so you can follow the curve on the knife at the same angle as on the straight part.Most knife have this area badly neglected once well used so you might end up with a slightly wider area where material is removed.Once the edge is all reduced to the same slim marker line it is time to repaet the process on the other side at the same angle you used before.Don't be too scared to see in a close up that your edge is not perfectly even or straight, a few imperfections will be buffed out in the next step.To finnish the edge and smooth it out you use a flat stone or diomand plate of similar grid to the file, for example 300.If you do this step right you won't even need fancy guides or tricks after doing it a few times.The key from now on is keep an even angle that matches your initial angle to restore the edge.The old masters were right here to use stones that are either secured tightly in a wooden frame or "clamped" down by a leather strap.Apart from needing a perfectly clean and flat surface on the stone and movement will cause a more or less rounded edge again.Every use one of these fancy chesse slicers that work like a potato peeler?You wanna do the same with your knife on the stone.With the stone in front of you start at the far end and move the blade down like you want to cut a thin slice of the stone.Always with the edge towards you like cutting something off, never the other way around.If you don't mount your stone too high you will notics that it is quite easy to use your palms as a guide to keep an even angle throughout a cutting stroke.To find the right angle you again cheat with a marker.But no matter what type of stne or diamond sharpener you use: use lube!!The coarse types usually are fine with water, diomand anyway, finer or so called "oil sones" require honing oil.Do a few strokes and check the marks you left on the marker.Adjust until you get about the same work area cleaned as in the previous step with the file.You will soon see that there are now uneven areas which cause a wobbly outline on the marker.Continue with this grit until you get a nice and even outline.For the rounded tip area you do it similar but with a slight twisting motion.It can help to do a few dry runs on a piece of cardboard to find the right twist.Simply place the rounded part on the cardboard at the approx angle for the sharpening.Now move the handle so the edge follows the curve on the cardboard - the circular motion you need to get from the straight part to the tip is the "twist" you want during the sharpeing of this area.Again, once satisfied do the same on the other side.Now it is time to decide if you want to keep the angle all the way or if you prefer a beveled edge with a slightly wider angle for actual cutting edge.The later is good for knifes that see a lot of abuse and hard work, the first for everything that needs to be really sharp.I prefer sharp so lets continue with this and if you can't figure out how to get a second agnle on the edge ask me in the comments ;)Depending on the quality of your blade you now need to work your way up the grid.If your edge (the part with marker left) is more than half a mm wide you might want to keep going with 300 grit until no marker is left and the edge develops a slight bur on the other side.From now on cleaning the blade and stone every few minutes is a good thing!Rinse it off, wipe it off, flush it off, whatever works best to keep it clean.If you go to 600 grit you will clearly see the difference in the work area.The scratches buff out an the surface becomes smooth.You keep doing the same slicing technique but only do as many strokes as required to get a slight bur throughout the edge on the other side.You will feel it when you move your finger along the side, one feels smooth, one feel very rough.Areas that stay smooth indicate that there is either still material to be removed or that you created a small dint while sharpening - the marker will tell you.Once you get a bur with just a few strokes you know the edge is there.Time to move the next higher grit you have available.From here on you might need to use oil instead of water and depending on the type of stone you will need to leave some slurry on the stone - check the manual ;)Either way the procedure is still the same: Slice a thin piece off until you get a bur.Then do the other side until both are even.Assuming around 1000 grid is the usual max on a hobby level and that you don't have any finer stone it is now time to take of the bur on the edge.No matter what you try there will always be some but created when sharpening.A lot can be prevented and smoothed out though.To do this you reduce the pressure during the last few strokes and turn the knife around often.When you get to the point where a single stroke causes a bur and another single stroke on the other side inverts the bur the knife is almost ready.Polishing a knifes edge can cause a bit of bluntness.For obvious reasons it is best to sharpen to the honing point where a 5000 - 20000grit wet stone is used, but these are quite expensive and require special care.In other cases like our example here you need to make the best out of it:Get some sturdy old leather like some belt.Use proper glue and clamps to glue it onto a really flat piece of wood.You want the smooth side glued and the rough side of the leather facing up.Prepare the leather with some kitchen knife that is need of sharpening anyway by placing it almost flat onto the strip with the edge facing away from you.With good pressure move the blade toward you.You will have to do this several times to align the fibres in one direction only.Now get some metal polishing paste or if nothing else polishing wax for metal - the fine stuff for the wax type please.Rub it in and work in with the kitchen kifes the same as bafore, always in the same direction.You will create a bit of a mess but that does not matter for now.The leather will become more and more smoth on the surface until it appear quite even.Clean the excess off and grab the real knife.There is now enough lube and polishing material in the leather to last quite a while.Start with the knife as flat as possible, again the edge facing away from you when you move the knife in a slicing motion towards you.Do this for a few minutes and you will see that the sharpened edge becomes shiny where it goes into the knifes body.Once all is polished increase the angle slightly and repeat.In a perfect world the polishing should now go almost to the last bit of the edge, only leaving a very thin rough line.This last line is the critical bit.There are two ways to deal with it, pressure or time.If you keep the last used angle but increase your pressure the blade will go deeper into the leather and the polishing should reach the front of the edge.In the other case you slightly increase you angle but only use very little pressure, more like letting the knife rest on the leather while you move it along.In either case you check the edge often with your finger and once it feel really smooth throuout you stop.Turn the knife over often during this last step as even with the polishing you create a slight bur.Only repeated turning and using as little pressure as possible will remove this last bur on both sides.If you know think your knife is still not sharp enough than you might just have a very cheap knife... ;)

Topic by Downunder35m   |  last reply


Clean pen nibs in nail polish remover? Answered

Is it possible to clean dip pen nibs (speedball) in nail polish remover? Gratias, josh1324 PS. ink is pigmented acrylic

Question by josh1324   |  last reply


Differents polishers in Dremel set. What to use? Answered

I use a Dremel-clone, and it has two kind of polishers; the white felt ones and this two other type: Looks like hard rubber, and I used it to burnish steel to clean some grinding marks. It works, but I'm not sure: 1 - Must I use the  polishing powder like with the felt ones? 2 - Why they have two colors, green and blue? Have they different hardness? Thanks for your time!

Question by infob   |  last reply


Need to polish tan leather fashion boots.

I have a pair of Steve Madden (very expensive) knee length, platform fashion boots. They have never been worn, but they have been moved several times. They are made of a regular smooth leather, but have some light scratches (which look lighter than the rest of the boot). I want to polish them for resale, but don't want to have the scratches turn out dark. Please advise, M

Question by depnomore   |  last reply


Rock tumbling, is there an economical substitution for grit & polish? .

I have vibrating & rotary tumblers. The commercial grit & polish I've been using, comes in a 4 step process. Is there a homemade grit or other options for tumbling rocks & gems?    Thank you

Question by Jolieblnde   |  last reply


A good way to clean/ polish badly tranished brass?

I have a brass bed that's badly tarnished. Tried Brasso with limited success. Becasue the bed is a large area to polish elbow grease would wear an average person out! Does anybody know of a better way to polish Brass?

Question by bilwen   |  last reply



Polishing small or very detailed metal parts - the easy way ;)

I should not get hoocked on the cummunity side here again but well, I am bored today...If you have a vintage car, some old steam engine models or even really old clocks then you know my pain.Copper, brass and sometimes aluminium was used and if not cared for in time they nice shine goes first.Dirt and dust come next.And with more time passed we start to consider leaving it as the polishing would take forever.Take one of my "hobbies": old mantle clocks...Literally everything inside is brass.Now polishing a bass backing plate with some holes is quite easy if you have an ultrasonic cleaner to clean the debris out of the tiny holes when done.Even tried to polish a sprocket or fine spring mechanism?If spoked then this is a really painful job.But the same is true if you have old copper and brass ware, like these old stenciled pictures on copper sheets.No matter what you try these jobs end up to take more time than what you imagined and in many cases fine details are left oxidised or filled with the polishing compount.Now imagine you could get rid of these tarnishes and discolorations without cramps in your hand and bying all sorts of polishing products?Sure there are the well known brands that polish a lot of metal with ease by simply wiping over them.But they use harmful and often toxic chemicals and are still no good for really fine details like grooves or emossed stuff.Wearing gloves and protection is often a must and at least I can't stand the stink of them.We all know how to clean our dishes, even how to get the dried on lasagne from last night off the dinner plates.So why not do the same with our brass, copper or aluminium parts?Just use a spongue, rub and wipe a bit, rinse off and let dry.Ok, those who tried before reding the rest might be a bit angry now as it does not work that easy.Well, actually it does, just don't use dishwashing liquid :)Let me give you two of the worst cleaning problems I encountered first:You did some very fine brazing to create something nice from brass or bronze.The flux you can wash off, but polishing the discoloration from the heat and resulting oxidisation will take longe than the brazing job.The other ecounter was the restauration of a petromax style blow torch of alomst 60 years of age - but thankfully it was never used for more than decoration.All brass and a lot parts impossible to polish due to size and being quite delicate.Now we all have ways to spend a lot of time and being creative to use normal ways of polishing.And, yes I did so myself for many years and kick can myself now too.Since we can't do any advertising here and I clearly don't want to promote any brands or harm other brands by rendering their costly products useless I need a way out that helps everyone.So, again, I am not trying to promote anything here!However I noticed someone in my favourite restaurants kitchen polishing some dark copper pot to a mirrow shine in less than 5 minutes!I was shocked and asked the manager to explain what I just saw.He was confused to say the least..."We clean our pots every day, sometimes more depending on what we cooked in them."Sure but what do you use to do what I need several hours for in minutes and with better results?"Just water and soapy powder to shine the metal sir. All natural product."Omg god or Kali! What makes it shine so quickly?"Shining powder sir!" - mind you the poor guy was now totally confused and worried, while I started to loose my insanity.He noticed the look on my face and went into the kitchen.Gave me a fance looking bag that apart from a lot of Indian writing I could not make any sense of stated "Shining powder" on the pack.When the manager saw the look on face this time he laughed and asked "How do you clean your copper pots sir?"I was speechless and just said with much more time and elbow grease...He packed about thimble worth of powder for me to try and said it would be enough for a medium sizde pot, just use a wet spongue and put a little bit of powder on it.And guess what the stuff worked as good as in the restaurant :(I can't even count how many hours I wasted polishing copper or brass parts with fine details.Or engine parts from aluminium with brass parts inside....With this stuff you just wipe and tough cases rub a bit harder and all is done in literally seconds.In tight areas or those with fine details you use a fine brush like those for painting in water colors.And with that and a spongue you clean even the finest details with ease.In an ultrasonic cleaner it even works on areas you can't reach, just wipe what you can reach and see somehow and it shines.Now if you want this magic stuff and check if the guy here is just pulling your leg then be prepared to pay a lot of money.200 grams of this powder will set you back between 5 and 15 bucks depending on where you shop.That is enough clean about 300 midsized copper pots or a few hundret meters of copper piping....Just ask for shining powder in your Indian grocery store ;)We all waste money or stuff we don't need, so if you have coper, brass or aluminium to polish then try washing it the Indian way - just for fun of testing something else.And if after that test you think the few bucks and information was well worth it than please post your experience with the powder in the comments below.I hope all those members here working with these metals will read this too, so if not help me to spread the word please ;)I am struggling to upload some pics I have taken from the blow torch but will try again alter once I reduced their size.If in doubt I will upload them to a hoster and link them.Disclaimer:I don't advertise, I don't promote!However I am so pleased with this dirt cheap product that I use it now as my prefered and natural option.For this reason I think it is worth sharing.It is not a magic cure! If you have pitted areas, solder marks or brazin coming out of joints it will not help.Same for scratches, they still require abrasive polishing to be removed.But normal dirt from being displayed for years, oxidisation and even slight discoloration from corrosion will vanish.And if the surface has a good polish underneath all this than it will come back with ease ;)

Topic by Downunder35m   |  last reply


Can I use silver polish on a silver trumpet? Answered

This is probably a stupid question, but I am just making sure I can becuase this trumpet is basicly my prized possession.

Question by airsofter1   |  last reply


How and what Powder to Polish Rock containing Agate or Quartz

Got this lucky wreck for $350 and a month of work later is fully refurbished running  smoothly .. I can hand shape ( grind ) Quartz and Agate to pleasing shapes. I can't use Tumble polish because it destroys the shape. Please help me understand what powder like talc etc should I use on the leather spinner polish wheel to shine my art stones like semiprecious stones in a store ??

Question by iceng   |  last reply



How to polish/buff polycarbonate (lexan) on roughly cut edge? Answered

I'm not talking about minor scratches. I would like to polish 1/2" thick cube that I cut out with table saw, it's not transparent at all on the edges (due to rough cut), but I'd like it to be :)  Can I do it with some kind of Dremel attachment?

Question by bratan   |  last reply


dose anyone know how to make a black polish for a old cast iron wood stove Tony

The stove is not painted and have removed all rust ect   Thanks   TONY

Question by tony6677   |  last reply


How should I go about cleaning an i-touch aluminium backing? Answered

Hello, i was wondering how to clean/polish the back of an iPod touch. I have used the dremel polish (but not the felt bit) and a soft cloth, but with no prevail. I have heard that 1500 grit sandpaper might work. any experiences/ideas?

Question by your dog   |  last reply


Resin help! - Wrapping paper came off/marked resin on pendants - How to rescue/polish off? Answered

I made these 4 pendants with pictures inside a bezel filled with resin on top, and though two pendants are fine, the other two must not have been totally dry and the wrapping paper came off a little on the resin and looks very bad. It was a present so I want to try to get rid of the paper somehow, I thought maybe by polishing? I have no idea how to polish it and I'm just afraid of using a polish that is not fine enough and leaving a misty/cloudy appearance, it is suppose to be very glossy. Would really appreciate any help thanks! :/

Question by lsadwdwadw   |  last reply


what tumbler can i use to polish up or smooth my 3d printed creations? Answered

I was wondering if there was a tumbler of some sort that i could purchase to smooth or put a finer touch to my 3d printed objects

Question by 3DeanPrint   |  last reply


How can I polish and rust-protect a steel file cabinet? Answered

I asked a question on how to sand a steel file cabinet down to a mirror finish a couple of weeks ago and got a lot of great answers. I tried some of the suggestions. What worked best was an orbit sander, starting at 60 and going up to 400. At 400, I could see a pretty good reflection of myself with no scratches.I could have made it perfect if I had kept doing that all over the whole file cabinet.Unfortunately, it would have taken forever to get all the scratches out because while I was learning how to sand it and trying out different tools, different sanding techniques, I made too many scratches. For example I used a belt sander on one entire side, thinking that would be faster. It was faster, but it left deep cuts all over. I had started by sanding off some of the paint with those metal brushes that you attach to a drill. Then when I tried to sand that section with the orbit sander, I couldn't get all the scratches out. Even using really coarse hand sandpaper didn't get the scratches out.So instead of giving it a mirror finish, I decided to go over the whole thing with the metal brushes attached to a drill. See what it turned out like below. I am going to leave it like that.So now I need to know how to finish it. I had been following these instructions but they are not working. The rubbing compound does not disappear when you rub it. It is just smearing brown stuff all over the file cabinet. I do not know what the purpose of this is. It's not appearing to polish anything. It just makes a mess. So after rubbing it with cloths didn't get rid of it, I tried to wash it off. But that was an even worse mistake because now there are small rust spots all over even though I dried it with a dry cloth after washing the file cabinet. Also, washing it made it look dirtier. There are water streaks all over it now. I went to Home Depot but I don't know what to buy. I don't want to ask any of the floor staff because they could just say anything and it might make things worse. A guy at Parts Source told me I should use Metal Polish. He actually told me to go to a jeweller and get jewel polish, but then he suggested this Blue Magic Metal Polish Cream. I don't know if he's right or wrong.So my questions are: How can I remove the brown rubbing compound? Washing didn't get all of it. Am I supposed to buff it off? Apparently you can't use water at this stage. How am I supposed to clean off the mess I made when I was only trying to polish it and make it perfectly clean and shiny before coating it?Assuming I can get it cleaned off and make all the rust spots disappear, what am I supposed to coat it with? How many coats?Is there something you're supposed to do after you coat it? Such as do you polish it then? With what?

Question by noahbody_   |  last reply


How do you change the color of leather? Answered

I have a brown wallet my girlfriend got me that she thought was black (she's colorblind), bc i like black so much. I like the wallet a lot, only problem is it's brown. I tried polishing it with black leather polish, but that hardly changed it.

Question by tigerdog330   |  last reply


Magnetic nail art?

Http://www.nylonmag.com/?section=article&parid;=410 Lancome used to make a nail polish with a magnet on the bottle. You'd paint your nails and then put them near the magnet, which would create a starburst pattern by attracting and repelling charged pigments. Is it just me or could this be done with a pinch of iron oxide powder in any nail polish?

Topic by lotusduck   |  last reply


How do i keep my pretty polished pennies pristine from precipitation?

Heya, experts! Short version: freshly polished pennies need to be able to remain bright and shiny after being left out in the rain for one night. Explanation:  We celebrate virtually every holiday in our family, and tomorrow is St Patricks's Day.  It's become a tradition for the kids to "discover" a trail of brightly shined pennies that lead out to some freshly planted shamrocks and other new plants, with a few brightly polished gold dollars underneath.  It's nothing grand, but it's fun to sneak out to plant a little evidence in the garden. This year will see heavy rain and general unpleasantness (SF Bay Area), and every year the pennies that get some water exposure will have dark spots where the water sat.  Lately it seems that i've made some bad calls on impromptu fixes, so i'm putting my question out to the more knowledgeable community here.  Would a little WD40 likely keep tonight's heavy rains from spotting the coins?  Does anyone have any suggestions that would probably work better? Any thoughts our ideas would be appreciated, if just to keep silly little traditions going.  ;-) Cheers!  - A Dad Who's About To Get His Yearly Thumb Blister From Polishing Pennies With A Jewelry Cloth

Topic by Spunk-Monkey   |  last reply


How do I remove sticker and glue residue from polished plastic?

I'm trying to remove a partially destroyed sticker from my motorcycle. The sticker uses a very strong glue (The strongest I've ever seen). The sticker is glued on the plastic windscreen. Alcohol doesn't work, and I don't want to use nail polish remover because it will damage the windscreen. Any ideas?

Question by sunblock   |  last reply


Painting a guitar? Answered

 Sanding? What type of paint? How many coats? What type of lacquer? How many coats? Polishing?

Question by adamgillies   |  last reply


How do you get surface scratches out of marble or granite?

Hi, An electrician worked at the house and put his 5 gal. pail of tools on the tub surround and put scratches on the polished surface. The marble co. says they have to send a 2 man team to fix it,obviously that would be very expensive. Any suggestions to avoid the expense I don't need right now? Thanks

Question by timesaver   |  last reply


whats the best way to care for scratched chrome on a motorbike? Answered

had my first fall today :( ended up scratching the exhaust...whats the best way to clean it up? im riding a yamaha xvs dragstar any additional information such as best way to keep the bike buffed/polished and generally clean and rust free will be much apreciated thanks

Question by dubpunkdub   |  last reply


Lacquer/Enamel for Brass? Answered

Hey I'm looking for a clear, tough coating for polished brass, to stop it from tarnishing. Initially I thought clear nail polish would do the trick, but it turns out it's not as tough as I thought... it'll rub off in places within about a month, from what I'm planning to do with it. Could anyone else give me a few suggestions/links as to what I can buy/use along these lines? Thanks

Question by .Unknown.   |  last reply


leather inlay coffee table

I have a wood coffee table with a leather inlay in the top.  how do i clean it and/or polish it without damaging the leather?

Question by tazmo1972   |  last reply


Headlight Restoration on the cheap.

How to restore your dull plastic headlamps to like new, for about $4.00 (if your lamps are dirty on the inside, that is a whole other instructable): Step 1 - Wash the headlamps with common dish soap and allow to dry thoroughly, this will remove the dirt and oils from the lamp. Step 2 - Using regular rubbing compound or silver polish (I used Silvo brand silver polish (about $4.00 a can here in Canada), it may work with copper polish as well) Apply a small amount of compound or polish using a soft cotton cloth (an old t-shirt or sheet cut into manageable size) gently rub the lamp in a circular motion (the amount of pressure is determined by the severity of the dullness, you may need to repeat the procedure more than once) allow the polish or rubbing compound to dry to a haze, usually by the time your done both lamps the first one will be ready to perform the next step. Step 3 - Using a clean dry cotton cloth buff the lens to remove all of the haze, if the lamp still looks dull repeat step 2. Step 4 - Once you are satisfied that the lenses are as polished as they will get, wax both lamps with a high quality auto wax, (a wax containing carnuba is the best) Mother's or Maguires works great. The wax will prevent bugs, dust and dirt from sticking to the lamp and it will retain it's clarity for a long time, if the lamp starts to look dull simply apply a new coat of wax. Step 5 - Stand back and admire your newly restored headlamps - you will be amazed at how much further you can see at night. *The attached photo is of my headlamp on my 1998 Suzuki Esteem - The before picture is from another 1998 Suzuki Esteem, my lamps were almost as bad as the one pictured here.

Topic by DELETED_Silent Ninja Bunny   |  last reply


how to clean wooden doors at home cheap ?

I want to polish or just clean them at home as professional cleaners are very costly plz advice me

Question by decentbookreader   |  last reply


best way to remove warts?

My sister in law used paint thiner ( a drop) over top of the wart 2-3 x a day......for about 1 week......worked really well!!!   nail polish also works great!!!! She  said that you can use nail polish  over top of the wart......this prevent the wart from breathing and sufficates it causing it to dry up and fall off......Duck tape doesn't work and is a pain   my husband did this method and it was a total waste of time.

Question by DELETED_dinab821live   |  last reply


Low friction "bearings"

For several of my projects I required some sort of bearing that would not only allow for a minimised free play but also very low friction.Before you get too exited: This is not a new type of bearing or anthing for heavy duty loads, not even for ongoing use without servicing.I found that even slightly heavier things rotated on makishift bearing far easier if the axle was verticall instead of horizontally.This gave me the idea to try a simple needle-bearing approach.This is how it goes:1. Grind and polish your axle to get a nice needle point - it must be perfectly centered!I prefer to do this with the axle in a fast spinning drill on a fine grinder.The polishing in a simlilar way, but please do not try it with a cloth in your hand on a spinning axle!2. The other part of the bearing is a screw or pin with a punch mark.I grinded and polished a punch for this so it has an angle of 60° and polished it to a mirror finnish.If alignment is of importance then of course the pin/screw must work for this purpose!If in doubt make it spind an use a pencil to get the true center.A drop of sewing machine oil and it spins nice and with very little friction.The key is to adjust the gap(s) between axle and punch mark to next to nothing.You don't want any pressure along the axle as you would "drill" a hole into your mounts.And you don't want it too loose to avoid wobble.I hope it might give you an idea for your next project.

Topic by Downunder35m 


Stripping altoids tins

I've tried paint stripper, nail polish remover, I'm reduced to a scotch brite pad. Anyone know an easy way to get the paint off?

Topic by Tool Using Animal   |  last reply


How i can make prism?

I want make prism of window glass 2mm . After cut glass side became not smooth. How can i polish side of prism?

Question by SevaKaptur   |  last reply



Has anyone tried to stain concrete with shoe polish, hair dye, or other household substances? Answered

I am casting small concrete panels for Xmas presents. I like the look of stain more than integral color, and am wondering if there are options to stain the pieces outside of commercial acid stains. The pieces will be decorative only, and not need to stand up to wear and tear like floors, countertops, or even coasters would. Would like to hear about unsuccessful attempts as well. Thanks!

Question by Owlman76   |  last reply


Etching a knife blade?

I am concerning etching a knife blade, by using nail polish (or something) to cover the part of the blade I do not want etched and raw  muriatic acid to etch with.  Anyone got any suggestions or recommendations.  

Question by WazIt   |  last reply


Anyone know how to make a rock tumbler?

I have purchased a number of buckets of colored granite and would like to really polish them up. It doesn't need to hold a lot at once, but would be nice if it did.

Question by terriradke   |  last reply


Bicycle powered rock tumbler/exerciser

I was wondering if anyone had any ideas for a bicycle powered rock tumbler. Get exercise while watching videos and light tumbling of jewelry or softer stones.

Topic by gemtree   |  last reply


Has anybody tried painting LEDs?

Because the colors available just aren't enough and we want more. *glances at collection of smt LEDs then at collection of nail polishes* The odds of me blowing up an LED or setting something on fire are slim, right?

Topic by aliasjanedoe   |  last reply


Hanging Bottle Lamp

Hello! I am try to make a pendant bottle lamp, but want to do it as professionally as possible. I found this picture online with a great polished cap and a bushing for the wire at the top of the bottle but cannot figure what or where to get it from. Any help?? Thanks Paris

Topic by PM Glass   |  last reply