After puncture in the freezer, the cylinder on the back underneath water tray is hot

I was deicing freezer in the refrigerator and accidentally puncture. Gas went out for a few seconds. The refrigerator has topped working. When I cleaned the back and trowed away accumulating water, the cylinder beneath is still hot. Any possibilities or repair?

Question by Sharing Fun with WiSH & EmmaS 1 year ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Punctured speaker dust cover (bubble)

I punctured the dust cover (the centermost part of the speaker that looks like half of a ball) of a Sonance Visual Performance VP65 speaker.  The puncture is about 1/4 inch in diameter and did not touch any of the internal parts. Can this be repaired?  Will it affect the performance of the speaker?

Topic by edieppa2 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


is the daisy red ryder bb gun anygood for shooting targets and cans?

Does it work on air or spring? can it shoot pellets aswell? and will it puncture a can or a cardboard box?

Question by sharlston 9 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Where's your Instructables patch?

Here's where I attached my Instructables patch. I didn't want to puncture the waterproofing on my bag, so I sewed the patch over the map pocket.Where's your Instructables patch?PS - Instructables member You gave me the idea for this forum topic over on my Orangeboard.

Topic by ewilhelm 11 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


I accidentally poked small hole in freezer cooling line, can I patch it with flex seal or something like it?

Was de-icing my haier mini fridge, when I accidentally punctured a tiny hole in  freezer wall cooling line, it hissed for like 2 seconds. Is it safe to plug back in? and can I patch the hole?

Question by brandon.salinas.319 4 years ago  |  last reply 5 weeks ago


IBM model M has 5 keys that do not work. How can I clean those contacts in the membranes?

The keyboard is in excellent shape otherwise.  Can I puncture the bottom metal shell in the locations in trouble and then inject contact cleaner?  Are there some other vent holes that might be used?  Could it be an electonic problem or circuit board plating in those areas?  The five keys affected are : g,  h,    apostophe ,   up arow,  and the number pad zero. Thanks

Question by rogets 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


My roofer drove nails through the drip edge. I can see the holes. He pulled the nails, will this cause water damage? Answered

Neither the ice barrier or the felt was brought down over the edge of the plywood on the rake edge of the house before the drip edge was installed. Will these punctures enable the water to get to the plywood and swell it or cause leaks? This was a re-roofing with a complete tear-off. These holes were in the over hang part of the drip edge, not where the drip edge was intended to be nailed to fasten it to the roof. You can see the holes from the ground. Thanks, Bill

Question by billygale 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


What do I use to fix Bouncy pogo kids ball.

Karroo Kids were given bouncy pogo balls that they sit on with handles. On which they bounced endlessly. Both now have 1 puncture each (oddly enough, not underneath). Patching with motorcycle/car patches was a bust and did not adhere. I assume the balls are made of vinyl. Unfortunately I am more than familiar with fixing (to the sound of tears) a favourite R5 cheap Chinese import toy with an R80 tube of specialized glue. (while the expensive "cool" toy go ignored! )! Any suggestions?

Question by Karroo Oakey 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Fuse Sheet Plastic to Wood

Not long ago, someone was lookin for solution to waterproofin wood box. Can't find it at the moment. Maybe someone else can find that thread. My experiment: Hot clothes iron                          [][][][][] 4 layers paper towel              ------------------                                                   ----------------                                                    ----------------                                                    ------------------- 1 layer wax paper                    ____________ 2 layers clear plastic tarp        ============== Block of 2x4                             [[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[] The layers of plastic fused pretty strongly together.  Bond to the wood was moderately weak. This could be done with multiple layers, and only  the lowest layer stapled to wood. Thus achieving strong bond to wood, yet no leak at staples since only 1 layer is punctured.

Topic by Toga_Dan 4 years ago


Building materials for kayak?

HI there I was wondring if anyone has ever considered/ tried building a solid bottom kayak out of recycled plastic (maybe a bin)? I loved the ease of carrying and price of my inflatable kayak but hate how easy it is to puncture in running water. I'd like to make something thats light to carry to the water and can stand being bashed around a bit. I was thinking of cutting some pannels out of any plastic I can get my paws on, stitch and gluing them together to form a sort of pea pod shape and then lining the edge with some of that foam stuff they make floats out of. Any thoughts?

Topic by moogle123 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Space Trash Crowds Orbiting Satellites

Two or three times a day, a satellite circling Earth narrowly misses destruction by an orbital hailstorm of junk sweeping the busy super highways of space.A spreading cloud of shrapnel from the collision of two satellites earlier this month is making wrecks for working spacecraft around Earth all but inevitable, analysts warn. As the ninth significant crack-up in two years -- including a punctured nuclear satellite -- the wreckage of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 is fostering a chain reaction of collisions that puts billions of dollars of spacecraft and manned space flights at risk.Full article and really cool slideshow: Harmless Debris on Earth Is Devastating in Orbit - Wall Street Journal.via benjaneer.

Topic by noahw 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


guess who bought a jeep

Yeah i bought a new jeep last weekend. i would have gone with something a little more fuel economical but cars ride too low to the ground. (i live in the sticks) plus i figure i can haul stuff with it, women, dead hookers, and general stuff i have accumulated over the years. its an 08 jeep liberty. i got it for less than invoice and the dealer is throwing in free leather seats. other than that tire i had to buy this morning so far i like it. (i ran over a nail and it punctured the sidewall, but i bought tire insurance so it wont happen again) i took a pict of it with my camera at night time with a 15 sec shutter its the only good picture i have

Topic by thematthatter 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Great Scott!! HEDGEHOGS CAN BE USED AS WEAPONS!!

Woohoo! I'm in possession of a weapon that I can slip past security!A man in New Zealand chucked a hedgehog at some punk and got arrested for assault with a weapon. Quote: "It hit the victim in the leg, causing a large, red welt and several puncture marks," said Senior Sgt Bruce Jenkins, in the North Island town of Whakatane. If convicted, he could face up to 5 years in jail.Read full story here:http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/7334233.stmBite me hippy anti weapon freaks! 'cuz irritate me and I'll throw this adorable spiky creature at you!!yeah, that's my pet African Dwarf Hedgehog Sir Danny "Spiky" Norman Shanksalot

Topic by KentsOkay 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Is a CRT electron gun any use?

Is it worth it to take the electron gun out of a CRT when salvaging parts? I've seen people remove the electron gun when they take apart the CRT but I don't know what they'd use it for. What can you do with a CRT electron gun? What chemicals does the gun contain? (I know the screen has toxic phosphor and stuff but I'm talking about the gun itself). Also, is it safe to vent a CRT tube? I have found that you should vent the CRT tube before working on it, by smashing the end from a distance, so that it won't implode if you happen to break it when working on it. But is it safe to puncture open the tube? There are toxic phosphors inside and I worry that venting it could cause toxic chemicals to go airborne.

Question by poiihy 3 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Battery Holder From Dilated PVC Hose?

I'm trying to widen about 1 foot of PVC hose. Ie. I want to dilate the interior diameter so 4 AA batteries will fit inside end to end. I'm trying to make a battery holder for my helmet light. The PVC hose is like siphon tube and I want to use it as a battery holder but it's a little too narrow. I tried heating the hose up with steam and jamming a lubricated metal pipe inside. This worked for a few inches but then there was too much friction. I also tried a smaller metal pipe along with a chopstick but I ended up puncturing the hose. So the question is: What is a good way of getting this segment of siphon hose a little bit wider? Or what else would be a nice waterproof and discreet battery holder for a helmet?

Question by snotty 7 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


CO2 88 gram modification

Ok my fellow creators I am asking for your help. CO2 project is making  portable air tools without lugging around air compressor. Have pipe work and connections already done and modified the CO2 adapter to puncture canister when screwed in to release air. The problem I am having is once I attach an air tool it work fine, but after I release trigger air keeps flowing through because of to much pressure. If I read correctly its about 100 psi. Thought about direct connect from tool to air but I would like to be able to switch out tools. Have air tool change connectors at end right now. I do have high pressure shut off valve. Its just trying to regulate air flow with amount of pressure this thing releases. To be honest eventualy may be weaponized. Thanx in advance for your input. 

Topic by mkirbysplace 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Painting an inflatable boat. Answered

Hi folks. I have been given a Gladding Float-Pac inflatable dinghy that has been left out in the weather a bit too long & the surface of both the orange & green rubber has become stained from fallen leaves. I have had a look around the interweb & have found a couple of paints suitable for inflatables but to tell the truth they are a bit expensive just to smarten up a boat that will seldom get used particularly as I would have to buy two colours. The boat is in otherwise good condition with no holes or punctures & there is no scuffing or fabric showing through so finishes like Tuff-coat wold be a bit over the top. Does anybody have any suggestion for a pait that would be flexible enough for the job, i'm not really too worried about the colours although the original green & orange would be nice to keep. Thanks in advance for your suggestions folks.

Question by Nostalgic Guy 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Has anyone ever used or repaired a SplatMaster marking pistol?

 Hello, This is a long shot but has anyone here had experience with SplatMasters? I bought two of these guns about 15 years ago, second-hand and they have never worked. They dry fire perfectly but the problem comes when I load a CO2 bottle; it leaks. Is this a known fault and can it be remedied? The bottle is punctured on the spike, as it should, then proceeds to hiss and empty immediately. There was nothing around the spike when I bought them so I tried various items ranging from inner tube to gas o-rings, until I ran out of expensive CO2 bottles. It may be possible that the gas is seeping from another part of the gun; Any ideas? Also, according to the photo with the red background I can see that every part seems to be there except a small spring and a ball detent;  Can I simply make one from a pen spring and a ball bearing? Any help appreciated as I would dearly love to have fun with these. Thank You

Question by FriendOfHumanity 9 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Who's Cannon Rules----------I_AM_CANADIAN's heavy cannon rules!!

Its official, and i accept my defeat, IAC's was rated better and more people prefer it. How will it compare to my newest instructable, my HIGH POWER CROSSBOW. Whose cannon is better, My Light Cannon V2.2, or I_AM_CANADIAN's Heavy cannon V5. They are both special in their own ways. His is more powerful and flies 80 feet. It loads in over 30 seconds. Mine is a little less powerful but flies almost 150 feet. Mine loads in under 15 seconds. Also, Mine uses 8 rubber bands and his uses 16. Here is the puncturing using the same front on the ammo. Try to build them before you decide. WHOSE IS BETTER. Note-I did not fake these pictures. Try them yourself and the results will be the same. I am not trying to start a fight I just want to see whose you think is better. Note. The Video was shot with IAC's V5 and my V2.3. I just built V3.0 but did not post it yet.

Topic by Electroinnovation 10 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


New car sub, does this work?

My cousin was nice enough to give me this nice little 200 watt 12 inch sub. It just needs some minor repair, theres a little puncture hole in the dust cap, simple fix. I tried hooking it up directly to my stereo and using the eq to filter out all the freq and still wasn't too happy. I took the amp out of my mirage sub and wired it all up to this one, the amp is only 75 watt rated, well I could be wrong, all I know was that the sub was 75 watt. But it works great, tell me if this is a good idea guys, lookin for opinions. Also too, is it normal that the heat sinks on the amp should be "energized"??? I picked it up by the heat sinks while it was plugged in before I had the sub and dropped it rather quickly, althought it seems to have loosened the joints up in my hand. Also too, does anyone know what brand of sub it is? All it says on the front and magnet is VR with a 12 in between (12 inch). I wanna find some specs for it as I'm not sure if the box it's in is tuned for it and I'm thinking about porting it or would that make it overdrive if it was ment to be in a sealed box?

Topic by Punkguyta 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Charging BoostCaps

I recently got a few of the 3000 farad 2.7 boost caps from electronic goldmine.  I have a quick question about charging them.  Applying a higher than rated voltage before the capacitor is charged all the way would be fine, right?  The voltage drop should cause the source voltage to approach 0, thusly below the 2.7 volt rating.  As an extreme example, lets say you simply hooked up a 9 volt battery to it.  Since the battery can only supply like 200mA, the voltage drops to nearly 0 as the capacitor appears to be a dead short.  The dielectric (or ion exchange or napheon membrane or whatever it is in a ultracap, lol) should be fine, correct? My main goal is to later hook up one or two of these for a regenerative brake system of something like a small gokart or bike or something.  Stopping at 30mph is like (assuming 200kg total mass) 20k joules, and each one can hold about 10k joules, and assuming a max efficiency of like 30 or 40% (I think itd be much lower, though), these capacitors could brake a gokart going fairly several times without having to be discharged inbetween cycled (but of course they would be).  For braking, could these essentially be hooked up directly (of course with pwm, and other things, but in essence:) to the motor with a little protection circuitry to prevent overcharging the capacitors?  Or would the higher voltage instantly puncture and destroy the boostcap?

Topic by guyfrom7up 8 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Cool gel mats for pets

Hi, all! I foster dogs and cats in Baton Rouge for several non-profit agencies.  Lately, I've had more than a few feral cats needing a temporary home.  I had an idea (inspired by something I saw online) to use the trunk from the crepe myrtle tree my boyfriend chopped down to "catify" the carport where they like to seek shelter at night.  Considering that I've never owned a power tool until now, I think it's coming together nicely so far (pics attached).  Please keep in mind that I'm no carpenter....   This is south Louisiana where the Summer temps are high and the humidity is even higher.  I can only imagine how awful that must be when you are sporting a full fur coat outside!  Here's where I need your help:  I want to make cool gel mats to fit the odd shaped green shelves you see attached to the walls.  I have been sewing for many decades, so making these "cool" cushions to fit is not a problem.  The problem is how to make the GEL that goes inside the mats that keeps the pet cool.  I'd rather not use any toxic chemicals, just in case one of them punctures the gel mat causing it to leak and then decides to drink the gel.  So, maybe there's a chemist out there, or just some intelligent individuals that  might have the answer to my problem?  Any and all suggestions are very much appreciated! Thank you, Linda

Topic by Lbcaswell 1 year ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Ingenuity Needed: Cutting records with quality.

It's lengthy, sorry, but it's worth it! Let me preference this with, I know this topic has surfaced before. Most of the forums and pages are filled with broken links to information, sold out products, and are all around rather worthless to return to. I'm posting this in hopes it stays a useful reference point. For  a few years now, I have been looking at cutting disks playable on a record player. I found an 'ible a while ago (the original one I bookmarked has been removed) that showed how to make an needle assembly. It demonstrated making a record engraver by putting a staple through the center of a speaker. This tool kind-of worked, but had some quality issues, as well as speed. When you push to engrave the audio, you slow the table. Less pressure, less quality, more quality, less speed. The other issue I ran in to was keeping the groove tight enough to hold more than 20 seconds. I'd like to construct a device that will cut CDs in to records with a good bit of accuracy, and give a second life to mis-burned disks (as well as some ancient unsupported linux disks...driver disks...early Windows builds...AOL disks...you get the idea) Putting the proper spindle on a properly geared motor should resolve the speed issue on cutting. Having the cutting arm on a servo should resolve the length issue, my only quandary is quality. ~~~~~ So, the point of this post, and the thing I'd like to have some input on is, How do I construct a cutting needle, that will offer some quality. I should refine that a little more - something that is going to transfer bass well. ~~~~~ I was not eager to puncture a speaker, so I modified the original plans. I placed the staple in a layer of plastic, and glued this to the speaker. The plastic gathered more of the vibration, and funneled it to the cutting head more accurately. This did work relatively well, but I feel with a few extra minds, this process can be made better. If this project ever sees the light of day, I'll make an 'ible, and cite any assistance. -Spence

Topic by mr monoply33 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Exploding K-cups in a Keurig coffeemaker

Our Keurig coffeemaker is several years old. We began to see a ragged star opening in the top of the K-cups after brewing and coffee grounds various places outside the K-cup. All of the usual recommended fixes were no help. (See below.) This video gave me a solution that worked very well for us. (I have no personal connection to the video or its maker.) We now see only a neat round hole in the top of our K-cups after brewing, not a torn and ragged opening. Video summary: Remove two screws under the flip-up cover above the K-cup holder. Remove the decorative plastic cover by tugging at it. Snip the zip tie that keeps the soft white tube on the fitting. Pull the tube from the fitting. Hold the end of the tube over a cup. Cycle water through the Keurig until several cups come out clean. Clear the upper and lower needles of coffee grounds. Attach the tube with a new zip tie and screw the cover back in place. One word of caution: Very hot water spewed onto the soft skin at the base of my thumb and it was very uncomfortable. I draped a folded towel over my hand while hot water was being expelled from the disconnected tube at the top of the Keurig. Also, I ran quite a number of cups of water through the Keurig until I got three consecutive cups of water without any debris particles of any kind in the water. (I did not see an accumulation of coffee grounds like the man describes in the video, but I saw what was similar to pieces of a brown wing from a housefly.) In the two or three days following the procedure in the video we did occasionally have a K-cup blowout, but have seen only perfect round holes after a week or so, and we probably brew a dozen cups of coffee each day. The usual recommendations-- +Keurig's official recommendation as the cause of grounds migrating outside the K-cup is too much air inside the K-cup as evidenced by a domed lid on the K-cup before it is punctured. Their recommendation is to poke the top of the K-cup with a pin before putting it into the Keurig. Because of my observations and experience, I give very little credence to this. +Accumulated lime from the water needs to be descaled from the inside of the Keurig. Lime accumulation does cause a partially full cup of brewed coffee. We regularly descale our machine. We have also run water through our machine whenever we have seen grounds in our coffee and some grounds came out with the water. Descaling is a good thing to do, but I doubt it has a connection to bursting K-cups and grounds where they do not belong.  +Clogged upper and lower needles. The video will direct you to use a wire to insure open passageways inside the needles above and below the K-cup.

Topic by Phil B 1 year ago  |  last reply 11 months ago


Roof deck over synthetic membrane: water intrusion?

Oops, so I posted this in Outdoors before I found Home. Double posting is irritating but it's kind of relevant to both... I'm new to the forums here (long time reader, infrequent poster), if I just committed a major faux pas, gimme a heads up and I'll take one of these down! Anyway, so the back door of my 3rd floor apartment opens on to what amounts to a raised back yard; the only problem is that this "back yard" is the roof of a 2 story addition to the brownstone I live in, and I'd rather not put my foot through a very expensive roof. I've been looking into decking, and right now my plan is a contact-only solid frame all the way around the perimeter of the roof, with a lip extending over the edge of the roof (to supply stability without puncturing the membrane) connecting to the actual frame of the deck which would of course be placed over the top of the brick walls of the building. From there I was going to face the deck with synthetics, probably with struts placed along the horizontal struts of the roof connected to both the upper deck and sub-deck cross bracing (depending on what materials I use/can afford and their relative strength). My hope is to find a way to make the deck in modular pieces that can be removed for when the roof inevitably needs to be resurfaced. So basically it would be large squares (or irregular shapes, whatever) that would sit on top of the struts/cross bracing with the help of a few screws and provide the deck surface. What I'm worried about is water intrusion at the contact points, such as around the edge of the roof and on top of the studs in the middle of the roof. I know synthetics are much more resistant to this type of failure than older materials, but are they impervious? Where do the pros put contacts so water doesn't leak into the floor below? Even if you minimalize it, the deck will have to come into contact with the roof at some point, or you've found some fancy new way of building I'd love to hear about. A few other thoughts are footprint: the building is an 1890 Richmond row house, could this be done with a small enough profile to increase the value of the property without damaging the "drive by" value? (I was picturing an iron railing to keep the project semi period, and this roof actually connects to the big hulking wooden fire escape, so it wouldn't be marring a virgin landscape) Also, do you think any building codes in the country would allow L bracing and big old bolts to hold the structure of the deck together instead of end-nailing the boards? It would make removal for roof work a lot easier. For the corners, would it be better to miter the ends at 45 and run a bolt through the two of them, end nail an L joint or use a thick metal l bracket and a few bolts to hold the joint together? That was kind of an intense post, I'm just looking to shoot the breeze a little bit with anyone who has any thoughts. Everybody always has their perfect way of doing things, on such a big, high pressure job (if this goes south I'd be poor AND homeless!) I want to really chew on the idea a little bit first. Thanks to anyone who actually read this far!

Topic by Macadaciouse 11 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


QUICK: Ideas for getting drone out of tree! [EDIT: already got it down, but ideas are welcome!]

Ok, so I have built up my $400 FPV quadcopter, and just last night, I was able to get it in the air working flawlessly! I then proceeded to have fun with FPV on a small TV monitor. I quickly got the hang of it, and decided to venture up and around the back yard. However, there was one problem I have been neglecting, which of course, it bit my ass as you can tell from the title. From countless hours of debugging and stress-testing previous weeks to find the intermittent issue with the ESCs, I finally pinned down the issue and was able to reprogram the ESCs, as well as calibrate them properly. (turned out when I first built the quad many moones ago, I unknowingly entered programming mode in the past and changed stuff I had no intention to change!) So eventually, I punctured one of the cells on the battery, and did not realize until a few days ago. I found after close inspection that it was most likely due to a crash which dislodged the battery from the strap, and it scraped up against the video transmitter shielding and heatsink. I removed and discarded the damaged cell, so I was left with a 2S battery. It is BARELY enough to lift the quad. And very slowly at that. However, I could not wait for the new battery to come! I just HAD to fly it to see if I got it to work! :D So today, I have been practicing full-on FPV, and unknowingly flew above a tree. I thought I was next to our chicken house,  and was looking directly at it, hoping to land directly in front of it. However, I did not know I was as close as I was to the tree directly below me. By the time I saw it it in the mobius camera, a slammed the throttle as high as possible, but by that time it was too late. That stupid 2S battery that I have not bothered to replace just did not have the umph to pop the quad up into the air higher, and as it discharged to below 6.98V based on the video feedback data, and the quad just kept descending even at full throttle due to the voltage being too low to effectively power the motors. So there it went tumbling and got snagged on to a thin limb. I lost remote control, so I could not get it unstuck like I did before from a previous flight. But I still surprisingly had FPV working, with the minimOSD sending down GPS data and battery voltage level. So I get to watch the battery voltage trickle down 1 mv at at time. (Welp, time to pop the kettlecorn and watch the 2S battery progressively deep-discharge and get more damaged by the minute!) It did, however, rise back up to 7.4V unloaded (telling me that the internal resistance must be pretty high, so I would not to too bothered too much to throw away the 2S battery entirely!)  Nor did I bother to watch it to see how low and how long it will take to discharge below the safe limit. I packed up all monitor and ground gear to get it out of the cold. So here it stands; stuck real high. I have tried climbing up 14-18 feet onto the tree, but it was still a good 12 feet up. I tried a rope to the trunk and shook the hell out of the tree. The limb that the quad was stuck on did not move much, and the tree was dampening the vibrations too much, even after hitting a resonance peak (technically a harmonic of the resonant frequency), where I could clearly see 2 "standing waves" in the trunk, but that got tiring real quick,and the winter sun has set and things were getting darker by the minute. I did not budge the quad.  I eventually resorted to shooting the limb with a 22 rifle, and on the 3rd shot, I got it to fall down!!! .......... 3 feet, that is, until it got stuck on an even LARGER branch, and now it is really stuck on it. It is on its side on a small fork in the tree, and it is snagged on that now. I can't shoot the base of the branch to break it, because it is like 4 inches in diameter, and on the forked branch right where it is caught, the quadcopter is sitting directly on! If I shoot it, there is a good chance of hitting the quadcopter and destroying the lipo battery causing it to catch fire, or hit electronics or the camera with the beautiful 1080p HD footage of the crash! Again, shaking the tree violently does not do much to budge it. Perhaps someone in the community has an idea on how to knock it down? 

Question by -max- 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Looking for a cheap compressor with a high pressure rating or for airbrush use?

Today a friend of mine asked me if I know a way to reduce the noise level of his compressor in the work shed. With the current heat he prefers to work in the evening and nights, which does not make his neighbours too happy. His main use for several airbrush guns and sometimes for mormal airtools or the big spray gun for an undercoat or similar. So his main concern is oil in the airline and the actual flow rate is of second concern as he has an old 25kg propane cyclinder as an additional air tank. For relative low air volumes I would suggest an old fridge compressor. With a thicker pipe at the outlet that is filled with stainless steel wool most of the oil stays in the compressor. That is if this pipe is a) long enough b) upright c) of sufficient diameter so there is enough for the oil to avoid it being pushed up A second, standard oil seperator will be enough for the oil level required for airbrush stuff - and most other things too. If there is no pressure regulator on the airbrush system it is best to add a small air tank and shut off valve for it. In our case however a fridge compressor would be just enough to keep the bigger airbrush gun running but not to fill the tank at the same time. Not to mention the problem of fluctuating pressure levels. Since we already had a tank and pressure shut off connected to the loud compressor it was only a matter of finding something that keeps the neighbours happy. The first thing we did was to check how often the compressor comes on and how long it runs till the tank is back to pressure. With that and the stated air volume on the compressor we guesstimated that something a bit bigger than the compressor of a window airconditioner should be sufficient. The search begins.... If you don't know what to look for I give you a few hints: Older airconditioners often run on R22 or R12 - both use quite high system pressures which is a bonus, but more on that later. As a rule of thumb for these compressors you cans say: the bigger the higher the flow rate. At the local wreckers and scrap yards we found a few units but noticed the bigger ones often used three phases and not just one :( So we opted for the R22 compressor of a 4.5kW unit. Keep in mind the 4.5kW is for the entire system, so the quite massive fans can be removed from the sum. Usually the compressor alone is the 2.5 - 3kW range. Ok, we found the big thing but how does this help us? First things first ;) The oil was removed as the housing stating the original oil amount. This allowed us to use an oil rated for air use that has little to no water absorption qualities - you don't want water in your compressor. With the usual heat the water should be no problem anyway. Next was a pressure test to make sure the thing actually still works, so we added some plumping in the form of standard connectors to the inlet and outlet. We got well above 200PSI and abondoned the test at this stage as it was more than enough already. The air volume seemd to be well more than expected too so let'S move to the next stage. A fridge or aircon compressor always needs to have a certain amount of oil in it as it will otherwise seize and overheat quickly. But they are also designed so that the oil mixes with the refrigerant to cool all moving parts. So the biggest hurdle is to make sure the oil stays where it should stay and won't enter or get lost in the tank. Only real option for this to use something to catch the oil that is capable of releasing it into the compressor once it shuts off. Now there are several options for this so I start with the most basic: A "catch can" will get most of the oil, especially if filled with stainless steel wool or similar. Downside is that you have to find a way to get it back into the compressor. A step better is a thicker pipe filled with stainless steel wool to catch the oil. If placed upright and the outgoing pipe can be bend a bit upwards you have a good chance that most of the oil will sweep through the valves and get back down into the compressor housing. But only too often the cheap or even free compressor is better than expected and the oil won't get back into the housing as the vlaves are just too good. The last and IMHO best option is a pressurised return system. Most compressors for bigger aircons have a seperate filling port or sealed off piece of pipe. In this case you can do a simple check to see if they are usable for our purposes. Open the port of pipe and use a simple bike bump or similar to get some pressure in it. With a dedicated oil filling port you are best off but they are hard to find. The air you pump in should come out of the high pressure side - you might need a little pressure to overcome the valves. If you hear any bubbling in the housing (use a pipe on your ear or a sensitive microphone) it means you are going through the oil inside the compressor - perfect! You might not hear any bubbling but the port or pipe is still usable. Get ready with your fingers and start the compressor. The fill pipe should be sucking air in, same for the service port if there is one. A dedicated oil port should not suck but instead force some oil up if you cover the high pressure outlet. I assume all is good and no oil is splashing out of the open pipe or port. Add a small amount of oil with a syringe or similar into the port/pipe. If you see an oil mist coming out of the high side it is bad news. Clean outlet air is good. To get the oil back from the catch pipe or can we have to add a hose or pipe with a needle valve. It needs to be adjusted so that there is only a very little airflow (or oil mist) coming out. This regulated outlet is now being connect to the port/pipe with a bit of suction that we found earlier. Now every time the compressor runs the collected oil is forced back into the compressor :) Please double check the port/pipe used is not directly connected to the intake port! The last thing you want is a puddle of oil going into the cylinder and damaging it! They are designed to move gas but not liquid! If in doubt use a hardened sttel nail or similar to create a small puncture in the top of the compressor housing if there is nothing else to use. Check first if the material sound very thick, if so it might help to drill with a 5 or 6mm drill first - only about 1mm to make sure you won't enter the housing and conimate it with metal shavings! Once you have a small puncture hole of about 2mm in diameter get some 2 component metal repair glue mix and add a suitable connection for the collecting pipe/can. If you feel up to it you can of course use a blow torch and solder the connection on. Now we have the compressor working with a oil return system that also gives up very little to no oil at all in our system. You might now think you are good to go but you should at least add a decent and fine filter to the air inlet ;) The compressor noise of a bigger system can still be an issue if thicker pipes are used that allow the noise to travel out. Keep in mind they usually run in a fully closed system.... As we only need to match the noise level of the compressor itself a solid steel can like an old fire extinguisher in the 1kg rage is a good way out. Fill it with filter wool and a fine filter pad after adding some hose connectors either end. You can misuse the trigger nozzle and keep it to seal the top if you braze a connector on it. If the intake here is about 5 times larger than the pipe connection to the compressor itself the air flow going into the thing is low enough for a cheap paper air filter can or box if you have a quite dusty enviroment to work with. The real trick is to have a hose or pipe on the inside of the fire extinguisher connected to the compressor pipe connection. A garden hose is great here as is reduces the noise quite good and is dirt cheap. Make a lot of about 2mm sized holes in this pipe and close the other end of it off. Now the compressor will suck it through the small holes and the soft garden hose reduces the noise, the surrounding padding brings it down to basically nothing. The special case of clean air for airbrush.... If you read this for the sole purpose of airbrush use then this chapter is just for you, all other might want to skip it. The two things you don't want to enter your gun is oil or water. Both are a common thing in normal compressors due to lubrication and pressure difference resulting in condensation of the humidity in the intake air. Oil free compressors of good quality can cost quite a few bucks and often require ongoing replacement of membranes or piston seals. A refrigeration compressor with the above modifications already provides clean enough air for most airbrush users if a proper tank is used to store enough of the compressed air. So you might just want to add a basic oil filter or very fine paper filter close to the regulator. For very detailed work with very sensitive paints you might want to build a filter box containing of several layers of oil absorbent paper. This stuff is often used in the industry to clean up minor oil spills and bind oil very well. A PVC pipe (pressure rated please) with 5-8 layers of filter screens should last about a lifetime before the filters need changing if the diameter is in the 10-15cm range. That leaves us with the dreaded problem of condensation and water contamination. Depending on the type of paint and gun used a small amount of water vapour is usually no problem. Solvent based paints usally show their disliking by unwanted drops or run offs caused by water droplets. Of course you just go and buy a professional dehumidifier and accept the ongoing replacement costs for the cartridges... But if you are in a climated that has above 30% humidity for most of the year than you will have to remove the water one way or the other. A big enough storage tank for the air that is upright usually helps to release any condensated water prior to usage. But if you use a homemade tank you might want to avoid this problem completely and forget about water in the system altogehter. Silaca gel is the answer here, specifically the indicating variety that changes color once "full". A spaghetti glas or similar should be big enough unless you are in a very humid climate - is so just use multiple in a row. The air intake side for the compressor has to go through the silica gel to be effictive. This mean we need two holes in the lid. One with a pipe or hose going all the way to the botom - that is the air intake side. The other right on the lid - this is the air outlet side which continues to the compressor intake. With the color change in the silica gel we can estimate how much usage we have left until we have to heat it up to remove the water. If this color change happens quite fast from the bottom to the top, let's say within three days or less than you really need to use more jars with silica gel in a row or a longer one - like using a long and clear acrylic pipe instead. Of course you can always just cut holes and "viewing glasses" along the length to a PVC pipe.... No matter how wet your climate is you want to get at least 100 hours of compressor run time before you need to recharge the silica gel. This brings us to the recharging.... Once the color changes and you only have about one quarter left to the top you want to get the water out of the gel and re-use it. To do this you simply heat it up in your oven to around 120-150°C - the supplier should state the max temp for this. If you use a gas oven or one with limited accuracy here it is best to stay within the 120° range. You need to stir and mix the gel or use something big enough like an oven tray. But be aware that these little balls are like glass! The roll and bounce like no tomorrow! IMHO it best to use an old cooking pot that has no plastic handles for this and not to overfill it. This allows for easy mixing without making a mess that might cause a bad trpping hazard on your kitchen floor tiles! Once the gel is back to original colr it is time to let it cool of to a safe temperature and to fill it back into our canister or pipe. Tanks and shut off systems.... We have a refrigeration compressor working for us, and since it was for R22 we can use much higher pressures as a simple compressor from the hardware store. The low pressure side is used to 70PSI or around 5Bar of pressure in normal working conditions. The high side often works at pressure in the range of 200-300PSI or 14-20Bar! The tank we used is a big propane tank that was restamped at some stage in his life for the use of LPG - so it was tested to quite high pressures. The lower pressure limit is what keeps the stored gas liquid at the given temperature. For Propane at an imaginary 30°C this would around 155PSI or 10Bar. The stamped test pressure, although outdated, showed 600PSI or around 40Bar of pressure with no problems - and the thing was thick in the walls... The old shut off switch from an old air compressor was adjustable after removing the safety cap with a bit of force and the help of few cold beer. With a little tank attached we adjusted it to turn the compressor off at 250PSI or around 17Bar of pressure. If your tank is old or has no test pressure stamped on do your own test in a safe location. Make sure the area is secured so there is no chance of debris from a brusting tank can go anywhere - this includes to chain down the tank itself ;) Use the aircon compressor to fill it up to 300PSI or 20Bar of pressure - this should be tolerated with ease by any propane or LPG tank. Shut the valves and let it rest for a day or so. It is best to do this in the early morning so the heat from the day will slightly increase the pressure. At the end you still want to have a working tank and no major pressure losses. All of our mods on this tank were done without actually harming the tank. This was possible as the original valve had a release port for filling purposes - as it standard on most refillable ones. Here we removed the valve and added a pressure guage instead - better to know what is happening than to assume things. As this "port" had a seperate connection to the bottom of the brass valve we added as T-connection to allow for the connection to the compressor. Just be be really sure a thin piece of copper tubing was brazed to the exit hole of this port so all incoming air will be going down and away from the outlet connection with the big shut off valve on top - which we use to actually isolate and close the tank when not it use. Last thing required was something to connect the pressure shut off switch and regulator to. That was the only major expense on this project as we had no old BBQ hose or similar to get a suitable connector to the tank. We bought a simple adapter for the use of smaller hoses and cut the unwanted bits off we there was only the bottle conntector with the nut left. After removing the rubber ring we brazed piece of copper pipe onto it. Here we drilled holes and fitted severy connectors. First for the pressure switch, then for the connection to the pressure regulator and two standard ones with a ball valve for air hose connections. One air hose connection female, the other male so a standard compressor can be connected as well or "backfilled" for additional and mobile storage use. As we wanted to avoid any reduction in the safety and burst pressure no release valve was added at the bottom on the tank. The added silica gel filter stage was used instead so no water will get into the system to begin with. Additionally, and painfully for me and me friend, the inside of the tank was coated with a layer of acrylic paint to prevent and rust as it was free from it when we checked it at the beginning. This involved filling a suitable amount of paint into it, closing the top while keeping the thread clean and then to move the tank around to cover the inside evenly. If you do this be prepared for some weird movements with your friends LOL Once we were sure all ust be covered by paint at least three times we released the exxess paint and allowed the inside to dry with the assistance of some air forced to go in with a length of pipe. This was repeated 3 times... Then another two just for the bottom third of it where there might be some moisture after all... Now you don't want to remove the brass valve with everything connected to it just to turn the tank over to releae the collected water. Instead we made sure the added pipe on the former relese port would go all the way to the bottom of the tank. If any water collection is suspected only the connection to the compressor needs an additional valve for the disconnection so the water will be force back out here. To make this easy and fast we used standard quick connectors and a piece of flexible airhose rated to 20bar of pressure for the connection to the compressor. We checked the performance of the moisture removal and oil removal only for a few hours of running time while priming some surface for later use. The compressor oil used was very smelly to say it nice but nothing coul be smelled in the first paper filter after the pressure regulator. To check for remaining moisture levels (65% humidity in the house) we used a 10m length of clear PVC tubing going through an ice bath. After 30 minutes of moderate air release there was no condensation on the inside of the tubing visible. Of course if you only need it for air supply and don't care about a bit of moisture and oil you can keep it simple ;) Benefits of doing such a stupid thing: For starters noise and the peace of mind that you can do a lot of airbrushing until the compressor needs to kick in again. Then of course the benefit of an almost silent system compared to a standard compressor - something you can actually tolerate while doing art. But the real deal is knowing YOU did it and you did it for cheap. Warnings and some advise... I know, it should be at the very beginning but I just hope you read till the end ;) If the compressor fails from overheating you are up for a new one. This means the tan size should be within the limits of what the compressor can handle - same for what you actually use on air. You want an empty tank to be filled before the compressor feels hot to touch - quite warm is fine but if you can't leave your hand on it then it is too hot. Same story for the usage. There is no point in using a tiny 10 liter storage tank if you need that capacity every few minutes. The compressor would only have little pauses and overheat quickly. You want a good balance of usage time before the tank goes below supply pressure and running time of the compressor to get it to full pressure again. This brings us to the safety of high pressures. Where possible only copper tubing or sufficiently rate hoses should be used, the later as short as possible to avoid them acting like a whip if something goes wrong. When it comes to the safety of the tank you want to make sure to stay withing it's rated limits. All benefits of a compressor capable of producing over 500PSI otr close to 35Bar is wasted if your tank and pressure regulator can't handle it. This must not mean that you try to use a gas cylinder of unknow age and pressure rating and assume it will work! If in doubt use a lower shut off pressure and stay within the limits of normal air compressors - which is around 120PSI or 8Bar. Never, ever use a tank that is compromised by inside rust or bad corrosion on the outside! If you don't know how to braze copper tubing, pipes and connectors then check out some of the great Instructables about it! Whenever you know you won't use any compressed air for more than a few hours close all valves especially the ones going back to the compressor on the high pressure side! Some compressors really don't like a huge pressure difference constantly pushing on the reed valves. If your tank is big enough to allow for more than one hour of operation before the compressor has to top it up you might want to consider a one way valve right on the compressor outlet. This will prevent any massive pressures going onto the valves - especially helpful for modern compressors that only rely on the sealing capabilities of the clyinders or rotary system used. One thing you should always consider is a pressure relief valve rated for about 50PSI more than your tank pressure - it can be added to the pipe ;) If the shut off valve ever fails the relief valve gives you the ease of mind that it will blow before your tank does. Maintenance... If modded correctly the compressor should stay in the compressor and the compressor itself should not overheat from use. Having said that your compressor might force out a little more than your best catch system can handle. If that becomes a problem it might help to use an oil with a lower viscosity. If all fails it just means you need to top up oil once the last last paper filter is filthy or use slightly more to begin with so the intervals are longer. The silica gel, if used should be recharged before all of it is wasted - no point in adding it if you use it once full of water. If no gel is used there will be water in the storage tank. Even with the added paint and a good air filter it is possible that nasty things grow in there. Making sure the tank is emptied of any water after long uses and again before the next use is good practise. If no pressure gauge is used on the tank you must make sure the shut off valve is always working fine and within set parameters. I strongly recommend using a gauge and if not to perform a pressure check of the system every now and then to confirm all is within parameters of normal operation. A compressor constantly running means you either use far too much air or you have a leak - same story if the compressos kicks in after some of forgetting to shut it off and close the valves. If you keep the above in mind the salvaged compressor should work just fine for many years to come. Troubleshooting and alternatives.... You put everything together the right way, double checked and something is till not right? Maybe my crystal ball helps me to find something... 1. Always oil coming through the catch system. It usually means you use too much of it. A salvaged compressor, if the refrigent was removed legally from the system should still have a "correct" level of oil inside. Too much oil would mean is being pumped through the system at an excessive rate. Very thin compressor oils tend to do that in the compressor is misude like we do. Changing to standard mineral oil can help here. As a last resort you can use a pressure gauge or good judgement to allow more flow through the needle valve from the catch system back to the compressor. Too much backflow here would mean we loose system pressure to the set level of this needle valve! 2. The R22 rated compressor seems to be unable to produce enough pressure. First do a leak test using soapy water to rule out any leaks. Do a back pressure test on the ports. If you can push air through them in the reverse way with ease it means the valves are damaged making the compressor useless. You need to replace it. A regular cause with our type of usage is a constand back pressure from the storage tank to the compressor. To prevent this it might help to mount an electric solenoid between the compressor and storage tank. Such valve should be off when the pressure switch is engaged and on when the pressure switch is disengaged. This prevents the coil from overheating but requires a "normally off" type of valve. A good source at the wreckers are cars with LPG systems installed, they usually have suitable 12V valves somewhere on or near the tank and filler cap. 3. I am using several kg of silica gel but still get a lot of water in my storage tank. Going overboard in a humid climate can be a good thing here but if moisture makes it into the tank even with great amounts of silica gel there are only two causes: a) the tube or cylinder used is not long enough or not wide enough to allow the absorption of all the moisture going through. b) the flow rate is too high and the temperatures are too. For the first the solution is obvious enough. The second is related to the first for the diameter and lenght but temperatures constantly above the 30°C while operating somehow limits what the gel can do. Using a cooling coil on the intake side or simply putting the gel containers in icy water will help to a great deal here. If that is not an option than I suggest to layer the gel and to seperate it with fine paper filter screens. This will slow and even out the airflow allowing for more contact time with the gel. 4. The compressor gets very noisy after some time. If "some time" means more than 30-45 minutes you simply have it running too much and it overheats. If the noise increases too much when reaching the shut off pressure it can mean the pressure is too high for it. 5. Can I use multiple compressors from smaller units or refrigerators to get enough air volume? Of course you can but it might mean you have to lower your pressure expectations. Consider that each individual compressor would get the back pressure from all other compressors running while it's outlet valve is closed. To avoid premature failure you want to make sure the compressors are shut off at a lowver pressure. 6. I don't want to use a big tank but require a good airflow for airbrush. Two or three fridge compressors working one after the other with a small tank to keep the output pressure even can allow for about 30 minutes runtime per compressor. With three it gives one hour for the the first to cool off and should be enough for ongoing work. Downside is you need to make some sort of automatic switch to "rotate" to compressor working. Last words.... Is you find any spelling mistakes you can keep them. However, if you use them in any way to make a profit with them I kindly ask for 10% of your earning from it ;) Why did I not make an Instructable out of all this? Well the day was very hot, the beer very cold and my mobile phone at home, so I did not take any pics. To top it up the whole thing is now in a seperate box for additional noise reduction so it can be used in the same room where the guy is working. Of course he just used a nailgun for the job without any regard of access or at least easy view of the two pressure gauges. Typical if you have a great idea and the cold beer tells you to forget all about screws or hinges ROFL Only comment was: You created it and it works fine, why would need more than the pipe connections for the gel and regulator? Maybe he will reconsider when the service is due....

Topic by Downunder35m 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago