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Rain Barrels

I have inserted a Sump Pump through the top of my rain barrel. I have a 6X10 inch screen tightly fitted in the barrel which I remove to insert the pump. Now my wife can drag the hose around the yard to water her plants and garden and to water the grass.

Topic by diff95    |  last reply


Procuring a Rain Barrel?

I am looking to start my DIY water collection system, but the key for me is to find 3-4 55 gallon plastic drums for this project. I located someone on craigslist selling several drums for a very reasonable price. The question I have is, should I be very concerned that these plastic drums once contained various car washing fluids? Can these be effectively rinsed out? Will my garden be severely impacted by this?

Question by mcain    |  last reply


rain barrel-wooden

How do I keep a wooden wine barrel I`m using for a rain barrel,from leaking?

Topic by trainman1197    |  last reply


Rain Barrel question - Why can't I just dip the water out?

I set up a plastic (?) garbage can, well cleaned, under a downspout.  It's well covered.  Why can't I just dip the water out with a big ole dipper when I need it?  My veggie garden is tiny.  Thanks in advance for any advise!

Question by pharris123    |  last reply


I was wondering about use of some barrels that I procured. Answered

They had Polyacrylic acid (CAS# 9003-01-4) in them, which was being used as a calcium dispersant/scale inhibitor.  I was wondering with a good rinse, wash and soak if they would be ok for use in a rainwater collection system that feeds a garden.  I discovered that that specific chemical is also used in all kinda of cosmetics, and in many of different pills (Musinex as an example) as a time release agent.  I figure if I clean them good, how bad could it be if it's something that you would ingest anyway?

Question by Bajimer    |  last reply


How to make a homemade rainbarrel inexpensively.?

I would like to make a rain barrel for use in the garden this summer. Any suggestions?

Question by kysmart    |  last reply


Where can I get the blue 55 gallon drums? Answered

Where can I get the blue 55 gallon drums, like the ones people use for rain barrels?

Question by crocboy    |  last reply


best way to connect 3 55 gallon barrel together under ground.But can use the submercible pump 1 barrels & equal out ?

I need help on how to connect three 55 gallon barrels under ground that will allow them to equal out all at once and allow me to keep my 12v submercible pump in only one tank.And then itll all flow to that one tank as its draining.

Question by lightsfanatic    |  last reply


Rain Barrels:am making a youth garden,1000 sq ft in a park. Only have a small toolshed roof to collect from. Any advice?

Our budget is tiny. Can't find free or cheap food-grade barrels. Anyone ever done this by recycling hot H2O tanks?

Question by kellyleighg    |  last reply


I am thinking of using a rain barrel for hydroelectric power. Any ideas?

Can you create electricity with a high pressure stream of water from a gravity feed source?

Question by joshjayne    |  last reply


Good place for Food-grade barrels?

Trying to do some of the rain barrel projects, but I don't know where I can find 55 gallon food-grade barrels without spending an arm and a leg to have them shipped.

Topic by Ryutso  


what is a "French drain"?

Was reviewing comments on rain barrel construction and someone mentioned "french drain"

Question by marycolletta    |  last reply


Cleaning a 55 Gallon Drum?

Hey, I'm looking to build a rain barrel, and found out that my local car wash is willing to give me a 55 gallon drum. The thing is, I don't know what kind of soap they use (I would have asked, but the guy was impossible to understand) or how to clean it out. If anybody has experience in this, that'd be great!

Topic by Weissensteinburg    |  last reply



where do i find free 55 gallon or more barrel here in toronto, canada?

Can you please give me suggestions where i can find a free 55 gallon or more barrel for rain water that i plan to collect? i'm currently located in toronto, canada. really appreciate any help i could get!

Question by leilamae    |  last reply


Does anyone have an underground water storage system?

I have four 55 gallon plastic sealed top drums barried in the ground. They are meant to store water from my washer and rain water. I have a 3" inlet running in line to the four barrels. On the other side I put 3/4 inch PVC to an inch from the bottom of the barrel. The PVC is meant to get used something like a straw in your soda. I have the straws in line to the water pump. The problem I am having is that the pump requires to be primed to work. How can I keep it primed? It would be great if there was a valve that closed when the barrel was near empty. That way the pump would continue to pump the water from the other barrels and never loose its prime. Any ideas here????? Again, these are sealed toped barrels. I cannot open them to put a sump pump at the bottom, not to mention, a sump pump couldn't supply the pressure needed for my sprinklers. Thank you in advance for any advice! ! !

Question by Mikestime22    |  last reply


I got a barrel but am unsure what was in it. If I take it to a car wash and hose it out, will it be safe to use?

I am setting up a rain barrel collection system to water my vegetable garden. It is a very large white barrel. I received it from the composting/recycling center at work and they weren't sure what was in it. They already used a pressure hose to rinse it out. I am planning on taking it to a car wash and spending quite a bit of time hosing it with soap and then rinsing. Is this a good idea.

Question by Bruster    |  last reply


Rainbarrels- New or Reconditioned? Answered

Greetings! I want to install rain barrels beneath four downspouts. I would also like to be able to use the water for consumption if the need should arise, so I wonder if the "reconditioned" 55 gallon barrels can be cleaned enough for such use, or should I just purchase brand new ones? I can save a lot of money on the reconditioned ones, but if they are going to contaminate the water, I will gladly pay the price for new. Any advice is most appreciated!  -Bradley

Question by RedMayor    |  last reply


WANTED: Supplies for a school project

I am making a green watering system for a vertical garden at my school. The design involves a 55gal. drum with an autonomous solar pump unit designed to water the plants on a regular basis. I have a pretty good idea what is involved and what supplies I need, the list is as follows. X1 - car battery (for power storage) X1 - watertight box (to hold battery and other electronics) X1 - DC water pump (to power the drip system) X1 - Electric timer (to control when the pump comes on) X1 - solar panel (sufficient to charge the battery) X1 - charge controller?  Also: Some lumber and PVC Feel free to ask any questions or make a suggestions.                                  Thanks, CKGarside

Topic by ckgarside    |  last reply


Adding garden hose connection to downspout

Trying to think of a good way to add a garden hose connection to a downspout for directing rainwater elsewhere and or collection. There are diverters/whatnot out there but they seem to be ridiculously overpriced and some have low capture rates. And no, putting a barrel or container right under the downspout isn't really an option. Idea 1 = plug the bottom of the spout, then add a connection on the side, near the bottom Idea 2 = plug the bottom of the spout, and integrate a connection into it Idea 3 = use a flexible connector on the bottom which would go to a round shape, add a PVC cap and add a connection on the end Idea 4 = use a PVC downspout adapter to attach to a threaded cleanout, then add the connection to the plug Idea 5 = use two elbows off the bottom (U), and add a connection somewhere on either side of the bend I'm liking #4 at the moment, but I'm not sure about what exact fittings to use... One of these? http://images.lowes.com/product/converted/046224/046224250500lg.jpg

Question by explosivemaker    |  last reply


Self sufficient garden idea? possibly off-grid? Answered

I had this idea for a rain barrel + solar timed pump+ drip irrigation system, but was having trouble about the pump itself. I would like the pump to let water drip every couple of hours, for about a week. I have had no such luck finding this item online or otherwise. Any information on such a product, like how to build or where to buy would be enormously helpful!

Question by Nekkyo    |  last reply


Solar water still

I'd like to make a good solar water still. I was thinking of something for purifying the water from rain barrels along my house and channel it into drinking water containers. Any good ideas out there?

Topic by robbtoberfest    |  last reply


Fluid dynamics: can you connect 55-gal barrels in series to lawn sprinklers to circulate and keep emergency water fresh?

I saw several Instructables about how to use barrels to collect and store rain water.  It doesn't rain enough where I live for this to be practical -- however, I have five blue 55 gal barrels that I use to store water for emergencies. I would like to hook all these together with PVC and run my lawn sprinkler system through them, so that the water stays fresh and drinkable. As it stands, I have to store the water with bleach, and dump it all out every 6 months and start all over again. Big waste, and a bigger hassle. Often as not, I am sitting on 275 gallons of undrinkable swamp water at any one moment in time! -- My question concerns the physics surrounding the fluid dynamics. Is this workable -- running PVC between each barrel in series? -- or does that reduce the pressure to zilch at the end, so pressure wouldn't be high enough to water the lawn and garden? Would you have to put a bleeder valve in the top of each barrel so you could completely evacuate all the air? I really hope someone has actually done this, so I don't waste my time and money making something Mr. Wizard would just laugh at!

Question by wobryant    |  last reply


Will this float switch idea work?

I'm messing around with cheap-o solar pumping project wherein I want to pump water 75-100' from a stream (or really a shallow well next to a stream) to barrel near my fruit trees. I wanted to install a float switch in said barrel to turn off the pump when the barrel is full, but was trying to avoid having to run wire all the way from the pump/controller/battery set-up at the stream to the barrel. I had this idea that if I pumped water first into a 5-gal bucket mounted on a tree near the pump and raised it up above the barrel, Not only would I make the most of my pump's feeble lift (by reducing the friction it must overcome and allowing gravity to do the work), but it would also allow me to put a float switch on the bucket itself, rather than in the barrel, thus reducing the wire run significantly. Here's a picture (not all system components represented).  Will it work?  I'm wondering if there's a physical/practical consideration that I'm missing... Thanks for having a look!

Topic by Sam_NY    |  last reply


Looking To Pick Your Skilled Brains

Advice on best how to make a piezometer out of readily available hardware store parts without use of any power tools and access to only a very few hand tools. Basically a piezometer is a clear, straight plastic tube that you attach to the outside of (in my case) a plastic 250 Liter rain barrel (about 1.5 feet diameter, 4 feet high) from top to bottom. The top is exposed to the open air, while the bottom feeds into the bottom of the barrel (by going through the side very close to the bottom). It needs to have a diameter of about 1/2 inch, be very solid, straight and secure, and a 'water level mark' must be etchable in it somehow to indicate the normal level of water inside the barrel when the barrel is full (full means a few inches before the absolute rim of the barrel). The barrel is filled with gravel at the bottom, sand on top, and enough room for a 12" waterhead above the sand. I'm using it as a slow sand filter (SSF). The idea is that the pressure of water at the bottom of the barrel fills the tube up to the watermark against the action of the atmospheric pressure forcing the level in the tube down below the watermark. When the level of the water in the tube is about 15 inches below the water mark, it means the water pressure at the bottom of the barrel has decreased to the point where the sand in it needs to be cleaned (no water getting through). Any ideas will be greatly rewarded in the afterlife. Thanks!

Topic by SozzledBoot    |  last reply


Help: Pump water into barrel for cheap? (and off-grid)

I'm sort of undecided on the best way to go with a water pumping project and hoping someone had some advice/ideas. The goal: pump water from a small stream into a rain barrel (or IBC tote) in a location with no electricity. It's for having water available for watering fruit trees and doesn't need to pump much volume (even 100 gal/week would be great).  It does have to do it while I'm not around though and I'd like to do it as cheaply as possible. My idea is to make a small diaphragm pump out of pvc (for the housing) and some rubber (for the diaphragm) and a couple check valves.  My inspiration is this guy's pump.  I could drive it with a small DC motor powered by a solar panel.  Maybe install a float switch that turns it off if the barrel gets full. Any other ideas on making a diaphragm pump using cheap or found parts? I've never done anything with solar and would appreciate any advice on components.  What needs to go between the panel and the motor, if anything?  I've heard talk of a "controller" but have no idea what it is or what I'd need...  Also a goal is to design using as low power motors as possible so that I don't have to spend much on panels. I've also played around with the idea of something wind powered, like this thing (but cruder, presumably).  And had this other crazy idea to make a bellows-style pump for a windmill using a toilet plunger. Anyway, any thoughts and ideas are appreciated!

Topic by Sam_NY    |  last reply


Trash-Burning Car, Giant Bristlebot, 25 Cent Ring

Trash-Burning Car Giant Bristlebot 25 Cent Ring Magnetic Rubik's Dice Cube Paper Wallet Weld a Barbecue Easy Rain Barrel Build an Artificial Reef How to Freeze Blueberries Beach Towel for Two Terra Cotta Fountain iMac Desk Clone a Tomato Plant Crocheted Fairy Wings Stainless Steel Patio Heater

Topic by randofo  


Low-Footprint Lamp, DIY Wind Turbine, Energy Usage Meter

  Low-Footprint Lamp DIY Wind Turbine Energy Usage Monitor Build a Solar Tracker Stationary Bike Power Garden Rain Barrels DIY Solar Panel Recycled Window Greenhouse Pringles Wind Turbine Bike Wheel Generator Home Solar Panels Homemade Sun Jar Water Flow Sensor Solar Thermal Collector Energy Saving Tools  

Topic by randofo  


Bicycle Flower Box, Vertical Planters, Raising Chickens

  Bicycle Flower Box Vertical Vegetable Planter Raising Chickens Japanese Torii Gate Make a Koi Pond Home Gardening Sustainable Raised Bed Garden Garden Rain Barrels Temperature Controlled Composter Birdhouses and Bird Feeders Three-Tiered Garden Fountain Build Your Own Earth-Filled Box Grow Organic Food on the Cheap Garden Hose Repair Tomatoes Instructables.com - 82 2nd St. - San Francisco, CA

Topic by randofo  


Leveling a tree stump

Hi there everyone. So I have a bit of a dilemma. There's 3 or 4 beautiful knotted and dried tree stumps that I pass everyday and I've finally decided I want to drag them back home with me (which is another problem entirely) and use at least one to give my rain barrel some height. It's about a foot and a half in height, and just about thick enough to handle it. My problem is that the top is completely uneven and has been hacked with a chainsaw. I'd need to level the whole thing on top and bottom to make it useable. I just have no idea how I can go about doing this WITHOUT using a chainsaw. Thanks in advance everyone. I'll post photos soonish.

Topic by norwish    |  last reply


Powering a 24 Volt sensor with an arduino? Answered

Hello!   Ok here is the issue. Right now I am designing a rain water collection system by having my down spout drain into a 55 gallon plastic drum. I want to cap the drum to avoid spillage. The problem is what happens when the drum is full and the rain is still coming in. I know there are plenty of mechanical ways to solve this problem but I wanna have fun with an Arduino I have laying around. What I am thinking is run a pipe out of the bottom that has an irrigation valve installed (for anyone who is reading that that isn't aware of what an irrigation valve is, it is and inexpensive solenoid valve that is used for unground sprinkler systems). I figure I will add a water level sensor to the inside of the barrel and then hook the sensor and valve together via my Arduino. From there type a little code and violaa I have an over fill protection device! Here is the problem: An irrigation valve is 24v and the Arduino is 6volts. I know I can get the 24 volts from a power supply down to 6volts via resister, but then how would power the valve? My goal is to NOT have to buy a 12volt 1" solenoid (i didn't want to spend a lot of money on this project). I am not sure if there is a solution to this problem, but being a very green/inexperienced electronics hobbyist figured could hurt to ask. Thanks

Question by Mpc1055    |  last reply


How do I clean a 55 Gallon Plastic Drum that contained Industrial Grade Detergent?

I picked up three free 55 gallon plastic drums after seeing them posted on craigslist.  I was inspired by the compost tumbler and rain collection instructables, and I was looking to build my own.  However, the plastic drums contained an industrial grade detergent used in food and beverage processing facilities.  Two of the barrels were FiChlor Foam HD and the other contained Liqualin CC.  Do you think I could clean these out enough to make them safe for these projects?  Would the chemicals have leaked into the plastic? For rain collection, I was going to use the water for flushing my toilet, so it wouldn't be for watering a garden, and definitely not for drinking.  For the compost, would the chemicals remaining in the plastic leak into the compost?  And then would any plants exposed to that compost die? I really appreciate some feedback on this.  I've read most instructables on here that involve 55 gallon plastic drums, and the recommendation is to use Food Grade containers.  I'm just disappointed about the possibility of not being able to use the ones I picked up because they contained a detergent.  The containers are marked as "Corrosive" and "Do not reuse this container unless it is first professionally cleaned and reconditioned."  This is definitely a bad sign. :( Thanks guys, Eoin Here's some information I found from the manufacturer, Chemetall: Safety and Handling Precautions: Oakite FiChlor Foam HD is a highly alkaline chlorinated material containing sodium and potassium hydroxide. Direct contact causes irritation of eyes and skin. It is harmful if swallowed. Avoid contact with eyes, skin and clothing. Wear safety goggles, rubber gloves and other protective clothing when handling. Wash thoroughly after handling. Avoid breathing vapors. Use only in well-ventilated areas. Do not take internally. Liqualin CC:  Heavy-duty, low foaming, non-silicated alkaline liquid for use in CIP systems or spray washing stainless steel processing equipment in beverage and food plants.

Question by eoingrosch    |  last reply


How much water is in my cistern?

I built a 33 gallon cistern my garage to collect condensate from my HVAC system. (I didn't have room outside my condo for a rain barrel). It has a spigot and a short hose, it lives above my utility sink, which is where the overflow goes when the cistern is full. I'm hoping some clever makers can give me some ideas on how I can build something that will tell me how much water is in the cistern. I have Samsung SmartThings so I've considered putting a water sensor just below the overflow hole, so I will know when it's at 100%, but I would prefer to have a percentage reading and an alarm when it gets to 90% or so. I considered an arduino with an ultrasonic sensor but that a bit involved... Not opposed to it but please be prepared to hold my hand thru the process of you propose it! ☺. Non-SmartThings solutions also welcome.Thank you - looking forward to your genius ideas!!Mark

Topic by MarkB673    |  last reply


I want to build a kitchen warm-up water diverter, but I don't know how.

I want to divert the initial cold water when I run my kitchen faucet (to get hot water for dishes, etc.) through a pipe or hose through the kitchen window outside into a rain barrel, and to be able to route that water out to the birdbath to fill it in the winter from indoors, or to water the yard in the warm months. The faucet is way higher than the patio outside, and the patio is maybe 6" - 10" higher than the birdbath so I'm thinking gravity will do it. But I don't have the know-how to construct such a system. It would have to include somehow sealing around the hose leading through the window, as we have cold winters. Therefore I would probably have to address the water freezing and plugging the hose outside.There is an electrical outlet on the outside of the house so I think I could wrap a warming blanket around the hose if necessary. Any suggestions? I have limited tools and skill, but a lot of time and patience. :)

Question by threeoutside    |  last reply


[newsletter] RC Ducks, Bath Bombs, Espresso...

July 31, 2008 Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup1","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); } Welcome back! Show us something sweet for our new Pie Contest. Make something delicious in the next two weeks, share it on Instructables, and win a great cookbook and an Instructables t-shirt! There's still time to enter the Invent-a-Sport Contest we're running with Horny Toad, and to get your project into the upcoming Instructables Book! Get creative, and share some of your great ideas. Japanese strawberry and sweet bean ball by Lizzio Instructables July 2008 Show and Tell by ewilhelm Revive an Old Motorcycle by skunkbait Espresso Coffee by lebowski This week's newsletter is sponsored by... LED Cube 4x4x4 by chr Make Your Own Bath Bombs by SoapyHollow Instamatic Retro by BruceMiller Build A Pair of Stereo Speakers by billbob Pair of RC duck decoys/submarines by courtney Soundproof Your Walls by rik_akashian ChapStick LED Flashlight by BCat Micro LASER Show with a CD Lens by linefeed Get published in the Instructables book! Seven ways to show off your pictures Mmm... pie How to Buy from the World's Best Store by dan Hot Process Liquid Soap making by yetunguez Rain Barrel Project by oddie1212 E-Bola by Tetranitrate Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup2","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); }

Topic by fungus amungus  


Year-to-Data, March 2014

Tl;dr: Check out this pie chart that shows the distribution of projects published in 2014 by category. The outer ring shows the channel within the category that had the highest volume of entries, along with the year to date project count. Do you ever wonder how the projects on Instructables are distributed across categories? I did, too. In a tenuous-at-best connection to the Pi Day Pie Contest, we made a pie chart showing where all the newly-published projects have been categorized since the start of 2014. That outside ring shows the most popular channels within the category, along with a project count for each. Some quick observations: (1) There isn’t as much food as I would have thought. It seems like people are posting food ALL THE TIME, but apparently the overall project volume is coming in via other channels. I guess we’re just getting a lot of good food entries that are being featured more often. The quality of authors’ food photography is getting very good, and the featuring team may be featuring projects under the influence of hunger. (2) Contests drive some (but not all) project builds. Since the start of the year, we’ve run paracord, organization, electronics, and crafting contests. And, wouldn’t you know it, those are the channels receiving the bulk of new projects. Even without a special contest, the Toys channel received an outsized number of projects, so we’ll see what happens later this year when we run a few contests around toys. (Pro-tip: Start stockpiling LEGO and KNEX pieces.) (3) Technology and Living make up just over half of the site’s new content. Sure, the robot has a strong preference for electronics projects, but we’re seeing a lot of great craft projects coming in as well. Either way, an army of hot-tool wielding* makers are creating some really cool stuff. (4) This community may be a little paranoid, but we’re prepared. Paracord and survival projects account for almost all of the outdoor projects we’ve seen so far this year. If I’m stuck in a rural farmhouse surrounded by zombies, I want some of you all right there with me. If you’re worried about the imminent collapse of civilization and are concerned that Instructables won't be around to help with the power out, you can buy a book of some of our best homesteading projects. You’ll be sitting pretty with a chicken coop and some rain barrels while everyone else gets punched over a can of soup. (Don't get punched over a can of soup.) (5) Did you notice anything interesting? Sound off in the comments. I've got some 3 month pro memberships to give away to insightful commenters. :D *or hot, tool-wielding authors.

Topic by wilgubeast    |  last reply


Coming Soon: EVERY Instructable, one massive book

[edit: this isn't real, but it would be awesome] In the interest of helping out our amazing community of authors, we’ve decided to make all of Instructables available for download in a single PDF document. That way when the EMPs hit or the grid goes down, you’ll have all the chicken rearing, solar paneling, rain barreling, wind turbining, and urban farming resources you’ll need. And because we’re including everything, you’ll also be able to stave off the post-apocalypse blues with bacon roses and unicorn poop. We’re putting all 127,000 Instructables projects into a single omnibus edition that will be sold at cost (TBD) to Instructables authors and for about $1000 for non-members. We’ll also make the PDF available to Pro members. If you’re so inclined, you can print and bind your own version. Get familiar with KaptinScarlet’s “How to Bind Your Own Hardcover Book” Instructable. We found a spectacular publisher who’s willing to bind the pages with paracord and baling wire. This edition should have just about 30 meters of paracord in the binding, along with just enough baling wire to keep the whole thing together if you choose to take out the paracord. The publisher also agreed to include a metal shank in the spine that can be fashioned into a makeshift knife, shovel, or bottle opener. The book is big enough to make a pretty nice counterweight for a small trebuchet, too. There were a few challenges for this publication. First of all, there’s an awful lot of content. To keep the print length down, we used small images wherever possible. We also cut the comment sections and individual project tables of contents. We did, however, keep the advertisements in the margins just in case AdSense will pay out during the End of Days. This publisher did balk at including packages of strike-anywhere matches in the book jacket. Sorry everybody. Matches were deemed “too unsafe” for their production and distribution teams. As though a conflagration of Amazon packages in the back of a UPS truck is less safe than losing a few digits to a frozen post-apocalyptic hellscape. The biggest challenge of all, though, was the sheer size of the book itself. The rough draft weighed in at about 500 kilograms. In a lucky break, using that ultra-thin biblical/lexicographer paper stock allowed us to cut the weight to just 220kg AND to make the pages double as bathroom tissue in a Charmin-less world. The tome will require a licensed forklift operator to receive it (or you can choose to pay the $150 white glove installation surcharge.) And, as usual, we cannot ship to a PO box.

Topic by wilgubeast    |  last reply


Dewalt battery powered inventions

Hey gang, 1st time, long time. I'm not very savvy when it comes to most things electrical, but have a question about (mainstream) rechargeable battery powered inventions.  In my case, Dewalt 18v batteries, but for arguments sake, it could cover a slew of rechargeables. I have at least a dozen Dewalt 18v tools and accessories.  I've had most of them for years and only the 2 most well-used tools have failed (and been rebuilt).  So I love the reliability.  I 'round-robin' my 6 batteries (mix of the older style XRP and the new Li-Ion), I've yet to have a battery fail and all still hold a decent charge - the oldest XRPs are going on 7-8 years old. I often use my (2) dewalt lights I have as light when the power goes out in the house or when I spend a few nights at the race track (tent camping, but not roughing it like out in the middle of the woods).  3-4 batteries typically do the job for a weekend.  I'm on the fence about buying a Dewalt (charging) radio, but it doesn't seem like it will charge via USB when it's running on battery power.... ...which leads me to my main (ignorant) question: Why don't we see inventions that can be powered by main stream rechargable battery (reliable, safe, readily available, and owned by many people already)? A couple examples include: A device to charge small electronics via usb (Cell phone, tablet, etc).  Smart phones can do so many things now, being able to charge it with existing batteries would make them even more universal (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steve-cichon/radio-shack-ad_b_4612973.html ) A small fan, something pretty portable.  (yes, I know I could probably rig something up with my drill, but having a dedicated fan would be nice) A small water pump.  (again, ignorance comes into play here)  Not sure what kind of pressure/flow rate is possible, but having it connected to my rain barrels to increase the pressure over my current gravity feed setup would be nice.  I'm not looking to pressure wash, just want to be able to have some more pressure. (minor update: An ebay search yielded one for sale, looks like I'm no pioneer here) I should have wrote the others down, I recall having a few more ideas. Any input from a knowledgeable person on the topic would be appreciated. And for those that may argue that buying these devices and using standard batteries (AA, AAA, C, D, etc) would be a cheaper investment.  You're right! (IF you didn't already have a bunch of tool batteries, which is my point) Regards

Topic by JustLuckey    |  last reply