The forums are retiring and are now closed for new topics and comments. The existing content will remain online and accessible through 2020 to provide everyone the opportunity to save any relevant information. In the spring of 2021, these Community forums will be taken offline.

Search for retro display in Topics


Retro Radio Cabinet

I want to re-fit this radio cabinet with some type of sound system.  I want to preserve, or transform the display glass, and I want the knobs on the front to activate some functions (volume, tuning perhaps) I want to put some very understated LED light behind the front pillars and redo the bamboo screen.  I am just not sure which way to go with it.  I could use a car system and 12 volt adapter system of some kind, but I would really like it all to plug in with just one plug.  I need ideas.

Topic by geckodfw    |  last reply


Possible to hack a retro clock into a split-flap display?

I've been wanting to make a split-flap display board for a while and hook it up to display various messages/times for my office, however building one from scratch seems to be very expensive due to the motors and parts involved. Is it possible to take a retro-style flap clock and repurpose it to be one of these displays? I haven't been able to find anyone attempting this before, despite it seeming (to me) like a pretty good way to get around the issue of the expensive step motors and gears involved, considering the relatively cheap cost of retro clocks online. Any ideas or opinions? Sort of new to this whole endeavour but willing to do the legwork in executing on the idea if it is possible.

Question by Flip175    |  last reply


How can I build a simple computer around a retro cpu like the Z80?

I am interested in building a small computer and had previously opted to build a very minimal computer out of discrete components (think 4- bit). Due to cost constraints and my skill level in electronics I don't think I can do this at the current time. So, I have opted to try building a small computer with a pre-built retro cpu. First, my two goals: <>I do not want a computer with extra capabilities like serial output or the ability to drive a display. I want a "bare bone" computer. This entails a dip switch input and led indicating output. I would also like the option to switch to some sort of latching system for the inputs and outputs so my computer can control and be controlled by peripherals as my skill level increases. <>Ideally I would like to have as few chips as possible. I was initially planning to use a Z80 as the cpu because wikipedia says it had the need for less supporting ic's than its predecessors. Also, there is a lot of documentation out there on the cpu. You may be asking why I am asking for advice then but the truth is because the Z80 computer building tutorials I have found all involve a screen and are more complex than I can manage. If there is another processor that is easier to work with, please tell me! As best I can figure, for my basic computer I would need: the processor, a ram chip, a rom chip, 8 latches for the input and for the output (for an 8 bit processor), an 8 switch dip switch, a clock, and an 8 led display. Are there any other chips I am missing (buffers or the like)? Also, how can a program be written to the cpu? My thoughts on this were that the very first address of the rom section would have instructions to read say bit 1 and bit 2 of the input. It would keep doing this if both were low. When bit 1 goes high it triggers the cpu to jump to a section of rom which performs a loop where it reads the input->stores it in a certain memory address allocated to storing programs-> increments this memory address by 1->reads and stores the next input. If it read a bit 2 initially it would jump to the memory address where program starts. All in all this seems like a very bad way to program, what is the best way to program? I am fairly certain that some startup program will need to be written to the first address of memory in the rom. Thanks for your help.

Question by seanroberts    |  last reply


Cardboard Template for arduino powered Arcade?

I'm trying to find the 80's styled arcade plans for a cardboard project I had in mind it uses the retro 80's upright Arcade style you see with the screen upright, and I haven't find a single one only a mod to the icade for iPad. I'm thinking learning to code the Arudino to power up a couple of Atari's Classic games on it on my own mini cardboard arcade cabinet. I also will need a template of it so I can create some arcade like artwork for it and display with ease and play on it with a removable joystick (for battleZone only) and replace it with the special two joysticks for battle zone classic. if there's some plans for making a mini cardboard mini arcade from the 80's let me know so I can try coding the Ardiuno to play Atari's classics.

Topic by SuperScourge    |  last reply


2008 Instructables and Universal Laser Cutter Contest Finalists

The winner has been announced here!Instructables and [www.ulsinc.com Universal Laser] are happy to announce the 14 finalists in the Laser Cutter Contest. Ten of the finalists were selected by judges at Instructables.com. The other four finalists were the Instructables that had the two highest pageviews or ratings as of Monday morning, Jan. 7.The authors of these Instructables are all in the running to win a VersaLaser worth over $15,000. Now we turn the voting over to you. Click on the "Vote!" buttons below the Instructables to submit your vote and help decide who wins the grand prize. You can vote for more than one Instructable and voting closes Jan. 31. Judge-selected Finalists(in alphabetical order) Autonomous Foosball Table Build a Greenland Kayak Build a Wind Harp! Build yourself a portable home - a mongolian yurt Extreme Business Cards Giant Fresnel Lens Deathray How I built a carbon bike frame at home (and a bamboo frame too) How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) Laser cutter, start slicing stuff for under 50 dollars Laser Image Projector Ratings and Pageviews Finalists How to Make a TRON Style Lamp: The MADYLIGHT How to build a sit down driving arcade cabinet The Spiral Data Tato -- A Curiously Complex Origami CD Case Blu-Ray Laser Phaser! Second Place The authors of these Instructables win a robot t-shirt and a laser-etched plaque. Listed in alphabetical order. 30 minute USB microscope The Ambience Enhancer Autonomous, Wirelessly Controlled Hovercraft Conductive Glue And Conductive Thread: Make an LED Display and Fabric Circuit That Rolls Up. Cool Wave Ring Dollar Store Parabolic Mic Handcut inlay A Home Power Plant - Wind Power Generator Revised How to Make a Color-Changing Lighted Faux Fur Scarf How to make a pair of Angel Wings How to Make an OAWR (Obstacle Avoiding Walking Robot) Make DIY Vanilla Extract "Quicksilver" Retro-Future Scooter from appliances and scrap metal Solid Wood Digital Clock The Stirling Engine, absorb energy from candles, coffee, and more! Squishy Breast Stress Relief Toy TiggerBot II Robot Tube Amp Rebuild (and Mod) U-Disp - The Digg (tm) display (Open Source)Wooden Gear ClockThank you to all the judges: ewilhelm, jesse.hensel, PT, randofo, intoon, canida, noahw, stasterisk, fungus amungus, lebowski, T3h_Muffinator, and bofthem.

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


The Last HOPE....

I realized I mentioned this before, but anyone that is interested in the last HOPE convention to be held at the HOtel PEnnsylvania, before the historic site is torn down; it will be held in New York City, at the Hotel Pennslyvania ( info on the last HOPE convention can be found at the link ). Steven Levy to keynote. As part of a social experiment, attendees HOPE in July will be issued badges with electronic tracking devices. Large displays will show in real-time where people go, with whom they associate, for how long and how often.The tracking technology, known as RFID, is fast becoming an unseen part of everyday life. This July, for the very first time, the general public will be able to participate in the transparent operation of a major RFID tracking program.Conference attendees will participate in games built around the tracking system. Players will seek ways to protect their privacy, find vulnerabilities in the tracking system, employ data mining techniques to learn more about other participants, and choose how much personal information they will disclose in order to play.This demonstration will be open to the public at The Last HOPE conference from July 18-20 at the Hotel Pennsylvania in New York City. The first 1500 pre-registrants will be guaranteed an RFID badge enabling them to participate in the game.Segway Racing Back by popular demand, we will once again have the Segway "personal transporters" available for attendees to ride and race.Vintage Computers Playground Also returning, The Mid-Atlantic Retro-Computing Hobbyists (MARCH) organization will be bringing in an assortment of older machines for people to play around with.Floor LayoutThe Last HOPE. If you miss this one, there's nothing left to say.In lieu of donations, flowers are requested. I MISSED the Last HOPE !

Topic by Goodhart    |  last reply


Laser Cutter Finalists- Master List

Due to the incredible number of fantastic projects entered in the contest, we've decided to name 15 finalists! Yes, you'll all get the same finalist prize (or a laser cutter)- congratulations for making it so hard to judge!We've still got 20 prizes to give away to the runners-up- they'll be posted when the final winner is announced!Now, the rest of you get to VOTE to help us decide the ultimate winner of the Laser Cutter Contest! Each finalist, listed alphabetically below by username, has an individual Forum post with links to his/her projects in the Laser Cutter Contest Finalists Group. You'll have noticed the Forum posts are now ratable- follow the links below, then click the + button to vote for your favorites! Voting ends Thursday July 12, 2007.Leave nice, constructive comments- this is a great opportunity to ask more questions to help you cast your votes. crabfu for Steam Turbine Tankdave spencer for erupting Volcano Birthday CakeHonus for How to make a Green Lantern ring- including a glowing version!jabroutin for personal powerPlantjeffkobi for Retro Hi-Fi ProjectKasey for Compubeaver --> How to case-mod a beaver - in 29 easy steps!lkrasnow for Precision Puzzlemaking Primer -- Volume 1mikejedw for Pringles Wind Turbine (Pleech) - Version One mydian_nightshade forFurniture grade cocktail arcade cabinetmzed for Low-cost Spherical Speaker Array nemomatic for Giant Squid kinetic sculpture from found materialsorthonormal_basis_of_evil for EMP shopping cart lockerStuart.Mcfarlan for How to Make a Three Axis CNC Machine (Cheaply and Easily)talbotron22 for DIY Kitty Crack: ultra-potent catnip extract turkey tek for Interactive Multitouch DisplayNote that this is only a part of the judging, so if you're a finalist don't stress too much over it. It's a chance for our entire community to have their voices heard.

Topic by canida    |  last reply


Laser Cutter Contest Winners!

It is with great pleasure that I announce the winner of the Laser Cutter Contest:Stuart.Mcfarlan for How to Make a Three Axis CNC Machine (Cheaply and Easily)Be sure to check out Stuart.Mcfarlan's plans for the Laser Cutter.Congratulations to all the finalists who will receive a Laser-etched Instructables Leatherman Juice S2 and an Instructables t-shirt for their simply amazing work:crabfu for Steam Turbine Tankdave spencer for erupting Volcano Birthday CakeHonus for How to make a Green Lantern ring- including a glowing version!jabroutin for personal powerPlantjeffkobi for Retro Hi-Fi ProjectKasey for Compubeaver --> How to case-mod a beaver - in 29 easy steps!lkrasnow for Precision Puzzlemaking Primer -- Volume 1mikejedw for Pringles Wind Turbine (Pleech) - Version One mydian_nightshade forFurniture grade cocktail arcade cabinetmzed for Low-cost Spherical Speaker Array nemomatic for Giant Squid kinetic sculpture from found materialsorthonormal_basis_of_evil for EMP shopping cart lockertalbotron22 for DIY Kitty Crack: ultra-potent catnip extract turkey tek for Interactive Multitouch DisplayWe had planned to select 20 second place winners, but just couldn't narrow the field, so we're awarding 25 second place winners, who will receive Instructables t-shirts! They are:$30 High-Speed PCB Drill Press by lancandy$60 Laser Engraver / Cutter by cgoshBreath powered USB charger by jmengelBuild a Tetris DVD (or book) shelf by odecom5Capture the Ethereal Beauty of Everyday Objects Using Polarized Light. by Tool Using AnimalCO2 laser that cuts sheet metal by owhiteCosmic Light With LEDs Embedded in Resin by technoplastiqueDuck Cam Decoy by RoadstarElectromagnetic Floater by J_HodgieFine Silver (99.9% pure) Popcorn Pendant! by roughtyperHan Solo in carbonite chocolate bar! by FreakCitySFLaptop Converted to 2nd Monitor by punish3rMake a wall avoiding Robot! a collaboration led by Brandon121233Make Conductive Glue and Glue a Circuit by mikey77Make rope out of dead plants -- with no tools a collaboration led by phyzomeMod a toaster and have retro art toast for breakfast by 5VoltMotherboard PCB Bracelet by llama13Portable Water resistant LED Picnic Blanket with hard center serving surface! by pointcloudStart a Guerrilla Drive-in by plusbryanThe Ice Bulb by mandrakeThe Intimate Video Light/ Handheld photograpy light. by curve12The One, The Only COTTON CANDY MACHINE! by T3h_MuffinatorTheater Effects: Gunshot Wounds by TrumpetNeelUse a Vacuum cleaner to build your own Skateboard by gregorylavoieWire Scorpion by OniToraAll the winners should watch for a personal message from us for prize claiming instructions.With so many excellent entries, and with each of them being at the top of their game in some different aspect, the judging was extremely difficult. We had help juding from a large number of users including 5Volt, african_andy187, Albetcha, BobbyMike, CameronSS, canida, daenris, drinkmorecoffee, ewilhelm, fungus amungus, herrozerro, ian, imanalchemist, J_Hodgie, jamesh, jesse.hensel, jessyratfink, jmengel, Kiteman, LasVegas, lebowski, lennyb, llama13, lothotrity, momo!, nagutron, nak, noahw, olddaddycrane, pt, Randofo, Robyntheslug, royalestel, ryzellon, Sam Noyoun, saul, Sedgewick17, sheekgeek, stasterisk, steven07, T3h_Muffinator, technick29, Tetranitrate, Tool Using Animal, trebuchet03, trialex, x9a, zieak, and Zujus. For more information on how we judged, check here.The entries submitted to this contest exceeded all of my expectations. They are totally amazing in their quality, instructional value, uniqueness, and pure brilliance. It is my hope that everyone had a blast entering the contest and learned something useful, fun, or both. To me, the value of posting an Instructable is when someone makes a comment saying that I taught them something new, changed the way they looked at things, or inspired them to make something themselves (even if it's something totally different than my Instructable). Looking through the Instructables submitted to the contest and comments on the finalists' forum posts, it's clear that this is happening all over, and it makes me smile every time. Congratulations to all the winners! And, thanks to everyone that entered. Even if your Instructable didn't win a prize, I'm sure it has had a positive impact on someone's life and will continue to do so.

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply


How to make Flip Clock Numbers and build a "like"-counter around it?

Hey All So I've got this client, who's absolutely crazy about the "FLIKE" (A physical like counter.). But he can't have it for another couple of months, and he'd like it to be a little more custom... Long story short, I might end up making a similar product in a few weeks. it will probably consist out of 5 digits and if it's up to me (not sure what the client wants) I'd stuff them behind a long picture frame. Something like this but actually mechanical and not just a picture of it:  http://www.notonthehighstreet.com/thedriftingbear/product/personalised-framed-vintage-flip-clock-print So I started googling every hardware piece I needed and it turns out it's a huge pain to find Flip Clock Numbers / Flip Board Numbers... whatever you want to call them. (What's the right name btw?) You can't just buy these things, let alone in a custom size. So the idea is to build them myself. I found this on wikipedia, which gives a clue about the inside: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Analog_clock_with_digital_display.png So I'm figuring out what needs to go in it to make this work. (I'll end up making an instructable about it) The numbers themselves are going to be made out of vinyl stickers. You can easily buy those from ebay in about any size if you look for them. The stickers will be put on to plastic boards. But I'm not totally sure what kind I should get. They should be thin and must be able to stand up straight, yet "easy" to fold. I'll probably get them lasercut, but you should be able to cut them by hand as well. Currently I'm thinking about gluing small metal or carbon rods on the back of those letters. Although I'm not sure if that would be strong enough. Would it be enough to file one side of the rods to get a bigger contact surface? (What do you guys think?) I'm planning of putting the half letters in a drum of ABS or PLA. it should be shaped like this:  |--------| I'm thinking about 3D printing this. But no idea how it'll do... One side of the drum will be connected to a small stepper motor (5.625° with 1/64 reduction). I don't have real experience with stepper motors, but this resolution seems more than sufficient. The other side will be connected to a metal or plastic positioner. Each digit might end up with it's own "unit" so I can swap them separately if they'd break. I've got great experience with lasercut plexi, so I might use that because it's more accurate than wood and I might have some lying around. I was first thinking about 1 stepper motor and a set of gears. I decided not to do that in the end because I don't have good experience with making gears and I can never find the right sizes online. Also, it'll make everything way more complex. So each motor will have it's own controller connected to it. Those controllers would have to talk to an ATMega or something. (I'm planning on using an arduino to prototype, but then just swap the chip and make a stand-alone version without usb etc) The ATMega has to be connected to the internet of course to get the current number of likes, so I'd connect it to a raspberry pi via I²C. I'm not familiar with the GPIO pins on the pi so I figured this would be a save and convenient way to handle this. The ATMega is robust, and I love the Arduino bootloader. A sketch is written in no time, but I have no idea how to start writhing this code for the GPIO pins. So why the Raspberry Pi? First off, this thing might end up being wireless, and since a wifi module for the arduino costs as much as a Pi, I figured this would be easier. The plan is to make the pi run python script that could ask the number of likes from the facebook API. Once returned, it'll send +1 or +5 or +10 over I²C. The arduino shifts the numbers to the correct position and replies with the total number it's displaying (3012 for instance). The PI can then recheck if everything is in sync. As for the set up. Since we have Pi, we can put on a LAMP stack (I know, this is overkill, but it wouldn't hurt either). So for initial set-up, we'd connect the counter to ethernet, browse to it on a different computer via "http://counter.local". And we'd be presented with a web interface. You'll be able to set the URL of the page u want to get the likes from, set and reset the number that is displayed on the counter, and the WIFI settings. The WIFI settings can be saved in the wpa_supplicant.conf file and on reboot it'll automatically connect to this network. From now on the whole system is manageable over wifi via a html interface. For debugging I might enable ssh though. So I guess you've got the whole outline now. I'd like to get your feedback on this! And this for the mechanics, electronics, and software side of things! 

Question by woutervddn    |  last reply


Crowdfunding

We love seeing our authors transform their ideas into a reality, and we want to help in whatever ways we can. Below are some of the campaigns our authors are working to get funded. We'll do our best to keep this list current, so please check out their projects, and help fellow makers in our community find success!  Current Campaigns i-mimic the animation made easy, Device capturing human motion directly in 3D animation software in real-time & without plugins. by Instructabler nawres102 Open Source DIY Automatic Tail Light, A fun and easy to assemble light sensor kit.  By Instructabler Solarcycle Tiq probe, it defines a new category of electronic debug & test tools for makers & professionals - filling the gap between DMMs & 'scopes. By Instructabler markhen57 If you have a project you're trying to get funded, let us know!  Completed Campaigns  Doughnut Safe, Turn your spare tire into a strong box.  By Instructabler Mrballeng The fumeFan, The fume Fan is a soldering fume extractor, work lamp, helping hands tool and a project organiser for hobbyists, makers and creators.  By Instructabler hertzgamma SOLARPAD Open Source 5 Watt Smart Phone Solar USB Charger, Strap this water-resistant solar panel and battery to backpacks or mount it to tripods for camping, hiking, and cycling.  By Instructabler Solarcycle Fish Bone, A no knots cord tightener specifically designed for paracord by author Mrballeng - Funded by almost 9000% of goal! Would you Woodwork, a funny and informational woodworking webseries by author Few Bits - Funded by 100% of goal!  Zero to Maker, a re-skilling guide for new makers by David Lang - Funded by almost 2000% of goal! Arabic Alphabet Fun Flashcards, cute and kid friendly learning tool by author acraftyarab - Funded and met goal! PIXEL: Interactive LED Art, an interactive LED-based display for retro pixel art by author alinke - Funded by over 600% of goal! Blinky Fish, a tiny fish-shaped board that fits on an Arduino to help teach, by author marc.cryan - Funded by almost 600% of goal! Chipper, the ATtiny Programming and Prototyping Shield, by author Hammock Boy - funded by over 1000% of goal! Piranha, a follow-up knotless gear tie for paracord, by author Mrballeng - funded by over 1400% of goal! The Question Block Lamp, a Mario-inspired, interactive lamp for your inner geek, gamer and child, by author bduxbury - funded by almost 150% of goal! Out of Time - A patina weathered I-Beam with moving gears by Instructabler hack818 Maker Kase - Universal Maker cabinet. Perfect for 3D printers, model makers, small CNC machines and open frame Bitcoin Miners by Instructabler bmc.loughlin Have you started your own Kickstarter or Indiegogo to help fund your project? Let us know! Please leave the link in the comments, along with a brief description. We'll add your project to our up-to-date campaign list above, and promote it across our channels. If you have any questions, or want to add any additional info, please email me at khoward@instructables.com Thanks!

Topic by kazmataz    |  last reply


Graffiti artists replicate The Matrix on Instructables.com--and win $15,000 Universal Laser Cutter!

Instructables and Universal Laser are happy to announce that the incredibly creative Instructable, How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) has won the Grand Prize in the 2008 Instructables.com and Universal Laser Cutter Contest: a 40-watt VersaLaser laser cutter valued at over $15,000!Grand Prize Winner How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) provides an extremely detailed Instructables tutorial on how to build a cheap, portable special-effects rig to create "bullet-time" animations--a technique, popularized in The Matrix movies, where the audience's point-of-view moves around the scene at normal speed while the action on screen is slowed down."We want to inspire great ideas and provide skills, tools, and shared know-how," Instructables CEO Eric Wilhelm explained. "This project represents exactly what we're trying to achieve with Instructables."The DIY Bullet Time Instructable was created and documented by the Graffiti Research Lab, an open-source urban art and communication collective supported by the Free Art & Technology Lab, a Brooklyn-based non-profit research lab creating work at the intersection of popular culture and the public domain."This will be the cornerstone of our new lab space," said GRL member fi5e. "A whole crew of creative people are really excited to put this thing to use! Thanks for helping us bring the VersaLaser to Brooklyn."The winner was chosen by votes from Instructables users and our panel of expert judges, who reviewed the 14 finalists drawn from a pool of over 600 entries. Congratulations to fi5e and everyone at the GRL - we know you'll really put the VersaLaser to work, and can't wait to see what great things you make! First Prize(in alphabetical order) Autonomous Foosball Table Blu-Ray Laser Phaser! Build a Greenland Kayak Build a Wind Harp! Build yourself a portable home - a mongolian yurt Extreme Business Cards Giant Fresnel Lens Deathray How I built a carbon bike frame at home (and a bamboo frame too) How to Make a TRON Style Lamp: The MADYLIGHT How to build a sit down driving arcade cabinet Laser cutter, start slicing stuff for under 50 dollars Laser Image Projector The Spiral Data Tato -- A Curiously Complex Origami CD Case Second Prize The authors of these Instructables win a robot t-shirt and a laser-etched plaque. Listed in alphabetical order. 30 minute USB microscope The Ambience Enhancer Autonomous, Wirelessly Controlled Hovercraft Conductive Glue And Conductive Thread: Make an LED Display and Fabric Circuit That Rolls Up. Cool Wave Ring Dollar Store Parabolic Mic Handcut inlay A Home Power Plant - Wind Power Generator Revised How to Make a Color-Changing Lighted Faux Fur Scarf How to make a pair of Angel Wings How to Make an OAWR (Obstacle Avoiding Walking Robot) Make DIY Vanilla Extract "Quicksilver" Retro-Future Scooter from appliances and scrap metal Solid Wood Digital Clock The Stirling Engine, absorb energy from candles, coffee, and more! Squishy Breast Stress Relief Toy TiggerBot II Robot Tube Amp Rebuild (and Mod) U-Disp - The Digg (tm) display (Open Source)Wooden Gear Clock Expert JudgesTo help us judge, we assembled an amazing team of expert designers, engineers, hackers, journalists, scientists, technologists, and other really smart people. They spent hours examining each of the finalists Instructables and helping us make a decision. We'd like to send a huge "Thank You" to each of our incredible judges. We couldn't have done it without you.Violet Blue (author, blogger, podcaster, columnist, and SRL vet)Gareth Branwyn (Contributing Editor, MAKE Magazine)Zoz Brooks (Host, of the upcoming TV Show Prototype This)Joe Brown (Editor, Wired Magazine)Colin Bulthaup (CTO of Potenco, co-founder Squid Labs) David Calkins (Co-founder of RoboGames) Julia Cosgrove (Deputy Editor, ReadyMade Magazine)Chris Csikszentmihalyi (Professor at the MIT Media Lab, Computing Culture Group)Simone Davalos (Co-founder of RoboGames) Lenore Edman (Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories)Dan Goldwater (Founder of monkeylectric, co-founder Squid Labs)Saul Griffith (President of Makani Power, co-founder Squid Labs, MacArthur Fellow)Duncan Haberly (Instructables)Matthew Hancher (NASA Researcher in the Intelligent Systems Division)Brian Lam (Editor, Gizmodo)Ed Lewis (Instructables)Jeffrey McGrew (Designer, Because We Can)Chuck Messer (Tackle Design, The Open Prosthetics Project, host of Discovery's Smash Lab)Megan Miller (Editor, PopSci)Jim Newton (Founder of TechShop)Quinn Norton (Journalist)Windell Oskay (Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories)David Pescovitz (BoingBoing, Institute for the Future, MAKE Magazine)Cloude Porteus (Instructables)Randy Sarafan (Instructables, Eyebeam Resident)Peter Semmelhack (Founder of Buglabs)Tyghe Trimble (News Editor, Discover Magazine)Noah Weinstein (Instructables)Eric Wilhelm (CEO of Instructables, co-founder Squid Labs)Dan Woods (Associate Publisher, MAKE Magazine) For the full information on how the winners were chosen, click here.

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply