Robot Dance

It's little known but robots were first invented by timid engineers who didn't want to dance at parties and also didn't want to seem socially inept. This is a video of a new breed of social robots created for companionship and dancing. This is also is why you should build this robot suit. LED robot suit

Topic by lamedust 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


how to make a robot suit with boxes?

I want to make a robot suit with cordboard boxes. i 'm not planning to use any metal stuff. i would also prefer it to look stylish without any curf parts. i am also not sure about the colour of the robot

Question by gajen 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


How to Build combat suit? What materials are needed for bulletproofing? Cheapest materials that can be used safely? Answered

I have some designs I'm mainly looking for recommendations and references for the materials needed. Also need some advice on kinetic energy replacement for high drops and jumps. Frame material needs to be light weight and strong. Outer armor will be interchangeable. Weapons are still in development more posted later. Also all metals must be nonferrous.

Question by DaVinciStein 7 years ago  |  last reply 25 days ago


Total robotics noob

I'm not sure if this is in the right section but I think this is the best place for it at the moment. So at the moment I'm still in the planning process but, I'm trying to get details worked out before I start work so all I have to do is start putting things together. I'm making this costume of one of my OCs for cons and costume contests. Anyways, the character's half robotic and I thought it'd be cool to make a few things interactive? Here's my character if you want to take a look at him -Okto. Sorry the image doesn't give a clear view and is pretty much toony. I haven't started drawing up the blue prints or his front and side view yet to where it'd actually be useful.  My thoughts are that the top section of his robotics on his head would have real moving gears. I was thinking about taking some watches apart to get the gears though the part I'm not sure about is making them move. I already have where I'd put the battery pack planned out but other than that I'm pretty much lost.What would be a good motor that you'd recommend? Also do you know of some good links to tutorials for programing? I've been struggling with it a bit and in addition to these bits I'm mentioning now I'm also thinking about giving him sound operated moving ears. My other part of my project functions on pretty much the same basic idea though I was also wondering about making the nob where it actually cranked. Maybe it could be used as the on and off switch for the gears or something. I'm not really sure about rigging it at all so any input would be appreciated. I'm trying to make the suit as genuine as possible as far as the steampunk aspects go for my Doctor Moreau style creature My last thing I'm trying to do that requires asking questions that's not in the picture is that the character has a binturong tail i.e. tail can work like an additional hand. I was wondering if it was possible I could rig it with servos where it could pick things up or hold things with the push of a button or something? Thanks for anything you can give me I greatly appreciate any help I can get.

Topic by VJCoon 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Robotics-related outreach activities?

Hey, So I'm the outreach coordinator for the robot team in my college. I was wondering if anyone here knows of any activities that can be done with kids ranging from kindergarten up through high school.  The two that I like are: 'Robotic Hand':  Building a 'robotic' hand using normal household materials. (probably best suited for elementary or middle schoolers) 'Intelligent Paper': Basically a more CS-themed attempt to demystify AI (probably better for middle or high schoolers) They don't necessarily need to be all-encompassing, any suggestions related to any part of robotics are welcome

Topic by killersquirel11 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Proposal for a Multitasking Robot

Greetings, I am a senior EE major at Polytechnic University. I spent most of my time working with robotics and electronics. I always wanted to enter one of these robots competitions but finding the time and funds was always the problem. Its really interesting that iRobot is deciding to sponser a few teams. After brainstorming I came up with a few robot ideas that I believed novel. Then I thought about it some more and came up with more ideas. Instead of narrowing them down I thought how great would it be if all of them could be made. That led me into designing an idea for an iRobot Butler that can do many tasks. The idea is to create a modular robot that has the ability to dock with its base station and perform multiple tasks with different specialized modules. The project I propose is to develop the modular autonomous docking system and several modular tools for the robot to utilize. These tools can be used for entertainment purposes or for human aid. Here are a few concepts 1) Mobile Music docking station and amplifier - You have a stereo system, great! Only down side is its always stationary so you have to blast it till the neighbors know the lyrics if you want to hear it everywhere in the house. With this kind of a docking station just come home plug it in and let the music follow you. 2) IRobot key fob (that thing that opens your car) - Why have robot if you can't command it when you need it. With a IRobot linked to some off the shelf electronics you could have it meet you in whatever room you are in. 3) Where's the remote? Who knows? But iRobot can help you out by using a embedded universal remote following the sony ir protocol. Just give iRobot a buzz and he could come in and change it to your liking. 4) Not so Clocky Alarm Clock - Clocky is a robotic alarm clock. It rolls off its nightstand, hides somewhere in the room and then starts to wake you by forcing you to find where it hid. With the modular IRobot when you go to sleep it can hook up with its Music docking station and do pretty much the same thing. 5) Life Alert System - Many of us have been hurt at times where we wished someone could come to our aid. If you are in a accident and unable to reach a phone, press on IRobot's key fob and him lock onto another tool which brings you a cordless phone module to call for aid. The Docking Station The docking station for the robotic butler could be tracked using the same method as the self charging station. In order to remove platforms or add them a servo would be placed on the iRobot which would lock or unlock the tray. To maintain electrical connection between the two trays an array of spring header pins could be used. There are many great robotic ideas out there for the iRobot however the expense for one robot to only do one thing is pretty great. In order to compensate for the overhead expenditure a multifunctional robot with inexpensive and optional tools is a possible solution to suit home needs. This way all of the design entries can be utilized. Regarding my qualifications, I taught for three years as a teaching assistant to a freshman engineering course. My most recent completed project is the development of a chemical model car experiment and an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle design project for freshman engineering. Both of these projects underwent a rigourous amount of work and will be shown at the American Society of Engineering Education 2007 conference.

Topic by cooblades 11 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


how to build a legit working ark reactor(like 20MW)?

Need to power robotic suit...

Question by AlbinoMoose308 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


[newsletter] Light Suits, LED Chess, Bioluminescent Algae...

June 26, 2008 Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup1","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); } Welcome back! The Robot Contest closes for entries in just a few days. Enter your robot now to win a trip to RoboGames 2009!Now that the summer has officially started we're celebrating with our BBQ PDQ Contest. Show us your tastiest food for the grill and win an Instructables apron! The Pocket Pal for Safe Travel by foxquarry The Invisible Face Mask! by aKaMaKaVeLy Bioluminescent Algae by ScaryBunnyMan Create Wall Art With Electrical Tape by lilybee Cheap Portable Bluescreen by themakeclass Turn Signal Biking Jacket by leahbuechley DIY Gary Fong Lightsphere by arturg Yip Yip Costume by sliny Build a 96-Volt Electric Motorcycle by Kentucky-bum Handy Tricks for the World Traveler by stasterisk LED Chess Set by Tetranitrate Mobile Computing on the Fringe by johnnyallenshaw Closes for entries onJuly 6th! Winners announcednext week Grill up something tasty! Extendable bed for an SUV or truck by galadriel How to get the best out of your travels by josh EL wire outfits by enlighted Guitar Tube Amp by gmoon Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup2","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); }

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago


Iron Man's Repulsors

How would you build iron mans repulsors? I have some already...     You could use a transducer for particle displacement, you might be able to send an ion beam through a "tunnel" of a heavier particle, since it can't travel fast in air. I need ideas! Thanks, Laserbeamtoast.

Topic by Laserbeamtoast 5 years ago  |  last reply 6 months ago


Transformational experience for Instructables Artist-in-Residence

Instructables' Artist-in-Residence Mario Caicedo-Langer is pretty hands-on. He can make a robot out of anything, but was intrigued by the 123D suite of apps. I asked him to document his experience here... http://blog.123dapp.com/2013/04/transformational-experience-for-instructables-artist-in-residence It's pretty cool - the next step is printing the robot in one print, while still having moveable joints.

Topic by andrewt 6 years ago


Gundam Helmet

I've already started working on my Halloween costume, which is a scaled down version of a giant Japanese fighting robot otherwise known as a Gundam Suit. I've finished everything except the helmet, which I am having serious trouble trying to build. The attached image is what I am trying to replicate. If anyone can post pictures or make an instructable and link me to it, it would be appreciated. Thank you! -Tomcat94

Topic by Tomcat94 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Crawlspace Buddy

A robot to navigate crawlspaces and show video. A boon to pest control or plumbing estimators. Rather than dry suiting and taking pictures (homeowners usually have at least three estimates), one could show live video of pipe leaks, festerring sewage, carpenter ants, termites, racoons or mice nesting. Perhaps the robot could carry a stun gun to drive out raccons. It has to be able to navigate the "wild" underside of homes or buildings and be waterproof. It could have an articulated arm to mount the camera and poke holes to search for termites.

Topic by gypsy_fly 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


What is the Source of Profound Intellect of Leonardo Da Vinci?

Leonardo Da Vinci is Have a Concept of Tanks,Hellicopter,Scuba suit, Airplane,Robot,And an Submarine! But all of this things is invented after! I think he has connection in Alliens or He had Timetravel! Pls. Before you Answer! Watch this video! Asker: Wareneutron(WN)

Question by Wareneutron 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


(newsletter) Gummi Bear Surgery, 5-Minute Ice Cream, Sleeping Bag Suit...

Sign-up for this newsletter: Welcome back! Mother's Day Contest - Sew something for Mom and win a sewing machine from Singer! Earthjustice United States of Efficiency Contest - Closes for entries on Sunday! You could win a MacBook Pro so enter now! The winners of the Klutz Rubber Band-Powered Contest have been announced. See who won! Become a fan of Instructables on Facebook. See contest updates, talk to other fans, and find out how the robot is feeling. Sleeping Bag Suit 5-Minute Ice Cream Hammered Leaf and Flower Prints Gummi Bear Surgery   Closes for entries this Sunday! Convert a Baby Swing from Batteries to AC Sourdough Bread Create Laser Art with a Digital Camera DIY Mineral Makeup Featured questions from our new Answers section: How do I monitor battery voltage and adjust engine idle with a servo? How do you get old t-shirts whiter?   Checkpoint Charlie Hat Green Solar Powered Water Barrel Carry Your Baby African Style Insulate Your Loft and Save the Planet     Sew something great for Mom and win a sewing machine!   Make Sunday special Drawdio! Homemade Solar Cell Broken Arm Lego Accessories Contactless Dynamo Powered Bike Lights Sign-up for this newsletter:

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Desk-top 3D printer - competition idea.

(I've mentioned this before, but in what seems to be a season of big making competitions, it seemed appropriate to mention it again.)Fab@Home is a scheme where people build their own 3D printer ("fabber") and print ... anything, made of.... anything - silicone, glue, frosting (icing). Their dream is to send fabbers into space on autonomous probes - they find somewhere interesting to investigate, they print a robot suited to the environment. If conditions change, print a different robot. Things get busy, print another printer! (Von Neuman, can you hear me?).Apparently one kid won a science fair by printing a map in chocolate!They have a wiki, including a page of ideas.Doesn't that strike you as a great project for Instructables?How about a competition - design something to be printed by a fabber, and win your design, printed by somebody's fabber.

Topic by Kiteman 11 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


A Dog's Dogbot

Dogs are great pets, I love them, but some people don't have the time to take care of a real dog so they buy a robotic one. There's a little bit of a disconnect between owning a living creature and a rechargable machine - but the desire is there.The sad thing is that we all have to go to school/work sometimes and so occasionally our dogs must fend for and entertain themselves, but what if there was a robotic YOU that could keep the dog company while you fulfill your obligations to society?A robotic dog companion could play chase, hide and seek, maybe feed the dog if you forget, train the dog using your own voice, throw a ball and if it was a Roomba it could even vacuum up the dog hair as it goes.You could even make a custom dog suit to outfit your iCreate with... and it be could pink - which is something you probably shouldn't do to your real dog.I'm having visions of coming home to an iCreate firmly entrenched in a happy set of canine teeth... haha... but then you could just have the iCreate say "Bad dog! Bad dog!"As I mentioned in my previous post, I'm getting really excited by all the ideas floating around in this contest and I want to thank iRobot for providing us the opportunity to build upon the amazing work they've done bringing robots to the masses. :)

Topic by althalinelife 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


nemomatic- Finalist

Nemomatic is a finalist in the Laser Cutter Challenge for:Giant Squid kinetic sculpture from found materialsThis is a forum post created by Instructables on behalf of the finalist. Help us judge the contest by rating this forum post! Check out all the finalists in the master list or in the Laser Cutter Finalists Group!It seems that many are interested what each finalist would do if they happened to win the Laser Cutter. In my case I would be very excited to produce small, limited edition mechanical sculptures. Everything that currently comes out of my studio is one of a kind, time consuming and expensive. While this may suit the incredibly scarce population of wealthy collectors, it leaves the rest of us in the lurch. I would like to bridge this gap with pieces that are equally fascinating and affordable. A whole army of little tin-toy style robots and monsters! Not to mention countless detailing and production aspects of my traditional work. Custom etched switch plate covers, precision cams, and on and on. If you would like to see examples of the design sense that I would apply to these little beasties, please visit my website.Thanks to you all for so many interesting entries. I now find myself using instructables like an encyclopedia whenever I encounter unknown territory in my studio. I hope my contribution was useful to some of you in the same way.

Topic by nemomatic 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


My gripe with the new I'ble classification system

Okay, so I know there is another conversation about this, but well I can't find it... so I'm going to give my 2 cts worth I know that recently the site has been re-vamped with a new Instructable submission classification, which, yeah okay I think has it's pro's and cons I'm personally abit infuriated with itbut well... I'm not going to just makea complaint and then not suggest a resolution Anyway... The single picture I'bles showcasing someones creation are a good idea (to an extent) but, I wonder if perhaps It's being advertised the wrong way? take for example This I'ble I think the posters sweets look brilliant, and I think that they may not know just how to do a step by step Instructable... but I have been noticing alot of pictures with very little write up etc... could we therefore in the welcome email that the Wonderful Robot sends link people to an I'ble emplaining how to post an I'ble, which includes a which classification suits what type of I'ble (If people at HQ are busy I don't mind helping) I don't know... I'm just finding it infuriating that there are alot of I'bles being created which don't include alot of content... Don't get me wrong I'm not saying thease people shouldn't post their creations... but I think we have to perhaps educate people as to how the system works... I dont know, it could perhaps be worth trialling it for three months or so, and if it makes no difference then bin the idea... but who knows, it maybe a step in the right direction?

Topic by Biggsy 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Computer science in schools - advice and arguments needed.

You may have heard that UK schools will be teaching Computer Science from September, instead of teaching ICT (= "how to use Microsoft products"). Most people will agree that this is a good thing, since the basics of Office can be grasped in an hour or so, and hardly need the current years of study. However, last year, whilst several thousand people qualified as ICT teachers, only 3 people qualified as Computer Science teachers.  Many existing ICT teachers only ended up as ICT teachers by chance.  That group includes me, but I am fairly sure that I will be asked to teach Computer Science next year. So, here's the thing:  I am not confident that those with a grasp on the purse-strings know enough to make an informed decision regarding the route to follow in September, investment-wise, and  I know I'm not. Possible routes that occur to me; The school teaches programming etc on PCs, using software to model the device being controlled by the programmes children write. The school invests in Arduino or Arduino clones, and forges closer links between the ICT and Technology departments to teach Computer Science through the medium of robotics. The school invests in Raspberry Pi, plus the required peripherals, and teaches programming of computers from the ground up. In all three cases, the existing ICT suits would remain as a resource for other departments to use. In 2 & 3, I would like to see the hardware being treated as a consumable, much like printer ink or wood. In all three cases, nobody currently employed has any skill in those areas and has no time to be formally trained in those areas, so would need to learn alongside the pupils. What do you think? Which of these routes should I encourage my school to go down?  Why? What other options are there?

Topic by Kiteman 7 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


(newsletter) Snow Globes, Skeeball, Improvised Gas Mask...

Dec 18, 2008 Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup1","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); } Welcome back! Get your tools ready for the biggest building competition of the year!The Craftsman Workshop of the Future Contest is open to any project that uses tools. Share your amazing ideas, and win $25,000 in Sears gift cards! Craftsman wants to see your workspace in the Workshop of the Future Contest: Show Your Space contest! Simply post pictures of your current space, or the space you wish you hand, and you're entered to win a weekly Craftsman tool prize! See who won this week! Help choose who wins the SANYO eneloop Battery Powered Contest by voting now! Homemade Holidays are here again! Sending some sweet custom gifts to friends and loved ones? Enter them in the Homemade Holidays: Holiday Gifts Contest and win some cool prizes! Decking the halls with some crafty creations? Enter them in the Homemade Holidays: Holiday Decorations Contest and win an awesome Dremel kit! See who won a prize in the Homemade Holidays: Holiday Card Contest! We've worked out a special deal for the Instructables community to get the Magnetic Sculpture Kit from the Maker Shed for 20% off until Dec. 19. After ordering, use this coupon code to get the discount: MAGNETIC Expandable Christmas Stocking by scoochmaroo Cardboard Cantilever Chair by wholman Imitation Alka Seltzer for Cheap by belsey 900,000 volt Van de Graaff Generator by nickademuss Any project that uses tools is eligible! All the best Christmas Instructables in one place! Garduino: Gardening + Arduino by liseman Make a cheap ice-skating rink by instructors GPS cup holder mount by botronics Hidden Christmas Tree Watering System by rickyspears Make a King Koopa Suit by Fylke Build a Heavy Duty Six-legged Robot! by rpantaleo Glass Whiteboard by johnpombrio Make Skeeball with Pizza Boxes and a PC by amonmillner Homemade Holidays Contests Share your gift ideas and win a Dremel kit Show off your crafty creations and win a Dremel kit! Bright Bike by theredproject Great Inexpensive Computer Desk by nickfarnell Light Bulb Snow Globes by itschrys Improvised Gas Mask by TimAnderson Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup2","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); }

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago


Ship of Theseus - Philosophy of Identity

This past saturday there was a show on TV about the advancements in the field of prosthetics and human augmentation. I only watched less than half of it - but the timing was interesting. I came across an article about the Ship of Theseus (from Greek Legend) and have been reading quite a bit about "identity" and similar topics. This is philosophy - so there's really no right answer, but I have found it very interesting to think about and thought I'd share and see what others think.The gist of the story: Say we were to preserve Theseus' ship. As parts deteriorated and rotted away, we replace them with new (better/stronger) parts. Eventually, we replace each part with a new one. The question now is - Is it still the same ship? I'm willing to bet most of you will say yes.Now lets say that instead of replacing the ships components with new ones - we take all of the parts from the warehouse (where the parts are being stored) and reconstruct the ship from these new/better parts. Which ship has the "identity" of Theseus' ship? This is an interesting question because I'm again willing to bet that the "first" ship mentioned is your answer. But why? The parts would have gone to the "first" ship if not into the "second" ship. Why should this be different?Third Case:We take Theseus' ship and we tear it completely down in dry dock. In its place, we reconstruct using new parts. Is it still Theseus' ship?Now lets look at a digital device - my laptop for instance. Let us say that I have an "identical" machine (spec wise) and I cut and paste each file from this hard disk to the "new" machine. Does this "new" machine take the "identity" of the "old?" Can we say this "new" laptop (ship) is in fact Theseus' laptop? Talking with my colleagues - their answer (unanimously) was no - it is not the same.So here is where I get to the human side of things... Biological process have our bodies continuously replicating cells. In about a year, roughly 90% of the cells in your body will die. But no worries - they are continuously replaced with new ones. So, does that mean we are a different person compared to 12 months ago (I've read this question from several sources)? How about amputees? Today, prosthetic limbs can allow them to do what many of us choose not to do - run marathons. Are they any less of what they were before? <-- I know that sounds "wrong" - put put "political correctness" aside (but by no means am I putting down the situation of an amputee).Again, I'm willing to bet many will say yes - we're the same person. One argument is that our memories make our "identity." Fair enough. Now lets entertain the future. We now have the technology to save your memories digitally. We can digitize the human brain preserving its intelligence and thinking ability. Just entertain this idea for a few minutes. So if my brain (and its memories) are now digital and I copy it to another vessel. Is it still me? Do "I" still have the same identity? I'd like to think yes, but what was your answer about copying a laptop's memory (was it no - they are not the same)? Why should my digitized memories be any different than that of a laptop's digitized memory?At this point, my colleagues were floored. They figured out where I was going a few sentences before I said it. That's what makes the topic so interesting (in my opinion).If anyone has ever heard of HAL-5 - you already know what a feat it is. HAL-5 (yes, that's a play off of a space odyssey) is a human exoskeleton designed to assist those whom otherwise would be unable to walk for long periods of time. The user can lift heavy weights (80kg - say a dishwasher) among other helpful tasks. How does it know to move? Sensors on the skin detect electrical impulses in the brain that tell the muscle to react. Those signals are processed and turned into mechanical motion. All of this happens before the muscles have time to move. That is, the machine is moving before you even do.So if we replace our bodies and even our nervous system with mechanical devices - what makes us the same person? AND, are we the same person if we can simply copy ourselves to a new body?So last point - and it's not even my own. One of my colleagues brought this to the table today (literally at the lunch table) :P We were talking about the advancements and the potential/reality of human augmentation. Then he says something that makes complete sense to me. He said that we are at the point where our brain is evolving at a rate faster than our human bodies are. Just give yourself a minute to contemplate and wrap your head around the potential of that statement. To a degree - we have already done this (just not internally). Why else would we fly in a plane or drive a car? Well, I for one sure can't fly or run at 70+mph.1. I apologize for the length.2. I'm curious of your thoughts -- if you have another aspect of this, please do post.3. Remember there is no "correct" answer, this is just philosophy.4. There will always be more question than answers on this subject (at least I think so).HAL-5: http://www.engadget.com/2006/10/29/hal-5-robotic-suit-ready-for-mass-production/HAL-5 (mountain climb): http://www.engadget.com/2006/08/08/hal-robot-suit-almost-summits-with-quadriplegic-man-in-tow/

Topic by trebuchet03 12 years ago  |  last reply 12 years ago


Robo-Goat Lives - At least I hope he Will

OK here goes. I work at zoo and I am a self taught geek, (mainly old school). I recently volunteered for a project mainly because I'm too stupid to know that it's not possible :~) Purpose of the program/project To - Engineer, Design and Build an Animatronic Robot Goat for: a Cheetah Conservation Fund in Kenya, Africa. This device will replicate a live goat in: size; appearance; movement; sound and smell (smell supplied by others), that can withstand the sever conditions of the desert, durable, possibly solar powered and easy to transport, setup and operate. Note: Up until this point real goats have been tried but they have not been too successful. They were either too stressed or they were stolen for by locals their meat. Objective(s): To lure Cheetahs into an area and enticement them into a cage trap with a simulated live goat (Robo-Goat), to provide a safe humane and ethical capture of wild cheetahs so that recently acquired state of the art GPS/Cellular tracking collars can be placed on them to help gather information to preserve this endangered animal. Analog Radio Tracking Collars have provided the only way to gather much of the information for many different wild animals. Radio Tracking style of the past has always been a difficult and time consuming endeavor, with old style tracking, large heavy radio collars that broadcast a ”beep” continuously, must be tracked with specialized hand-held radios and yagi antennas. All this to locate an animal being studied. Many times you would have to get close enough to disturb the animal just to find out where it is and then try to track it. Obviously not good “normal behavior” data gathering. The new GPS/Cellular systems track the animal in real time and send back data coordinates on the animals location, elevation, speed and direction as it travels. This GPS information is sent via cell towers, (yes they have them in Africa), to a computer that logs and graphs the movements. The research gathered through these efforts may provide the answers to saving these endangered animals. Project design/methods: #1. Establish parameters Record video & audio movements and sounds of normal & panicked goats Research and study movements and demonstrate what mechanical requirements will be necessary to replicate the minimum needed movements - [DONE]. {Raise and lower head; Look left and right; open/close mouth} Determine movement engine {I'm not sure here} {All of the movements are really axial in nature} {At first I was thinking motors but then there are end stops, control systems, ect. To deal with} {next I'm considering solenoids for the low energy requirements and simple full scale movements, except you cant control the speed} {But now I am becoming fixated on model airplane actuators for low weight, low noise and appendage like joints and accessories} {then I ran across "pager motors" and how they are small powerful and inexpensive some how I don't know where to begin} {can you tell this is all still up in the air?} Throw distance & Speed of movement - [DONE]. {Raise and lower head = 90 degrees of arc from base of neck = 5 seconds max} { Look left and right = 90 degrees of arc from left to right with return to normal center point half way = full movement l-r = 2 seconds max i hope} {open/close mouth = 45 degrees of arc from lower jaw = 1 second max} Repetition rate & pattern {random if possible} Determine audio requirements - [DONE]. {this is easy but requires playback trigger synchronized with mouth} The Cosmetics: Determine body and outer skin requirements – [Engineering]. {aluminum wire frame mesh} {foam sculpted head for low mass} {foam wrap suit for body & legs for low mass} {tyvek skin, airbrushed or penned for low mass} {stainless steel / nylon joints for low mass} DB level of normal and panicked goats - [DONE] {I have determined audio system requirements} Determine control system requirements {clueless at this point} Determine power requirements {I'm thinking deep cell marine battery and solar panels to retain charge autonomously} {amp hour rating for battery and solar charging circuit TBD after R&D; tests} {if solar is not feasible them battery exchange schedule TBD} #2 Acquire all electronic and mechanical parts #3 Create mechanicals Fabricate lightweight frame and skeleton structure. Assemble motion joints and motion engine Assemble and test motor functions Determine estimate of MTBF for spare parts, if any #4 Create & install sound system Edit custom audio media for both normal & panicked goats Utilize 12v Solid State Audio Playback Unit # 5 Create Control System #6 R&D; Testing Test charging and power circuit Final assembly #7 Final test Any help to provide suggestions to get me started on the type of engines would be great. tia

Topic by sharpfocus 8 years ago


Instructables Online Classes

What are Instructables Classes? Our new online classes are the latest addition to Instructables! We're launching with nine classes - 3D Printing, Glue, Hand Sewing, Knitting, Leatherworking, Pasta Making, Robots, Wearable Electronics, and Woodworking - and more will be added each quarter. These online classes get you making with fun, project-based lessons, one-on-one help with your questions, and complete material lists and downloadable project resources. Do I need to have prior experience to take a class? No, not at all! All of our classes start with the basics so beginners with no prior experience are the perfect students! However, even if you’ve already dabbled in any of the class topics, you will surely still learn a ton, because the lessons progress and become more difficult. Our instructors kept material and tool costs in mind while crafting the classes in an effort to keep them accessible to everyone. Most of the classes can be done on a budget in your garage, backyard or one-bedroom apartment! What if I have questions when I’m taking the class? We’re committed to providing you one-on-one help and feedback. If you have a question, please post it in the “Ask a Question” section of the class or on any lesson and we will get back to you in a timely manner. Feel free to add pictures of your specific problem or tool so we can help in the best way possible! What are the benefits of taking a class? We firmly believe that making is one of the very best ways to spend your free time. Our classes are no different! Each one is fun, informative, and inclusive, using a range of media from videos and GIFs to images and text to explain new skills. Each new skill is also tied to a project, so you can make things while you follow along. You’ll be getting your hands dirty with new projects that you’ll be able to show off to your friends and loved ones! And, if you have any questions, you’ll receive one-on-one support from your instructor. Why do I need to be a Premium member to take a class? Our classes are a premium feature. Our instructors have been working around the clock for months to create the best quality content that is engaging, fun and teaches you the essential skills to make your creative dreams a reality. Our Premium membership starts at just $2.95/month and gives you access to ALL current and future classes on all your devices, as well as the perks listed below. You can also purchase one class for a flat fee of $29.95. What are the benefits of being a Premium member? When you sign up for a Premium account, not only do you get access to all current and future classes on your desktop, tablet and mobile phone, you also get a whole other suite of Premium features. These perks include the ability to download any Instructable as a PDF (that’s over 200,000 projects with 100s added daily), no ads while viewing on any device, partner discounts from maker-friendly brands, and more! How do I complete a class? In order to successfully complete a class, we track your progress in three ways: Quiz questions Homework Class projects You’ll see prompts for these activities scattered throughout the lessons. Make sure to complete all of these checkpoints to successfully complete the class. If a lesson doesn’t have any of the three progress trackers, you will successfully complete the lesson simply by reading and viewing all of the content on the page. Can I suggest an idea for a class I want to take? Please do suggest any and all ideas for what you want to learn! We are taking suggestions for class ideas at the bottom of this page. We might just make your dream class a reality! How often will new classes be added? We will be adding new classes on a rolling basis and sending updates via our newsletter. Sign up here to hear about them first.

Topic by asergeeva 2 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


The worst time of my life

If three years ago somebody had told me that I would be at Maker Faire, using my cyborg arms, watching Arc Attack playing the “Doctor Who” theme, and meeting Adam Savage from “Mythbusters”, I would have said that person is crazy or is mocking me. But I was there. With Instructables. It was awesome when Adam Savage, in the middle of his conference, yelled to me “Hey man! Nice borg!!”. “OH MY GOD!” I thought, “ADAM SAVAGE FROM THE MYTHBUSTERS TOLD ME I MADE A NICE BORG!!” But, beyond Adam Savage, the giant robots, the fire and electricity shows, the beautiful steampunk women, the good energy, the delicious food and the pictures with Daleks; the most beautiful, shocking, awesome and magical moment of the Maker Faire 2013 was when I had just arrived at the Autodesk booth. I saw the giant map of DIYers from around the world, and I realized my picture and profile were representing Colombia and I was one of the three leading makers of South America. I was paralyzed remembering all this journey, from being a complete loser without a future to that point in time and space when I felt absolutely happy, calm, and at peace with myself. It was worth it to keep fighting, just for that sublime moment. I felt like a Rock Star. Not because I was, but because Instructables and Autodesk made me feel like one. ……………………………………… When people ask me “Why do you love Instructables?” my answers are always the same: because the site is awesome, has amazing projects and great contests with cool prizes; because Instructables is the only one who has supported my DIY activities, especially in my country (Colombia) where science and technology aren’t priorities, and so on. But I never gave the complete answer. And now, after these fantastic five months as Artist in Residence, I want to tell the truth: I love Instructables because they were with me in the worst time of my life. ……………………………………… In 2009, I lost my job as Security Analyst in an important Colombian company. I thought I could subsist thanks to my junk projects and creating my own business, but almost nobody was interested on buying recycled crafts (besides, I wasn’t as good then as I am today.) And the only interested people wanted my works for free. It was not enough for a living, so after a few months I started looking for a job. Due to its economic situation, Colombia has high rates of unemployment and it’s very hard to find a job, and there’s no government subsidy for unemployed workers (sorry Colombia! One day, I will talk about all your beautiful and fantastic things, because you have a lot. But not today). Besides, when you are a former military officer the only civilian jobs you can apply for are in security because nobody thinks you can be creative; and if you are, nobody takes you seriously. Every two weeks I had an interview. Every interview ended with just another “we will call you.” It’s time to confess something to the world: at the same time, I was diagnosed with mild Borderline Personality Disorder and depression. It’s not something that “SHAZAM! You are nuts!”. No. I knew from years ago there was something wrong about me, but just in that moment I found out what I have. Just in case you ask: no, this condition doesn’t make me a bad employee, and I’m very competent in my work. No, I’m not some kind of evil psycho. Just a little bit creepy sometimes, but I always try my best to be a good person. And no, I’m not trying to look like a “dark and bizarre, Tim Burton style” character just because I want to look interesting. It may work for an artist or a teenager, but not for somebody trying to get a job in the security business or a stable relationship. I didn’t have any health insurance; I didn’t have money for any treatment and, in case I could afford it, there is a social stigma about persons with some kind of mental disorder, and no company would be interested in hiring a security manager with that kind of problem. So, I had to keep it to myself. I didn’t even tell it to my family. And my girlfriend broke up with me. So, my life was “complete.” I was without a job, love and almost without my sanity. Almost all of my “friends” were gone. I was drowning in debts. I didn’t have money even for basic things. I had to return to my mother’s house. I lost every goal, every dream, and every hope. The situation was so desperate that I seriously thought about giving up. But only two things stopped me from doing that. One was Carolina, the only friend I had in that moment. The other thing was Instructables. ……………………………………… I found the site several months after because I was looking for simple robots ideas. Then, I saw Instructables has contests, and I entered my first project (the “SPD Exoskeleton”) for the 2009 Halloween Contest. A lot of people made awesome comments about my project, and I received my first prize: the “Photojojo!” book and a Robot T-Shirt. “What? I just post pictures of my project on an internet site and they give me free stuff? Interesting!” Then, I made another project, the “Valentine’s RoboGrinch”. I was a finalist in the 2010 Valentine’s Day Contest. People around the world commented about my ideas, and my projects started to become popular being featured in other sites and blogs around the planet. When I got the First Prize on the Dead Computer Contest, I gave to my mother the netbook I won. It was the only present I could afford to give her in a long time. In my darkest moments, when I thought about giving up, I remembered I had some project on Instructables I didn’t finish or publish, and then I keep fighting just one or two days more, because I didn’t want to leave it uncompleted. When I finished it, I endured one week more, just for knowing if it was successful in a contest. Sometimes I won. Sometimes I lost. When I could get some money, I used it for buying tools or materials for the projects, instead of food or paying debts. Because I started to think that every project, every idea I was making, every instructable I was writing, was my little legacy to humanity. Probably one day I will die, but at least in some part of the Internet, it would be a proof that I made something good, something that could be appreciated by anybody, and my life was not in vain. And I started to win more contests. It felt good, because I thought “I’m a loser, but this loser is kicking butts!” With so many fantastic authors, the competition got tougher, so I had to improve my skills (and my English. Instructables was the only opportunity I had to improve and practice this language.) I became very good at making stuff with plastic trash and limited resources! Besides, without knowing anything about me and my personal situation, even without being on the same country, the Instructables staff and community were (and are) very special and kind with me. They always made me feel respected and loved. Instructables was the only escape I had from my reality. This site has thousands of users and still they had the time to talk to me, to care for me, to make me feel like part of a bunch of friends! They were the only people that didn’t see me or treat me like a loser or somebody who needed to be pitied. They were the only ones that made me feel I wasn’t completely alone on this planet. All of this situation lasted one year and two months. Instructables kept me fighting almost all of that time. ……………………………………… Finally, in September of 2010, I got a job. It wasn’t the best (honestly, it was horrible!), but at least I was working. Four months later, I got a better job as security manager of a business center, enough to start paying debts. On October 2010, I went to the Colombian equivalent of Comic-Con, using the Cyborg suit I built for the Instructables’ Dead Computer Contest. Thanks to this, a beautiful woman found me out of the crowd, because she loves robots. She became my biggest fan and we shared a big love. I never thought I could find a love like that. She was the girlfriend I got thanks to Instructables! She was the inspiration of my “Cyborg Heart in a Can”. And I gave it to her. And then Instructables interviewed me as Featured Author. I would be the first Colombian to be a Featured Author! That was awesome! In total, I have won twelve Instructables contests and two challenges. Thanks to Instructables, people of all the world know about my cyborgs and my Roboplanters. (The funny thing is I’m still feeling like the black sheep of the family!) ……………………………………… It was 2012. After one and a half year of relationship, my girlfriend and I broke up, for good (our respective problems were stronger than our love.) Besides, I was stuck at work and I couldn’t study something art or robotics related because the restrictive schedule of my job. So, the depression was returning… I was lying on the couch watching “Doctor Who” when a phrase get stuck in my mind: “All of time and space. Everywhere and anywhere. Every star that ever was. Where do you want to start?” And then I realized that nothing was tying me to Colombia and I could apply to the Instructables Artist in Residence Program. I wanted to know, at least for a few months, how it was to be in the most awesome company in this world. So I quit my job, I sold most of my belongings, I packed my Dremel, my trench coat and my sonic screwdriver, I said goodbye to my family and I traveled to San Francisco on February 27th of 2013. I didn’t come for the “American Dream”. I came for the “Instructables Dream”! ……………………………………… What can I say? How can I describe the most fantastic experience of my life, using just a few words? How can I summarize five months of happiness, learnings, DIY and good energy, when every day was an amazing adventure? I felt, after 35 years of life, I finally arrived in the place I belong. I met the faces behind the site I love and admire. You know who they are (sorry for breaking the magic but, please! Update the Instructables Team page! A lot of awesome people are not there!) I’m trying to not mention specific persons, because I shared awesome experiences with each one of you. Every one of you taught me something, every one of you made me feel appreciated, every one of you does a fantastic job keeping this site working. And I want nobody feels excluded of this post (Sherry always fights for sending out prizes on time, silently. Why nobody says “Thanks Sherry?”) Because Instructables is more than servers and computers and projects and internet. Instructables is the people. From the beginning, Instructables and the Autodesk Consumer Group made me feel like one of the team, like part of something bigger than myself. The Pizza Thursdays, the Marvelous Mondays, the Build Days, the Design Nights, became magical events for me. But it wasn’t only Instructables and Autodesk. This beautiful city of San Francisco taught me real lessons about tolerance, respect and being yourself. It doesn’t matter if you are radically different to the other people. Just be a nice person, do your job and respect the others, and everyone will respect you. I had never touched a CAD software, because I didn’t see any possible use for it in my life. And I thought it was something so complicated that only engineers and designers could use that kind of program. But then I went from 0 to 123D Design! I learned the basics in just two days and I fell in love with this awesome program, and it’s free! (But, seriously guys, try to fix that problem with the crashes. Everyone in the lab knew that when I screamed, it was because the program had a crash and I hadn’t saved the progress). And later, I learned how to use a 3D printer, a machine beyond my wildest dreams! I remember the infinite sadness the first time I went to the amazing Pier 9 (new installations of Instructables and the Autodesk Consumer Group) and thought I could never try that fantastic technology; and the happiness when Noah told me I could stay two months more! You have all the best freaking hi-tech tools in this freaking world, and you don’t need to be a NASA scientist or a millionaire to use them! This place is waiting for people of all the world, to come with their ideas! (It doesn’t matter how crazy they are). 3D printers, laser cutters, a water jet, a bunch of expensive machines I still don’t know the names of, an awesome test kitchen, metal and wood shops, even a sewing area! And all available for the DIY community! But, more than being on Pier 9 because the fantastic machines, I loved to stay here because Instructables.  My life has good things and bad things, successes and failures. But being part of Instructables and sharing moments with all of you has been the most memorable experience of my whole existence! ……………………………………… I want to say something to my dear friends of Instructables and Autodesk: if one day, for some inexplicable reason, you feel like your work is meaningless, you don’t like it’s Monday or simply you forgot what this is all about, just remember something: you will never know exactly how many lives Instructables has touched: how many persons found their true calling thanks to the projects, and how many persons found a hobby that makes their life happier. How many couples fell in love thanks to the delicious recipes and romantic crafts, and how many parents shared precious moments with their sons building something. But now you will always know, at least, Instructables and Autodesk saved one life. My life! ……………………………………… I wish to finish my post with some “Doctor Who” quote. I love “Doctor Who”, because is all about being awesome and optimistic and keep smiling even in the worst situations or despite you are feeling absolutely sad and alone. And the series has a lot of badass and beautiful quotes! But now, when I have to start packing my bags, when I have to return to my hometown where I have to pretend I’m a “normal” person and try to get a “normal” job again, when I have to say goodbye to my coworkers (that are at the same time most of the only real friends I have had in my life), and to the greatest organization I have had the honor of being part (where for first time in life I felt truly appreciated, respected and loved, and happy because it was Monday and I could go to work in a company that is making of this world a better place); there’s one, and only one phrase that I got stuck on my head; the last words of David Tennant as the Tenth Doctor when, standing alone after saying goodbye to his loved ones (and to the most awesome time of his life), his final moment comes: “I don’t want to go.” Mario Caicedo Langer Former Artist in Residence. Instructables

Topic by M.C. Langer 5 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago