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Wire Wrapping Kits

I can make you a kit for any of my wire jewelry projects. I have the nest and the basic cab kits already, since I teach those, but I can assemble what you need for any of my wire jewelry instructables. Gemstones will be whatever is in my studio at the time, though you can tell me what kinds of things you like. This will hopefully take the anxiety out of not knowing how to get started. Kits usually cost about $3o - $40 plus shipping. Just contact me through instructables if you want one.

Topic by Rhonda Chase Design  


Pig farmer proves that great ideas can come from anywhere

Here's a story with a great moral to it. If you're observant, then you can come up with a brilliant solution to a problem. And it doesn't matter if you went to a fancy design school for it or just need to solve a problem. Canadian pig farmer Mary Haugh had a problem; multiple heart attacks put her husband out of commission, and she alone had to somehow control and herd their 3,000 hogs through the barn. Traditional methods of getting pigs to move are to use a stick, an electric prod or a "chase board," a length of wood the farmer wields horizontally to angle the pigs in a particular direction.Haugh then came up with a roller that dispenses a swath of red cloth--a sort of farm version of the retractable "lane guides" that movie theaters use. Working with her brother Peter Jones, a mechanical engineer, she developed a 30-pound stainless steel prototype that retracted fabric like a windowshade and could unspool 50 feet of material. The pair also designed it so one end could attach to existing stabling, enabling one-person operation.The resulting product rolls up neatly, can easily be carried and deployed by one person, and meets Canadian standards for biosecurity as it can be washed with the pressure washers most farmers already own to clean other equipment. More importantly, it works far better than anything that came before it--testing trials reveal it saves 70% of the time needed to herd hogs, which translates to hours per week. link

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


Looking for any and all ideas/advice for building my own eco home on the cheap

Hi, I am looking for any and all info related to building my own low cost eco house. Off grid if possible. I moved to France last year and purchased a 1 Ha piece of land. I had a good job and the world was our oyster. Then, on Friday the 13th, 2013 I lost my job. I also lost everything we owned in the world when it burned to the ground along with the storage facility it was in - and almost no insurance. This all happened within 90 minutes. I am not looking for sympathy or charity, just good advice. My wife and I are not going to give up on the dream, we just need to chase it on a much reduced budget!   Currently I am clearing the 2 acres (1 Hectare) which is overgrown with about 3000 pine trees, and, thorn bushes that are 3-4 yards tall in some places. I hope there are some fellow dreamers here willing to share their ideas, designs, experience and knowledge. Thanks so much.

Topic by thoughtfission    |  last reply


Get Paid for your Hardware Projects

Looking thru all of the cool projects here, it seems like there are too many projects that took tons of effort, sitting in attics. Or they're being used by the project designer, but no-one else can benefit from the designer's hard work. A lot of people would love to try some of the projects you've come up with, but they're not sure where to start.Here's what I'm proposing;- I'll keep a stock of the most useful components (passives, IC's, etc). I'll also keep stock of several 'generic' project PCB's.-You come up with a cool project using these components, Or modify a project you've already done. Once you've got it done, send me your source code / design and a Howto.-I'll publish your projects on my site, and I'll market my site to drive hobbyists. I'll spend real money marketing it, driving traffic so that thousands of folks will visit and check out your projects.Here's the best part; If a visitor thinks your project is cool, they can order the materials to build it. I'll take care of shipping, inventory, payment processing, etc, and I'll share the revenue with the project designer. Imagine if your hobby paid some bills instead of making them! And all you have to do is write up a 2 or 3 page 'How I did it' and share your code.HOW TO GET INVOLVEDI need to do a fair number of things on the business side, so I won't be ready to launch for 2-3 months. Before I can launch, though, I need to figure out what the inventory of components should be. There are two ways to get involved;IF YOU HAVE A PROJECTGo to the website and submit a brief description and a Bill of Materials (BOM). The BOM is the most important. Once I've collected enough BOM's, I'll build an initial component inventory for projects. Try to be thorough with the BOM (Everything but solder). Your project doesn't need to be done (or even started), but if you share your project now, you'll get priority listing when the site is launched.IF YOU WANT TO SEE A PROJECT AVAILABLEVisit the website and drop me a note. I'll collect project ideas and see if any designer are interested building it (or chase down a designer who already did).My goal is to let other folks enjoy your awesome projects and appreciate your work. You'll also be able to make some money with your hobby, too. All feedback is appreciated!To get you thinking, a few projects I've seen around or think people might find cool; 'IRC client in an altoids tin', Music Visualizer, C64 wiimote baseball bat, LED stock ticker, Homemade portable MP3 player, POV clock / 3d display, Guitar Hero kit, LED lighting system, 3d printer, Parking assistant, SIM card reader, Metal detector, GPS logger / tracker, Balancing Robot, Remote Camera recorder, PS/2 Keylogger... Whatever! At this point, I don't need completed projects, just an idea of what they are and the Bill of Materials.The only way to make this project viable is to limit the inventory depth. By submitting projects now, I'll be able to build an inventory that will best support your ideas.The website is www.gadgetgangster.com. Thanks in advance,Nick

Topic by Gadget Gangster    |  last reply


Can any one help me designing a light chaser circuit? BEST ANWSER GETS A PATCH Answered

I am Made/making ( i've made one so far ) some Par cans (DJ lights). I would like to know how to build a circuit so the lights can chase each other (chaser circuit). At the moment the lights plug in to the mains and require 230v and 50w to power them. I want the circuit to be safe and I would like to also know what gauge wire I should use. I would like the cost to keep below £20.00 because that would exeed store bought prices. Thank you Oscar

Question by oscarthompson    |  last reply


Protect my house on mischief night?

Last year my house was egged in a drive by "shooting". in past years there were attempts at TPing my tree but its like 200' so it was a fail. Anyways i need suggestions on how to defend my house. so far i have Airsoft sniper in the tree Water hose Super Soaker Flame thrower Chasing them on a bike with a 100Db alarm on it MORE airsoft guns Paintball Bazooka "homemade" Camera flash for blinding them Firecrackers (possibly if i can find them in time) panic button for car alarm POSSIBLY putting a trail of gasoline on the road so in case of a drive by someone in the bush can light it and scare the crap out of driver and prevent them from leaving Playing random music VERY loud and getting like 10 people to give a GIANT group hug SMOKE BOMBS Night vision (kipkay design) pitch forks and torches Please any other ideas would be helpful

Question by tomtortoise    |  last reply


Ghost riders in the sky

I know that this probably isn't the perfect site to be asking for this, but I figure I'll give it a shot. I'd like to come up with a design for a picture I intend to create, which shows the Four Horsemen, except instead of horses, they're riding motorcycles. If anyone is familiar with The Outlaws' version of the song song "(Ghost) Riders in the Sky", I'd like it to fit in with that theme: hard-charging, kind of dark... you can tell from the atmosphere that they're Hell-riders. I'm trying to come up with a layout for it: how are the Horsemen arranged, what precisely do their bikes look like, where are they, and are they chasing the Devil's Herd of cattle? And should they even be the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, or just regular cowboys who were eternally damned, like the song goes? Both have different visual possibilities. So what I'm looking for is even the crudest drawings depicting one aspect of the picture that you think would be cool. Maybe you have the idea for the perfect shape and level of tattering to one Horseman's cowboy hat, and would like to suggest that. Maybe you think that if one of the guys was riding a Vincent, it'd be the most badass thing since open pipes. Chasing the cattle through a canyon, or idling at the top of a cliff looking down on the Devil's Herd? Any cool color palette you've seen? good reference photos? Stick figures are great. Here's what I have so far, although it can be changed no problem. Like I said, I'd like details of the coolest intake you can think of, the perfect instrument panels, the perfect trenchcoat for a rider. Any little detail, rendered in any level of quality. I'm considering showing them all riding along side each other, holding rifles, instead of the badly-perspectived parked scene shown here. Have the perfect design for the mountains? Toss it in! I plan on making these very huge, so don't worry about details being too small. You'll notice that I'd like to have one Indian, left-hand throttle bike, potentially a big twin, and potentially a Four, with fringed leater seat and saddlebags. I'd also like to have a stretch chopper with a king & queen seat, but I can't decide between a wide or a narrow tire. Notice how the Indian rider is holding his rifle in the second picture. I'd like to have him holding a gun, and at least one of the other guys having a pistol belt with two Colt Peacemakers. If anyone has a cool way of depicting that, please share. I am open to suggestion as to what the right rifle would be. You can also notice that in the second sketch, there is a Harley springer front end lurking in the background on the left, and I didn't draw the Indian rider's whole body, so that's actually Chopper Dude's rear wheel, not Indian Dude's head.

Topic by Rishnai    |  last reply


Live in the Bay Area? Interactive art this weekend!

Alchemy is an event intended to bring all types of art forms together and make them accessible and fun to interact with and add your creative mark to - come play and design and craft and art it up with us! It's at -- CELLspace in San Francisco -- (2050 Bryant, @ 18th St, in the Mission) This Saturday -- April 26th -- from 9pm-2am. It's $15 and there will be a full bar available. The shows and stations that it will include: - a fashion show "Styles of Magic" by Missing Piece @ 10pm - a magic show "Phantoccino" by Keith Boudreau, showing 4 times over the night - an all-local Art Gallery curated by Will Chase Arts, half of which is priced under $100 - Alchemical Afforestation, an interactive steel sculpture by Shira Loa ---> you make the bark of the tree! - Digicrylic Mash-Up by Dangermarc and Ron Goldin ---> you draw on one side, they on another! - PyroCardium, a heartbeat-powered candelabra by False Profit Labs ---> try the stethoscope on! - Web of (de)Construction, a live textile piece by Medium Reality ---> become entangled in this web! - Identity Tapestry by Mary Corey March ---> see how your line of self lines up with others! - Flame Tree Building Workshop by False Profit Labs ---> make a fire sculpture! - Phoenix Aviary, a reactive video installation ---> dance and move, and see the flame-tastic results! - Writing Photos, an intersection of writing and photography ---> tell us a story that you see in the picture! - Altered Paintings, reworking thrift-store finds ---> that mountain scene needs an anime monster, don't you think? - Interactive Lights & Magnets... Photo Booth... Lego Robots... Origami... Knitting and more! check out www.false-profit.com/alchemy Hope to see you there! Here are some pictures from our last Flame Tree Building worskhop. Reply to this post if you are interested in signing up to learn how to build these propane flame effects.

Topic by brettlevine    |  last reply


Computer Science Project: Automated Follow Spot

Hi all!  This is my first post on instructables. I've been using this website for years to facilitate many projects, however this is the first time I'll actually be posting any questions of my own on the forums! Exciting! I'll cut to the chase, for my computer science A - Level I am required to complete a programming project, complex enough to get me a good grade, but feasible enough to actually complete! I decided to take a more practical approach and have arrived at the decision to make a robot of some kind. As I'm heavily involved with the drama department in the school I wanted to create something that could also help them. I decided upon an automated device that can use some form of trilateration to determine the position of a person on stage and then position a light to light them up. For those who have more experience in the world of technical theatre, I'm talking about an Automated follow spot. For those who don't here is a link to a wiki page.    The premise being that a person normally has to control a follow spot, pointing it at the person (or people) on stage, to light them up. An issue we have is that sometimes we don't have enough stage hands to operate the follow spots, which means they're left by the wayside. My idea will negate the need to have a human operator and should simply follow the person around the stage. The main idea at the moment is to use a single long range bluetooth transmitter, attached to a wristband (which would be worn by the actor/actress) and have three long range receivers, which in conjunction can trilaterate the position of the actor/actress and position the light to illuminate them. I have a couple of  questions: 1. Firstly, is this feasible? This is a project that I really want to see through to fruition, especially as it will count towards my final A-level. For someone of my level of knowledge/experience - is this possible? 2. What would be the best method for transmitting the radio signal? Bluetooth sprung to mind instantly, but is this the best option? I know there might be potential pitfalls in that a theatre is full of metal items and interfering signals that could disrupt this, so are there any better alternatives? I know there are only two questions for now, but I've only just started the design of the project. I'm sure when I get seriously into it I'll have many many more, but I trust that the good people of instructables will be able to provide some help! Thanks again, Eliot C-Hill

Topic by EliotC2    |  last reply


Project Proposal: Evolving the Artificial Intelligence of an iRobot Create to Traverse Mazes

I am doing a PhD in computer science at Michigan State University in the Digital Evolution Lab (http://devolab.cse.msu.edu/). My PhD involves evolving intelligence, which uses evolutionary computation to try to evolve, instead of engineer, artificial intelligence. I propose to try to evolve the controller of the iRobot Create to be able to solve mazes of increasing complexity. I would evolve neural nets that took the iRobot Create's sensor information as inputs (most likely via the "streaming sensor data" mode) and the outputs of the neural net would control the robot. The robot will learn on its own how to get better and better at traversing mazes. This same technology could then be used to have the robot do different tasks (such as cover a room, or chase/avoid another iRobot Create in a game of cat and mouse). Most of this type of work occurs in simulation because, as graduate students, we do not have the resources to buy robots. This scholarship and contest would be a blessing to me, as it would allow me to work with robots in the real world. Evolutionary computing simulates natural selection in a computer. It uses the "survival of the fittest" rule. The difference is that, instead of plants and animals competing, different versions of software are battling for their place in the next generation. Natural selection, plus a lot of time, produced all the life on this planet. In a computer world, because generations can happen in microseconds, we do not need millions of Earth years to pass before interesting things begin to happen.The simulation would be set up so that the better programs will have lots of kids (versions similar but not identical) in the next generation and weaker software will die out. In this case, "better" programs would be those that get closer to the end of the maze (where a docking station would be placed). Over time the software will become better and better since mutations (random changes in the program) occasionally produce a program that is a slight improvement over its parents. This slightly better software will thrive for a while until it too is replaced by the next slightly better software. Given enough generations, these small changes can add up to produce jaguars, whales, Olympians and poets. Hopefully they can also produce iRobot Create's that are great at solving mazes!I do not know how far I would be able to get in this project before the end of the contest deadline. I hope to be able to get a proof of concept going. At a minimum, however, I would continue to work on this project after the contest ends and would be glad to share my results with the iRobot Create community and acknowledge the scholarship gift in any papers published on the subject. The iRobot Create is perfect for this work because researchers in the field frequently use robots like this one. As such, this design is someone of an industry standard. Unfortunately, each research team must build or find their own version of this robot archetype. If it proves effective, the iRobot Create could become an industry standard. It would also be good to use because the preprogrammed modules such as 'cover and dock' and 'mouse' could serve as interesting programs to compete the evolved solutions against. If desired, I would be more than happy to provide more information and or references about this technique. Cheers, Jeff Clune

Topic by jclune  


Project Proposal: Evolving the Artificial Intelligence of an iRobot Create to Traverse Mazes

I am doing a PhD in computer science at Michigan State University in the Digital Evolution LabDigital Evolution Lab. My PhD involves evolving intelligence, which uses evolutionary computation to try to evolve, instead of engineer, artificial intelligence. I propose to try to evolve the controller of the iRobot Create to be able to solve mazes of increasing complexity. I would evolve neural nets that took the iRobot Create’s sensor information as inputs (most likely via the ‘streaming sensor data’ mode) and the outputs of the neural net would control the robot. The robot will learn on its own how to get better and better at traversing mazes. This same technology could then be used to have the robot do different tasks (such as cover a room, or chase/avoid another iRobot Create in a game of cat and mouse). Most of this type of work occurs in simulation because, as graduate students, we do not have the resources to buy robots. This scholarship and contest would be a blessing to me, as it would allow me to work with robots in the real world. Evolutionary computing simulates natural selection in a computer. It uses the ‘survival of the fittest’ rule. The difference is that, instead of plants and animals competing, different versions of software are battling for their place in the next generation. Natural selection, plus a lot of time, produced all the life on this planet. In a computer world, because generations can happen in microseconds, we do not need millions of Earth years to pass before interesting things begin to happen.The simulation would be set up so that the better programs will have lots of kids (versions similar but not identical) in the next generation and weaker software will die out. In this case, “better” programs would be those that get closer to the end of the maze (where a docking station would be placed). Over time the software will become better and better since mutations (random changes in the program) occasionally produce a program that is a slight improvement over its parents. This slightly better software will thrive for a while until it too is replaced by the next slightly better software. Given enough generations, these small changes can add up to produce jaguars, whales, Olympians and poets. Hopefully they can also produce iRobot Create’s that are great at solving mazes!I do not know how far I would be able to get in this project before the end of the contest deadline. I hope to be able to get a proof of concept going. At a minimum, however, I would continue to work on this project after the contest ends and would be glad to share my results with the iRobot Create community and acknowledge the scholarship gift in any papers published on the subject. The iRobot Create is perfect for this work because researchers in the field frequently use robots like this one. As such, this design is someone of an industry standard. Unfortunately, each research team must build or find their own version of this robot archetype. If it proves effective, the iRobot Create could become an industry standard. It would also be good to use because the preprogrammed modules such as “cover and dock” and “mouse” could serve as interesting programs to compete the evolved solutions against. If desired, I would be more than happy to provide more information and or references about this technique. Cheers, Jeff Clune

Topic by jclune  


Jurassic Spark kids game: how to distribute fun more evenly?

I recently made up an outdoor kids adventure game that is really fun for most, but could use help with making the game more fun for all the kids. I conducted an anonymous survey afterwards and a few kids were sad that they didn't get to find the batteries (explained below). My question relates to this. I'm asking here because I figure teachers have tons of experience with kids!The game is called Jurassic Spark. I've written up the details with lots of pictures in this Instructable for the game, but I'll summarize here:Target kid age: 4 to 7 years old (although I plan to continue adapting as kids get older) Scenario: The Jurassic Spark electrified fence has lost power and many dangerous dinosaurs are on the loose. Can our brave explorers (kids) find the high power batteries to energize the fence before it's too late? Watch out for the T-Rex!Player roles: explorers (kids), small dinosaurs (adults), and the terrifying T-Rex (adult)!To win: the explorers need to find and return the 6 high power Batteries back to the Power Station to energize the electric fence before the dinosaurs tag all the explorers. Because the kids are young, the dinosaurs (adults) aren't playing to win, just to make it an exciting challenge. The game lasts around 15 to 20 minutes.Getting tagged: When a dinosaur tags an explorer, the explorer has to freeze and put their arms out like in freeze tag. Frozen explorers are encouraged to yell for assistance "Help! Help! A dino chomped me!" and can be unfrozen by being touched by another free explorer.Tail stealing: The explorers are not completely defenseless, however. The small dinosaurs have tails that can be stolen and they hate that! "Roar! Who stole my tail!?" Tail lacking dinosaurs must return to the dinosaur pen before they can regrow their tail and return to hunting. I feel that this is a very important part of the game as it brings balance and a whole lot of fun. It also encourages lots of exciting team building as kids will often gang up on a dino to take it down or distract it. Once the electric fence is powered up, dinos that have their tails stolen are trapped in the pen until the game ends (usually only a minute or two).T-REX: To up the level of excitement, we add a T-Rex wild card into the mix! The T-Rex cannot be stopped and loves chomping on explorers! There's nothing quite like seeing a giant roaring T-Rex head chase or stalk their cute tiny prey :)We played the game with 20 kids, 6 small dinosaurs, and 1 T-Rex.Question: How can I make the game more fun for the kids that feel left out because they didn't find a battery? We made a rule that a kid can only return one battery per game, but there are 6 batteries and 20 kids. The older kids tended to find the batteries each game. My gut is telling me that I wouldn't be able to handle a game with 20 batteries.The part that makes this extra challenging is that the kids are young and I can't make too many complicated rules. We'll add complexity as they grow older with tranquilizer darts and stuff like that :)If you are interested in reading all the survey feedback, it is near the bottom of the Instructable.Thanks!Adam

Question by afraser-kruck    |  last reply


From the Editor: Greetings and Salutations

Hello! Many of you already know me, so please bear with me as I introduce myself to all of those who don't. My name is Randy Sarafan and I am the Technology Editor here at Instructables. What led me to this point is not necessarily a straight trajectory, and I hope the tale I am about to tell may prove useful to someone. Contrary to popular belief, I did not wake up one morning as a child and say, "I want to be the Technology Editor at a user-submitted how-to website." In fact, as a child, I would normally tell anyone who was curious enough to inquire that I wanted to be a duck. I persisted telling people that I wanted to grow up into a duck until an alarmingly mature age. Anyhow… understanding that not everyone can grow up to be a duck, I developed a backup plan to become a 3D computer animator, and make special effects for movies. I fell in love with special effects after seeing Jurassic Park as a child. While my peers were playing sports, chasing girls, and doing recreational drugs, I spent my teenage years developing an animation portfolio. This largely translated into learning gestural figure drawing by sketching nude models with artistically inclined retirees at the local community art center. So, I got good at drawing naked people. As a teenage boy I thought this was a very useful skill to have. Unfortunately, when I finally went off to college to do 3D computer animation, I learned that 3D modeling is nothing like drawing naked people. At the dawn of this millennium, it turned out that creating a 3D animation was very unpleasant - a bit like getting a root canal. I spent many long hours in a dark, sweltering computer animation lab, literally sleeping on the keyboard. The rule was that if you left your computer for more than five minutes, anyone could stop your rendering job and lay claim to the workstation. This experience - like any professionally executed root canal - gave me a lot of time to sit still and think. I concluded that I was wasting my time creating and animating virtual worlds when there was already a perfectly good world to animate all around me - I wanted to animate real things. This sentiment may not sound very silly right now, but expressing these feelings in 2001 was pretty much crazy-talk. By that point, all of the things we now take for granted, like, smart devices, open-source technology, hackerspaces, the maker movement, online sharing, and personal fabrication were not even blips on the collective radar. In fact, I did not even begin to know where to take my desire to "animate the real world." It was only by accident that I chanced upon the Parsons Design and Technology program at a college portfolio day while attempting to transfer colleges. The admissions representative asked me what I wanted to study. I told him animation. He told me they didn't exactly have that as a major. I - in turn - asked what they did have. He responded with Design and Technology. I asked him what that was. He mumbled something about building websites and robots. "Robots?" "Yes. Robots." I was sold. When I enrolled, the Parsons Design and Technology program was in its infancy as an undergraduate major, but existed for about six years prior as a graduate major. What made my educational experience unique was that albeit I was an undergrad, I was largely taking graduate classes with some really phenomenal professors and graduate students. I cannot emphasize enough how influential and formative it was for me to work side-by-side with brilliant, and highly motivated graduate students for three years. I went into the experience with the vague goal of "animating the real world" and left with the conceptual education, technical foundation, and confidence to do it. This rightfully panicked my mother. It was now 2005, and there still was not a clear career path for someone with a degree and talent for "animating the real world." She thought I was doomed. To be honest, I too was a little fuzzy on the big "what next?" question. Albeit, I was a little less concerned. I could not articulate what I intended to do with my education, but I began to sense there were opportunities available. By this time Make Magazine had come into existence, Instructables blipped onto the radar screen, and the Eyebeam OpenLab was churning away as an idea incubator. I sensed we were on the cusp of some fundamental change, but it was still looming a little too far off on the horizon to see it clearly. Having no real path yet laid out before me, I followed my girlfriend to the west coast. I figured that perhaps a change of scenery would be nice. I ended up living in her parent's basement in the middle of the coldest and foggiest part of San Francisco. While doing a series of odd jobs, I began posting projects on Instructables primarily to keep myself sane. There is something powerful about going from a lone weirdo making things in your girlfriend's parent's basement, to be amongst a community of weirdos all making things in their basements and garages. Suddenly, what I had been doing on my own did not seem quite as strange. I may have just been some guy in a basement, but I felt like I was part of something larger. Instructables became a website that I visited religiously. One day while lurking on the site, I noticed that they were not only local, but hiring interns. I immediately applied, and almost as quickly was invited in for an interview. When I went for the interview, I was foremost surprised by the unconventional nature of the work environment (to say the least), that everyone I met knew me as "USB Apple Guy," and everyone seemed genuinely interested to meet the "USB Apple Guy." It turned out this was less of an interview than an informal screening process. Before I knew it, I was part of the Instructables team, with a vague job, and loose instructions. Over the six years that followed, I held a number of positions within the company before landing squarely upon Technology Editor. Of all of the different jobs that I have done for Instructables, I would be lying if I were to say that Technology Editor is not my favorite. I now make a living "animating the real world," sharing this knowledge with the Instructables community, and inspiring others to do the same. Even though I would have never guessed life would bring me here, I am very glad that is has. I look forward to helping this community grow and prosper.

Topic by randofo    |  last reply


Fastest you have ever been.

I have a car, but no permit or license. One day, my brother told me to bring him something while he was at work. I was driving down the street going the speed limit or a little over and under. I turned onto the main road Speed limit, 50mph, and just went 50 or so the whole way. and when i got back onto the highway, this guy is following me to my bumper basically, so in the non passing zone just getting on i am going about 25mph, as you are getting on it is 35mph limit, as soon as it reaches 50mph, i jam the gas, it goes into passing gear and in no time i am doing 80mph. and on an S-curve still doing 80. On the stretch i am doing about 60mph, and decided i should just stick to the speed limit. Got a story? A Nice Morning Drive It was a fine morning in March 1982. The warm weather and clear sky gave promise of an early spring. Buzz had arisen early that morning, impatiently eaten breakfast and gone to the garage. Opening the door, he saw the sunshine bounce off the gleaming hood of his 15-year-old MGB roadster. After carefully checking the fluid levels, tire pressures and ignition wires, Buzz slid behind the wheel and cranked the engine, which immediately fired to life. He thought happily of the next few hours he would spend with the car, but his happiness was clouded - it was not as easy as it used to be. A dozen years ago things had begun changing. First there were a few modest safety and emission improvements required on new cars; gradually these became more comprehensive. The governmental requirements reached an adequate level, but they didn't stop; they continued and became more and more stringent. Now there were very few of the older models left, through natural deterioration and . . . other reasons. The MG was warmed up now and Buzz left the garage, hoping that this early in the morning there would be no trouble. He kept an eye on the instruments as he made his way down into the valley. The valley roads were no longer used very much: the small farms were all owned by doctors and the roads were somewhat narrow for the MSVs (Modern Safety Vehicles). The safety crusade had been well done at first. The few harebrained schemes were quickly ruled out and a sense of rationality developed. But in the late Seventies, with no major wars, cancer cured and social welfare straightened out, the politicians needed a new cause and once again they turned toward the automobile. The regulations concerning safety became tougher. Cars became larger, heavier, less efficient. They consumed gasoline so voraciously that the United States had had to become a major ally with the Arabian countries. The new cars were hard to stop or maneuver quickly, but they would save your life (usually) in a 50-mph crash. With 200 million cars on the road, however, few people ever drove that fast anymore. Buzz zipped quickly to the valley floor, dodging the frequent potholes which had developed from neglect of the seldom-used roads. The engine sounded spot-on and the entire car had a tight, good feeling about it. He negotiated several quick S-curves and reached 6000 in third gear before backing off for the next turn. He didn't worry about the police down here. No, not the cops . . . Despite the extent of the safety program, it was essentially a good idea. But unforeseen complications had arisen. People became accustomed to cars which went undamaged in 10-mph collisions. They gave even less thought than before to the possibility of being injured in a crash. As a result, they tended to worry less about clearances and rights-of-way, so that the accident rate went up a steady six percent every year. But the damages and injuries actually decreased, so the government was happy, the insurance industry was happy and most of the car owners were happy. Most of the car owners - the owners of the non-MSV cars - were kept busy dodging the less careful MSV drivers, and the result of this mismatch left very few of the older cars in existence. If they weren't crushed between two 6000-pound sleds on the highway they were quietly priced into the junkyard by the insurance peddlers. And worst of all, they became targets . . . Buzz was well into his act now, speeding through the twisting valley roads with all the skill he could muster, to the extent that he had forgotten his earlier worries. Where the road was unbroken he would power around the turns in well controlled oversteer, and where the sections were potholed he saw them as devious chicanes to be mastered. He left the ground briefly going over one of the old wooden bridges and later ascertained that the MG would still hit 110 on the long stretch between the old Hanlin and Grove farms. He was just beginning to wind down when he saw it, there in his mirror, a late-model MSV with hand-painted designs covering most of its body (one of the few modifications allowed on post-1980 cars). Buzz hoped it was a tourist or a wayward driver who got lost looking for a gas station. But now the MSV driver had spotted the MG, and with a whoosh of a well muffled, well cleansed exhaust he started the chase . . . It hadn't taken long for the less responsible element among drivers to discover that their new MSVs could inflict great damage on an older car and go unscathed themselves. As a result some drivers would go looking for the older cars in secluded areas, bounce them off the road or into a bridge abutment, and then speed off undamaged, relieved of whatever frustrations cause this kind of behavior. Police seldom patrolled these out-of-the-way places, their attentions being required more urgently elsewhere, and so it became a great sport for some drivers. Buzz wasn't too worried yet. This had happened a few times before, and unless the MSV driver was an exceptionally good one, the MG could be called upon to elude the other driver without too much difficulty. Yet something bothered him about this gaudy MSV in his mirror, but what was it? Planning carefully, Buzz let the other driver catch up to within a dozen yards or so, and then suddenly shot off down a road to the right. The MSV driver stood on his brakes, skidding 400 feet down the road, made a lumbering U-turn and set off once again after the roadster. The MG had gained a quarter mile in this manner and Buzz was thankful for the radial tires and front and rear anti-roll bars he had put on the car a few years back. He was flying along the twisting road, downshifting, cornering, accelerating and all the while planning his route ahead. He was confident that if he couldn't outrun the MSV then he could at least hold it off for another hour or more, at which time the MSV would be quite low on gas. But what was it that kept bothering him about the other car? They reached a straight section of the road and Buzz opened it up all the way and held it. The MSV was quite a way back but not so far that Buzz couldn't distinguish the tall antenna standing up from the back bumper. Antenna! Not police, but perhaps a Citizen's Band radio in the MSV? He quaked slightly and hoped it was not. The straight stretch was coming to an end now and Buzz put off braking to the last fraction of a second and then sped through a 75-mph right-hander, gaining ten more yards on the MSV. But less than a quarter mile ahead another huge MSV was slowly pulling across the road and to a stop. It was a CB set. The other driver had a cohort in the chase. Now Buzz was in trouble. He stayed on the gas until within a few hundred feet when he banked hard and feinted passing to the left. The MSV crawled in that direction and Buzz slipped by on the right, bouncing heavily over a stone on the shoulder. The two MSVs set off in hot pursuit, almost colliding in the process. Buzz turned right at the first crossroad and then made a quick left, hoping to be out of sight of his pursuers, and in fact he traveled several minutes before spotting one of them on the main road parallel to his lane. At the same time the other appeared in the mirror from around the last comer. By now they were beginning to climb the hills on the far side of the valley and Buzz pressed on for all he was worth, praying that the straining engine would stand up. He lost track of one MSV when the main road turned away, but could see the other one behind him on occasion. Climbing the old Monument Road, Buzz hoped to have time to get over the top and down the old dirt road to the right, which would be too narrow for his pursuers. Climbing, straining, the water temperature rising, using the entire road, flailing the shift lever back and forth from 3rd to 4th, not touching the brakes but scrubbing off the necessary speed in the corners, reaching the peak of the mountain where the lane to the old fire tower went off to the left . . . but coming up the other side of the hill was the second MSV he had lost track of! No time to get to his dirt road. He made a panicked turn left onto the fire tower road but spun on some loose gravel and struck a tree a glancing blow with his right fender. He came to a stop on the opposite side of the road. the engine stalled. Hurriedly he pushed the starter while the overheated engine slowly came back into life. He engaged 1st gear and sped off up the road, just as the first MSV turned the corner. Dazed though he was, Buzz had the advantage of a very narrow road lined on both sides with trees, and he made the most of it. The road twisted constantly and he stayed in 2nd with the engine between 5000 and 5500. The crash hadn't seemed to hurt anything and he was pulling away from the MSV. But to where? It hit him suddenly that the road dead-ended at the fire tower, no place to go but back . . . Still he pushed on and at the top of the hill drove quickly to the far end of the clearing, turned the MG around and waited. The first MSV came flying into the clearing and aimed itself at the sitting MG. Buzz grabbed reverse gear, backed up slightly to feint, stopped, and then backed up at full speed. The MSV, expecting the MG to change direction, veered the wrong way and slid to a stop up against a tree. Buzz was off again, down the fire tower road, and the undamaged MSV set off in pursuit. Buzz's predicament was unenviable. He was going full tilt down the twisting blacktop with a solid MSV coming up at him. and an equally solid MSV coming down after him. On he went, however, braking hard before each turn and then accelerating back up to 45 in between. Coming down to a particularly tight turn, he saw the MSV coming around it from the other direction and stood on the brakes. The sudden extreme pressure in the brake lines was too much for the rear brake line which had been twisted somewhat in his spin, and it broke, robbing Buzz of his brakes. In sheer desperation he pulled the handbrake as tightly as it would go and rammed the gear lever into 1st, popping the clutch as he did so. The back end locked solid and broke away, spinning him off the side of the road and miraculously into some bushes, which brought the car to a halt. As he was collecting his senses, Buzz saw the two MSVs, unable to stop in time, ram each other head on at over 40 mph. It was a long time before Buzz had the MG rebuilt to its original pristine condition of before the chase. It was an even longer time before he went back into the valley for a drive. Now it was only in the very early hours of the day when most people were still sleeping off the effects of the good life. And when he saw in the papers that the government would soon be requiring cars to be capable of withstanding 75-mph headon collisions, he stopped driving the MG altogether. Written by: Richard Foster

Topic by Yerboogieman    |  last reply


Repulsine - the great mystery...

Even before the repulsine saw some attention during WW2 there were sightings of what we know call the classic UFO shape.Be it in Austria, Poland or other places in Europe, people reported weird disk like thing with a dome flying around.What leaked in images and documents after the war shoed that the repulsine looked basically identical to what people saw as a UFO in the sky over big parts of Europe.Then again, the repulsine appearently never made it a usable stage, same for most jet fighters at the time and still they flew around...If we now just take it for granted that actual test flights really happened back then you might wonder why we did not see any after the war anymore.For most critics it is a simple sign of facts and "confirms" that the replusine might have been a nice idea but never anything that really left the ground.As said, I often like to dig deeper and in this case the digging took far more years than what I planned on.I can not provide any solid proof for the following but I am sure even a sceptic will come to similar conclusions after reading it.Try to find some "eye witness" reports from people who saw the so called "Roswell UFO".Yes the one that made Area51 so secret and famous...Reports can be boiled down to some essential features of the hull, for those who saw it proof that it is alien.Three distinct round shpes on the underside, like you add the bottom of an egg to a round disk.Said disc of the bottom was also shaped like a wing, or the flying disk toys our kids like to play with.On the other side the shape grew up like a half shphere with an added cone or round top on it.On these area they claimed to have see engine outlets or similar and appearently the top cone was spinning in another direction than the rest of the UFO.Now I am no expert for Roswell but if I leave area and time out then I could have been fooled to think these people discribed exactly the same thing people saw a few year eariel flying over Europe.The Roswell UFO was not from another world, just stolen from the looser of a really bad war.What was seen was a working Repulsine, be it an original or something the US created from the 5 prototypes that disappeared after the war.Ha, ha, good one, then why don't we saw them flying after this anymore?Well, for starters it was a testflight gone wrong.Presumable it was planned to be limited to Area51 but the pilot lost control.Considering the Nazies appearently did their best to kill everyone involved in the project before the aliies arrived it is no big surprise.What that test flight would have shown is the impossible manouvers people already witnessed over Europe.90° or more turns at full speed instead of making a turn like a plane, sudden changes in alitude as well as accelleration on a level that makes even modern rockets blush.And if it really was the first bigger testflight they did it explains the big secrecy about the Roswell incident and what followed and created Area51 as we knew it.A "weapon" capable of these things would mean total dominance and options to impove planes and more.So why did they not even do that - or did they?The repulsine was created based on what we call today fringe- or pseudo- sience.If there is only one peroson, or a few that can even understand the claimed working principles that it can't be science as we know it.So, lets take a look what things were already heavily used in the repulsine that "we" claim to have developed or discovered decades later.Coanda effect.When air travels over a surface then it will follow the surface.You can try this with paper strips and blowing on them as well as a stream of water and some shaped objects.Long known but never found any real use until the military picked it up.For example air inlets were then developed to utilise the coanda effect.Remember how a lot of them these days look like a ducted fan housing?The round and slightly conical shape of the inlet will actually act like an airfoil and provide lift - of pulls forward in the direction of the air flow direction of the engine.I supercars we use it to create more downforce and better aerodynamics.Venturi effect.Again a very old one but funny enough also a major factor to make a jet engine work.Tesla turbine.In the Repulsine the rotating copper disks acted like a huge Tesla turbine by using a similar effect.The space between the disks got smaller and smaller towards the outer perimiter.Due to the fast rotation the molecules were accelerated and this created a partial vacuum.We use these principles today for specail vacuum pumps but also in military applications.Harmonics.Without harmonics and resonance the Repulsine would have been impossible.And at a first glance it seems we never made any use from that bit of the machine.Then why do we design exhaust systems in such a way than already the extractors ensure a pump like action and controlled backflow?The sound a good exhaust makes is also based on using the harmonics created by the explosions in the cylinders and expanding gasses.We learned that it is far more efficient to use harmonics and resonance in an exhaust system from somehwere ;)Plasma.The repulsine was said to have emitted a bright glow during certain movements or speeds.To create plasma we need a lot of energy, not so much however if the plasma is a by-product anyways.We learned that a high enough voltage differencial in a vacuum can create a nice plasma arc.From there things like analog TV monitors were created.But we never made anything that creates plasma for any use in an atmosphere.Well, unless you start to check supersonic rocket engines and other things.The working principle is very, very close here in some applications like the ramjet.Vortex energy.Today we see all vortex energy stuff as a free energy scam or at best a waste of time.But from the inlet to the outlet the entire Repulsine utilised what we now know as vortex energy, vortex math and so on.The air is twisted and spun around so many times that it is hard to keep track - but it always happened in a harmonic and resonant fashion.In some way this is implepemented in very expensive cars to keep the ventilation system almost silent even at full power.If you ever take an expensive car apart you might wonder why the air system is not as smooth and straight as you would have expected to get this silence ;)There is more but the list would become too long ;)So, if the repulsine was really that great then why was it taken apart to only utilise fractions of it in other things?If you have something really great that combines a lot of things then no one would suspect if you "developed or discovered" some of it in other projects.And to give you a very bad comparison for the other way around:If you know how to combine a petrol engine with some long blades then you could fly!I know, we did that already but you get the point.I can give you a motor and blades but that would not mean you could build a plane or even helicopter!At that time and still today something like a Repulsine would upset the "balance of power".If claims are correct then the engines of the repulsine were only required to provide the enrgy for directional changes or speed but it flew on "free energy" as the main engine system.In lame words like a jumbo jet that only needs a small engine for the hydraulics and electricity...Another big problem is the replication even if you would have a complete and working model to disect.You see most parts were brazed or welded as screw or rivets would have been problematic in certain areas.Other parts like the Kudo horn like intake systems would even today pose a challenge if you want to replicate them 100% correct.And if your understanding of science and physics greatly differs from those who originally created the thing...If your understanding tells you a dice has 6 sides (we all know that) but in my understanding it would have 16 then you would never understand how my dice rolls ;)Bringing true free energy of any form into this world is only allowed if someone can still make good money from it.Just check solar cells and wind generators - we all can have them but our providers make sure they have enough of them as well ;)Will we ever see a fully working Repulsine again?Of course !Some people like old cars, some collect old planes or old machines and tools.A great project for people in the right trades is always to build thier own little steam engine.So to say as a reminder of how it all started.Same will happen with the Repulsine as the first really utilised free energy machine the world had.The war and killings were not what really scared the world.This happened and will happen over and over again to various extends.Really scary was once certain people realised what might happen if over there the war would end with a victory and people would have time to develop for peaceful things instead.Without the war or this idiot Hitler a peaceful war would have taken over the world by storm.Those making sure we know nothing else but paying for our fuel and energy would have lost their monoply.Times change though...We destroyed our world with our needs for fossil fuels and electricity.What is left we destroy by chopping it down, digging it out or just by building new estates on prime farm land.People are now more desperate then ever to find ways to reduce their energy bills or enviromental impact.Otherwise Google wouldn't make billions on all the fake free energy videos out there.But what would it take to recreate the Repulsine?The person able to come up with the understanding of at least attempting to build one again would need to have certain qualifications and titles.He or she would hold a Nodel price for completing some of our known laws of physics or for finding some of the still missing ones.It would be a quite hard to understand and like person too, maybe even highly autistic.The person would also have an addiction like need to complete things, add the missing bits.And of course a totallydifferent understanding on how nature and the universe work.David T. from England is such a person, or at least the closest mankind can offer so far.He can see math in his head as shapes and images.Complex math problems appear to him like developing landscapes in high detail.He even learned to speak icelandic fluently within 7 days!!Imagine such a person would develop an interest in the old pioneers like Schuberger, Newman, Tesla and so on?Where we normal people fail to see any relevance or connection a guy like David would be able to literally see how all these inventions and ideas connect.He would be able to SEE the math behind it!Knowing how something was supposed to work and combining what is known through patents, drawing, videos or reports would enable such a person to make conclusions.For example where we might just see a nice pattern when we throw a stone into an undsturbed lake such a person would also already know and see the corresponding math the created the waves and why they were created exactly like this.Assuming David has no real interest in such things, then is it possible others already try?Sadly yes and even worse they do it with kids.Learning methods that are different can bring great results.For example while we use a calculator for big numbers some kids attend really strict and performance based classes to do this with an ancient abacus!After years of hard and often painful training they are able to it with a small abacus that only has a single row of discs.Shortly after they graduate to a virtual abacus - they only twitch their fingers in the same motions they would use on the real thing, but the disks and rods are all just visualised in their heads.That however is all meant as an improvement and the kids do it because they want to and not because they are forced to.Like learning to be a chess champion before even being old enough to work...In china however we have a very selective education program.Kids are not just trained slightly different to our kids but also closely monitored on their progress.As soon as one stands out for some skill it is subject to examination.Being well above average here means it is an opportunity for the kid and the parents - on paper at least.We in the western world would see it as a viscious circle though.Over the years china developed not only a better understanding of how these special kids brains actuall do their things but also how to create tests for this purpose.What looks like impossible or nonsense to most kids will trigger a scecific response and understand in those that are special.We would create something that allows parents to know early on where the kid has really good skills and what activities should be promoted.In china though the parents receive a nicer flat or some additional income while kids are send to a far away school.Again we would refer to such a school more as a boot camp.Discipline is at least on military levels, same is the punishment system.In most cases families are not reunited for many years, phone or even video calls only happen in the rare times when western TV crews are allowed a sneak peak.I just say: If a kid would see the parents often enough then it would not only know what to talk about but also be happy to talk to them - this however you won't see.It is like they talk to some distant uncle or such.What is really scary though is how these kids are trained to see their purpose and how important it is to be the best in what they do.Imagine you lost your kid at an early age and the only thing you got over the year was letters from the government saying how well it is doing and that you can be proud of it.Then it graduates and you are not even allowed to be there on that day...After that the kid is gone for good, you get a new flat and your proud kid supports you with some nice extra income.You don't get to know where it is working, what it is doing or if it might just be attending some university.By any standards these graduated kids can be seen as a great number of genius young people.Math, music, languages, science, you name it and they will have the experts aged below 20 for it.But what do they do once school is finnished and life starts?So far no reporter or family was able to figure it out.Means they don't appear in some high profile company, they don't start a successful business or teach at any public or private school.I leave it up to your imagination where thausands of kids find secret employment once they graduated....If, at least in theory we could be able to understand all these old technologies then why don't we at least try?Everyone has a goal, some desire a happy family and nice house, other need fame or just money to be happy.With that comes greed.You might have a really nice car but that does not mean you would give to some neighbour for a trip.Even if it just a nice rose garden, you might not want to share the views with anyone.This is true on all levels and we created a term for it "Need to know basis".If you just operate a press in a factory then you don't need to know when or what the next job is that comes for your press.You will know when it arrives and can check the documents attached.You don't need to know that your council is expanding and it is only seen as a courtesy to let you know on some notice board or in the local newspaper.And even our government does the same.What we do from the first days of our new baby we do on all other levels in the same way.What the baby does not need to know we won't tell or show.But we provide all the littly anklebiter needs to develop and be happy.Changing nappies, feeding, proving comfort when sick or having a nightmare.Later we teach language and other skills like walking.It goes on as you know...Humanity as a whole is like a little kid as well.If we would know all the little, dirty secrets then we would riot and go mad.Things that are of no concern are nothing we need to worry about, so we don't get to know them either.Knowing how build the latest fighter jets is seen as a thing that would give a possible enemy an advantage.Makes a lot of sense to everyone as these things might have to protect us one day.The questions that remain are:If humainty is a child, then how old are we now or when do we graduate?If there is a collection of secret and old knowledge then who owns and controls it?What would it take to force the release of all the things people actually created for a better world and not to be locked away?As funny as it might sound but one answer to all these questions would be to do nice orund trip in your Repulsine.Fly over ever single country in this world.Let their guided missle and what not chase you and once enough show then how quickly you can make a 180° turn to get behind them.So called unimportant countries might ignore you and the people only enjoy a nice show.Those powerful enough will fear you and think it was "the other side" showing their superiority.Once done with your round they all will have to realise there is a new power that is at the helm now: Knowledge and understanding.No more secrets, a repulsine for everyone who wants the plans to build one.A new world would start.Ever thought about that when wondering why all these "Aliens" we see in their ships in our skies never land to say hello ? ;)Even if they would be Aliens and not just some human pilot in some experimental craft:Shouldn't this demonstration of absolute power and control without any violence tell us something?The Repulsine need to come back to life to end all this UFO nonsense and Alien theories out there.You hear the sounds, see the ligh show and impossible abilities.And suddenly most if not all UFO sightings would have a common factor again.Just because the Repulsine is claimed to be lost and that it never actually worked despite film evidence showing the opposite does not mean there is no one using the technology.A working Repulsine available to everyone would also kill the doubt on so many other old inventors and "fringe" scientists.Science and physics would need to be redifined as would be able to find a lot of missing links.I know there is not only a lot of people out there trying to get what they can about the Repulsine but also that there are others who try to prevent this.You have a really easy time getting permission examine some old and histrically important artefact from a museum than getting just a hands on approch for what remains of the Repulsine in various places.Not even decent 3D scans will be allowed.Anything like just getting a tiny pipe cam inside is rejected with the excuse it could cause damage.If the thing is a hoax and never worked then why would it be so important to never touch or move it? ;)I recently got word that two of the remaining Repulsine "artefacts" were examined by the same group of "scientists".This happened in the late 80's and said scientists were claimed to have had acces to a collection of spare parts for the original Repulsine that was lost after the war.A private collector was also mentioned who denied all access but what he had in a secure storage facility appearently disappeared shortly after his refusal.Putting all the dots and hints together it would mean that someone in the late 80's was able to get literally everything that is left of the project in his hands.Those who claimed to have seen these scientists working on the Repulsine leftovers claim they used top notch technology to do so, including 3D scanners - and those were basically imossible to get back then for any uni out there...The laptops used were said to use touchscreens and were connected to all sorts of equippment.And they did it in almost total silence, like a group who studied a performance many times and knew exactly what do when and where without the need of many words.Professional in examining something unknown all all possible levels.I was unable to get any information on these scientist or who they worked for.But if you are one of them and readin this then I would love to hear from you!

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply