Using Radiant Alumipex for Solar Pool Heater

Hello everyone, First time here, found lots of info but have question about using this type of piping. I've noticed most people use either black hose or irrigation pipe. I have extra black radiant heat hose and was thinking it would be much better. Its black hose shell with a thin aluminum shielding then thick white pipe inside. It says rated for 200F - 100psi and is 1/2 thick. Brand name caked Weil-Mclain Alumipex for Radiant 1/2nom 1216 PEX-AL-PEX. Can someone please let me know if this would work. Thanks. Brian

Topic by fst2011   |  last reply


How might I heat a basement space with solar heated water running through radiant underfloor tubing?

I live in the northeast and have a basement meant to be used by the kids as a hang out and studio space. It's cold. I'd like to heat it cheaply and environmentally. My preference is to use radiant floor heating with hot water supplied by a solar water heating system. I need to build both. I've seen great ideas for heating the ground and upper floors but I'm snagged on how to adapt any of them to a basement space. Oh, and I have practically no budget at all - tubing to be purchased but most everything else scrounged/salvaged/adapted. Any helpful suggestions?

Question by vexx2   |  last reply


What type of light cause a solar cell to work? Answered

Is it the uv's or the infrared or the visible light or dose it use the radiant heat to work

Question by dizzydog598r   |  last reply


im looking for some help building an ir led array i have 150 10mm IR leds to power, must be from batteries

So which batteries to use? how many leds to connect ? series/parralel? additional resistors?thanks in advence guysmy leds claim to have the following spec:RADIANT INTENSITY 6mW/Sr If=20m/aRADIANT INTENSITY 30 mW/Sr If=100m/aFORWARD VOLTAGE 1.4—1.45vREVERSE CURRENT 10u/a

Question by donnybronson   |  last reply


Tesla Coil Safety?

My high school recently had an engineering fair, and my friend had built a tesla coil. Its has multiple spark gaps, an RF filter (I think thats what its called), a 120 to 20000v transformer, and toroid top-load, if any of that matters. We/I would entertain ourselves by standing away from the coil and holding a fluorescent tube (by the glass with bare hands, not by the contacts) near the top-load and watching it light up. Even though I was well away from the coil, my forearm muscles would twitch, especially it the coil spark hit the contact on the other side of the tube. Then if anybody touched me, both of us would feel a shock and the same slight twitching (the same kind of twitching you feel from those electric muscle stimulators with the pads you put on sore muscles). We even set up a chain of about 5 people holding hands, and all of us would feel a shock, even though only the first person in the line (aka me)  was holding the fluorescent tube near the coil, with my hand on glass, no where within range of the streamers coming from the top-load. Now for my question: is this dangerous? (I know its non-lethal, im talking about my nerves) And what exactly was happening? because it was not an incredibly large coil, and i know that the field of a coil is much larger than the actual streamers. I also read somewhere that insulators dont work the same at incredibly high voltages. I think what I was feeling was the skin effect, and the charge came from the excited electrons in the tube. If my ideas are correct, then wouldn't me holding the tube be just the same as if i had just put my hand near the top-load and let the streamers hit me?

Question by masterbuilder   |  last reply


Would a survival blanket help a criminal to evade detection from a thermal camera?

 I have a survival blanket that claims to reflect back 90% of my radiant body heat and I've always wondered: If a criminal were to hide under a bush wrapped in a survival blanket would he be able to evade a police helicopter searching with a thermal imaging camera? Thank you.

Question by FriendOfHumanity   |  last reply


Need help with heated wire installation not using a thermostat

  I am trying to use some wire for radiant floor heating to warm an area. I have a separate way to turn the current on/ off without a thermostat. I just need to know what the thermostat output is. I have 110 and 220 V  AC outputs available. Do I need to convert this to DC?  

Topic by stino66   |  last reply


What size/type resistor do I need? Answered

I have an electronic heater timer that is operating a relay that feeds a radiant heater. The timer needs at least .5 watts of load to function properly which we don't have with the relay so my thought is to add a resistor to give us the necessary load. The circuit is 277 volt and I would like to know how to calculate this problem.

Question by Sidney T   |  last reply


Homes Protected from Raging Forest Fires

Every year we hear about countless homes being destroyed by forest fires. Unfortunately, the public isn’t aware that our current level of technology can readily address this problem. I have been examining a concept that has intrigued me over the past decade and which I call a “fire shield”. This shield functions by completely enveloping a private home and protecting it against encroaching forest fires. We’re talking about protection against a blazing fire storm generating high speed winds and flames in excess of 100 MPH. The shield would be a flexible structure that easily inflates like a balloon (needing perhaps three people for a day to erect) and forms a protective hemispherical, shell-like dome over the home (Fig-1). The structure would be impervious to penetration by high speed flames and their intense radiant heat, thereby keeping the enveloped home safe, cooled and protected. Each home would require a pre-fitted, customized buildup of a number of pre-built modular, balloon-like segments. They are manufactured and then assembled over the house only once, to get a customized tailored fit, then taken down and stored, and thereafter are ready to be deployed within a day’s advance notice of an encroaching forest fire. The Fire-Shield would be a modular, portable, inflated dome like those used for indoor tennis, which is prepared and custom-fitted to be later erected within a day. While typical inflated domes have their entire inner volume pressurized, our Fire-Shield will only require pressurizing a small volume contained between its double-walled structure that forms the dome as shown in Fig-1. The surface of its outer material uses NASA's radiatively reflective, aluminized Mylar to ward off the intense radiant heat of a fire storm. In addition this surface gets protected against the 100 – 150 MPH fire-winds, which are ready to impinge upon it, by injecting a high speed film of air (just like gas-turbine blades) produced by portable blowers. The actual heat-shield contains multiple, redundant pockets of cells directing the flow of air to both film-cool its surface and protect the shield against direct flame contact. Each major modular segment would contain its own portable, gasoline powered wind generator to supply the airflow. Depending upon home-size, several of these modules would be easily connected using Velcro plus redundant snaps and safety-stays. The shield gets attached over chimney tops and to pre-installed, grounded cement-posts, plus strategic hooks about the outside of the house. Special, inflated pillows are also strategically placed (between the shield and the house exterior) to facilitate the formation of a hemispherical shield that envelopes and protects our home against a high speed fire-storm. The Fire-Shield Design Concept The concept for a fire shield went through a gestation period of several decades as my career in thermo/fluids evolved. It started with the design of jet engine turbine cooling to thermal control of satellites, and finally to designing radiant heat barriers for cryogenics. These activities enabled receiving a score of patents as well. These activities inspired the concept for a rapidly deployable Fire-Shield to protect homes against a raging forest fire. The idea requires integrating several technologies ranging from inflatable commercial air domes to jet engine cooling to radiatively cooled spacecraft. Also included are flexible material coatings developed by NASA that radiatively reflects high temperature heat, making the deployable Fire-Shield a viable concept. Two key design principles are employed to protect both the heat shield and the home it envelopes. The first is shown in Fig-2 and uses a high speed film of air (faster than the anticipated fire-storm flame speeds of 100 – 150 MPH) that is locally directed to blow over the shield’s surface, cooling it and protecting it just like the metal turbine blades of jet-engines. The temperature of speeding flames impinging upon a jet engine’s metallic turbine blades is hot enough to easily melt them, yet the blades are protected by using this film cooling technology. The same technology will protect the heat-shield from meltdown when high speed flames of 100+ MPH attempt to impinge upon its surface. The second principle protects the shield against the intense radiant heat coming from a blazing forest fire where temperatures can exceed 2000 F. While this radiant heat does not physically touch the shield, as would a fire-storm’s flames, its presence is “felt” and is as deadly as the hot flames that would normally scrub over the shield without our film-cooling. We use a radiatively reflective, thermal coating barrier that repels this radiant heatload and protects the shield from melting. Such coatings were originally developed by NASA to protect satellites and spacecraft. The coating gets applied to the shield’s outer domed surface and will reflect better than 97% of all intensive radiant heatloads that are incident upon the dome’s surface. (Patent Pending; Original Concept Documented in 2006)  

Topic by RT-101 


Need Advice on homemade Broiler

I'm making a 24"x24" vacuform machine. I have the base built but racking my brain for a cost effective heating source.  Is it possible to take a replacement broiler element for an electric stove and just solder a split extension cord to each side? Or better yet get an adjustable thermostat cord like one that would come with an electric skillet and use that? Is this a safe way to do this? The unit that would hold this, would be steel and wood to help radiant heat down plus keep anything or anyone getting burned. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you

Topic by zatman   |  last reply


Thoughts on this method to heat my pool? Answered

So, I have an intex easy-set 12' pool. We have finally leveled the ground and re-filled it and it works great. I live in Texas the swim season is pretty long already. I have this all rigged up with a bungee cord tether so I can swim in place for exercise. I dug out the center to give me another foot depth where I needed it. I also have a solar cover and the entire thing is covered by an elevated parachute tent for shade/wind block. (Also modesty). For now the water warms up significantly enough by about 10 am without much heat loss at night. I have thought long an hard and this is what I have come up with to heat it during the colder months. I can build a typical solar collector with hoses and hook it to either my saltwater sand pool pump or the cheapy pool pump it came with (which would be better?) then put it on top of a metal roof piece in the yard slightly elevated from rain water, then attach radiant floor heating mats underneath it. I am hoping this would provide a boost of heat on less sunny days or when it is significantly cold, like December. With a much cheaper energy bill. I am guessing I will need to insulate the heating things a bit or something. Feel free to suggest anything. I am just kinda in plan mode atm.

Question by HidiousTak   |  last reply


Embedded Youtube videos missing - blank space

Www.instructables.com/id/Lithium-Rain-Radiant-Beacon-of-Righteousness-Blin/  Previously embedded youtube videos are missing.  There is a blank space where the video widget should appear in the instructable.  2 videos are missing.   I also had embedded a video as a comment in forum topic "Why" and that embedded youtube video no longer appears.  The comment appears as a blank space. XP, bug appears in IE and Safari. update: FIXED. I needed to uninstall flash player and install latest flash player.  Security settings to allow video to run only on external programs seems to have been reset/changed in IE8 browser options.

Topic by caitlinsdad   |  last reply


Large Scale Mould Making - the Evolution

I'm so excited, I now have + hours of video to cut and share :)Today we:Finished the split standSet the finished plug in the stand and aligned our waterlineBondo'd stand and plug for a flange lineApplied mold release waxSprayed PVA (Poly Vinyl alcohol)Applied a polyester tooling resin with cabosil (A silica thickener) to serve as the inner mold face (outer shape/surface of final product)Applied 4 layers of chopped fiber with polyester resin (took about an hour and we're still a tad bit high - even with good ventilation)Mind you the resin is catalyzed with MEK-P (Methyl Ethyl Keytone Peroxide -- some call it rocket fuel. It will eat the flesh off the bone and then eat the bone.Why am I so excited? Because we finished today and the catalyzed resin was COOK-ING. "Too hot to touch" is about 180 for the average meat human. It's well above too hot to touch - in fact, the radiant heat is a bit much for most meat peoples. And that's with the prescribed 1% catalyst.More information coming soon :) It's going to take 8 hours to capture all that video :PPhoto: Adding more PVA to the pot in the middle of the second coat.

Topic by trebuchet03   |  last reply


Solar heating and perceived temperature

We've had an interesting discussion spanning several months on the efficacy of this instructable's approach to heating: https://www.instructables.com/id/Foil-Solar-Panels-for-Windows-VERY-Easy/ The conversation has gone long and isn't really that appropriate for the comments there so I've moved it here. Summary: The approach described in the instructable is to create a thin metal panel that hangs inside of one's window, which is heated by the sun's radiant energy. Convection then carries the hot air next to the panel up and circulates it within the room. The question is whether this approach provides a warmer perceived environment than simply letting the light into the room. As I see it, the question has two components. First, which one nets more heat energy inside the room? For an average room, the light will be scattered many times before a tiny fraction reflects back out the window. A flat foil panel as described in the instructable would have to be extremely absorptive to match this level of energy capture, because it gets only one bounce for its capture and also must capture the heat in an extremely small thermal mass. For this part of the question, not having a panel seems the likely win. The second part of the the question is more complicated. What is the perceived temperature in the room, given differences between convection heating of the air versus radiative heating of objects and surfaces in the room? On this count I'm unsure, but it seems that radiative heat contributes more to human comfort (see this Wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mean_radiant_temperature). If that's true, the panels lose again. Discuss!

Topic by nagutron   |  last reply


How to get the best range out of an IR LED? Answered

Hello, I'm using my Arduino as a universal remote and I've got everything working, but my IR LED isn't really strong.  I've read around the internet and all I've found are people using an IR LED with either a 33 Ohm or 100 Ohm resistor in front of it. Currently I'm using this RadioShack High-Output Infrared LED http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062565 [Radiant Power Output = 16mW min  Forward Voltage = 1.2V  Forward Current = 100mA  Wavelength = 940nm] with a 100 Ohm resistor in front of it and only get a foot or two of range.  I'd really like to get out to about 20 feet but I could make due at 15/16 feet.  So I got nose-y and opened up my TV remote... it's all surface mount, but as best I can figure it the signal leaves an IC, goes through a 100 Ohm resistor and then goes into a transistor (labeled 2T) before heading out to the IR LED.  The third pin from the transistor snakes around to a bunch of other parts and I lost.  So I was wondering what to do to increase the range of my IR LED... change the resistor?  Power it via a transistor?  If I can use a transistor does anybody know how to wire it up? Any help is much appreciated. Nick

Question by Schmidtn   |  last reply


2007 High Country tour of sustainable Living

Hi all. So here I am on fall break. Two days of not going to classes. I decided to tell ya'll (I'm in the south, I'm allowed to say that) about this weekend.This weekend was a big weekend up here in the mountains, and ASU's Homecoming eclipsed some great stuff, let me tell ya'. Instead of going to the game I decided to go on the 2007 High Country Tour of Sustainable Living. It was amazing! let me fill you in on some of what happened.Friday evening I found out about this and decided I couldn't miss it. So I got up bright and early Saturday morning, put on my robot t-shirt, and headed out. People started arriving around 8 AM and kept coming until 8:45 when we were finishing up breakfast . We all piled onto a biodiesel fueled bus and started for our first destination. I had had my coffee so I was up for talking at 8:45 on a Saturday morning. Right away I met some neat people, and we talked about bio-fuel in general, Who Killed The Electric Car, and the Appropriate technologies department at the university. We pulled up to a farm to be greeted by Ned Trivette and a 65' tall wind turbine, back dropped by the beautiful mountain scenery. Grid-tied and nearly maintenance free, this turbine provides about about 10% of Ned's household power usage.After talking about wind power and how Ned's setup works we loaded up again and headed to the Kennedy residence out in Vilas. We made it as far as the road that turns off to go to their house. There was no way that bus was going to make it up the hill to the house, so we all got out and the few cars that were there started shuttling people up while others of us walked. I walked, and let me tell you, that hill is STEEP. We got to the house without any mishaps and learned about this high efficiency house. It was facing south so it can soak up the sun in the winter months and had deep overhangs to shade the house in the summer months. By far the coolest (pun intended) part of this house was the thermal radiant heating system. Panels on the roof heated the 750 gallon Carolina water stove, and from there the water was pumped throughout the house to the radiant heating system in all the floors. Highly efficient and fascinating. After this we headed off once again. Here's where our schedule got interesting, and everyone was helpfully flexible. We apparently decided to take a "short cut." Someone thought we could make it on this steep dirt road that we took. We did make it, but not before getting stuck a few times and running over a rock. pieces of the bus were falling off and smoke from the tires was going everywhere! Once we finally made it over the hill we didn't have much more trouble. Instead of going to lunch, like we were supposed to do, we went to the ASU Biodiesel research facility. This was the highlight of the tour for me. I learned so much related to my latest endeavor, biodiesel. (for some reason spell check doesn't like that word.) We met Jeremy Ferrell, the guy in charge of all of it. He showed us the process they use to make it, and discussed all the latest research. This facility is amazing! It's completely sustainable. They have solar panels so they're making as much power as they're using, and in their passive solar greenhouse they have a "living machine" to recycle their gray water. There were things (algae and the like) growing everywhere, and the same solar thermal system that we had seen earlier, to heat water. I'm actually going back there sometime in the next few weeks to pick Jeremy's brain about biodiesel "stuff." ASU Collaborative BioDiesel projectAfter this was over and I was dragged back onto the bus we finally went to get some lunch. We were starving.We went to the Hill/Mitchell Residence for lunch. This house was awesome. It was only about 1600 square feet and had a concrete slab between the two floors, to retain heat. They had the radiant heating as well. I didn't get any pictures of the inside of the house but it was at least as cool as the outside. They also had a great garden going. Over lunch we had a speaker who talked about green building, and a lot of what goes into it. (I don't remember his name, sorry!)Our last destination was the Marland residence. It stands up on a hill above the university, in direct sunlight. This house is incredibly energy efficient and quite pleasing to the eye. (it was purple). With very few electric lights in the house that need to be on in the daytime, most of the windows face the sun, with overhangs on the roof for shade in the summer. It also had a tank-less hot water heater, which I had never seen before. It's apparently very energy efficient. So that was this years tour! (or the good parts, at least.) apparently it happens every year, so I plan on going in the future. Let me know if you guys have any questions or comments, in case I got any of the info wrong or left some out. (a lot of this is from memory and the handout we got)Thanks for reading,-DMC

Topic by drinkmorecoffee   |  last reply


Throwies reimagined - Really I did tried :) :| :/

Seeing other forms of making interactive throwies, eg using microchips impresses me.However i think it is important that we try parts of the B.E.A.M philosophyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BEAM_roboticsNamely keeping things simple, and avoiding the use of microprocessor.The component of a interactive throwie is that it has1. Power storage2. Trigger3. Circuit4. LED5. (optional) Power collection of radiant energy.I like to see more suggestion on ways we can address each issues.But to kick start the issue, can you see if my idea is feasible.essentially for my prototype not-yet throwie, I used a circuit from http://unconventional-airsoft.com/2003/11/16/momentary-fan-switch/#more-21to create a throwie that on sensing motion, doesn't flicker but turns on for a while.By ensuring that i use few and simple componants, i hope to keep cost per throwing down.Unfortunately my problem is that using a resistor to keep the capacitor from draining too fast from the base, actually decreases the voltage drop to an unacceptable level at the led.On my end it is unsolvable for the moment. Maybe you can work out how to make a cheap throwie, that can still do these functions or more.Any ideas how to solve this?Other Ideas for throwies1.Open and attach a switch to a barometer, to have a air presser passive trigger.2. A leave shaped pad with two conductors that do not touch, to act as rain sensors. (Resistance increase when leaf dries)3. Is sensitive to infrared radiation from side, so that the throwie is trigger-able by other activated throwies. (As well infrared devices)4. Has a short loop of coil to recharged capacitors, by outside induction.5. If activated rarely, uses a tiny single solar cell to charge capacitor.6. Has a hook to be easily collected for recycling. (Using a simple loop of wire on a pole [Like a dog catcher pole] )7. A single thermistors in series with led.8. A tricolour LED, and a Two light resistor. One LDR acts to sense if it is day an night, if night a low power light is activated. Only when an object strays near, and reflect light into another LDR, does the throwie get triggered at all.9. A throwie triggered by vibration.10. A throwie that responds to radio waves.

Topic by akimbo m   |  last reply


Carbon Button Lamp

The Nikola Tesla group forum is asking for new projects, so I'm posting this as a suggestion. I would love to build it myself, but I lack the tools and money. This is my first contribution to Instructables, so please comment constructively.Nikola Tesla invented the Carbon Button lamp as a kind of incandescent light, because Thomas Edison banned him from using his incandescent filament bulbs. Nikola later discovered that versions of it could also be used in wireless, trans-Atlantic telegraphy, and to investigate what we now call x rays. In fact, he even used the lamp (or something similar to it) to take x-ray photographs, 8 years before Wilhelm Rotgen discovered them.For this reason, I must warn you: this device may possibly generate x rays. I am not responsible for any harm of any kind that may or may not result from re-creating this interesting device.There are phosphors that you can buy that will absorb x rays and re-emit them as visible light. I recommend that you coat the bulb with it until you know for sure that the x rays aren't strong enough to hurt you, or if makes x rays at all. Mixing it with a phosphor made for uv light wouldn't hurt either.Theory of Operation:The bulb is powered by a Tesla Coil, or other source of high voltage, high frequency current, such as a driver for a plasma globe (actually, the modern plasma globe is descended from this kind of technology!)When the power is turned on, electricity bombards the carbon button. Because carbon isn't the best conductor, this causes the button to heat and release electrons into the bulb's vacuum (the technical name for this is "thermionic emission," or the "Edison effect") . These electrons, in turn, excite the remaining air molecules and cause them to create visible light. This is strikingly similar to how fluorescent lamps work!Supposedly, the bulb should shine 10 times brighter than an incandescent bulb.(Note that the excitation of the air molecules, not the incandescence of the button, is actually the main source of light from the bulb.)If anyone decides to build it, please post an instructable showing the steps and finished product. I suggest you get started by reading the patent, number 514,170. You may also want to read part of Tesla's lecture, "Experiments with Alternate Currents of High Potential and High Frequency."To anyone who will attempt this, I wish you good luck!Patent: http://www.google.com/patents?id=UpldAAAAEBAJ&pg;=PA1&dq;=514,170+tesla&source;=gbs_selected_pages&cad;=0_1Lecture: http://www.tfcbooks.com/tesla/1892-02-03.htmQuestions:What can one use for the carbon button?Could one use a modern, hollowed-out light bulb for this? (I would think there would be some problems with sealing the globe, and with the stem.)Edit: I recently found the third picture in Tesla's Colorado Springs notes and his "apparatus for the utilization of radiant energy" patent. It must be the single-electrode x ray tube I was talking about before...

Topic by ElectricUmbrella   |  last reply


DEPLOYABLE FIRE ESCAPES for TOWERING BUILDINGS

The “9/11” World Trade Center disaster horrified Americans as they witnessed people leaping out of 100 story windows to their death. There was simply no available escape system to facilitate a safe yet quick evacuation to the ground floor. Elevators weren’t working and internal staircases were blocked by sporadic debris, black smoke and fires. The situation was virtually hopeless to the point where many chose to jump rather than be burned alive. So here we are, with technology capable of constructing 100+ story buildings but without the means for external fire-escapes. Unfortunately, the public isn’t aware that at our current level of technology we can finally address this problem with our architects. We are talking about a means to rapidly deploy a flexible escape tube-chute from 100+ stories that hangs along a guy-wire which is pre-attached to our escape floor and anchored to the ground (Fig-1). This tube-chute escape system will deliver a person from 100-stories down to ground level and safely outside the building in under 10-minutes. Prior to deployment, the entire system is housed inside a container that is either attached to the outside of the building or built into a structured wall, opening to the outside at various floor levels. When in deployment, the inlet of the flexible escape tube will be anchored to the outside wall of a designated escape window and contain an inner diameter sufficiently sized to accommodate an individual. The tube’s exit end is tethered to a rope-wire that runs down our permanently located guy-wire, through a series of guy-wire slip-rings, and quickly pulls the tube's exit end to ground. The rope-wire is permanently attached to a winch-motor located on the ground. During deployment, the winch pulls the tube’s rope-wire down to ground level by slipping along the guy-wire rings. As the tube-chute deploys downward, it automatically forms a spiral about the guy-wire, creating a very long escape slide that gets anchored to the ground. A fully deployed tube-chute exhibits three basic attachments for stability: 1) a set of flexible slip-rings and tethers attached between the permanent guy-wire and tube to form its downward spiral, 2) a tube-chute inlet anchored to the outside of the building at various floor levels, and 3) a tube-chute exit anchored to the ground and providing a fully deployed and reliable escape system ready for use. As each person enters the tube-chute, they are only aware of the outside winds which buffet the tube plus the internally hanging cloth fingers used to slow their descent as they slide down to safety. They are not aware of any height and feel relatively secure due to their complete envelopment by both the tube and its touching fingers.  A 100-story descent would take about 6-to-10-minutes to reach the outside safety of ground while travelling at a speed of roughly 5-fps (3.5 MPH) as regulated by the spiral-ramp and internal cloth-fingers retarding gravity.   Technical  Details: The tube-chute is reinforced by a sewn-in spiral wire that gives it strength and flexibility. Its tube is made of heavy duty nylon, much like the large yet light air-hoses used on many high stress applications today. The tube cork-screws its way down and around a permanently deployed guy-wire that stretches from the designated floor of the building to the ground. The tube is sized for a person to enter and slide down the spiraling pathway until he reaches ground level. Gravity will act to propel the sliding individual down the tube. To counter gravity, we rely on the tube’s spiraling design to produce a gradually declining ramp that slows and checks an individual’s descent speed. The number of spirals and ramp-angle necessary to reach the ground will be sized to limit the gravity-induced speed so as not to endanger an individual’s sliding descent. That and the internally hanging cloth fingers guard against excessive speeds and will prevent skin-burns from the sliding friction. The tube’s nylon material is impregnated with anti-flammable chemistry and its exterior is aluminized to prevent radiative heatloads from causing a fire due to either direct flames or the radiant heat from indirect flames. A final note on the overall weight for this flexible tube-chute structure. Clearly, since we are designing a deployable fire-escape system, its weight must be kept to a minimum for deployment safety and reliability. Items such as the cloth materials, tube-wire reinforcements, and spiraling tube tether attachments must be carefully chosen for weight, strength and durability. While issues of weathering may not be that important, as it will be housed and protected from the elements, the shelf life of the various materials chosen is of paramount importance.

Topic by RT-101   |  last reply