Sawdust as a medium for hydroponics? Answered

Actually I have 2 questions pertaining to hydroponics. First you should know that I have a passive hydroponic system functioning right now the container is partially submerged in a nutrient solution with holes in the bottom of the container. The medium I'm using right now is perlite to allow more oxygen and act like a wick. I do have a top layer of aquarium gravel to anchor the plant better. I've been thinking of trying to add more oxygen to the roots by using an air pump. I was going to insert the tube from the top (the dry section above the water) pointing down to the wet section to blow some air to the roots. Would this be an unnecessary addition if I continue to use perlite as a medium? My second question is the title, would sawdust work as a medium for hydroponics? I assume it would be able to act like a wick for a passive system my concern is would the roots get enough oxygen in sawdust? Also most mediums are inert sawdust wouldn't be, would that have a negative impact on my plant?

Question by thecoonskin 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Would Polyurethane resin & Oak saw dust make a durable, wood looking ring?

I am wanting to make my own wedding rings for a more unique & special ring.  I do not have the proper equipment to make the ones from wood shavings but I have experimented with resin rings before & I was wondering if I could apply that method with polyurethane resin and sawdust to get a durable ring?  I have the mold for my ring but don't want to go through the hassle of wasting money buying things that will not work.  If you have ever tried this please let me know how it turned out.  I want it to look like a real wooden ring and not cheap.

Question by RebeccaA55 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


What tools should I order from Lee Valley to get started in woodworking? ?

What tools should I order from Lee Valley to get started in woodworking? I have a jigsaw and a drill, I'm thinking more about chisels, planes etc... What would you buy if you were starting all over again? I

Question by dan_ce 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Hoover modification: Making the dust go directly into a big bin

In my collective woodworkshop, we have a lot of problems with sawdustOne person attached a vacuum cleaner to our tablesaw to suck up most of the dust, but the problem with that is that the hooverbags fill up too quickly.So I am trying to make it so that the sawdust will go directly into our sawdust bin after being sucked into the hoover.I want to cut off part of the bottom of the hoover and attach a coneshape making the dust fall into a bin. I also want to attach a cut up vaccum bag to the cone, to make less dust fly dirctly out of the exaust port.I have been reading up on hoovers, and I am worried that the suction will disappear if there is a great big hole, not allowing the "vacuum" in "vacuum cleaner" to happen.Update:Yup, you definitely need to not have a hole in the bottom of your hoover to create a vacuum. Now I want to try something with creating a direct way to the exaust port, so that the dust just flies out of there...HELPI haven't been able to find any modification like this, but please post some if you have.I am going to jump into this, but I would love some input and ideas.It's a Miele S311i, I can't find detailed manuals on the product... I'll be updating on my progressHope someone can help!

Question by Buildmeaboat 10 months ago  |  last reply 10 months ago


I am trying to cast a large "sawdust" object?

I am attempting to create large molds/casts of trash bags. the goal is to create a life-size trash bag made of sawdust. I'm not even sure where to begin. i'm not sure if i could create a mold of a bag somehow or if i could fill a bag and go from there. i know wood glue won't dry in a large mass, so i'm not sure what materials i should use. 

Question by ChristieS35 1 year ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Shop Vacuum Hose Adapters

The more I try and understand the nightmare that the shop vacuum hose and adapter issue has become, the more I have to believe Washington was involved in its design. There is apparently no more oversight of this industry than there was over Wall Street and the banks that led to the second great depression... Can someone tell me where a person can find a source that makes real problem solving adapters, and tells you the true inside and outside diameters of both ends instead of contributing to the confusion of this national mystery? Thanks

Topic by TerrifiedCitizen 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


How can I separate the silver 925 content from waste dust from a cutting project?

Ok, I cut sterling (.925) handles off knives sometimes.. the knives are stainless steel and the inside of the handle can be plaster, resin, sawdust..etc.  After using the larger silver part of the handle i have cut off, I still have a pile of silver/plaster/sawdust/resin dust that I really need to separate out the silver from.   Any ideas?

Question by sassquatch62 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago



I am looking for a way to "cast" wood.

Possibly mixing sawdust with a resin or something like that. There is a product that is called Arbowood that is like this but all natural. I want to be able to pour a "liquid wood" material into a mold. Any Ideas?

Question by ndelta 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Public access woodshops/classes in Boston area?

Are there any public-access woodshops in the greater Boston area? I'm thinking of something like The Sawdust Shop in Sunnyvale, or The Tech Shop in Menlo Park. I've tried searching Google, but all I found were workshops associated with colleges and universities, for students only.

Topic by kelseymh 10 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Coffee Ground briquettes, problem/question. PLEASE HELP!!? Answered

I have recently got into the idea of making my own briquettes for the fire. aswell as the possobility of even selling them! I have heard that you can use coffee grounds, mollases and wax to make them. but i was wondering if you could mix the used grounds with sawdust, add some water and then press them? The recipe for briquettes made from wax, mollases and coffee grounds: http://www.ehow.com/how_5846974_start-fire-coffee-ground-briguettes.html Please help, Thanks!

Question by DELETED_JoshM96 8 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Best tool to use to cut off silver-weighted knife handles?

Ok so I have a project from time to time.. I find sterling silver .925/1000 knives that have weighted handles.  Weighted means that the handle of the knife is a covering of silver surrounding a filler (ceramic, plaster, resin, sawdust) and the filler keeps the stainless steel blade in place.   I currently use a Dewalt bench grinder with a abrasive blade attached to slice open the silver handle and then I have to split it open and break out the filler. I have heard of a Diamand bladed tile saw.. I have no experience with one.. any suggestions?

Question by sassquatch62 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


How can I make a sensor that will turn off my dust collector when the bin is full?

I am installing a cyclone dust collector in my workshop, and I want to make a sensor that will determine when my dust bin is full so that the chips and dust won't overflow into the filters.  I'm thinking garage door sensors could be blocked by sawdust rising into the transparent flex hose between the cyclone and bin, but I'm not sure how they work.  I would use them to turn on a warning light and turn off the dust collector.  Any ideas?  I'm good with tinkering and basic electricity, but am stuck trying to figure this out.

Question by woodwringer 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Intricate wooden clocks you can make yourself

This crazy clock is one of several designs that Clayton Boyer makes and sells the plans for on his site. It may look pretty fiendish, but according to him: "As far as skill level required, I would suspect that if one has the tools necessary that skill is not as important as perseverance. When I started building these, I had almost no skill whatsoever, but that always develops after getting a little sawdust into your lungs. These are not difficult to build, but they do take some time." Anyone want to try making one of these? I'd love to hear some thoughts from others who have tried it. Link via boingboing

Topic by fungus amungus 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Share a photo of you in your happy (making) place!

I was in my garage the other night creating a big mess and a lot of noise, when I looked down and realized I was covered with sawdust and wood shavings. My immediate thought was, "This is my happy place!" . . . and I decided to snap a photo.  Got a photo of you in your happy (making) place? Whether you're surrounded by yards of fabric, hands covered in clay, whipping up something tasty, soldering iron in hand . . . we'd love to see some photos of you doing what you love--making stuff! I've got some pro memberships to give away, and maybe even a few robot t-shirts!  This is a standing offer. Share a comment and a photo below!

Topic by seamster 3 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


Any ideas for achieving a Bakelite appearance?

Hey guys. So I'm in love with Bakelite, but not with the price of the raw material. I also want to form my own projects with a Bakelite aesthetic and don't want to deal with shaping such a fragile material. My question is: does anybody know of a recipe for making Bakelite? I also don't have much in the way of workspace or tools, which I'm guessing makes the manufacture of real Bakelite rather difficult. Because of this I'm willing to settle for something that isn't Bakelite but has a similar appearance. Any ideas about how this can be achieved? I've thought of maybe adding sawdust, dye, and finely ground plastic into clear resin, but I'm not sure if that would really look like what I want. What do you guys think?

Question by rozmusway 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Wood molding casting

Need some ideas:I have an antique wooden chest of drawers. Most of the wooden molding around the top and bottom is long gone, BUT I do have two original sample pieces. They are a pretty intricate design and there is no way I'll find anything like them today. So I thought I'd make a mold and cast some to replace the missing wooden strips. I smeared up the thin wood strips with Vaseline and pressed them into plaster of parís. Well the mold turned out fine, but now I am struggling with what to use for a casting material. I tried plaster of parís, it was to fragile. I tried painters caulk, but it was too flexible and looked like heck. Thought about mixing sawdust and glue, but am pretty sure the texture will be wrong and grainy. It needs to be stain-able so I can make it look like it's wood and semi rigid so I can get it out of the mold. Any suggestions??

Question by john043 1 year ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Band saw part missing?

Need a little help here. This is a craftsman 10" band saw. The image is directly below the cutting surface. I suspect there is a part missing, maybe a guide or roller. Where the arrows are in the picture, there are holes as if a bar should go across to hold a roller. Can someone please confirm there's a part missing, tell me the name of the missing part and hopefully where I can order a new one? One day I was cutting, the blade broke. No big deal, right? I put a new blade on and continued working. It runs pretty well, but the blades pop off pretty easily. It gets very frustrating. Later, I found a wheel (about less than 1/2") in the sawdust. It could only have come from the bandsaw. I didn't find any other parts, but they could have been sucked up by the vacuum. Thanks for the help!

Question by BryceP5 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


Spontaneously-Combustible Flour?

Well, I know that if you put finely powdered stuff, like flour or sawdust, it has a chance that a spark will form and create a huge (and I am talking HUGE) fireball. Watch this video (those stupid kids): The above video amuses me: They state do not try this at home, but they apparently did. They obviously didn't know what they were doing, because if they had, they wouldn't have risked their friend (or at least severely burning him).Does anyone know the percentage chance that this will happen if, say, I took a cup of flour and use a shaker (or just a shaking motion) to spread it out into the air? If I wanted some flour to combust, would I be better off (not in health, in entertainment) to just use a match?Oh, and yeah, I am 13, but I am a bit more mature than other people I know that are my age. I'm glad they don't know about this site, because if they did, they would already be . (Seriously.)Thanks in advance!

Topic by Bran 11 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Chemicals people would want to make?

Basically I want to know what lab chemicals you want to make, if you know how to make any useful chemicals. please post, I am not responsible for and injury's, fatality's, or "bad things" of any sort that come from this thread, all things posted here are to assumed for informational purposes only.

Topic by mr.space 9 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Maker Faire 2009: Scott Landon Woodturning and Lasercutting

Wood-turner Scott Landon was hanging out in the shop building at Maker Faire. He's trained as a machinist, but now spends most of his time at the Sawdust Shop working wood on the lathe and experimenting with the ways he can use the shop's Epilog laser cutter to do new things with wood. He's come up with some pretty amazing stuff!Traditional veneer inlays are quite tricky, so he's been experimenting with using the laser cutter to etch the space for the inlay then testing different materials to fill the gap. Check the pictures below for examples using thread, laser-cut fabric, laser-cut paper, and polymer clay as inlay materials. These materials are more conformal than wood veneers, and can span the curved edges of a bowl nicely. For those interested in following up on his experiments, he swears by Gorilla Wood Glue as it apparently dries without cloudiness. We'll definitely be trying some of his ideas here at with our own Epilog laser! I bought one of his small laser-cut paper pendants (see the red piece below) to put up at Instructables as inspiration.

Topic by canida 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


E-book: Cooking Material. Could molecular gastronomy help discover new matter?

AN INGREDIENT IS A MATERIAL! Using this e-book "Cooking Material", starting from your own familiarity with cooking, you’ll find inspiration to create material from a recipe. Please watch the book trailer (if you don't see the video, please click on this link) Is it possible to make dough with sawdust instead of flour? Caramelize glass crystals like sugar? Freeze-dry a string of wool so it resembles spaghetti? Today, industry innovation has made it possible to transform traditional materials into diverse states. Liquid wood for furniture manufacture, textile spray for auto interiors, and metallic foam for experimental prosthetics are all examples of familiar materials that have been altered into new, more efficient forms. Are these “special” recipes edible? Not at all! What is their use, then? For one, disseminating the elementary knowledge of chemical-physical reactions taking place in different materials, while maybe you will discover a wall plaster or a jewelry clay or something else useful—and allow your imagination to move freely. Molecular gastronomy adds scientific knowledge to our traditional cooking savoir-faire. This science allows to explore matter through new eyes: so grab you mixer and get cooking, get experimenting! E-book: Cooking Material. Could molecular gastronomy help discover new matter? on iTunes Store or Amazon.

Topic by humier 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Can i use all-thread as an axle for pulleys and gears? Answered

I recently used all thread to make an axle for two casters and wheels so that i could adjust how loose or tight the sides of the caster rubbed on the wheels. i made the casters and my dad attached them to the pre-made base that he had made earlier, looking back i probably should have helped out and made an instructable along the way... anyways the method that i used to put the wheels onto the axle made me wonder if i could easily use the same method to put a pulley or a gear onto all thread. the idea is that i would simply put a nut, then a lock nut, then a washer, then the pulley, then a washer, then a lock nut, then a nut and i would tighten the holy bejeezer's out of it until it was firm and steady, the friction of the washer would transfer power through the lock nut to the all thread. would this work? even as a proof of concept? i want to avoid ordering anything off the internet so if anyone knows where to get actual pulley and gear axles here in upstate new york that would be beyond great! also as a side note, i'm thinking about using a hole drilled into a flat piece of steel or even some uber hard wood that's been sitting around collecting dust and sawdust to use as support for the axle, it'd act as a kind of bushing/bearing type deal. the idea is that i would keep it working by simply putting two nuts together on either side of the hole on the all thread and tighten them together until they locked.

Question by waldosan 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Multi-function, multi-materials workshops?

I'm on a small rural acreage. My shop situation is that I’ve got two separate, fairly compact spaces for working with wood (or general “handyman” repairs for the home) and for working with metal (cutting, welding, grinding, etc). My metal area is where I also often work with small-engine equipment. These spaces are located inconveniently, separated by nearly 100 feet! I think about how I might like to combine functions under one roof. So I’m posting to try to coax some of you people to show me how you may have done this. Or examples you've found on the internet (give URLs). Obviously, no one wants to get sawdust into an area where torch flames or electric-welding sparks could cause a hazard. And you wouldn’t want to get engine lubricants or solvents mixed up with wood projects. Discussion and description are fine, but I’d really like to see pictures or floor-plan diagrams if possible.  I need examples that represent modest investment, as I could probably only afford to build an enclosure of about 16x24 ft, with a bay door. ( Yes - could probably learn something from shops that are somewhat bigger than this.) In grandfather's day, farm shops were usually multi-purpose. You know, for "bench carpentry", and maintaining or servicing the truck or tractor, welding bailer components back together, etc. Often had a tablesaw, maybe a bandsaw - besides the hoist, welders, socket wrenches. I suppose sometimes a fire did occur in one shop or another, but probably not often.  I'd like to see some more modern versions, rather than just the "version" I have in terms of vague memories. Thanks.

Question by Joel_BC 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


From “garage” concept to multi-materials workshop: ideas, layouts?

The common concept of a “garage” (the ’man cave’ stereotype) is a place to work on cars and/or motorcycles. How could this be adapted to be a place, under a single roof, to work on small engines, and projects chiefly involving wood as the material, and ones made from steel and/or other metals? Situation: I’ve now got two separate and pretty compact spaces on my rural acreage for working with wood and for working with metal (including work with small-engine equipment). These spaces are located at inconvenient distance.  I’m wanting to conceptualize how I might combine functions under one roof. Needn’t be said: no one wants to get sawdust into the area where torch flames or electric-welding sparks could cause a hazard. And you wouldn’t want to get engine lubricants or solvents mixed up with wood projects, or near flames.  There are people who have done this combo successfully, but few available layout diagrams or photos on the internet - I’ve searched, a lot!  I need input, hopefully including some illustrations of examples.  I’ll only be able to afford a modest investment, possibly 16x24 ft building or a bit larger, with a bay door. (Part of what a bay door would facilitate would be taking welding processes just out of the shop, to work on outdoors during fair weather.) I know that just a few decades ago small-farm shops were often multi-purpose, and used for "bench carpentry", also for maintaining or servicing the truck or tractor, welding bailer components back together, etc. They often had a tablesaw and a bandsaw - besides the hoist, welders, cabinets of wrenches… certainly both a woodworking vice and a “bench vise” for metal. Can you help?  Thanks. (For you who think my question sounds familiar, sorry: I'm just trying again with a new subject line and rephrasing some of my explanation.)

Question by Joel_BC 2 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


How to order the correct ball bearings and threaded rod so that they will seat well and not be loose or have play?

I am trying to design, what will essentially be a very specific miter box / saw guide for a hand saw. Here is a product on the market that is almost exactly what I am trying to build. The only difference between what I need to build and this miter box, is that the miter box from that link cuts at a 90-degree angle to the workpiece being sawn, whereas I need to saw boards at angles much more acute than 90-degrees. There are commercially available adjustable miter-boxes, such as this one, that allow you to set whatever angle you need, and it will still guide the saw straight. However, they are made for cutting baseboards and molding, so the angle-range is only 90-degrees to ~40-degrees or so. I am cutting wooden boards for making, "scarf joints". So, I need to saw through 4" thick boards at an 11-17 degree angle. Where the above miter box saws perpendicular to the board it is sawing, the one that I am building, at 11-17 degrees, will be closer to cutting parallel. The housing, I think I can cobble together from angle aluminum and hardwood. However, I haven't bought ball bearings since I was a kid riding skateboards. I was hoping to take a threaded rod and push it through the hole in some bearings, then use some spacers and/or washers to space them apart, and secure the whole bearings/spacer/bearings sandwich with some washers and nuts. I do not live near a place that actually sells bearings much less carries bearing and threaded rod in the same store. Therefore, I cannot try it all out right there in the store. So I am going to have to order the bearings and the threaded rod off the internet. I need bearing where... Heavy load is not an issueHow fast they spin is also a non-issue.But that are...Shielded from the sawdust (do not have to watertight)Fit snuggly on a threaded rod and not rattle around. A loose guide-bearing isn't much of a guide, eh?Would one of you fine gentlemen help me by pointing to where I can buy 16-20 bearings, a threaded rod that will definitely fit them, and some .50 - .75" spacers (metal or nylon) that will also fit the bearings?

Question by Dolmetscher007 11 days ago  |  last reply 9 days ago