Search for reprap in Topics


Getting Started with Reprap

I need all of the information, websites, Ideas, anything that you can give me to help me out. I have been dying to have a 3d printer, and it sounds like a self-replicating one would be the way to go. If you can, than please do, it will be greatly appreciated. Anything helps! See my latest instructable here.

Question by shotgunshane    |  last reply


Makerbot VS RepRap? Answered

I've have been considering making/purchasing a 3D printer. I've slimmed down the choices to the RepRap Mendel, and the Makerbot Cupcake. Both seem like good choices, but I can't really decide. The big factors in my purchase should be performance above all else, price, availability of parts, and the type of plastic it uses. Can anyone please suggest something?  

Question by GearsOfAwesome    |  last reply


RepRap the next big thing?

Im interested in the RepRap project but is it me or does it seem to be relatively unknown to most people, even those who would be interested in this sort of thing? Something like RepRap would pave the way for so much possibility with easier and more complex diy projects, once it gets easy and widespread enough for anyone to make we will see some amazing things being done, this is the sort of enabling technology that we've all been looking for!

Topic by Pseudoscience    |  last reply


ReRapRequest

Do you have access to a 3d printer?  Can you do me a favour? Three years ago, I published an Instructable for a paper catapult, which has had a steady trickle of interest ever since. Recently, Instructables member hintss created files for it to be printed in 3d, but i don't have access to a 3d printer :-( If you have access to a 3d printer, and the time/resources to spare, could you have a look at the files hintss has posted in the comments of the Instructable, and maybe even print one off?? Please?  I'll even create a shiny new patch for you?

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply



Having trouble with Marlin RepRap library

I am currently in a senior design group at Saint Louis University and we are working on a "DIY" 3D printer using electronics parts from SainSmart (Arduino Mega 2560 & RAMPS 1.4) & Hardware from McMaster-Carr. We loaded on two libraries to the Arduino: 1) Marlin RepRap (https://github.com/ErikZalm/Marlin/tree/Marlin_v1/Marlin) 2) U8GLIB (https://code.google.com/p/u8glib/) [which is used to supplement the Marlin RepRap] We have the LCD GUI set up and we are sending commands from the LCD to make small X, Y, and Z steps. It seems like the Arduino recognizes the signal and does send it to the stepper motors, but all the motors do are sort of 'vibrate' and not really spin. If we take small steps we get a little movement, usually which is incoherent. We recently moved the voltage down to 10.5V from 12V from our power supply (because of the 1.5V from the USB to the Arduino), because 12 V caused smoke to come from the Arduino's voltage regulator. We don't know if this is causing the problem. We also do not have the heatbed hooked up because we do not need it for our purposes. We are using a 12V 18 Amp PSU. We were able to get the mechanical endstops to work and the fans to work, but we cannot get the motors to work properly. Does anyone have any suggestions, or has anyone worked with this Arduino library who could help us out? BTW: Our SainSmart kit is: http://www.sainsmart.com/3d-printing/3d-printkits/sanguinololu-rev-1-3-a4988-lcd-2004-3d-printer-controller-kit-for-reprap.html Thank you everyone ahead of time for all your wonderful help and guidance!

Topic by JakedGr8    |  last reply


Electronics for a diy 3d printer Answered

Hello, I would like to know if these parts will be suitable for building a 3d printer without modifying the code made for 3d printer. Yes, I see modifying the code as inevitable for making the 3d printer accurate. If there are any other parts beside a powers supply, a the hot end parts I would appreciate that.. Can I use this microcontroller?  http://www.ebay.com/itm/Microcontroller-Board-ATmega2560-16AU-USB-Cable-For-Arduino-Module-R3-MEGA2560-/181531871863?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash;=item2a44248a77 And these step sticks?  http://www.ebay.com/itm/RepRap-StepStick-Pololu-A4988-stepper-driver-for-Sanguinololu-Arduino-Mega-RAMPS-/281182048802?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash;=item4177c19222 Thanks for any help.

Question by jbaker22    |  last reply


is this print possible? Answered

Hello, i am working on my 3d printer, but i haven't completed it yet....... but still a question arises in my mind..... that can i print this (here- http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:399610)  , i mean i sliced it..... and saw..... that at one layer..... it extrudes filament..... in the middle of no-where...... i mean how can it stick in the air...... ???????

Question by _Boltz_    |  last reply



Set up RepRap Pursa i3 Printer?

I have completed the build of my RepRap Pursa i3 printer. Where do I go from here? How do I set up the printer to make it ready to plug into my computer and start printing?

Question by HenryAT    |  last reply


Need to build a metal prusa i3 x ends and carriage for reprap

Hello there, i need a basic diagram for metal x ends and the carriage as here, 3d services are two costly and there are no cnc machines hence i don't have any other option except for making it by aluminium sheets and so by the metal welders 

Question by _Boltz_    |  last reply


Why do prints on Repetier Host not start, when manual heating and motor controls work?

I am running a RAMPS board Prusa i3 on the newest version of Repetier Host, and everything worked fine on the last computer I had. I set Repetier up on a new computer, and everything functions as it should except that when I try to start a print, it says a print is in progress, but it's not printing. The stop/pause buttons are there as if a print is in progress, the bottom right corner forever says its printing layer 0, and the manual control window does not show a print in progress. Testing has indicated that the motors and heaters respond correctly when using manual controls, so the problem isn't the connection, baud rate, etc. Nothing was changed in terms of the hardware or firmware of the printer itself. The print runs fine using the virtual printer simulation. I also tried deselecting the box for "check extruder and bed temperature". Does anyone know what would cause the print to fail to start?

Question by AmpOwl    |  last reply


"It Will Be Awesome if They Don't Screw it Up"

Public Knowledge recently published a white paper on 3d printing (see link for downloadable PDF version). It compares low-cost home 3d printing technology with home computing and digital publishing, with specific reference to the possibility of DMCA-style legislation preventing the technology reaching its full potential. In many ways, today’s 3D printing community resembles the personal computing community of the early 1990s. They are a relatively small, technically proficient group, all intrigued by the potential of a great new technology. They tinker with their machines, share their discoveries and creations, and are more focused on what is possible than on what happens after they achieve it. They also benefit from following the personal computer revolution: the connective power of the Internet lets them share, innovate, and communicate much faster than the Homebrew Computer Club could have ever imagined. The personal computer revolution also casts light on some potential pitfalls that may be in store for the growth of 3D printing. When entrenched interests began to understand just how disruptive personal computing could be (especially massively networked personal computing) they organized in Washington, D.C. to protect their incumbent power. Rallying under the banner of combating piracy and theft, these interests pushed through laws like the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) that made it harder to use computers in new and innovative ways. In response, the general public learned once-obscure terms like “fair use” and worked hard to defend their ability to discuss, create, and innovate. Unfortunately, this great public awakening came after Congress had already passed its restrictive laws. Of course, computers were not the first time that incumbents welcomed new technologies by attempting to restrict them. The arrival of the printing press resulted in new censorship and licensing laws designed to slow the spread of information. The music industry claimed that home taping would destroy it. And, perhaps most memorably, the movie industry compared the VCR to the Boston Strangler preying on a woman home alone. One of the goals of this whitepaper is to prepare the 3D printing community, and the public at large, before incumbents try to cripple 3D printing with restrictive intellectual property laws. By understanding how intellectual property law relates to 3D printing, and how changes might impact 3D printing’s future, this time we will be ready when incumbents come calling to Congress.   Podcasts and videos on 3d printing. Gothic Cathedral play set. BBC reportage. Freedom of Creation (3d printing designers)

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Printing Stephen Colbert's Head

I recently finished building a RepRap Huxley, and shot a time-lapse video of this print. You can see the video here. (I would embed it if I could)

Topic by JamesRPatrick  


How can I get a cheap 3D printer and not have to do complicated building? Answered

How can I get a cheap 3D printer and not have to do complicated building?  I want to be able to make things, but don't have much money and I can't build them very easy.  I would preferably want under $1000.   thanks- Pufferfish9108 

Question by pufferfish9108    |  last reply


3d Printer Extruder Answered

Hi! I want to make a Wades geared extruder. But since i don't have a printer to make the printed parts, i want to make them with wood. So i need to know the dimensions for the parts. The length, breadth and height of main body and idler. and radius of the wheel. an image to what i need  please i need some help. thank you :)

Question by SowmenD    |  last reply


Arduino IDE wont load to Mega 2560 it gets half way through the compile and upload, then says com X is already in use? Answered

I am running win 7 and it doesn't matter what the baud rate it set at for the port. There are no other programs running to lock up the port and only usb plugged in is the 2560 and the keyboard. Someone please tell me the secret. Thank you in advance! Oh and it doesnt matter what version IDE I use either..... Dave

Question by Dr.Z2    |  last reply


I'm looking for an affordable and complete 3d printer (or CNC) kit for under $550. Any suggestions?

I just want something small for my little projects, nothing fancy. I want a kit because it's cheaper, and I love putting things like that together. It just needs to come with every part necessary for it to run (electronics, mechanical, printer head, frame, etc)   I'd be fine with a two-axis CNC machine kit within that range too if it had its own spindle. I'm looking at this right now: http://printrbot.com/ Thanks.

Question by DIY Emilio    |  last reply


20 part modular 3D-printed Gothic cathedral

Here's yet another reason why I intend to make time to build my own 3d printer once I've finished university. Thingiverse member Skimbal has designed and printed this 20 piece modular Gothic cathedral. It just fits in the print area of his 3d printer and can be arranged in lots of different ways to build unique cathedrals. While not particuarly useful it sure is impressive and if I were 10 or 15 years younger, a lot of fun to play with! Will be time to start thinking of what I want to print soon! Yayy! (found via BoingBoing)

Topic by Jayefuu    |  last reply


Can I use an arduino mega and a R.A.M.P.S. board to run a CNC machine? Answered

Right now, I`m planning to use an arduino duemilanove, and 3 EasyDriver Stepper Motor Drivers. RAMPS board: http://ultimachine.com/ramps EasyDriver Board: http://www.sparkfun.com/products/10267

Question by Stuffses    |  last reply


Will a glued acrylic structure hold for a 3d printer ?

Hi,  I'm designing a delta style 3d printer from scratch while trying to use only laser cut acrylic sheets and aluminium extrusions. The entire design is based on the T Bolt construction idea. But there are a few parts that simply need to be glued together. I'm trying to avoid using such joints in load bearing areas but there are a few areas where this is becoming difficult such as the carriage. I'd like to know if i can safely glue the laser cut parts together with out the entire thing falling apart and if yes what kind of glue should I look for? Blckthng

Question by blckthng    |  last reply


Is ABS/PLA filament from china okay to use in a makerbot. ? Answered

The price difference is what throws me off, should i be worried about the quality of this filament vs the $48 makerbot filament? Makerbot : http://store.makerbot.com/filament Cheap Alternitive: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Repraper-Reprap-3D-Printer-Filament-ABS-3-0mm-1-75mm-12-Colors-For-3D-Printer-US-/190847246981?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash;=item2c6f61e285

Question by LucasOchoa    |  last reply


Show and tell

Hey all, I am super keen to see projects using 3D printing for personal fabrication, whether it be via RepRap, Makerbot, Shapeways whatever.. Just to share the 3D printed goodness

Topic by dscott4    |  last reply


Problem driving a stepper motor using the A4988 reprap driver board and an Arduino? Answered

Hi guys I am having a problem driving a stepper motor using the A4988 reprap driver board and an Arduino I have set up the wiring using an example I found online (Diagram attached: A4988 wiring) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CmjB4WF5XA.. However the motor does not seem to turn. The motor I am using is from an old Hitachi printer which I took apart a while back. Printed on it is 0.9A/ph. It has six wires however I am using it as a bipolar stepper by just leaving the center tap of each winding unconnected. I have adjusted the VREF on the A4988 board to insure that the current is limited bellow the 0.9A. To do this I used the data sheet of the A4988. As I wanted to run the motor at full step mode, the A4988 data sheet specifies that the winding current could only reach 70 percent of the current limit. consequently: Current limit = 0.9 * 0.7 = 0.63A Current limit = Vref * 2, Therefor Vref = 0.63/2 = 0.315V or 315mV I have therefor set the current limit using the potentiometer on the A4988 to aprox 315mV Once the wiring was set up, I applied power and measured the Vref to confirm it is still the same and it was. Next I disconnected the Power to both the Arduino and the driver and connected in the stepper motor. I then connected the power and uploaded the following code: // defines pins numbers const int stepPin = 3; const int dirPin = 4; void setup() { // Sets the two pins as Outputs pinMode(stepPin,OUTPUT); pinMode(dirPin,OUTPUT); } void loop() { digitalWrite(dirPin,HIGH); // Enables the motor to move in a particular direction // Makes 200 pulses for making one full cycle rotation for(int x = 0; x < 200; x++) { digitalWrite(stepPin,HIGH); delayMicroseconds(500); digitalWrite(stepPin,LOW); delayMicroseconds(500); } delay(5000); // five second delay digitalWrite(dirPin,LOW); //Changes the rotations direction // Makes 400 pulses for making two full cycle rotation for(int x = 0; x < 400; x++) { digitalWrite(stepPin,HIGH); delayMicroseconds(500); digitalWrite(stepPin,LOW); delayMicroseconds(500); } delay(5000); } Nothing happened... started off with 5 volts on the power supply and ramped it up to aprox 12vs however still nothing happened. I can feel the heat sink heating up on the A4988 which means power was reaching it. I measured the voltages from the Arduino to the A4988 and the power supply to the driver and the voltages matched the input. I started shaking about the power connections to and suddenly the motor made one step, but that was it. So i thought it was a problem with the breadboard. I checked the connections on the breadboard and all where connected. To be safe i decided to use another breadbord. Again nothing happened. I checked the Aarduino using the 28byj48 and UNL203 driver and stepper that came with it and they worked fine. I confirmed the wiring sequences and layout multiple times and they all matched the tutorial I followed. My inital thinking was that the stepper motor was broken, so i disconnected it and tried running it using the power supple (5V) by connecting and disconnecting each coil in manually one by one, and it turned one step at a time, which meant that the stepper was working. Finally i decided to see if current was reaching the stepper, I therefore connected the Altimeter in series with one of the coils and it did not read any current, which meant that current was not reaching the coils. Now I am unsure what to do, or what has gone wrong. The vref still reads aprox 310 - 320 mV, this makes me assume that driver is not fried. I do have another A4988 driver however I started working on that one and now the Vref does not go above 62mV so I'm guessing that it is burnt, however the second one reads fine. I have tried using the enable button with the following code (Attached; A4988 wiring 2) however it still didnt' make in difference. The following code is what i used for when I set the enabled to low (Note that the pin numbers have been changed) int Index; void setup() { pinMode(4, OUTPUT); //Enable pinMode(2, OUTPUT); //Step pinMode(3, OUTPUT); //Direction digitalWrite(4,LOW); } void loop() { digitalWrite(3,HIGH); for(Index = 0; Index < 2000; Index++) { digitalWrite(2,HIGH); delayMicroseconds(500); digitalWrite(2,LOW); delayMicroseconds(500); } delay(1000); digitalWrite(3,LOW); for(Index = 0; Index < 2000; Index++) { digitalWrite(2,HIGH); delayMicroseconds(500); digitalWrite(2,LOW); delayMicroseconds(500); } delay(1000); } Why did the motors initially step (only one step upon each shake) when I shook the power supply leads? I am afraid to try that again as I think this is what damaged the first driver I was using. And why is there no current reaching the coils? I would really appreciate an opinion on this issue as I have no idea what to do Many thanks for you time. Adnan

Question by k1228438    |  last reply


Stepper motors for Prusa mendel? Answered

I have these bipolar round stepper motors that i salvaged from old printers . Can I use this stepper motor in the prusa mendel? and will they work fine?  also can i use stepper motors which are like this one.. meaning the round small ones or do i need to use the nema 17 ones?

Question by SowmenD    |  last reply


How do you make more accurate tools from less accurate ones? Answered

I was wondering, in a general sense how people make more accurate tools from less accurate ones. More specifically, I was reading about reprap and it said it was possible to make components of itself from other previous repraps. However, the errors in them would compound and make less and less accurate/precise models. Therefore there would be some limit to how many times it could replicate. But, for instance. A lathe requires an accurate/precise leadscrew to control x axis motion. Using a lathe it is possible to make another leadscrew however this would be less accurate/precise than the one already on the machine. So for my true question. How do they make more accurate ones than the previous ones. If all the current lathes in the world are +- 1mm then how would you make the next set of lathes that are more accurate/precise than that without a piece of machinery that originally had better accuracy. (sort of a chicken and egg problem) Is there some type of machine or algorithm or something that allows a machine to make something that is more accurate/precise than itself. Thanks

Question by louey    |  last reply


Is there a relay that uses a 110v trigger for a 12v output? Answered

I know that this is probably the most backwards way to do things (and yes, I know, probably extremely stupid [but I'm also new to relays..]) , but I am in the process of trying to make a heated platform for my RepRap (I have gen 6, thus the reason for this). I have a PID controller, and I have the board running off an ATX power supply. So, what I would like to know if there is a relay that can use the 110v the PID controller to turn on/off the power from the ATX to the heat bed.  Thanks in advance! 

Question by DoctorWoo    |  last reply


3D Printers for Peace competition - ideas that benefit humanity

Michigan Tech University has opened a 3D printing contest: Printers for Peace! They are challenging the 3D printing community to design things that advance the cause of peace. This is an open-ended contest, but if you’d like some ideas, ask yourself what Mother Theresa, Martin Luther King, or Gandhi would make if they’d had access to 3D printing! Prizes:   1st Prize Fully assembled, open-source Type A Machines Series 1 3D Printer The Series 1 recently won best in class in the Make: Ultimate Guide to 3-D Printing. It has a 9-by-9-by-9-inch build volume, prints at 90mm/sec in PLA, ABS and PVA with 0.1mm resolution. 2nd Prize Michigan Tech’s MOST version of the RepRap Prusa Mendel open-source 3D printer kit The RepRap can be built in a weekend. It has a 7.8–by-7.8-by-6.8-inch build volume on a heated bed, prints comfortably at 80 mm/sec ABS, 45 mm/sec PLA, HDPE and PVA with 0.1 mm resolution. 3rd Prize MatterHackers sampler pack: MatterHackers sampler pack of 3-D printer materials of 3 PRO Series PLA spools, Laywoo-D3, Nylon, and Soft PLA. Anyone in the United States or Canada (excluding judges and their relatives) is welcome to enter. Contest closes September 1, 2013. For more information and to enter visit the Michigan Tech site 

Topic by Ivana_Zelenika  


Our voltage regulator on our Arduino Mega2560 is smoking, and we don't have any idea why. Can someone please help?

So we are designing a 3D bioprinter using an Arduino Mega2560 along with a RAMPS board to power our motors and LCD screen. We are using open source software for the RepRap printer Marlin (http://reprap.org/wiki/Marlin). Our RAMPS board is powered by an external power supply unit. When we have only our motors plugged in, we have some control over them, but when we plug the LCD screen in, the voltage regulator starts to smoke.

Question by hsteven7    |  last reply


Should I publish this?

I just finished building a RepRap Huxley, and I took time lapse video of each build day. You can see everything on my blog post here. Instructables is a kind of showcase for my work and I was wondering if it would be appropriate to publish each video (there are four) as a step in an instructable. I didn't design the Huxley, and it would be difficult to reproduce my results just from watching the videos, but I did build it myself. That's why I can't decide if I should post it. I wouldn't want people to think I posted build instructions for the whole thing. So what you you think? I would love to get the opinion of some higher-ups.

Topic by JamesRPatrick    |  last reply


build a 3d printer with a standard stepper motor controller? Answered

Hey Im thinking about building a 3d printer, so I'm looking at the (endless) possibilities out there. Can I build one with a standard (4 or 5 axis) stepper motor controller (like the ones on ebay)?? instead of using an arduino (I saw on the internet that that's what they use on RepRap) (and since I'm building a 3d printer/ CNC I think it would be more convenient for me to use stepper motor controllers for "both" the machines, and besides that it appears to be simpler since I know nothing about arduino :( ) I was thinking I maybe could use a controller with 4 or 5 stepper motor outputs and then use 1,2 and 3 for the axis and then use the other one to "tell" the machine how much material it should "spit out" any advice?? or any other ideas for a SIMPLE 3d printing curcuit?? 

Question by lordl9999    |  last reply


How would I go about making an Arduino control four Lego motors for a 3D printer? Answered

I am trying to make a Cartesian 3D printer out of Legos I have the printer almost done. It is time to start thinking about how I am going to control it. The RepRap uses the Arduino, I believe, although I'm probably wrong. I have an Arduino Mega The motors are RCX geared motors. They are powering a few worm gears, and all the setups I have are so far identical. I have, or will when this is finished, X,Y, and Z axes, as well as a filament feeder. I could just adjust the values of some already present software. This is probably the easiest solution. If worst comes to worst, I can replace the Lego motors with some sort of servos. So i guess my question is: where can i get 3D printer control software for an Arduino? And also, what random things do you know that could be helpful to this project? all comments welcome Thanks.

Question by kiffer360    |  last reply


need a little guidance with an arduino controlled CNC machine. help?

Ok so I am in the process of getting the axes set up, and theyre in a state that would allow me to test them. I am using the laser carriages from CD-ROM drives, so i know i wont get amazing build sizes, but that isnt the matter here. I've searched and searched and searched and have yet to really find definite instructions. The hardest part is going to be coding the arduino. I would like to use an ATmega16, but a 328 will work too. I intend on using L293D's to control my motors. they seem to work fine for on the bench testing, so with cooling in an enclosure i dont see why it wouldnt work. but I have no idea where to start with the coding. Ive seen references to GRBL, some reprap stuff, and a LOT of people being told basically "your method is stupid, buy these motor controllers and use my method", which i guess works well, but I dont have the money to buy the fancy motor controllers and the 293s seem to work fine. so, can someone point me in the right direction, or give me some pointers here please? I'd really appreciate it.

Question by zack247    |  last reply


designing an easy to build open source 3D printer

Hi, I'm trying to design an open source 3D printer that should be easy to build, doesn't require any 3D printed parts (all custom parts should be made out of plates) and the other parts should be standard parts (CNC) you can easily buy on ebay. I'm as well playing with the idea that you could make the custom parts out of cardboard (since they are so simple) and then print parts that are similar to reprap's, so one design would be made with 3D printed parts. It's supposed to be a low cost (300-500$) printer. I wanted to build a cheap open source 3D printer but didn't find anything I liked so I decided to design a simple printer I would like. If I'm already designing it I can as well make it open source for others. I tried to put together some concepts in SketchUp, this is how it looks so far, what do you think, tips, suggestions? the collection of the designs: http://i39.servimg.com/u/f39/14/68/63/67/design10.jpg the gallery with bigger pictures: https://imageshack.com/a/gwdz/1 or http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=177&u;=14686367

Topic by 3dnio  


Prusa i3 newly build first 3d printer all together cant test print confused

Hello all, I recently just purchased my first 3d printer. I bought a Prusa i3 newest model here is the link -> http://www.ebay.com/itm/271714170595?_trksid=p2059210.m2749.l2649&ssPageName;=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT It is this model “LCD Screen Aurora Partilhada Model DIY Reprap Prusa I3 High Accuracy 3D printer” I put everything together by watching the movie and looking at the wire diagram, I followed the movie and the wire setup. Everything is hooked up correctly. When I power on my 3d printer it turns on but when I try to do a test print it says it doesn’t say its preheating and only gets up to 21 degrees the bed and extruder I believe. But it is always at these temps it doesn’t start at 0 and work its way up. So I am having issues getting the printer to run now. I installed the filament as it showed but I cannot print anything to test and make sure it works. What should I do? I would love to print anything like a test piece just so I know my printer is working! Then I can continue to learn 3d Modeling and make anything that I can think of. Thanks, ~Thebigbear~

Topic by thebigbear    |  last reply


3D Printing Open Survey

Hi everyone! I am a huge 3d printing enthusiast from Poland (Europe). I run personalfactory.tumblr.com - news aggregator/blog concerning 3d printing, fablabs, open-source hardware and related. If you have some spare time please fill in my 3D Printing Open Survey - If you could make almost anything, what would it be ? Updated results are publicly available after completing questionnaire (Please press "Wyślij" - Send button and "Wyniki ankiety" - Results button at the end). This survey will be used to evaluate demand for 3d printing services globally. It consist of 30 questions about: - open-source 3d printers - future of additive manufacturing - 3d printing services - ecology in 3d printing - copyright issues and 3d printing Three example questions: 2. Which of the following 3d printing applications is the most interesting? * - Things personalization - Printing food - Attempts to print structures resembles in functioning living tissues or blood vessels - Creating impossible or difficult to create by using conventional technology things - Printing rooms or buildings on earth/moon - Printing chemical compounds (for example drugs) - Using in renewable energy sources - Printing parts and/or mechanical vehicles 3 . Have you ever heard about cheap DIY 3D Printers (for example RepRap, PrintrBot, MakiBox A6) ? * DIY - Do It Yourself - Yes - No 4 . When 3D Printers will become one of the typical household appliances ? * - After 5 years - After 10 years - After 15 years - After 20 years or later - Never - I don't know Feel free to ask questions! :)

Topic by dziarski  


davidbuzz - Build yourself a portable home -- a mongolian yurt - Universal Laser Cutter Finalist!

To see who won the VersaLaser, read the announcement here.davidbuzz was a finalist in the 2008 Instructables and Universal Laser Cutter Contest for:Build yourself a portable home -- a mongolian yurtShould this project win the grand prize VersaLaser laser cutter package from Universal Laser worth over $15,000? Help us judge the contest by rating this forum post! Audience votes will count for 20% of the total. Check out all the finalists, and vote for your favorites!This is a forum post created by the Instructables staff on behalf of the finalist. Finalists, please edit this area below the bar to add your own statement:Hi everyone, davidbuzz here! - Just adding my personal note here, (as instructed!). I think that my entry, which took two weekends to write (not including yurt building time of innumerable hours and 3 yurts), and includes nearly a hundred photos, and full details, is rather good, and really comprehensive. It's also backed up by the fact that it's already inspired at least 2 others to start building yurts themselves, which is fantastic. Thanks to everyone's interest, my instructable made it into BOTH the "top rated", AND the "most visits" lists prior to being a finalist, so it must be popular. Please vote for me to show that! (up-rate this forum post!)As for winning the laser-cutter, I can promise you that I already have 20 different uses for it in mind ... including finishing my CNC table and building a 'reprap' (google it), and I'll be sure to post instructables on the good ones of them for everyone to see too!. I'd also like to take this opportunity to offer the use of the laser cutter to any instructables members located in Australia, for the cost of the materials & postage ... if I win! Yes, that means I've just opened myself up to 22 MILLION possible users (the population count of Oz) ... so put your votes in NOW! Viva-La-Instructables!

Topic by davidbuzz    |  last reply


Archaeology Student needs help with 3D scanning and printing

Hi Guys and Girls, first time posting like this so i hope this is in the right place, and if it is i can get some help. I'm currently studying Applied Archaeology, in the Institute of Technology Sligo, in Ireland, I'm in my fourth and final year and as part of this I have to research and write a thesis. The topic I am planning on doing involves 3D scanning, and if everything goes to plan, it will turn out great, and is something no one has done before in Irish archaeology, Ok so here’s the thing. It is still early days, I haven’t even decided on the title or gotten a chance to experiment with the scanner, and I am relatively new to 3D imaging and all that it involves. But as part of the overall concept of my thesis I would like to haves some of these scans print using as many of the various different methods of 3D printing as I can. This is so I can compare and analysis there suitability. This is where I hit a wall and I hope someone can help. There aren’t many companies that do 3D printing in Ireland and those that do usually deal with medium to large company’s and thus are way out of my price range. Edit: 21.09.2011 Ok after a doing a boat load more reserch I have been able to pick three methods of 3D printing I would like to use: 1. Fused Deposition Modeling using the, RepRap and MakerBot. 2. Laminated Object Manufacturing. 3. Stereolithography. If any of you out there have an interest in Archaeology and can offer advice on 3D scanning, image editing, has access to a 3D printer or are lucky enough to own one of these machines, and are willing to help me out I would be extremely grateful. I am more than willing to contribute what I can to the cost of raw material, cover the postage to Ireland and of course give massive amounts of praise and acknowledgement to all those that have helped, when I’m writing my thesis. Many Thanks Michael Michaelfeeney01@gmail.com  

Topic by Amon-100    |  last reply


Arduino Workshop Nottingham UK

More information at www.nottinghack.org.uk Arduino-Sundae - An all day workshop from 11am 3rd October 2010 Station Street Nottingham. £40 - Includes Oomlout Arduino Budget Pack. An introduction to Arduino for beginners. Step by step introduction to working with the Arduino prototyping board and an introduction to microprocessors in general. In addition to on-screen step-by-step instruction, experienced hackers will be there to help you. Includes an Arduino Kit or bring your own for a discount. A day filled with Arduino using the www.oomlout.co.uk Budget Arduino Kit (included in the cost of the workshop or buy and bring your own for a discount).  Schedule for the day: 11:00 - Settle in get your kit open it up and have a play around meet others etc  11:30 - "Hello World" Arduino 101 basic Arduino introduction including setting up external LEDs, Motors and sensors etc  12:30 - Show n' Tell - Arduino-Projects-Show-Case a number of projects including - Drawbot, Arduino Tank, 3D Printer RepRap, Addressable lights and many more (bring one too if you like) will be available for inspiration, discussion and tuition.  13:30 Lunch (bring your own or pop to a local place we are very central)  1400 - Use the pool of parts to try your own project. Helpful and experienced hackers want to help you learn more and will circulate to answer your questions. At Nottinghack there are no stupid questions.  16:00 - Close (but your welcome to stay until 18:00 then we'll probably go for a coffee or beer). Have a think about what you'd like to learn. We have a few suggested projects to help people who aren't sure and there will be lots or electronic bits n' bobs to help you get stuck in. Make sure you bring your laptop and download the Arduino Open Source environment and install it before the workshop http://www.arduino.cc... The cost of the workshop is only £40 including the Oomlout Budget Pack for Arduino and a day of tuition and hands on help. If you already have an Arduino and the required equipment the cost is £20 only.

Topic by ChickenGrylls    |  last reply


Leaving China and Taking a Part With Me.

My time was short, it seems my time is always short. Groggily I was pulled from bed the day after the Maker Faire. Spending the night at Eric's place was so wonderful, it was my first nights sleep since leaving America a few days earlier. We loaded Eric Pans car with gear and headed out to pick up a 3D printer. 3D printing technology is booming in the states, nearly every hackerspace in America has a Makerbot and design firms have Shapeways to turn to to get their rapid prototyping. But elsewhere in the world these things are still fresh! Sharing tools is something I love to do because you never know where people's creativity will take them. You never can know all the problems in the world, but all the people know all their problems! One of my missions then is to share low cost and open technologies to people I think can make awesome use of them! The night before after the Shenzhen Maker Faire all the Makers were invited to a gathering. Beer, frogs on skewers and peanuts were all provided free of charge. We ate, drank, wheeled and dealed. Wiess Tech is a filament company in Shenzhen and they have started noticing that more and more of their customers were 3D printers. Especially DIY 3D printers. So they've begun to make Makerbot replicas with some modifications. And there I was - I wanted a 3D printer to bring with me to Beirut and they wanted… Well, I wasn't sure. The language barrier between us was strong. Somehow Eric and I convinced them that it would be a good idea to give me a machine, and perhaps I'd pay them back when I got to the states. At this point I was at $244 dollars and dropping and I couldn't even afford the incredible hackerspace price the company was offering of $500 dollars! They agreed, and that's how I found myself rushing off to their head quarters the next morning before catching my ship. But first. We must go to Seeed Studio to buy a cup of coffee from the robotic tweeting (QQ) coffee machine in their break room. Hahaha! We headed out to Wiess Tech and on the way there we drive by construction zone after construction zone. Aparently Shenzhen didn't exist 30 years ago, and now you can still see the signs of a rapid expansion. Everything here is growing at an incredible pace, and apparently even maker culture. We arrive at Wiess HQ, which is housed in a 30 story complex decked out with multiple confusing entrances, cafeterias and dual elevators for the odd and even numbered floors. After spending a bit of time wondering how to get to floor 22 and circling the building, we found ourselves face to face with a small crew of about 8people. A few people managing papers, a secretary, some of the marketing team, and one guy sitting at a table putting together Wiess Tech versions of the thingimatic. After speaking with them we find that they also sell a machines based around the Reprap project, one of the earliest open 3D printing projects and have in the works a few models of their own designs. I'm excited to see how Weiss Tech bootstraps itself off of open sourced designs and starts producing their own versions! I hope to see a whole new generation of better, faster and cheaper machines that stay open! Go Weiss Tech! Heading out to take a 3D panorama from their deck Eric rushes and tells me that my ship leaves in 20 mins and that the time is now. After an awkward moment or two talking about paypal and me giving them advice on staying open we undo all their packing (too bulky) throw the machine into my luggage and run. In the car Eric and I discuss the future of Chinese makers. It really seems this is just the start of something much larger. It's an exciting time, his company is building great products, more Chinese companies are looking at open source technologies and more people are calling themselves makers. Perhaps it's through Maker culture China will be able to become more than the King of manufacturing, but also participate in producing quality designs and solving serious problems. Leaving China, the baggage handlers on the ferry were rough handling Adriana, my 3D printer, and it really cut deep. But as I watched Shenzhen bay slowly recede, I knew the next time i came back, again, everything would again be different. This is the pace of China and yet it seems softened by the fog falling over the rolling green hills. +Bilal Ghalib

Topic by lamedust    |  last reply


Heated print beds - are they overrated gimmicks?

For years now I use my old, trusty Mega Prusa with the bare basics in terms of hardware. But basically every new printer out there comes with heated print beds and most users "upgrade" to one to get better quality prints. So I started to to check the reprap forums and other websites to find out why a heated would be a "must have". Quite a simple task you might think, but not so for someone who prints every material on a cold bed with success... What are the official pro statements for a heated bed? 1. Better bed adhesion of course. 2. Less warping of parts. 3. Far less problems with layer seperation. 4. Better print results. And of course there are a few more but not worth listing them. Why do I think most of the four statements are actually unrelated to using a heated bed? Bed adhesion is a matter of print material and surface of the bed / bed preperation, like tape, glue and such. If you filament peels off a cold bed with no adhesion at all it simply means the surface is either unclean or unsuited for the print material. Warping of parts happens because the material shrinks when it cools down, a heated bed is only able to keep a certain height of the print warm. Higher prints won't have any benefit in terms of better layer adhesion with a heated bed. Same goes for seperating layers. Unlike the common believe a heated bed does not fix this problem - it only masks it! Layers seperate because there is not enough bonging between them. This can be due to insuffient extrusion width, too high print layers, wrong print temperature and of course wrong z-axis stepping and wrong extrusion multiplicator. And how good a print comes out of your printer depends on a good calibration and proper print settings - again a heated bed only masks problems ;) Ok, so heated beds are nonsense, right? Well, wrong again ;) They take a lot of worry out of the daily print life to start with. Especially prints with big foot print will benefit, although PLA should never be a problem on a cold bed. If you print long parts in ABS or even Nylon you can have a hard time forcing the plastic to stay on the bed all around the print. A heated bed, with the right settings of course, can make sure your print keeps the shape until it is high enough so the bottom part won't be affected by shrinking anymore. My opinion on how to get the best results... Manage to print on a cold bed first! Smaller parts don't need a heated bed anyway, so use them to improve on your skills of finding the perfect bed material / coating! You will find that once you have really optimised your printer and settings most parts won't need a heated bed anymore. Once you are really happy with the result of smaller prints on a cold bed try something bigger and pay close attention to any problems on the way. For example a big print might start out perfectly but after about 5-10mm of print height you see the part starts to warp and slowly peels of the print bed - especially long parts or thin areas are affected. The infill also affects how a parts reacts during the cooling, so try the same problem print with solid infill as well as only 15% infill to compare - you can stop the print once the problem is identified, don't waste filament. Now comes the magic of the heated bed... You want the temp as low as possible but still high enough to prevent the warping! Why go low if high would help more?? Simply said: If the bed is too hot the part stays soft for a long time, which can badly affect layer bonding and shape. Imagine you squish the plastic on an already "hard" layer - the plastic is pressed flat to be within the set specs. Now if the the layer is still too hot and soft the plastic will push the lower layer in - which of course will expand outwards. So the layer can actually end up to be lower than it should be - layer will still peel ;) Start with around 50° C for ABS and turn the heat down gradually every 10 layers or 25 if you print really thin layers. If the part still prefers to warp go 10 degrees higher. But again: If the stuff would not stick properly on a cold bed work on that first! How do I print on a cold bed and claim it works fine? To be honest, with a lot of time spent on trying, calibrating and finding the right "magic" to put on the glass to make things stick. Nylon, if the part is big, can still be a frustrating task unless cardboard or Bakelite is used but I still prefer the glass bed. I no longer bother with tapes as it can be costly and I hate changing the entire setup just because I use a different material ;) As said, the main key is a proper calibration of hard- and software! If your prints look messy and you spend as much time cleaning your parts as printing them you know what I mean ;) At the moment my "bed magic" is a clear craft glue with methanol as a solvent, mine is from Aldi but similar products can be found in every craft store. The bed is sanded with 600 grid diamond blocks to be as flat as possible and to provide a bigger surface area for the glue. When mostly printing Nylon is first clean the bed with alcohol and put a layer of plastic primer on it before re-applying the glue. With the right temp settings this glue surface can be reused several times with increasing bond to the part. Once the glue start peeling off the bed it cut the area clean and apply another coat just in the spot. A single bottle of craft glue, diluted down by 20%, lasted now about 3 rolls of filament - not too bad for a 2$ investment LOL Seriously though, squeeky clean your glass bed using alcohol and / or acetone and play with different types of craft glue. You want the stuff that is clear and uses either methanol or ethanol as the solvent, don't bother with water based glues! If the glue sticks well to your part but peels off the bed easily try a layer of plastic primer on the bed first - do this outside! However, if your printer is only capable of using PLA anyway you might not want to bother at all and stick to tape ;)

Topic by Downunder35m  


McMADSAT make and do, show and tell. Scotland's first Maker Event 2009. Full report

Report of the McMADSAT event 14th March 2009, at the Glasgow Science CentreWe had a fantastic day. Outside it was a grey gale of a day, but inside was a riot of colour and activity. The aim was to enthuse the public with the fun of making things from a variety of technologies. Anyone who wanted to, could join in, make something and take it away with them, and all for free. Hundreds of people of all ages came along and had a great time. A general video of the event can be seen at https://www.instructables.com/community/Mc_MADSAT/ (Thanks to Les Oates for making this excellent film for us).I am happy to discuss further with anyone planning their own event, and you can see more about it and the process by which I got the event going, at http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com/ExhibitorsStar Guest, all the way from London, was Professor Maelstromme (AKA Amanda Scrivener), who brought her beautiful creationsWhat can you make from a dead umbrella? Display of the possibilities for reusing the fabric and structure of dead umbrellas.The Tea Party. 1950s style tea party made from a combination of hand made fabric and edible pieces.Cardboard structures from the students of the department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde.Greensteam's steampunkery, 101 uses for a dead keyboard and other examples of her work as shown on Instructables.The Offline Mechanical Blog – a very old manual typewriter with continuous paper available for the public to type their messages and thoughts on for all to shareLemonie (another Instructables enthusiast, who travelled up from York especially) brought his amazing conversion of a VHS player-into-toaster that makes toast with VHS imprinted in it. He also brought his nice LEGO USB stick, a lantern made out of a tin-can & glass. and his *untested* wind-turbine, made from VHS player parts.On the Young Makers stand we had a display of virtuoso Lego constructions and an extensive collection of home made Steampunkery.The self-replicating machine from the department of Design Manufacture and Engineering Management at the University of Strathclyde, the Reprap, was on display and moving but sadly not reproducing on the day.ActivitiesThe public were offered a wide range of free hands-on activities, which ran continuously all day, to 'Make and Take'Soldering - make a solar theremin (or a robot). 16 of these were made and all worked first time. Some were taken for a trial run in the sun and a video of this can be seen at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzUZMon3vpA The Stemnet ambassadors helped visitors to make their own Musical Straw Oboes.One of the most popular activities – especially with children – the Stemnet ambassadors supervised the making of many handsfull of Gloop.The Stemnet ambassadors used the plastic Polymorph for visitors to make a fingerprint keyring to take away.Fishy things - Busy Bees Art studio provided painting and collage fishes to make, particularly for our very young visitors.The Glasgow Crocheted Coral Reef invited visitors to try their hands at crocheting and contribute to the growing coral reef, all made from wool and even strips of plastic bag. Many total novices not only tried their hands but actually completed a piece of coral to contribute to the reef. This workshop area was very busy throughout, with visitors typically spending 30 minutes or more participating. Many thanks to my civil engineer pal who ran this.House of Cards - visitors could make and take their own set of the design classic 'Eames cards', which slot together to form fantastical structures. Ideal for recycling old greetings cards.Cable necklets, keyboard bracelets and keyboard film wallets. All made from recycled/repurposed materials from dead keyboards. Popular with adults and children alike.Risk assessments were provided to the Glasgow science centre, for all the activities. There were no injuries and the 'emergency first aid bucket of water' was not needed as there were no soldering or gluegun burns.Participant Presenters30 people were involved on the day, either as exhibitors or as workshop facilitators. An essential component of the team was the group of11 Stemnet ambassadors, most of whom were there all day. It would have been impossible to run so many activities without them. Another group in the team was the members of the Glasgow Electron Club who, with some friends and a Stemnet ambassador, ran the soldering workshops continuously all day. We were particularly fortunate to have two exhibitors travel up specially to take part. Several exhibitors were entrepreneurs who gave their time for nothing, even though the venue rules meant they could not sell anything, nor charge for the activities being provided. This was especially generous given the harsh financial climate just now. Everyone said they had lots of fun.PublicOver 1,000 people visited the Glasgow Science Centre on the day. The BSA/NSEW assessment forms collected only represent <10% of the visitors to the McMADSAT area. Stallholders and workshop facilitators estimated a total of about 425 active participants (people who did an activity, or asked questions and generally interacted with the displays) by 1530 (GSC shuts at 1700). However, even these only represent a proportion of the people visiting the event which, although not recorded, probably amount to about double that, since most of the activities were taken up by children accompanied by other family members. The numbers at any given time were variable, depending upon the GSC's own activities/talks etc. I would estimate that the McMADSAT area was visited by at least 700-800 during the day. From the few assessment forms returned, and from chatting to the public, it was clear that most had come simply because they were coming to the GSC anyway, but some (mainly young adults) had come as a result of internet and email information or because of the Metro article. The GSC visitors seem to be mainly families with children of primary school age. The University of Glasgow Steampunk Society had come especially to make contact with the steampunk element, as featured in the Metro article. We also collected some contact details for future events. BudgetThe total budget for the event was the £500 grant provided from NSEW Scotland scheme. This had to cover all the exhibitors' costs and the costs for the free make and take activities, plus all publicity etc.In-Kind Sponsors:The Glasgow Science Centre provided free space, tables, cloths, technical assistance, without which the event would not have been possible at all.The publishers of Make and Craft magazines, O'Reilly's, did not feel able to sponsor us in the same extent as they did for the much larger event in Newcastle on the same day, but did send boxes of back issues of their magazines to give away, which probably amounted to an equivalent of about £300 at UK newsstand prices.Clockworkrobot.com provided more theremin kits than contracted for, which were themselves at cost price.Madlabs provided free batteries for all the kits they supplied at cost.Instructables.com assisted with publicity and allowed the use of their logo.VenueNone of this would have been possible at all, particularly on this minimal budget, without the kindness of the Glasgow Science Centre. The Director agreed immediately to offer us the space free, plus the use of tables and technical help to enable this event to take place. We were able to partially set up the night before which was very helpful in avoiding a scramble on the day. We were able to get the loan of 4 GSC soldering irons which avoided us having to get personal ones PAT tested. This was the ideal venue for us as it meant we really didn’t have to do a great deal of publicity as we could be sure of an audience from the GSC's normal throughput.PublicityThe event was listed in the NSEW diary and in the university of Strathclyde's NSEW information. Posters were distributed around venues in Glasgow and information posted on relevant websites. A blogspace http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com was set up as a temporary web presence to refer people to. The Metro published a small piece which was a wonderful boost.Lessons for the futureNeeded more helpers and more exhibitors. Outdoor displays would have been impossible as the weather was dreadful, but it is still necessary to have some more dramatic displays as well as the hands on activities. Successful soldering for novices really needs 1:1 or 1:2 supervision. The budget only worked because minimal publicity was done at low cost and all the participant presenters were generous with their time and resources. Anything more ambitious than what was done on this occasion would need a larger organising team and significant sponsorship.

Topic by greensteam    |  last reply