what is the best type of tree to create a bonsai tree with? Answered

i live in florida so trees that live good there would be best

Question by sculptur 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


I would like advice on pruning - topiary

Hello, I would like some pruning advice.  I have an established azalea growing around a statue.  I have been trying to train it into a grotto shape for three years.  As you can see from the photo, I am having a challenge getting the vertical part in the back.  It's very sparse and leggy.    Where should I prune it to make the back fuller and taller? I'm looking forward to your replies.

Topic by lgooms 2 years ago


Will a Prune Juice Laxative help with my constipation or is it just a myth?

A lot of people are aware that the health of our digestive tracks or particularly the large intestine commonly known as colon have adverse effects on the health of our whole body, not only physical health but also mental health. When our colon is unhealthy or diseased and full of toxins, this toxins enters our bloodstream through the process of intoxication. When our bloodstream becomes dirty it also affects the brain. Commonly we experience mood swing. Another tangible effect of this unhealthy condition called constipation or the hardening of stool due to inadequate digestion or lack of it. With this said, you may wonder what are my best herbal and natural remedy for cleansing the inside of my body and avoid if not irradicate this condition of constipation? One very good natural remedy is eating of Prunes. A Prune is a variety of plums. Prune juice is made by steaming prunes until it is softened and pureeing then juice is squeezed out. Prune juice contain a natural laxative known as isatin. Prune juice is high in insoluble fiber. Each prune fruit contains 6% of dietary fiber. Prune juice is good remedy for constipation. It is also high in anti oxidant. Visit http://www.colonnews.com/colon-cleansers/will-prune-juice-laxative-help-my-constipation-or-it-just-myth.html for more info

Topic by MucusInStool 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Has anybody ever trained a french lavender bush into an unusual form, once the bottom part has gotten woody?

We were too timid with our pruning and now, 3 years later, well... you know how they get. I'm wondering if there's an attractive way to work with it. I don't like the mindset of throwing away and replacing plants. I get attached!!! Thanks!?

Question by sugarego 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


i want to know about alpha-beeta pruning?

Its related to artificial intelligence. please help and don't give me answers of wikipedia.com

Question by akhilkhandelwal 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Wood-framed mesh "tent" to grow strawberries; How-tos needed!

Hello, I'm looking for some help in constructing a wood-framed mesh "tent" to grow strawberries. The strawberries are visible through the screen that's stapled to the wood frame in a tent shape. It looks like you can lift off the triangular "roof" to collect strawberries, prune, etc. Just saw this in a Sunset Magazine ( February 2009 issue, page 32G) as well as in someone's backyard during a garden tour this spring. It looks like it would keep the berries protected from predators. Does anyone know how to make such a thing? Thanks!

Question by tracy phillips 9 years ago


Instructables at Etsy Craft Night, Monday 12 November

Eric and I will be at Etsy Labs in New York on Monday, 12 November for Craft Night!Come by, meet us and the great folks at Etsy Labs, snag some robot stickers, and make something while you're there. I'm told there's a fiber theme this Craft Night, so we'll bring the prunes and Metamucil! (Etsy will probably have yarn, knitting needles, and the like.)Details and Directions:Craft Night: 4-8pm, Monday, 12 November 2007Etsy Labs325 Gold St., 6th Floor, DUMBO, NYCCross streets: Johnson and MyrtleSubway: 2 to Hoyt St.

Topic by canida 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


identify this vine please

Can anyone tell the name of this vine? i'm in jamaica and anyone else who has doesn't know the name of it either (i've seen it mostly in the hilly,cooler towns) i tried to get a pic of the old and new flowers together but it's kinda blurry ( very windy out) the new ones are red then they turn pink right before they fall off the vine i have taken the off the stakes it was on as it gets real heavy the older it grows but the vine doesnt get thicker just more leafy. all the birds like it especially hummingbirds .the scent from the flower is similar to night flowering jasmine though not as strong flowers are always open it maintains itself i have never watered it or pruned it... and i can't think of anything else ... thanks for the help

Topic by kirstie 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Garden - Greyhound Topiary - First Time Animal Topiary Help?

I would like to grow my wife a greyhound topiary, I am wanting to grow a plant through a metal frame. But I am running into a few problems. The frame is 92cm x 114cm x 27cm and will be planted into the ground in full sunlight. (UK Midlands) The first problem is what plant to use. I do not want to use moss. I have looked into Box, Yew, Pyracantha and Privet but have no experience on what would be best growing through the frame, Im not too fussed how long it would take to grow. But I do have lots of time to prune it so a faster growing variety would be better. The second problem is where do you grow the plant into the frame? Do i get 4 plants and and grow each leg? Or one leg and grow down the others? Or do I grow through the middle of the frame and grow down all 4 legs? and keep the main steam woody. Any help would be appreciated, Thank you in advance.

Question by NuclearGreyhound 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Cutting PVC Pipe - Lengthwise for guttering

Ok, here's one I thought I'd throw open to the masses.... I'm knocking off the last of a fully automated self-sufficient watering system that runs completely off grey/rainwater. However, the coke can guttering is not working in this position as it has previously :(  I was thinking of using PVC piping, cut lengthwise for guttering. However, I'm working out the logistics of cutting it. It can't be cut directly in half - this would be too shallow to catch the runoff from the chicken shed. and funnel it down to the tanks, so I'm looking at removing a chunk of the top.  And I also have no table saw. Wheee. What I do have Dremel (x2) with associated cutting wheels Jig saw (With associated plastic cutting blades) Circular Saw Mitre saw Hand saws (tenon, crosscut, hack, pruning, etc) So, here's one that I'm throwing open. With the tools I have, how would you do it?  I'm leaning towards the dremel, but there would probably be issues with maintaining a straight line (not that I care about some warp, it's a gutter)   Ideas? *EDIT*  Ended up using a jig saw with an acrylic cutting blade. Worked a treat.

Topic by taleya 8 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Cultivating blackberries - works for roses too!

Although in many regions (wild) blackberries are considered to be a pest, in our gardens they can be delicious.I don't mean the wild variety here but the cultivated ones with big fruits and no thorns on them.And if you ever tried to successfully save money by just buying one and using cuttings from it for the new season you know the troubles....Creating cuttings from blackberries is quite easy if done the right way.But there is an ever easier and simpler way if you don't mind doing your pruning a bit later than usual.Once the harvest season is over and all berries are gone you see that the blackberries still keep growing before they finally start dropping their leaves.And if all went well then your blackberries have grown in long "snakes" supported on a vertical structure - like long bows.During a good season this bows get so long that they almost reach the ground at the end of the season.All you have to do it to free your snkes so you can places their ends into the ground, preferably out to the side so you can start a new row of blackberries with enough space between them.Use some soft cord and weights to keep the ends in the ground and fill the hole.Only water once when done otherwise let nature take care of things.In a very dry climate or season you might want to water a bit once a week though.When leaves start to drop in big numbers cut the above ground bits off with about 10 to 15cm left standing.Prune the big ones as you always do to get them ready for the next season.And when the next season starts you will see that most of your little "cuttings" take off like mad.They had the mother plant until it was time to go dormant, so no extra energy was required to stop a dying cutting from going dry.The end of the plant realised it is under ground and for that reason it is time to grow roots.Then suddenly it is time to hibernate and all energy is left in the remains, ready for use in the next spring.It is no problem to get over 15 new plants from a single one this way for the next season.It also works quite well fo roses.Although here you might need to create a podest or similar to place pot on.And the season for it is different too ;)It all starts with your pruning at thend of the season.All parts that did not produce flowers, those "wild" stems need to be fully removed.Those who produced good are cut back so you are left with 3 to 5 "eyes" - these tiny pimple where the new shoots come out.Pay attention to their location as it determines the direction of the new shoots ;)Don't have too many facing inwards.When the rose starts growing again in spring you should prepare your stand for the pot.The new shoots are quite flexible and can be directed to grow where you need them for the pot by using bonsai tape or wire - just be gently with them!Once long enough that the end can be placed about 5cm deep into your pot with good potting mix or the good soil from your garden:Place the pot so that the end shoot is held in the soilwithout force - if in doubt let the shoot grow a bit longer and form it donwards with wire.You want to bury it only when there is new growth going out if it but not of the end currently only has the leaf(s) showing.These fresh end shoots should point downwards into the soil.Cover it all and keep the soild moist at all times but not soaking wet.It really helps to have the pot shaded.You can use small seedling pots and check for roots a few weeks later or just wait till the end of the season.Either way a root should form in the pot and once strong enough you only have to wait and look out for eyes forming on the stem.If the do you can cut the stem so you have enough eyes on the potted stem.Be aware though that this will only result in a strong and healthy rose if the mother plant is not a hybridised clone.For the later it is best to transplant and eye onto a donor bush or wild rose.

Topic by Downunder35m 4 months ago


Yeast fermentation for composting solution?

I threw some hay off my lawn and some green weecds into a garbage can, some sugar and yeast and formented it to slug beer but the slugs did not like it. It then fermented further to vinegar, and a crust of green "Mold?" covered it. seems to have protected the vinegar from further fermentation. I tried a second bigger batch ( morning glory weeds) with less sugar but after a few days of good fermenting it went rotten and stinky. So there are probably thresholds for sugar content. Would the yeast be a way of adding fertilizer to organic gardens? Yeast can (I think) convert urea and nitrate to protein. Perhaps some green stuff has enough sugar to work without sugar addition. vine prunings? maybe. The first batch, i put bleach in to kill off microbes before I added water and yeast. Perhaps hydrated lime would work instead of bleach and also get the ph good for yeast fermentation. This might be a cheap way of liming your garden. (Here in victoria, hydrated type s lime is cheaper than limestone for garden addition. (But it contains more calcium!) The "yeast tea" or vinegar tea could be used on the garden and the weeds could then be transfered to normal compost or used as mulch. It might be an alternative way of using diseased materials of composting seedy weeds to kill the seeds. Brian

Topic by gaiatechnician 9 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Edward Tufte - Our experiences in moderating a forum

Here's an interesting point of view for moderating a web forum. Our "be nice" policy is similar, but doesn't reach this level. I have spent long periods of time thinking about and debating how to value the contributions of essentially anonymous authors. Anyone can contribute an Instructable, forum topic, or comment, and their value varies wildly. Would Instructables be better if we aggressively pruned contributions deemed to be low value? How would we do so in a scalable way? Catching swear words is a good first step, and maybe misspellings are next, but reviewing content is really best done by humans. Should each Instructable author be able to moderate the comments on their Instructables? We've been loathe to do this because the potential for abuse seems to outweigh any benefit. Democratic systems are good in theory, but in practice a vocal minority tends to dominate the conversation. Moderating a forum is fairly straightforward: knowing what you want, deleting entire threads that aren't going anywhere, correcting the spelling of the word "it's," fixing URLs, deleting individual contributions that fail to advance the thread. It helps to have experience writing and editing (and reading student papers, refereeing journal articles, reviewing manuscripts and grant proposals).As clearly indicated to potential contributors, we do a lot of deleting--only about half of all submitted contributions survive for more than a month. This doubtless hurts a few feelings but substantially raises the quality of the board. Very few published contributions are edited at all, other than silently to correct spelling, update an URL, or to delete a sour note in an otherwise good answer. Our view is that every contribution to Ask E.T. should advance the analytical quality of the thread. We particularly seek to avoid the chronic internet disease of "All Opinions, All the Time." The idea is to have an interesting and excellent board on analytical design that serves the content and the readers, not a board logging every attempt at publication. We also are ruthless in deleting contributions with incivilities, rants, taunts, and personal commentary on other contributors....For some boards, a bozo filter may prove useful by automatically deflecting certain trigger words. My friend Philip Greenspun constructed a filter at photo.net which bounced all those who misspelled the word "aperture," on the grounds that they did not know much about photography.Our experiences in moderating a forum: What's best, not what's newThanks to Nivi for the find.

Topic by ewilhelm 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


The secret to storing Loquat for wine making!

If you don't know what Loquat means then just look it up on Google or Wikipedia ;)Mostly used as ornamental trees in the warmer climates Loquat fruits come into season right when the summer is on your doorstep.Although the fruits are delicious and high in nutrients, vitamins and so on: Most people do not even bother to try them :(So if you spot them please give the fruit a try and you might get hooked as did.The biggest problem of using Loquat for more than a direct snack is not the seeds inside.They are quite big and you figure ways out to get around them.Biggest hassle is how the fruits ripen.Unlike most real fruit trees there is fixed time.When the first fruits are ready then the last migh be ready about 3 or even 4 weeks later.And depending on the local wildlife you really need to check daily for ripe fruits....So how to do it properly then?Loquat goes bad really fast no matter what you try.Eat them quickly as otherwise they go off.Don't bother...Those are common answers you get from people who had those trees for years in their gardens.The trick however is really simple:Do not plug them off, cut them off!Some half decent pruning sizzors work great here, especially the smaller types.Cut the stem of the fruit so at least 5mm are left on the fruit.Without the hole from ripping the fruit off and handling it with gentle force there will be no damages or open areas ;)Like that the fruits stay fresh for a few days in your fridge, just make sure they are kept quite loose.Do not just fill a big box with them and hope all fruits survive the pressure ;)If in doubt layer them on soft foam strips or cardboard - works really well if can find complete clusters that are ripe enough.If you have access to more than one big tree you can get enough to even make a really nice wine from it.You need to be quick though, so let me tell you how I do it:Prepare a big enough fermentation vessel, in my case a 25 liter plastic drum, purpose made...Add about 10 liters of warm on prefably filtered water, some sugar and a good amount of your prefered brewing yeast.My personal favourite here is port wine yeast ;)You should prepare this drum once you can collect enough ripe fruits on a daily base.Prepare the fruits by removing the stems, the hard spot at the bottom and then cutting them in half.A small spoon can be sharpened to help to get the seeds out if have some with many little ones hiding.Have a pot with boiling water ready and put about 250 to 400 grams of prepared and cleaned fruits in it per load.A quick heating is essential as you want to keep the cooking time as low as poosible.90 to 120 seconds should be enough to get the heat throughout the fruit - please check every now and then that the fruits are quite soft now.This step is vital to prevent self fermentation - you only want your yeast cultures to work on the fruits ;)Squash the fruits when adding them into your drum.To make a full 25 liters with just a table spoon of sugar at the start you will need about 10 to 12 kg of fruits for a high volume and sweet result.The best option due to the constantly changing sugaar content in the fruits is to go with the flow.Stick to max of about 15 liters per 25 liter drum.Monitor the sugar content and alcohol level.Port yeast dies off at a bit over 14%vol of alcohol.Although some strong ones go up to 18% here...If the alcohol level goes over 10% while the sugar content is still quite high then you add water until you get down to about 7%.If the sugar content goes down too low you add more fruits.With still enough active yeast you can even transfer half oa drum to a new batch once the drum is getting too full and the sugar content is still too high.Just a matter of getting used to working with ongiong adding of fruits and water to compensate the time it takes to get enough ripe fruits.Of course there is always the option to go low and start with 5 liter canisters instead....

Topic by Downunder35m 5 months ago


Hydrogen Peroxide at home and in the Garden

Although the topic is quite old for some of us and mostly because I am too lazy today to make an Instructable: Hydrogen Peroxide ! Back in the day Hydrogen Peroxide was mainly known for the ability to bleech your hair, later it replaced chlorine based products for the preparation of paper and organic fibres. For me it is a good opportunity to go back in time and to pull out some of the remedies my grandparents already used. Who knows, there might be something that helps you or you might know other good uses that I failed to mention here, so feel free to comment. First off: What actually is hydrogen peroxide? We could check Wikipedia but I think it is enough to say that it basically water with an added oxgen mulecule which turn the stuff into a quite powerfull oxidizer. When hydrogen peroxide reacts the added oxygen is released and the normal water remains. Precausions and health risks. In the normal supermarket form hydrogen peroxide comes at a strenght of just 3%. This is just enough for wound treatment or cleaning off a fresh and small stain. The stuff you can buy at your hair dresser comes in concentrations of 5-15%, above that it is of little use to them. Pool grade peroxide however can come as high as 50%. It often requires a permit of at least leaving a copy of your drivers license to buy such high concentration but well worth it price wise. The downside of anything above 5% is a risk for your skin, eyes and airways. So when handling hydrogen peroxide you should waer long sleeve rubber gloves, safety or better swimming goggles and make sure that you don't create vapour by spraying it against the wind direction. Having water at hand to dilute and spillage on your skin is always good. What happens to me if things go wrong? Well, if handled correctly nothing should go wrong but of cause the worst would be eye contact. Getting concentrated hydrogen peroxide in your eyes means extreme pain and even with rinsing it out asap eye damage is more than just possible. Again: wear proper eye protection and if spraying use a filter mask, the paper type is enough!!! Nothing immediate happens on sking contact but a few minutes after contact the skin will turn slightly brown or goes white. This is caused by the oxygen release into your skin cells, if washed off quickly after noticing the discoloration will fade after a few hours. Prolonged exposure of the skin can cause skin cells to fully discolor and living cells might get damaged - a burning sensation is usually the sign that you need to wash the area now ;) Enough bad stuff said, let's see what we can do in the garden.... Fungal infection of your old roses or on your fruit trees? Sometimes the weather does not like our plants and by the time we discover a fungal infestation it is usually pruning time. There are commercial producta available that work quite well but especially the copper based ones tend to do more harm than good in th long run. An alternative is a solution of 10-20% hydrogen peroxide. Spray generously over all affected parts of the plant, leaves, twigs, stem and all. Make sure everything is properly wet! In some cases the fungus can act as a water replellent and it seems impossible to get any of the solution to wet these areas - a drop of dish washing liquid into the bottle will fix this! Watever runs off can be left as it only helps to get oxygen into the soil but of course you should not soak the area... Leave it on for about an hour, around 20 minutes if it quite warm. Rinse all off with clear water and repeat every 2 days for 5 treatments all up. After this time wait 2 or 3 weeks and check if the fungus still gows in some hard to reach areas. If so then repeat the treatment there until satisfied but wait another 2 weeks every 5 single treatments. In some areas of the world certain types of fungus on roses are refered to as "rust". ----- Moved into a new home and the garden beds smell really bad? The last house I moved into had a previous occupant with a big dog but no time to clean after his pet. The garden beds looked dead and I mean so dead that I could not even find weeds in them. And the smell was a distinct mix of old dog poo with lots of fresh cat poo mixed in it - the perfect outdoor pet toilet :( Trying to dig it all under made me recover that the top soil was more §$&*# than soil. I had to get rid of the bacteria of all the poo and somehow neutralize a lot of the unwanted "nutrients". The solution was to first loosen all the soil as deep as I could go. Then I added rice straw (but anything straw like or dry grass will do) to mix it through. At this stage I wished I had a gas mask LOL All up the contaminated garden beds covered about 20square meters. I got a 10 liter canister of pool grade hydrogen peroxide, from this I diluted down with 20 liters of water and a few drops of dishwashing liquid to help with the soil wetting. All was applied as evenly as I good with a watering can and then the area was covered with some tarp to try keeping as much oxygen on and in the soil as possible. A day later the tarp was removed and all beds watered with hose to drowning point. This watering was repeated every 3 days for 3 weeks to drive out all the excess and unwanted nutrients from the poo. The smell was already gone except for some cat urine residue which disappeared after some rounds of watering. Three months after the initial treatment I did some soil tests, added nutrients were required and the next season I had vegetables growing :) ----- Planting? Whether from seeds or seedlings, give hydrogen peroxide a try! I use a 5% solution to soak the potting mix I use before putting my seeds in it. Not only does it kill a few of the unwanted things that might still be in there but it adds a lot of oxygen into the soil, which gives the seeds a much better start. For seeds I use a 5% solution as well but only leave them in for about an hour before placing them between some wet paper towels until they start germinating. This way I can be sure all harmful bacteria and fungal spores are dead and I can use a sterile seed to keep going. Might just be my opinion but I think the germination rate is better and seedling in comparison start growing faster and stronger. Home uses.... As we learned before hydrogen peroxide, at least in higher concentrations is a powerful way to remove fungus. In our bathrooms we often have the problem that the ceiling starts to develop black spots as in the colder times water condenses here and takes a long time to dry off. If you now go to your favorite hardware store they will recommend the use of a chlorine based product, basically bleach... And although it does the job it also means your house will stink for days and if you scrub the ceiling you will get it on your sking and stink too. Hydrogen peroxide at 20% or higher concentrations can be sprayed onto the cleiling :) Of course you will need good protection for this and all things color should be removed, like towels or floor mats. By protection I mean a minimum of swimming goggles, a tyvek suit or similar to cover all exposed skin areas and at least a paper dust mask, better a filtered respirator like you use for spray painting or using insecticides. If you have a spray bottle with an adjustable nozzle then a stream is far better than a spray mist!! Not only is your exposure far lower but it much easier to wet the ceiling quickly. Wet all affected areas, then leave and the room, close the door and take off all clothes you used t protect you. The clothes can be left out to dry but double check that you had no soaked spot where your sking might have been in contact - if so rinse the skin with plenty of water! It will take some time to work and then dry, so best to do this in the summer time or if during the colder times you need to make sure the room is porperly heated and aired out to dry! Repeat until all black spots are gone, really bad areas will leave a permanent discoloration looking like a slight brwonish color is the ligh it right otherwise you won't see it. Once fully dry it is best to scrape off all lose paint and then to use a acrylic based sealer before giving the ceiling a fresh coat of white. The sealer will prevent the water to penetrate more than the paint level and if you get the fungus back on the paint it is far easier to clean ;) ----- Carpet cleaning.... When moving into a new rental with carpet on the floor you often are left with areas indicating the carpet might be "clean" but the underlay certainly is not. You can fix the underlay but you certainly can make sure all harmful stuff is gone from the carpet. Carpet cleaning machines can be hired but often much cheaper if you buy the "recommended" cleaning product with it. Rent is usually based on a daily base and price depends on how much cleaner you need. If you only want to desinfect the carpet which otherwise looks mostly fine than go for the smallest pack available and use it to spot clean areas you want cleaner first. For the desinfecting part I recommend to test how high you can go with the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide before using it on a big scale - keep in mind the carpet will never be fully dry and the remaining peroxide will continue to act! Test a 10% solution first before you go higher as you don't want to buy 30 liters or more of pool grade peroxide - just trust me on that one and only try to buy this much you do want to get into trouble a few days later! If 10 percent solution left on the carpet does not cause any bleaching of the fabric (unwanted bleaching that is) you can try higher for spot cleaning in demanding areas. A good spot to try the solution is under the cover or duct outlets, under these joining bars where carpet changes to tiles (if you can lift them off) or in wardrobes if the carpet goes inside. There are two way to treat your carpet once the general cleaning is done. a) use a garden sprayer or similar to wet the carpet This is good for single room treatment like for the baby room but especially on thicker carpets it requires a lot of solution and can become costly. Once wet leave for at least 30 minutes so the peroxide can do its thing, then use the machine with either the solution filled or just to dry off the carpet. I recommend to use the peroxide solution in the machine as it allows for better penetration and it will remove more soiled solution this way. If your catching container starts bubbling like mad it means you have a lot of §$%&#+ in the carpet and it might be best to first clean it all with the normal carpet cleaning agent before using the peroxide again - again tesing on smaller areas can help wasting the peroxide. If you need to store prepared solutions than it is best in a cold place. It will take several hours on an otherwise clean carpet for the peroxide to fully disappear so it best to use shoes and prevent skin contact during that time - especially if a baby crawls around ;) ----- Toilet.... We don't want to talk about it but everyone needs to clean their toilet sooner or later. For most things in there using the toilet brush when it happens will keep things clean and healthy. But what if someone in the house is sick or with a weak immune system? You could use all sorts of commercial cleaners and desinfectants but a wipe with wet towel or cloth soaked in a 10% solution of hydrogen peroxide will quickly eliminate all harmfull things on your seat, lid or bowl, including the buttons to press and the door handles ;) Just wipe and leave it wet for a minute or two then wipe again and ry - done! Personal use I always pack a small bottle of supermarket grade peroxide when going off road or camping trips. Although we now have modern desinfectants that won't stink or otherwise harm you I still prefer the old stuff ;) If you are far from civilisation than the last thing you want to need is medical attention for something that started as small as a scratch or graze.... Out in the unkown wilderness you will never know if the rockk you just crash landed on was used as a urinal by a fox the night before... A bit of gravel left in your skin might contain harmful bacteria... A cut with your own knife?? - What did you all cut since the last proper cleaning of the blade? You see where I am going here, a small thing might turn into something really nasty a day or two later. If you clean a freash and minor wound properly and then rinsie it with hydrogen perodixe most if not all harmful leftovers will be killed by the releasing oxygen. Of course this pretty much useless on bleeding wounds or where it is obvious that you won't be able to remove all debris from the wound - here it means you trip is still over in favour for proper medical treatment. The thing is that hydrogen peroxide was basically abandoned for all wound treatment once the modern "cleaning aids" became available as the peroxide will not only attack harmful things but also living tissue. The claims goes as far as causing bad scar tissue, damage to blood vessels and even "burning" of the tissue. One big problem I have with all these claims is that they were never really mentioned until the new meds came out. IMHO exposure time and how you use it it the key - common sense if you ask me. Noone should ever soak a wound in peroxide, if it is that big that you need to soak it you need medical attention anyway. And as said you should rinse the wound, that means all remaining liquid should be allowed to flow off - this will only leave a minor amount of peroxide in the wound and the exposure time will end with once all oxygen is released. For minor wounds I only use a paper tissue or cotton bud soaked in peroxide and wipe the wound.... ----- Smelly feet? Ok, maybe not the best way to start a conversation but we all know what sneakers do to our feet in the summer... Insoles with copper and activated carbon will help a lot and at least "cure" your sneakers while they are off your feet and have time to dry. But the smell is actually cause by bacteria growing from everywherey in your sneaker to your sking, actuall starting at your sking... If you wear your sneakers for long periods of time time or even whenever possible and also suffer from a bad smell hydrogen peroxide might be able to help you. Most sneakers will tolerate a machine wash and should come out germ free, if that is no option pack them in a sealed back and leaven them in the freezer over night - this will kill all bacteria and remove the smell. Now to break the endless cycle you need to remove the bacteria from inside your skin. So daily sock changes, freezing shoes and washing feet is a must! Your feet will really benefit from a foot bath in a 5% solution of hydrogen peroxide. To keep costs at a minimum use a container that is just the right size for your feet and prepare the solution from pool grade peroxide. I an ideal case you should not need more than 2 liters but all used product can be stored cool and re-used the next day, after that you need to make a new batch. Keep your feet submerged for at least 10 minutes. This will allow a deep penetration of the skin but might result in some white spots that will disappear after a few hours. Consenquent foot baths can be reduced to 5 minutes. After about a week you should notice that wearing your sneakes no longer causes and bad smell and you can stop the treatment. Freezing the sneakers over night, dialy (or more) sock changes and daily, proper cleaning of your feet should prevent any further bad smells :) ----- Bleaching your hair Althoug it was done for many years I really can't recommend using hydron peroxide for this purpose! Any concentration strong enough to have a proper effect in a reasonable time will at least cuase skin irritation. Back in the days they said your burning scalp is what you need to endure to get blonde hair :( And as said already you really don't want to get that stuff into your eyes... General uses If you have a fruit based stain then cahnces are hydrogen peroxide will remove it, especially if fresh. Even at supermarket concentration repeated application and proper drying off with a paper towel or similar will remove even red wine or beetroot stains. ------ Blood... On you skin blood is easy removed with cold water, same on other surfaces but washing off is no option a wet cloth or cotton piece will work fine. Hydrogen peroxide is good if things need to go fst or if the surface is porous, here the releasing oxigen will drive out the blood with the bubbles. ----- Fish tanks... If you love your tank then you really hate to medicate or even worse have a bad algea infestion, especially the stuff of the black kind. A change to activated carbon filter material is always recommended after a medical treatment to remove all leftovers from the system. However, certain medication simply won't be affected by a carbon filter and stay in the system until fully used or broken down otherwise. Especially in bigger tanks a partial water change is often out of the question as it would cause too much additional stress to the fish and plants. Hydrogen peroxide can help to break down most if not all remains of the used medication while at the same time adding more oxygen to the water. To be sensitive and safe in all enviroments I recomment to calculate the concentration based on the volume of your tank and to add the required amount of peroxide very slowly into the outgoing water stream from your pump. By slowly I mean in terms of a slow drip if using solutions over 10% to be added to the tank. If in doubt remove a suitable amount of tank water into a bucket and add the concentrated peroxide to reach the final tank limit. I strongly recommend to stay below 2% in favour over additional treatments a few days later if required. That means the diluted solution you add should be entered into the tank slowly if in doubt add a glass full every few minutes. For the treatment of the dreaded black algea you do the same 2% solution but be prepared that it will take several treatment until you see them die off. If you can then it is best relocate the fish for a few days so you can use a stronger solution of 5-8% just with the plants left in the tank. When transporting fish in a bag it can pay off to add a little bit of 3% peroxide to the bag to give additional oxygen for transport. I do this maually for every fish I buy from a store so I can be sure all fungus and bacteris is killed of before I introduce it to my tank. Really helps to prevent loosing a lot of fish just because you added one or two more to your tank ;) For the normal sized transport bags I use a good shot glass full of 3% peroxide in case you wondered. ----- Fridge and freezer Be it after long use or because you bought one second hand - once empty and warm some of our colling gadget just smell bad. A good clean with a hot water and your favourite cleaning agent is a good start, no need for aggressive stuff ;) If clean but still smelly, like after a power failure with fish in it you might want to go one step further. Best option is to use a spray bottle and a peroxide solution of at least 15% here. Use proper protection as mentioned above and spray all surface with the solution until soaked. What you can take out you take you take out, clean properly and then wipe or brush with the same peroxide solution. Bare aluminium should be handled with caution as in some cases it can oxidise badly, leaving a white and not removable crust behind. Here it is best to wipe and then wipe again with a cloth soaked in clear water to limit exposure time. No need to dry out - wipe out and check if it still smells, if so repeat and wiped off all areas as good as you can with a solution soaked cloth. Once the smell is gone dry out and enjoy smell free use from now on :) ----- Fruit and vegetables Unless you know exactly what happened to it you might want to clean your vegies and fruits properly before using them. Pesticides, herbicites, fungicites.... Not mention normal fungus and bacteria on the product.... On a commercial base hydron peroxide baths are often used to clean products for sensible people, hospital use or long term storage. For a personal use this only makes sense if you have free and unlimited access to the peroxide. An alternative are ozone bubblers. Expensive models can eb bought in shops or online, complete with timers or even a gauge showing the concentration in a room. On a hobby level for the kitchen sink we can use an ozone generator, air pump and bubble stone from the aquarium store ;) Let the pump bubble out the ozone for a minute or two, fill the sink with the fruit and veggies and move them around every few minutes. Best of course with an open window to limit you exposure to the ozone! Rule of thumb: If you can smell it is already too much in the air! The ozone in the water does the same as the peroxide: It breaks down harmful things with pure oxygen. The downside is that it is very harmful for your airways and body in general, so against all what youtube can offer I actually prefer to treat my fruit and veggie in a sealed bag. Place them inside, push out as much air as you can and then fill up with the ozone from the generator. Once the bag is full leave for about 30 minutes then wash and use or place the things in the fridge.

Topic by Downunder35m 1 year ago  |  last reply 1 year ago