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Inbox | sent | trash from: sent fromfrank678 when: Nov 10, 2007. 2:04 AM subject: FROM;MR.FRANK ZIWOS. FROM;MR.FRANK ZIWOS. Tel:00225 08 21 78 50 COTE D IVOIRE, WEST AFRICA. Dear One, Permit me to inform you of my desire of going into long time relatioship and financial transaction for our mutual benefits. I am MR.FRANK ZIWOS and I inheritated an important sum from my late father who died in recent crisis in Cote d'Ivoire. I wish to request for your assistance in investing this sum in lucrative venture or manufacturing and real estate management in your country. I have FOUR million, five hundred thousand United State Dollars. USD($4.500,000)to invest in this transaction and I will require your assistance in receiving the fund in your account in your country. I will gladly give you some reasonable percent from the total sum for your assistance. Please it is important you contact me immediately on this email addressof: fziwos04@yahoo.com for more clearification on the next step for smooth conclusion. Awaiting your immediate response and God bless you. Thanks for your understanding Yours Sincerely, MR.FRANK ZIWOS. reply delete this is one of those scams people do. this guy sent it to me in my pm. let me know if you recieved this too.

Topic by DELETED_DELETED_kruser495    |  last reply


So, EMF blocking Stickers, Pendants or Death-Crystals? Answered

Uh, how to start with this one... Local health store started carrying the latest line of emf blocking stickers and pendants. At first I thought good grief, if people are that gullible as to not look into the science behind they perhaps deserve to have there money parted from them. Several weeks later though, a symposium was booked in the local convention hall. I was surprised to learn how many people actually went to this, and were indeed parted with a fair chunk of change. If you look into to it there are numerous if not hundreds of these anti-emf scams abound on the internet all claiming only theirs works... That alone would send my spidey senses tingling. I really don't want to get in to the science behind why this is a scam, and would appreciate answers from people who know what they are talking about rather then those have been duped. Moving on... I am afraid the owner of the health store is going to get slammed on this one eventually. Normally I would say the owner of the store has a good head on her shoulders with an excellent BS sensor. Not so much, this time around. Guess my question would be how to inform her of why its a scam with out her eyes rolling into the back of her head. "Had a friend go the symposium for kicks, "she has a doctorate in bio-engineering, health science and is pursing her latest degree in occupation health sciences." To her shock and delight it was simple for her to see through the scam, but she had to admit his did provide a technical sounding argument, mixing truth with techno babble, that perhaps someone with an understanding of only layman’s terms could be persuaded by. Oh, what to do...

Question by iminthebathroom    |  last reply



SCAM/SPAM EMAIL

I received an email from 'INSTRUCTABLES ROBOT' saying i had "1 new comment". I'm sure this is Bogus email. Did 'INSTRUCTABLES'(real site) send it to me, or is it really 'BOGUS'? Just askin'-and /or warning everyone of it. has anyone else received such a 'THANG' as this?

Topic by MEMJIM    |  last reply


Is this site a scam or is it good? Answered

The site  is: http://horizonnashville.com/ I just wanted to know because i sent them a song and they sent me some information and a contract. The email says: Congratulations! We are impressed with your song lyrics (BLANK) and I’m happy to tell you that we have accepted them to be set to music and Professionally Recorded! We have many credentials and accomplishments and we hope to add your song to our list. With sales, radio air-play, television, motion pictures and live performances a prolific songwriter can easily earn in excess of One Million Dollars! Please open and read the attached letter and contract. Our contract is for your benefit. It protects you as 100% owner of your words and provides that you receive all money that they may earn, in addition to, our "Cash Bonuses"! I look forward to a rewarding relationship. Respectfully, Ronnie James President, Horizon Music (615) 417-1945 www.horizonnashville.com The contract says:                                                                                      SONG RECORDING CONTRACT                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Date: May 25, 2011 Songwriter: Vincent Dolliole I would like for Horizon Music to produce a professional recording of my song listed below: (Blank)                                                                                                                                                     Horizon Music agrees: 1. To compose music for the Songwriter’s words and produce a professional song recording using five Nashville musicians and one Nashville singer. 2. To provide the Songwriter with two compact disc copies of the completed song within approximately three weeks from the date that their contribution is received in full for that song. 3. To submit the song to music industry professionals as Horizon Music deems appropriate. 4. To ensure that the songwriter is paid 100% of all money that may be earned by their words from sales, radio airplay, television, motion pictures, live performances and to pay $80,000.00 Cash Bonus for each song that reaches the Number One position and $20,000.00 Cash Bonus for each song that reaches the Top Ten position in the internationally recognized Billboard Magazine Chart. 5. To edit the Songwriter’s words only for phrasing and commercial time allotment and to protect them from plagiarism to the best of our ability.                                                                     Songwriter agrees: 1. To make a one-time contribution of $369.00 for the song listed above to be professionally recorded. 2. To make a partial payment of $_______________________ (minimum $123.00) and send the balance in payments that are convenient for my budget. I understand that I may use a personal check, money order or use my charge card below. 3. Please charge my: Name on Credit Card: ____________________________ Amount $_________________ Card Number: _______________________________________________ Expiration date: _______________ Check song style preference: ____ Country ____ Pop ____ Christian ____ Rhythm & Blues ____ Rock Print, sign and mail one copy of this contract with your contribution to: Horizon Music, P.O. Box 292006, Nashville, TN, 37229 If you do not have a printer, e-mail us your regular address and we will send you copies by regular mail. _____________________________________ _________________________________ Songwriter’s Signature Ronnie James, President

Question by VinceJDJ    |  last reply


BEEZID.COM...scam, or genius

Well, It's both. This is a new website that works like ebay, but all of the items are BRAND NEW and cost only pennies on the dollar. How the **** could this possibly work? Well the guy who made this website is probablly already a rich genius. Cars sold for a few hundred dollars, tv's for only $100, and brand new ipods for merely $50. Here's how it works. Items start at a penny and every bid brings it up another penny, but everybody that bids PAYS a dollar for their bid. so do the math. A car is sold for $500, which means 50,000 bids...so the guy gets $50,500 for a $20,000 car, but the winner only pays $500. This website is engenius for the creator, but be careful. You could be spending hundreds of dollars and never win anything...so keep in mind...all of the money has to come from somewhere. And in this case its coming from all the people who bid and lost the auction.

Topic by Electroinnovation    |  last reply


ebay laser pointer scam

Ebay is scamming people when they buy laser pointers. This video outlines the scamhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dmLfw3QzNqg

Topic by grannybasher    |  last reply


Virus Scan scam on instrucables!

For the past week or so, after clicking an instrucable or step within one, I am sometimes re-directed to one of those sites that claim you have a virus and should do their free scan.  It's getting really annoying as you can't easily leave these sites.  Has someone hacked the site? Update: On 12/31/09 my security software deleted a trojan after once again being re-directed to the Virus Scan site.

Topic by scooterkid92    |  last reply


an Humorous note on Email Scams

 Well I posted my motorbike on Craigslist, and I got this nice email from a chap in Canada: Hello, I'm James John, I hail from Canada in Ottawa city, I came across your advert and am Highly Interested in purchasing you (motorcycle) which you offer for sale at craigslist.com. I Due to the fact that its been a long time have been searching for it, Please Kindly get back to me as soon as possible with the necessary answers to the Question in mind. Are you the first owner? The present condition? Your final asking price? Why Do You want to sell It?  And I will also like you to send me Pictures to enable me to view what I intend to purchase and i will like you to know that my form of payment is through a Certified Check or USPS Money Order .. I await your urgent response so that we can Proceed further. Regards Jms =============================================================================== So uh, how many monkeys y'reckon the Great Scam Conspirists keep locked up to come up with these aye?

Topic by KentsOkay    |  last reply


Beware of the new Email scam!

Recently I noticed that one my Emails accounts got some unwanted attention.Both in the standard folder as well as in the provided spam folder I started to collect Emails.And I don't always mean from senders I knew or webistes I am registered with.My usual approach is to just delete what comes from unkown senders or has a suspicious feeling to it.So no winner got it all crap, no offers, no invitations...A few however seemd to originate from some well known "things on the web" - and some of them I am registered with and get ads, offers and such.Sadly that resulted in some Emails being looked at and then discarded anyways.I kept deleting those unwanted mails without opening them for a few days.They they magically changed ;)Websites I used and especially those that require login details appeared as senders.Nothing with any vital info in the preview but also no real activity from my end on those websites.Then I made some impulsive buys on Ebay :(On top of the usual Emails I also got some "reminders" and "seller offers" added.Never happened before and certainly not activated in my Ebay account as feature.And unlike real Emails from Ebay there was my account name missing.Instead a conviently placed and highlighted shortcut button to "You account login" was provided.Ok, fake, forwared to Ebays spam team and quickly confirmed as spam.Moved and only hours later I got more Emails with similar tempting offers as buttons to confirm something that requires me to login.And now from websites or services I actually logged in to this day.The wise donkey said: You have something on your computer that shouldn't be there!Reboot from a CD to have the hard drives checked for malware - negative captain :(Ok then must be something within Windows, time to use a system restor point for a few weeks ago.Again nope...So I used a different browser and quite few websites and services that require my login details.No new Emails... with those websites.Kept using this brwoser for a few days and only stuff I already had cam again a few times but overall far less spam mails.Used the standard browser for a few hours with some login requirements and within a day I had corresponding Emails for a few of them.Found several bad tracking cookies in my browser.Bad in terms of redirecting all visited IP addresses to some addresses I can't even find.Deleted all cookies as well as the browser history.Reboot...A closer look at those suspicious Emails revealed that some include a thing similar to the old single pixel tracker.If you open them and not otherwise prevented it will result in some webservice knowing you actually opened the Email.Together of course with your Email address.The headers were good fakes too so the real sender is properly disguised.Those bottons and links mostly went to websites my browser protection already knows and prevents.Some however did not.In a sandboxed browser I was able to get onto some more or less convincing copies or the originals websites login page.The addressbar always started with originals name but then had a lot of cryptic stuff added to it.Sandbox blocked all what would otherwise make it throughcame through but the browser was rendered useless in the sandbox after I "logged in".Did another check and confirmed that all links buttons and such on that "infected" website also cause the same browser crash.Only difference was that only WITH something typed into the login field the browser tried to establish a new outgoing connection before getting dusted.Conclusions:The malicious Email provides the IP address used.Most if not all links within such an Email end on malicious websites.Some, especially at the beginning don't!!Instead the links go to websites that use cookies and other stuff normal protection mechanisms overlook.Somewhere between opening the link and closing it or the browser a change is made.Either you get a popup windows looking like some advertisement or when you start your browser the next time you see some website added that was not there before.The spammer now know you actually bothered enough to follow at least of the faked links provided in the Emails.The added bonus tracker provides ongoing supplies of websites you visit.A lot still use things in the address bar that identify them as a login page, even if it just starting with HTTPS.Popular websites and services get faked copies on servers in the dark web or at least outside normal DNS services.Now the spammer adds more and more Emails faking things you login to when using a browser for it.Until now nothing too bad or irriversible happend.But get fooled and actually click on a link in one of the new spam mails and it might be over.In the "best outcome" you would be locked out of your browser and have to delete it in safe mode or attempt a manual removal of the hijacker.A bit worse is if your protection started to fail and instead of the hijacke you end up with something manipulating your system.Really bad would be if you end on faked login website, and safety fails until you are locked out from your own system.Don't know what Email you might get after that and what demands to fix your system...However it gets worse: Like the one before but when enter your credentials and hit the login button the website jumps to some random Youtube clip or Goole search page.In case you wonder: You just gave the spammer your personal login details for said webiste or service....Most "deadly" would be if you end on more than just one like that.Every single one give the spammer a new login that you might pay for or that includes even more senstive data.Having to format and re-install all sudden is a thing of far too late then.I do not know if there was an Email I clicked on first, an infected advertisement or even some leaked Email addresses including my own on the internet for sale.All I know for sure is that those tracking options in the malicious Emails correspond to tracking stuff in the browser.No virus, no real malware until you click on the wrong stuff.Anything to prevent this from happening?Whatever you do: Do not use anything that requires the internet! - Just kidding!! Relax...1: Never click on anything inside mails from sources you don't fully trust! If in doubt copy and paste the link into an editor and check if it identical to the real address! Usually you would find some random stuff after the dot of the address name where you would other wise see .COM or .COM.AU.2. In case you ended on some spam or fake looking website anyways you should delete the cookies and browser history. The history might not be required though.3. Best would of course be to only allow known and trusted cookies or to not use any that survive a restart of the browser.4. Very important! If you start to get those Email very shortly after using it to create an account for something on the web then please provide the website you registered at with that Email address !!!5. If you get faked Emails for things you are actually registered with then please consider to imform the admins or support of this website about it. You might not have clicked on it but some user there might if nobody places a warning ;)What if all went to a total failure?I assume why you made that backup of all vital data and kept it updated?Also how install your operating system, in my case Windows, again.A hijack is easy, a fully infected or even encrypted system not.

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


cheap evil ways manufactures scam you

Manufactures scam you all the time from smaller jars to plastic bolts please post some that you have found and post it here! if you find a solution do that too

Topic by BIGHAIRYDUDE    |  last reply


Redirect to Amazon gift card scam

Links in email from 2/18 are being redirected to the page attached

Topic by pjbuilds    |  last reply


Quantum physics

Wow I was looking for some info on quantum physics and stumbled on this *cough* nut job *cough* and check this out *cough*Scam! *cough*

Topic by iman    |  last reply


http://www.instructables.xyz/ phishing?

Http://www.instructables.xyz/ looks suspicious. Phishing. I ended up on that page via google. Someone wants to steal logins and passwords.

Topic by PawelR    |  last reply


Amazon $1000 gift card wtf!

Why am i getting a scam amazon pop up every time i open the intructables web site?

Question by Donutlou    |  last reply


Either NY Times is wrong or Esquire got scammed big time

The New York Times states that Esquire had to invest seed money (six figures according to a couple blogs) for E Ink to develop a battery thin enough for a magazine cover...I'm sure everyone who's already cracked one open can tell you, they are powered by standard CR2016 batteries, not some magic million dollar tech...dude, Esquire may have gotten PWNed big time.

Topic by gschoppe    |  last reply


Is there really a theory behind the hojo motor scam? Answered

I ran into it on line.  More truthfully, it ran into me.  I've never heard of it.  I do know it's a scam, you can't spend $100.00 at the hardware store and build a device that supplies 120 volts at 2oo amps to power a house.  The whole thing did pique my curiosity, just like a gasifier or hovercraft or flying lawnmower would.  The problem is that if you try to find just information on what the thing is all you get is page after page after page of scam sites or people trying to sell plans for some mythical device. The only thing I've been able to ferret out is that it's some kind of perpetual motion device that will power my whole neighborhood if I spend 9 hours building it.  I like to think none of my fellow humans are silly enough to believe that. Anyway, without trying to tell me you have one powering your house and an orphanage out of kindness or trying to sell me plans please explain the theory behind it.  Sorry if I sound grumpy, I've been battling scam sites trying to look legitimate for the last hour.

Question by AngryGuy70    |  last reply


Typo-Squatting (Misspelled Domain Name scams)

Here's a Very interesting article about of of the most common internet problem: Typo-SquattingTypo-squatting is the practice of creating domain names that are often misspelled names for bigger brands.For example: Runescape is a popular free MMORGP (Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game). There are sites which names are misspelled versions of Runescape. A few I encountered while playing:RuenscapeRunscapeRiunscapeThese misspelled sites are mainly used for either- online scams- pay by click ads - which feature popular search terms for the original site. The misspelled site gets payed every time someone clicks on one of those.- Spyware and AdwarePopular targets for this practice is google, apple, microsoft,For example, I will demonstrate the case of the iphone:from McAfee:By the end of 2007, at least 8,000 URLs using the word iphone will be registered, according to a well known domain expert. The most valuable iphone.com is owned by Apple itself, but when Steve Jobs announced the product early in 2007, Apple didn't own the iphone domain yet. One expert estimates that Apple paid at least $1 million to buy that piece of valuable Web real estate. Among the 8,000 registered URLs incorporating iphone are community fan sites, rumor and hack sites and, of course, scam sites. Freeappleiphonesnow dot com claims to offer free iPhones and variants that don't even exist (like the iPhone "shuffle" and "nano".) The URL is nothing more than a redirect to royalsweeps dot com . When we tested the site, we received debt consolidation offers, get rich quick solicitations, "free" cell phone prizes and other questionable e-mail. Many of the iphone-related domains are misspellings, or typos. Iohone dot com, for example, was registered on January 9, 2007, the day Apple officially announced the iPhone. In August 2007, the site consisted of pay-per-click ads for iPhone-related Web sites. Microsoft says that on an average day more than 2,000 domain names are registered that contain Microsoft trademark terms.According to the US Government Accounting Office, at least 8.65% of all domain names are registered with false or incomplete Whois information, a practice that makes domain squatting easier. More recently, in September 2007, the managers of the .eu top level domain suspended 10,000 domains registered by a Chinese woman who was accused of being a cyber-squatter. The first two Images are from the domains Freeappleiphonesnow and Iohone The other images are from microsoft dot cm and another website that results in 482 spammy emails a week. The last image is from McAfee

Topic by Keith-Kid    |  last reply


Some of the current Ebay and Paypal scams to be aware of

Recently the spam activities increased for my inbox and with that the amount of phishing Emails and direct scams.Today I will only focus on the big two: Paypal and Ebay.1. General Paypal scams and phishing mails....Most of these are really easy to spot.Genuine Emails coming from Paypal always address you with your full name!Scam or other bad Paypal Emails will use your Email address or just your first name.There is a problem with some users here, but I will go into these details a bit further down.In most cases the scammer will spoof areal looking Paypal Email or server address.This means in your Email client the sender appears as "Paypal" and not some cryptic server address you can find in the source code of the offending mail.The simple scams use links to malware or phishing sites - often trying to look like the original so be aware of this.2. The latest and for some hard to spot Paypal scam.You are more likely to become a target if the Email looks genuine enough to fool you to click on some link in it.A lot of users do a quick check with the mouse on some links offered and check in the bottom left corner for the link that appears.Sadly in the latest scam mails the scammer uses genuine graphics and links.In some case directly from the Paypal servers, like logos and backgrounds.Only one link is in there that will fool you.If the scam informs you about a payment you supposedly made than it will be the link directing you to your account to cancel the payment for a refund.If the scam mail is about a refund you got then it is the same link - the one making it easy for you to get to your account settings.In one scam mail I landed on a really good looking copy of Paypal's login portal.The address bar however did not contain the usual secure HTTPS and neither a genuine address going to paypal.Problems with these new scam mails happen if you follow the suggestions or free will for naming your Email account.If your Email is for example tommy19726@mymail.com then you will spot this quite easy in the scam mail when you are addressed as tommy19726 instead of Tommy Hilfinger.It seems to be a favour now to have a real looking Email, so Tommy might have used Tommy.Hilfinger@mymail.com.And then in the scam mail he would be addressed as "Tommy.Hilfinger" - only the DOT is then different to a real Paypal mail!!!If you have one of these Email addresses with no numbers and just your first and last name then pay specail attention when checking Paypal mails!!!3. The latest Ebay scam from China :(Lately I had to order quite a few things that I could only get through Ebay for a reasanable price.Shipping costs were the major problem with other sources as I don't see the point in paying much more for postage than for what I bought.Anyways, the scam goes like this:You order something with a value above about $50.You get the usual payment confirmation and a few days later a tracking number.Problem is that this tracking number won't get any updates at all.It usually only states "Shipping information received".This means someone in China requested a shippment but never actually lodge an item or had one picked up.You can't do anything through Ebay until the max delivery time is over.Trying to get a working tracking number from those seller only gives you excuses but nothing of use.In many cases the answer you get has no relation to your request!Once the last date to get the shippment is over the seller keeps stalling and asks you to wait a few days more.No attempt to explain that the tracking shows that nothing at all was sent on the way gets any useful answer.It is like talking to your digital assistent set to a language you don't speak.Once you start a claim through Ebay the case and refund is handled quite quickly.Does not mean you are left alone by the seller, especially if you did the right thing and left negative feedback.And no surprise, suddenly the seller is then even able to uderstand your language LOLBiggest thing is that these dodgy seller are adjusting quickly.Once you state in your responses that you will open a calim they usually "offer" a refund.Even if you clearly state you want the item and not the refund you will get a nice thank note back and then a refund that makes a claim impossible.You are left with no item and can wait another 3 or 4 weeks if you find trustworthy seller that is.Only chance is to open a "Item not received" claim right after the last due date.But even if Ebay agrees and provides you with a refund, as they have no interest to do more, you need be quick!The item in question will end in the hidden section of your purchase history.Only if enable to show your hidden items you can then select it to rate at least the transaction for a negative feedback.If you act quick enough you can even leave negative feedback in the usual way, but only through activating your hidden items.What can you do to stay secure?The easiest way for Paypal is to simply ignore all content in any Email you get that seems to be from Paypal!Whatever you do or feel you need to check: Go directly into your Paypal account through the app or with your browser but DO NOT use any links provided in any Email.If you think an Email is suspicious then just forward the Email to "spoof@paypal.com" - or .com.au for Australia, .de for Germany and so on.In case the Email is genuine you will get a corresponding response.If the Email is indeed fishy then Paypal will notify you to delete the Email in question.For Ebay the problem is not s easy - at least if you don't buy locally.From my end I can only state it is the Chinese sellers, Hong Kong and mainland.And a few years back the recommendation was not to buy from a seller with less than 95% of positive feedback.You can try it yourself and mess up one sale if you are private and see how badly your feedback goes down - just kidding, please don't try!!!With the introduction of "power Sellers" and Ebay stores however this guide was rendered totally useless.A power seller with 99.7% positive feedback can still literally have hundrets of negative feedback comments for the past few months.Quite often you see it spiked a month or 6 ago - a clear indicator the seller is going to new account and tries to make as much quick money as possible before Ebay closes him down for good.If in doubt you really need to check the negative feedback in detail before buying.Some really dodgy sellers make all sales "private".This not only removes the item from the feedback but also the sale price.Intended only for special uses, Ebay sees no need to stop this misuse.If you can't see detailed feedback for a seller then just don't trust the seller!If you see way too many negative feedback comments during the past 6 months then stay away!Click on other listing showing identical listing images and you can be almost certain that even if the seller name is different it will be the same scammer.You can usually confirm this by seeing a similar pile up of negative feedback with that seller.Why do I stress so much about Ebay scammers if you get a refund anyways?Interest...No really, I mean interest in getting it for the money in your account.Firstly, if you wasted about 100 bucks and waited a few weeks for finally getting a refund, then you were out of pocket twice.Once by paying for something you never got and then again for the money you lost in interest.Sure on your end only a few cents worth...But see it from the other side:Have just hundred transactions of $50 going into your Paypal account where you never actually bother to send anything.Add a longer than usual shipping time and make it free.Means you have $5000 in your account collecting interest rates for 4 to 6 weeks.Do it on an even bigger scale and you can invest 10.000 or more on a regular base.With up to 10% of interest on foreign currency Chinese banks are only too happy to take it.Or did you never wonder why an item sold in Greece needs to be paid for in US Dollar, UK Pound or Canadian Dollar? ;)A good Ebay scammer can make over $25.000US in interest rate payouts this way before Ebay even decides to limit or monitor his sales.And once Ebay or the feedback rating goes to negative on him it continues on another account with the same items and availbilities.Quite often you can find a seller has let's say 5 items sold and 12 still available.Isn't it then funny and of course pure coincidence that another seller has the same, hard to find item, with the exact same 5 items sold and 12 available?Ebay has no interest to actually stopping this in any way, Paypal also prefers to look away if the same account is used for multiple Ebay accounts.Not even the need to provide the Paypal details of the seller in plain english is a requirement anymore.You need to use a translator to figure out what "company" is behind the Paypal account and it never matches the Ebay account in any way....I did some checks on the few suspicious sellers that still had at least item prices listed with their negative feedback.There are some out there having a vlue of well over $12.000US in "not received" claims over the last 12 months.About a year ago I tried to start a little (ad sponsored) reporting service online.Scammed Ebay users were asked to provide the details about the item, Paypal address of the seller and the amount/time until refunded.Within 3 days of going online and with only having two users that reported a scammer my provider gave me a shut down notice - effective immediately.A few days later I got an Email stating my website was shut after both Ebay and Paypal stated I would violate their privacy terms and break US law.Needless to say this notice also included a note informing me that if I attempt to conitnue to provide such service I will be taken to court for legal action.So what was the fuzz all about you might wonder?It was planned that users can provide the required data, without this data actually showing up anywhere.Once the databse was full enough a user could enter a seller or shop name or even a Paypal account to have it checked for negative things.You either get "unknown" or a list that states when and how many users reported this seller.With no deatils about any transactions, item numbers or user names linked.Did I mention how supportive Ebay and Paypal were when I contacted them about the take down notice? ROFLRules and regulations...I pointed these flaws out to Ebay and Paypal more times than I can count over the past 3 or four years.But as always, money is all that matters and those scammers won't be stopped.If you get a refund then the seller will be punished by more than your feedback, only if the Paypal account he used was unable to provide the required funds.In the rare case the Paypal account disappears with the seller you will notice the refund comes from Ebay or Paypal but not from the seller's account.This is the only real buyer protection Ebay has on offer.The rest is just following the pressure of local laws, especially in terms of refund and warranties.Does not mean though a warranty for an Ebay item will be honored by a company....If you start selling on Ebay then one big requirement is to have a validated Paypal account.Also a real physical address - although this is only too often just taken as granted once you had a delivery to your nominated address.Either way you Paypal account's address and name must match what you used for Ebay.Means if things go really south both Ebay and Payl will have enough details to surrender you to the local law.In China however things are different, starting with space.An export business is highly subsidised as it brings in foreign currency.So you can just hire a dummy letter box in some office building for company purposes.All mail however will be directed to whatever real address you specified for your "company".Same for actual company grounds.A n awful lot of producing factories/companies over there get additional support by the government for supporting small export businesses.That means you, as a little Chinese Ebay power seller forward your orders to whatever factory produces or stores these thing in huge amounts.This company then does all the shipping for you.Becomes really clear once you try to figure out from where you Ebay shippment really came.There won't be any Ebay seller name on the address, same for whatever you found in the Paypal invoice.The guy can just sit in his lounge room and never actually touches any shippment at all.In mayn cases those sellers have good discounts and since small items ship for free out of China, no one complains about the extra work.Both Ebay and Paypal are well aware of those loop holes in China!But as with multiple accounts they look away and prefer not to act as long as the money keeps flowing.

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


Ripped off by Hearst Mazines(SCAM company)

I'm wondering if anyone here has ever subscribed to magazines such as Popular Magazines. Four months ago I subscribed through Hearst Magazines paid by credit card, thinking Popular Magazines is a pretty well recognised magazines. First two months I could put up with thinking there might be some error. Writing to the people in Hearst Magazine only resulted in auto-reply messages. Third month there was one reply with a case i.d.  At first I thought I was getting somewhere. Still, nothing happened. I wrote to them again showing some frustration, I asked whether I will be getting my first issue this November or next November. The reply was: "Thank you for contacting Popular Mechanics. We have extended your subscription so it will continue through the November 2011 issue. Thank you, Popular Mechanics Andrew   Customer's email address: aoandy@yahoo.com Case id: 12214311 " What does that mean? I have written to Consumer Protection. I doubt any action will come soon enough. But I am writing here as a warning to anyone and everyone to beware of this scamming organisation. If you feel the need to rid the world of such people, I encourage you to spread this message. Thank you all. We have received your subscription order. ORDER SUMMARY: Date: 2010-09-06 Term: 36 Issues Amount: $61.00 Ordered by: SF Lin Delivery Address:    S-F Lin     67Soi 57 Lardphrao Rd.    B********,*********** This is an auto-generated email, please do not reply. If any information is incorrect, or if you need to contact customer service for any reason, we ask that you wait at least one week for your order to be processed and your information to appear in our system. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery of first issue. Popular Mechanics is a publication of Hearst Magazines Division, Hearst Communications, Inc. ©2010 Hearst Email Privacy • 300 W. 57th Street • New York, NY 10019 Customer Service | Privacy Policy | Give Popular Mechanics as a Gift | Other Magazine Subscriptions  

Topic by macmundi    |  last reply


"Unemployed Mom's Tip on Teeth Whitening" - TOTAL SCAM !

  The ad for supposed free trial offer of the two teeth whitening products by the so-called unemployed mom is a total scam & rip-off !  Not only will you be charged unauthorized from them but, also by other companies who are given your financial information. I am working with my bank right now after closing my account to get money back if possible.  Do not trust any of those lying criminals! Steve

Topic by oedius    |  last reply


Be aware of the new LED light-door knocking scam!

It might just be a local thing for now here in AU but history shows a good scam often is picked up globally...The topic of the scam is a FREE upgrade of your old incandescent lights to modern and cost efficient LED lights.Down here we have these government sponsored and energy related initiatives for home owners and landlords on a more or less regular base.Sometimes it is solar cells, then solar hot water systems or better insulation, now we again have LED lights as last time not everyone took the offer.The offical way to benefit is to apply for it, usually a quick online process.After that a certified guy or girl makes an appointment and replaces the number of lights you specified.But to address more people and get around landlords door knockers are also used.These offcial guys provide you with some flyers highlighting the program, details about the process and so on.And if you are interested sign you up on a list for your replacement.It means you don't sign anything, you just confirm your ID and end on a list.A a week or two later you see a bunch of students running with little ladders and boxes of lightbulbs knocking on doors.So far so good and sometimes you even get older people replacing the bulbs for free.You can quite easy identify the official guys down here as the display ID tags with picture and those tags not just look professional but also contain all vital info and signs that correspond to the official government initiative.The scammers jumping on the money train however show a slightly different approach.Usually students with good language and promotional skills come in a nice dress and knock on your door.They come with a more less well made copy of the government flyer, usually not in the right format and not on nice, glossy paper.They also usually only show you a badge after you ask then to but won't follow the official code and have it displayed on the dress.Said badge, in my case, was of bad quality and was just an ink jet print laminated in bulk and cut straight, not even with the standard rounded edges...I played along anyway and showed interest, so I was asked if it is ok to have a quick look to check how many lights are required.Keep in mind here that the official guys won't need that info - they take this info by the actual amount of lights the students replace later on!I told the guy I only need 6 lights as the rest was already replaced by myself.Needless to say he insisted stating that he needs to confrim the amount as a requirement for the free replacment because the installer needs to know how many light are required...You would expect now to see someone walking through your house with the head tilted to the ceiling....2 minutes, maybe three...It took almost 10 minutes, for each light he filled a bit out on his form.Like lvining room, 3 lights, ladder required, toilet, one light, cover needs to be removed.....This time was used to get an impression of what is visibly available in the rooms...Once done the nice guy wanted me to sign his now filled out form and asked for my name so he can put it in the form.Don't know why I felt this urgent need but I asked nicely if I could actually have a quick read of the form before I sign.Reluctantly he agreed and handed my the form.What I spotted right away was that it was two pages that were not connected in any way, like with a stapler, not numbered either.The first page had all the details of my lights and requirements plus some not really clear looking government inignias.Like what you would end up with if you embed in a word document from a web page.Low quality instead of coming from a proper and official print shop.Page two then only needed my name, address and signature under the long list of fineprints.I did not even have to read it all to know it indeed is a bdly made scam.The FREE LED lights are still free, but each one comes with an installation fee of $35.This fee covers checking the fittings and light switches and if required their replacement at the costs of the occupant plus of course the disposal of the old lights.The offcial cooling off period for this type of contract is honored though.Well, that is until you read it all and double check the first page.14 days are granted for this officially and in the contract I was supposed to sign.With the exception that I automatically agree to have the replacement done at the convinience of the installer.Also added was a clause that states the contract is binding and the payment is required within 7 days once the lights are replaced.Page 1 though already had next Friday listed for the replacements of my lights....Means my cooling off period is reduced to 7 days....To cancel the contract I would have to send it in writing and with confirmation.And the arrival needs to be confirmed at least 48 hours prior to the installation date so the installer can shedule accordingly.Basically means I have to send this cancellation letter the same day I sign the contract to have any chance at all to avoid paying at least $35 per LED light.Needless to say I refused to provide my name and did not sign despite all well meant attempts to convince me otherwise.And although I can neither deny nor confirm to have made a specific phone call, some cop car picked the guy up shortly after when he was knocking on another door further down the street...Be aware if some really nice guy or girl offers you a FREE service after you opened your door!Be suspicious if they "require" entry to confirm or check certain things!It is quite possible this requirement is only to check for valuables!Do the smart thing and take what they offer in paperwork and ask them to come back a few days later so you can have a good read.Don't let them pressure you in any way!!!If it is a free service then you don't need to rush things and any official door knocker will be happy to give you the parperwork and tell you if you want to have it done you can simple use the details on the info material and register yourself online.And if you go that route you will see an official government portal for it.Even if a scammer goes as far as creating a website for the scam it won't provide you any of the standards you expect from your government.If you really decide to sign something on the spot or to provide personal details then at least read all the fineprints and everything else on all the documents!That means unless you know legal talk that you should have someone check it for you!

Topic by Downunder35m  


Complaints

Here is a topic where people can post complaints about instructables. Pleasedo not be negative but instead make the complaints constructive and cite what you would like to see changed.

Topic by lding    |  last reply


Scammer On Instructables!

Beware of this scammer on instructables. Going by the username of 'soukayna', they will have no profile picture. Clicking on their profile will show that they claim to be a 24 year old female. They'll send you a message via orangeboard or PM reading thus: "Nice To Meet You My name is Favor, i saw your profile and it drew my attention to write to you. I would like you to communicate me through my e-mail address (favormadi@hotmail.com)so that we can get to know more about each other more and also to exchange our pictures. I am waiting to her from you. until then continue to be blessed. Favor" A quick google search on the alleged "Favor Madi" revealed that they've posted this scam on several websites. The best thing you can do is immediately delete their comment. If anyone knows a way of reporting them to the instructables site, please do so. It's dissapointing to me that the first comment on my orangeboard was a scam.

Topic by Chikpeas Brother    |  last reply


Need a partner for Peltier type project to chill liquid. Medical Device. Cash Compensation

Need a partner for Peltier type project to chill liquid. Possible prototype for a Medical Device. Cash Compensation. I am in Toronto. Not a scam.

Topic by dnicol1    |  last reply


Why don't superchargers and turbochargers break the laws of physics and HHO generators do? Answered

I saw an article today on how HHO generators are just a scam.  There are of course many scams associated with it, but I have yet to test the whole thing myself so I have yet to form a solid opinion on the whole thing.  One of the biggest arguments is that based on the laws of thermodynamics, the same energy is required to split the water as is released when they recombine.  This is true, but couldn't there be other benefits to the whole thing which are being ignored.  If that statement was true wouldn't eco-boost engines be a scam.  The turbocharger can't just create energy can it.  The exhaust which spins up the turbo causes back pressure on the engine right. Then there are friction and slip as well.  It seems very lossy right, but it works. It isn't a scam.  The same goes for a supercharger, the same energy of the added compressed air is taken from the engines drive train.  Now I understand that the compressed air causes a better burn similar to mixing KNO3 with sugar vs just burning it in plain air.  But what if you mix gunpowder and sugar, why is that any different.  I feel like this analogy accurately displays what is going on in both cases, and I feel like there could be an argument for the benefits of HHO. Again I have no experience in the subject yet, but it all seems reasonable. The HHO isn't being used as a fuel, it is being used as a booster which pulls more energy, more efficiently from the petrol.

Question by jj.inc    |  last reply


Old 64 games for my g-pa

Nebody got some old 64 games out there? i want to buy some more for my grandpa to hold him over while i try to get him a Wii. pretty much any old game will do as long as it runs. im willing to buy but obviously not a lot for old 64 games. oh by the way, im not trying to be rude, but i am not stupid and i am not going to fall for any scams. srry but there are so many scams out there you have to warn people so they will stay away so you dont have to waist your time.

Topic by XI3    |  last reply


Suspicious Email

Heyyy Yall, i got an email from 'INSTRUCTABLES ROBOT'. the email said "a member, firestorm 16912 had subscribed to me". and gave a 'LINK' (https://www.instructables.com/member/firestorm16912/ Who-What-Where is this  coming from and why? thanx. memjim

Topic by MEMJIM    |  last reply


Dodgy email sent to me via Instructables Scam, spam, hacked email

I was not sure where to post this but, it appears the Instructables email may have been used for mischief (or some one really likes me) I received the following email from "info@instructables.com" on my home email address, It a has not appeared on any Instructable in-box, and the link doesn't seem to go anywhere Hi liquidhandwash! To view all your comments in one place please visit your Comment Tracker: https://www.instructables.com/you/backtalk --------------------------------------- From: philomina Date: May 24, 2013. 5:58 PM Subject: https://www.instructables.com/member/liquidhandwash/ hello my name is Philomina edwin i wish to request for your friendship Write back to me here in my email address (philomina_edwin@yahoo.com) i will tell you more about my self, thanks I wish to hear from you soon, Yours friend, Philomina reply: https://www.instructables.com/you/backtalk/?action=reply&commentId;=CDCJ2AGHH2W3AL8 --------------------------------------- Cheers, Instructables Robot To turn off these notification messages, please visit your preferences: https://www.instructables.com/you/watchlist?modify=WATCHLIST

Topic by liquidhandwash    |  last reply


Anyone ever bought anything from Cheaper Than Dirt? Answered

I was thinking about buying some paracord for the upcoming paracord contest, and I wanted to see if anyone has had any experience with this site (shipping time, reliability, scams, etc.)

Question by nickodemus    |  last reply


Where is a good place to buy silicone? Answered

I'm trying to find a good place to buy silicone for making soap molds. I don't want to get scammed on one of these internet sites. Thanks for any help, Oldanvil.

Question by oldanvilyoungsmith    |  last reply


FIY battery problem

I got scammed and bought that junk... Swivel Sweeper. A few million others also did. The battery died only a month later. I've been trying to make a surrogate battery because I don't want to give them anymore money for a replacement battery. Any ideas?

Topic by kanata    |  last reply


Cheap smartphone

Hi , i found a really cheap android smartphone here ... but im not sure is scam or not. http://www.funbookes.com/mysaga-c3-android-4-2-dual-core-smartphone-4-0-inch-wvga-capacitive-screen-wifi-gps-bluetooth-black-white.html Anybody here know about this brand or this phone?

Topic by docrivers    |  last reply


Blood Copy

So, the last forum topic i put in was about a site called blood copy, it was about vampires and a weird fake blood Supposedly for "vampires" being sent to people in the mail, called True Blood. Turns out this was a huge marketing scam advertising a new TV series Called True Blood

Topic by pyro13  


Used car scam? My sister bought a used car privately and now the catalytic is done- what can she do?

 She bought the car about two weeks ago, and it ran great for exactly 5 days.  Then it started shaking and making strange noises.  She took it into our old high school auto shop for a diagnosis, but a student disconnected the battery while it was hooked up (to clean the terminals) and we lost the diagnosis.  The instructor informed her that it would take a few days for the engine maintenance light to come back on, and to come back if and when this occurred.  Well it did- exactly 5 days later.  We are pretty sure it was reset the day she bought it so that by the time the problem arose, it would be "her problem", but can't prove it.  I'm pretty sure a catalytic converter does not constitute a safety issue, thus wouldn't be covered under her certification.  Is there anything she can do, is she on her own?

Question by mikahchayce    |  last reply


Broadway Photo... scammers?

Well ive had my eye on the Canon Eos Digital Rebel xTi for quite some time now.I found bwayphoto.com and was amazed at their price (body + two lenses = $597)!here's the link: Canon Eos Digital Rebel xTi on bwayphoto.comI've been doing research on both the camera and the website.The camera i am happy with. I love canon cameras, especially their easy-to-use UI, and the reviews are wonderful. It's the site that I am worried about... I have read reviews on it and there are so many bad reviews on it! I bought my camcorder from the site a couple years ago, but my mom did it for me so I don't really know whether she had any problems or not (she doesn't remember either).Actually, she might have fallen for their scams because she bought me an extra battery along with it... anyway... Before i make any decisions, I'm curious if any of you trusty Instructablers have ever used the site (or any of the sites affiliated with the company) and whether or not you are happy with it. There isn't a better price i can find online or in stores, so I'm having a hard time deciding whether or not i should just go for it and have my mom negotiate with them and whatnot...So should I stick with bwayphoto.com and try them out for this, or should i spend more money on the same camera (minus one lense) at a more reliable source?

Topic by alvincredible    |  last reply


Airsoft Megastore not safe?

When I open Airsoft megastore.com on google chrome, put something into my cart, then hit checkout, Chrome says the site is not safe to input valuable or personal information to. This got me thinking as to why it wouldnt be safe. No security protection against hackers? Or has it been hacked and if I input my credit card info will they be able to steal my info? I just dont want anyone getting ahold of my credit card info and buying stuff... Is ASM a trustworthy site, and Chrome just has a glitch or something that is causing the site to be deemed 'unsafe'? Or is it all a scam? This dillema has stopped me from buying a gun during their black Friday Doorbuster Deals, which was a great deal. Oh well better safe than sorry I guess. Thanks

Topic by chopstx    |  last reply


I believe someone misuses instructables.com for his own agenda

Hi, i believe there is someone using instructables.com for some kind of SEO scam. I believe it goes like this:- Post a mediocre/repeating guide- Add links to different websites, for example to www.american-home-loan.net as seen in https://www.instructables.com/id/How_to_Convert_AVI_WMV_RM_VOB_to_iPod_PSP_Cell_/- Have a highly valued site (instructables.com) link to cheap sites- ???- ProfitI believe the ??? would eventually be remove the guide and point to some site that seels some crap. This is called a SEO scam if i remember correctly.So far i have catched 5 different usernames using that scheme (i believe the same person is behind all of them):https://www.instructables.com/member/byrdcarlyle/https://www.instructables.com/member/disraedole/https://www.instructables.com/member/arlenegeorge/https://www.instructables.com/member/gilmergraham/https://www.instructables.com/member/aliceanton36/Check out the guides, they are basically all the same with a link in the first part at least repeated twice. It all points to the same server and even CMS, however, different hostnames are used.I would like to hear a second opinion.

Topic by tecneeq    |  last reply


Frisbee golf equipment question.? Answered

I was idly browsing Frisbee equipment with a view to persuading an acquaintance in the local school sports hierarchy to start an Ultimate league going, when I noticed that there are different kinds of discs for Frisbee Golf - Distance Drivers Fairway Drivers Mid-Range Drivers Putt & Approach Yet, in the catalogue descriptions, they are all the same size, and all the same weight. What is the actual difference between these discs?  Or is it just a scam to make you buy more discs?

Question by Kiteman    |  last reply


What is the most reputable, realistic way to sell photos.?

I am not a famous photogropher, but I do enjoy photography and have accumulated a pretty good collection of decent photographs over the years.  I've heard some hype about online stock photo selling, but the majority of it has that 'get rich quick' scam type feel to it.  I was wondering if anyone has had any experience with selling thier photos and would be willing to give me a bit of advice.  Thanks :-)

Question by Tunesrlife    |  last reply


Why would i upload my creativity for free and have to pay to download others? Answered

Who the h e l l would do this? Let me get this straight. I upload something that took me time, energy, and sometimes shear genius, to create and in order for people to see this project they have to PAY for it? YOU MEAN I'M NOT GETTING PAID FOR THIS BUT INSTRUCTABLES IS GETTING PAID? THIS IS A SCAM!!!!!!!!!!!! ESPECIALLY WHEN YOU CAN GET ALL THIS FOR FREE ON YOUTUBE!

Question by Moe Instructables    |  last reply


Eric's Big Idea!

Ads and such usually appear off to the side of forum pages, and instructables, most are scams (haha), but occasionally they are something worth checking into.Below is the ad I saw on the side of a forum topic, and decided to follow it.I got the address for Big Think, which is, from what I gathered, a plethora of ideas for many different things to better the nation.Below is Eric Wilhelm talking about Instructable's impact on education.LINKBTW, there is a typo on the second link..:D

Topic by bumpus    |  last reply


seboni

I receintly received a message from a member claiming to be Savanah Eboni, a.k.a. seboni. The message was suggestive in a manner I didn't expect from this site. On further inspection I have seen that messages of this nature have been sent to others and they have also complained about it. However, it seems that this person is still an active member and continues to solicit and harass the members of this site uninhibited. Are measures being taken to protect the integrity of this online community, or are you, like so many others, profiting from or just ignoring these people peddling scams and pornography?

Topic by notjustsomeone  


Did everyone else earn an Instructables Halloween card? Answered

I got a vague and generic email saying I have earned a Halloween card from Instructables. Then it asked for my name and mailing address. It this some sort of marketing gimmick so that Instructables can sell my information to a bunch of scam artists and the publisher's clearing house? Or is Instructables secretly working with the FBI to turn in people who have submitted Instructables that adversely affect the economy and/or domestic security? Or am I just really paranoid? Cuz I really think I earned a Halloween card. :)

Question by klee27x    |  last reply


Virus on 'ible Home-made-lava-lamp-%5bupdated-for-the-last-time%5d/ ???

I was clicking through "next step"s on this 'ible and got a persistent popup insisting I had a virus on my computer.  I know this scam is to actually put one ON my puter, so I kept trying to cancel out of it.  It took me to a site that was "scanning" and I unplugged my net cable before anything could download, shut down, and rebooted only to do a full Norton scan.  I think I avoided harm, but please look into this!

Topic by hishealer    |  last reply


Abuse of "Instructables"

The term "instructable" seems to have penetrated the public conciousness enough that people can appropriate the word to try and make themselves look legitimate.I came across this video on YouTube. It's a referral scam, but it calls itself an instructable!http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=a2-IK-8qKqkI have informed the user - (Link: http://uk.youtube.com/user/3ZCASH4U ) about his offence, but have had no response.Maybe other members would want to give him a piece of their mind?(I didn't have a associated image, so I've included this sneak preview of my next papercraft Instructable...)

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Asking for Life Coaching Shames Me. Don’t Want To Be Suckered In.

Quote came from a friend of mine. This was after he laid down how all the self-help productivity stuff online is a scam. How its a blackhole of never ending reading. I think this is a real problem for some people, they actually think "less" of themselves if they reach out. And theres actually some really good material out there. What do you guys think? What is the hardest productivity challenge you’ve faced? Why was it hard and how did you solve it? What resources did you use?

Topic by sal.afzal  


Is GoFundMe a good trusty crowdfunding site?

I just want to know if GoFundMe is safe? Is there any frauds that I should be aware of? I know your project will not be seen unless you share the link but I don't mind. I wanted to use Kickstarter but it's only in the US and you need to give a reward. Indiegogo can be used for charity causes but they Take $25 off the final amount for users out of the US. GoFundMe takes 0.30 Cents per donations so it might not be too good? Please let me know what you think. :)

Topic by Electrospark    |  last reply


Instructable is plagiarized (not a bug)

Hello whomever is reading this,I was online, today, and I was looking up different recipes for thermite. Upon searching Google, I came upon two different results that were quite intriguing. Here are the two results:https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-thermite/andhttp://how2dostuff.blogspot.com/2006/01/how-to-make-thermite.htmlIf you follow these links and read the steps, you will see that they are nearly the exact same and that the author does not give the second website credit. (Notice the dates)This is an obvious act of blatant plagiarism and I believe that the person whom wrote this instructable should be confronted about doing so.Thank you for your time,Christopher Karr

Topic by chriskarr    |  last reply


Several Easy Steps to Boost Your Computer's Speed

Some of you may have seen my instructable, Several Easy Steps to Boost Your Computer's Speed, and I have been getting some feedback. But I wanted to post it to forums, see if anyone can come up with some more ideas on how to boost a computer's speed. Let me know if you can think of anything! Feel free to comment here or on the Instructable.Thanks!Lukethebook333

Topic by lukethebook333    |  last reply