New Scientist

I'm sure people are aware but http://www.newscientist.com/In this weeks issue:Someone in China has spent some time analysing the US power grid, and figured out that it could be collapsed by taking-out a lightly-loaded sub-network. The US department of homeland security is apparently looking into this. However, Prof Ian Fells (a jolly chap with a beard) of Newcastle University UK says "they only need a bunch of guys with Semtex to blow up the gridlines near a power station"The Mythbusters are interviewed, but even they don't know why thermite on ice explodes, do you?And Richard Dawkins has a new book out, from the review:"Implying that your audience is stupid does not qualify as a great new angle. Yet this is precisely what Dawkins does"."It's really kind of comical. If "spot the condecensions" is a new drinking game, then bottoms up! There's one in just about every chapter"LThere's much more, but I mainly wanted to post the Mythbusters link, and the Dawkins review.(There is an article on Velociraptors)

Topic by lemonie 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Dance of the Scientists

So you think you can defend your research in front of a panel of experts? How about if you had to do it... with interpretive dance.No, this is not a joke. This is the first annual Dance Your Ph.D. Contest. Read this description and hit the link for videos of the dances....the diversity of the dancers was nothing compared with the diversity of their output. The graduate student category is a case in point. The first dance, Gruetzbauch's 30-second galactic tango, focused on one phenomenon: the capture of a galaxy by a larger one. Schraffl gave us raw data—a small scene from Il pittore parigino by Domenico Cimarosa—without analysis or metaphor. Sven Ramelow did a bit of both. His quantum physics Ph.D. title allowed him to make a play on words: The acronym SPUC is a homophone of a German word for ghost, and hence the scary sheet dance. Meanwhile, he used a laser light attached to his head to illustrate the strangely behaving photons he studies. (Very clever.) But then came Brian Stewart.No one was surprised when he scooped the prize. For one thing, Stewart wore nothing but a shimmering, translucent loin cloth. (That's worth a few bonus points in my book.) But the judges told me afterward that his dance stood out because it accomplished two things at once. Most importantly, "he connected with the audience," said Pastorini. "That is the purpose of dance: to create emotions." A big help was his choice of music a jazz interpretation of African Pygmy tribal music by Herbie Hancock which created an atmosphere of funky ancientness. Dance Your Ph.D. Contestvia Neatorama

Topic by fungus amungus 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


An Instructable in New Scientist!

Instructables member XenonJohn has had his Self-Balancing Skateboard featured on New Scientist TV, using video taken at the UK Maker Faire. I had the pleasure of meeting John at the Faire, and I can safely say that this world needs more like him. Kudos, John.

Topic by Kiteman 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Hungry Scientist Contest Judging Deadline?

Maybe I've been hallucinating, but wasn't the "Judging Ends" deadline the tenth? I swear it was an hour ago... Then again, I did think I saw two yip-yips in the sidebar. Yes, I've read the rules: "6. Instructables reserves the right to modify, cancel, postpone or end the contest at any time as necessary..." I'm just curious to see how everyone (myself included) came out.

Topic by ERNesbitt 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


US Army Hosts Mad Scientist Conference

The US Army recently held a mad scientist conference. I couldn't make this up if I tried. I wasn't invited, so I will share my predictions here. I predict that in the future, warfare will involve holiday specific pneumatic cannons and victory will be determined based on the amount of holiday spirit and cheer you can forcefully spread to your adversary. Seriously, were any of you invited to this?

Topic by randofo 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Instructables on New Scientist TV

Instructables "artist in residence" Mikeasaurus has had his magnetic silly putty featured on New Scientist TV. Kudos, Mike!

Topic by Kiteman 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Scientists Snack on Giant Squid

Recently scientists in middle-earth have admitted to snacking on a colossal squid being stored at their lab, while working on defrosting another giant squid. Mark Fenwick says that "It was almost like a tua tua, you know a cockle. It was very nice. It left a real taste in your mouth and stayed for quite a while,"(They say that they were checking for ammonia, but I suspect they just love the taste of cockle.)Remind me never to be a giant squid.Link

Topic by Tetranitrate 11 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Calling British Amateur Scientists!

From the BBC: Snail "GPS", Facebook psychology and crowd dynamics at music gigs: these were just some of the ideas submitted during last year's search for "citizen science" projects. Now, Radio 4 is launching its search for the next BBC Amateur Scientist of the year. A panel of judges, chaired by Nobel Prize-winning geneticist Sir Paul Nurse, will select four finalists. The shortlisted entrants will then have their ideas turned into real experiments, with the help of a professional scientist. Last year, 70-year-old gardener Ruth Brooks won the award for her research into the homing distance of garden snails. She found that Helix aspersa, the common garden snail, can find its way home from up to 30m away. But for gardeners to be sure that their snails will not come back, they should be moved over 100m. Do you have a cool idea that could be turned into a proper piece of scientific research? The judges for So You Want to Be a Scientist? will be talking about what they'll be looking for in this year experiments on Material World, Thursday 29th September at 4.30pm, Radio 4. Entry is open to anyone over 16, who is a resident in the UK and applications can be submitted online until 31 October.    

Topic by Kiteman 7 years ago


Ask a Scientist [topic: ancient science]

Topic: The 2000-Year-Old Computer (and Other Achievements of Ancient Science)We learn in school that the science of our ancestors included such endearing bunk as flat planets, geocentric solar systems, and the balancing of the body's four humors. (Even the pre-internet decades of my youth now seem to me like a dark, distant era of ignorance that I can't believe we all survived.) Did our ancient predecessors get anything right? Of course they did. Tonight, science historian Richard Carrier will discuss the nature and limitations of ancient science.While crucial contributions have come from many different cultures throughout history, Richard will talk about a handful of Graeco-Roman scientific and technological advances that might surprise you. Here's a teaser: we'll learn about the Antikythera mechanism, the oldest known computer discovered in a 2000-year-old shipwreck near Crete (pictured below). Cool.ABOUT THE SERIES: Ask a Scientist is an informative, entertaining, casual science lecture series, held at a San Francisco cafe. Each event features a speaker on a current topic, a short presentation, and the opportunity to ask all those burning questions that have been keeping you up at night. No tests, grades, or pressure, just food, drinks, socializing, and conversation about the universe's most fascinating mysteries. February 26, 200807:00 PM - 09:00 PMCost: FreeLocation: MapAxis Cafe1201 8th Street (btw. 16th & Irwin)San Francisco, CA 94107Additional Info:http://www.askascientistsf.com/

Topic by noahw 11 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


CandyFab 6000 prints in 3D with sugar

The folks at Evil Mad Scientist have gone back to printing with sugar with their CandyFab 6000. This version of the 3D printer that makes solid objects out of sugar now fits on a desktop. It's also designed so that you can easily get all the parts to build it from scratch without having to search for old HP pen plotters.Hit the link for more info. CandyFab 6000 via Make blog

Topic by fungus amungus 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Opinions please: EMS "Meggy Jr"

OK, I keep saying I ought to learn to solder properly. I ought to learn to programme chips. I ought...Well, you get the idea.So, I was browsing Evil Mad Scientist, and I came across Meggy Jr. It's a kit, you solder it, you can programme it. Ticks all the boxes, no?But, all I have to go on are EMS' own comments - looking for reviews, all I find are reports of its existence, plus silly comments from people who haven't used it. I haven't found any video of it being played, and I can't tell if it makes any sounds.Has anybody used it? Is it any good? Is it worth splashing out $130+? (This isn't an immediate purchase - probably in the New Year.)

Topic by Kiteman 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Time Travel Contest (with actual prizes!)

Fancy winning a few goodies?From the New Scientist magazine:Our theme this year is time travel. When the Large Hadron Collider at CERN was about to go into operation, some physicists speculated that it might attract visitors from the future (New Scientist, 9 February, p 32, and Feedback, 5 April ). For our competition, we ask you to imagine three such visitors arriving, each bringing glad tidings and bearing a gift from the future. What would the gifts be?Ten lucky winners will each receive a copy of Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration of the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation and Time Travel by Michio Kaku. They will also receive a selection of New Scientist goodies - including books from the Last Word series and a pen-drive.You may enter the competition online. You can also enter by email - with "Competition" in the subject field, please - or by fax or post.The competition closes on Monday 1 December {a significant date} and no entries will be accepted after that date. The results will be published in the 20/27 December issue of New Scientist. The editor's decision is final. Happy imaginings!

Topic by Kiteman 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


what are the role of the scientists when mining zinc.

Im doing a assignment and i cant find anywhere what the roles of the scientists are. Can you help me?

Topic by Claws47 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


can scientists not discover medicine for H.I.V.?

Question by bangla 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Ask a Scientist Special Event: Phat Tuesday Physics Circus

Come join ringmaster Zeke Kossover and his crew of sensational sideshow scientists as they (and YOU) perform dazzling demonstrations that illustrate physical principles! Watch, and listen, as sound shatters a wine glass! Ride a hovercraft! Turn on an electric pickle! Try to look at invisible glass! Witness the stopping of time! (Ok, not time exactly, but the hands of a watch.) Zeke and his crew will astound, amaze and explain, every step of the way. Can you think of a more appropriate way to celebrate Mardi Gras, than sledgehammering a bed of nails into the chest of a physics teacher from New Orleans? I sure can't!RINGMASTER: Zeke Kossover, physics teacher at Jewish Community High School of the Bay.THE CREW: Tucker Hiatt, physics teacher at The Branson School and director of Wonderfest; Leif Steinhour, Constructor, One Off Shoppe.WHEN: Tuesday, February 5th, 7:00 pm WHERE: Axis Cafe, 1201 8th Street (btw. 16th & Irwin) Ask a Scientist recommends that you come early to make sure that you get a good view.http://askascientistSF.com

Topic by noahw 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Scientists say: Hit Them Hard!

It had to happen.Scientists from the University of Ottowa have modelled the effects of a classical zombie plague, as part of a model in epidemiology.They looked at what would happen if uninfected humans attempted to cure or quarantine zombies, and the effects of retaliation:We show that only quick, aggressive attacks can stave off the doomsday scenario: the collapse of society as zombies overtake us all.It looks like we might have a need for all those zombie Instructables after all!PDF of the paper, via BBC story.

Topic by Kiteman 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Fractal Snowflake Cupcakes

Evil Mad Scientist goes to the kitchen and again merges math with food. Their new sugary fractal creations are made with either fondant or marzipan. Check out their site for the full details on how to make one of these on your own. Fractal Snowflake Cupcakes

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


What would you ask Terry Pratchett?

Next week, (New Scientist are) going to interview Terry Pratchett, author of the enormously successful Discworld series of books - or rather, you are. Tell us what questions you'd like to put to him in the comments below. We'll run the interview in a forthcoming issue of New Scientist.Remember, the more original your question is, the more likely it is we'll pick it - which means "Where do you get your ideas?" is out, for a start. And bear in mind we cover science and technology, not writing or publishing.Thinking caps on, then. Or should that be pointy hats?You must be able to do better than "Is it hard being so awesome?"!Link to article and comment boxNote "Next week" was written on 25th September 2009 - if you are reading this some time in 2016, you're a bit late to contribute...

Topic by Kiteman 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Cardboard (expired)

Have a really good Instructable about cardboard? Want to win a spot in "The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Cardboard" Collection? You can submit your entry by commenting below and providing a link to your Instructable. The Mad Scientists will judge this contest and the winners will be announced shortly and will be included in the "The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Cardboard" Collection. All submitted Instructables must be cardboard themed. Users are limited to one Instructable per contest. They can be both new Instructables and existing ones. Good luck!

Topic by The Mad Scientists 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Candy (WE NEED ENTRIES!!!)

Have a really good Instructable about candy? Want to win a spot in "The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Candy" Collection? You can submit your entry by commenting below and providing a link to your Instructable. The Mad Scientists will judge this contest and the winners will be announced shortly and will be included in the "The Mad Scientists' Weekly Contests- Candy" Collection. All submitted Instructables must be candy themed. Users are limited to one Instructable per contest. They can be both new Instructables and existing ones. Good luck!

Topic by The Mad Scientists 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


What does it take to become a scientist and an astronomer ? Answered

Question by Gopal Dey 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Dinosaur Discovery

Exciting news from Utah: well-preserved dinosaur fossils, petrified trees, and other remnants of the time of the dinosaurs were found. This could help scientists get a better grasp of the plant life during the Jurassic era. Not that there's anything more to know--Jurassic Park and Dinotopia taught us everything there is to know about dinosaurs.LinkPlus, take a look at the video at the bottom of the page about dinosaur excrement. The expert's living room is something to be, well, admired.

Topic by joshf 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


I want to make a battery powered mad scientist lamp.

I will be using 4 25 watt bulbs and would like some advice on what to use for a battery.  I am ok with it being quite dim, I need the batteries to be rechargeable and the lamp only needs to operate 3 or 4 hours at a time.  Any advice would be appreciated. https://www.instructables.com/id/Mad-scientist-lamp/

Question by chaintool 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


How can I dress up as a space scientist?

I am doing a careers project for school. I am researching being a space scientist. As a part of my presentation, I have to dress up as my career. My only idea is wearing a shirt from the science fair with a rocket on it and a lab coat, but I am not sure whether or not space scientists wear lab coats. Any ideas would be very much appreciated!

Question by cupcake811 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


The Sawed-Off Flash Drive

Evil Mad Scientist shows off the power of geek camouflage with their Sawed-Off Flash Drive that looks like a cut USB cable. Nice one! Link

Topic by fungus amungus 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Peggy: Like Lite-Brite with LEDs

Evil Mad Scientist has been really putting out the LED projects lately. They were selling a Mooninite kit, then they had pink LEDs (yum), and now they have info on how to make Peggy, an LED display where you simply plug them in and watch them glow. This 25 x 25 grid allows you to worry about what image you want to glow instead of how they're going to be wired up. Evil Mad Scientist page

Topic by fungus amungus 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Automatic Insect Painting/Gluing Device for Scientists? Answered

Scientists studying small insects need ways to assign a unique ID to each bug. Two of the most common methods they use are A) manually painting small color patterns onto the thorax (and sometimes head and abdomen) of the insect, and B) gluing a small tag(number, qr code, RFID chip) to the thorax. These techniques are very effective, but SUPER TIME CONSUMING. It can take a trained student about 5 minutes to paint each ant or bee (and they need to paint thousands). I want to help them out by decreasing the amount of man power needed to give a unique ID to each insect. My thoughts were to make a device where an insect could walk into a tube of designated size (exact bee space at the entrance of a bee hive for instance), have its presence sensed, maybe prevent it's forward or backward motion for a short while,  and have a device that attaches a tag or paints a unique pattern onto the insect. You can see some of my initial thoughts in the scanned picture below. HIGH RES HERE My question is about good places to start in building this contraption, or if anyone has good or simple . The thresholds are quite small for the insects (bees are maybe 1/8-1/4 inch wide), and we need to be exact where we attach the tag so as not to hurt the poor critters or alter their behavior. I am handy with an arduino and simple servos and can incorporate computer vision from an android phone into the mix with the ADK First elaborate or super cool response gets gifted a 3 month pro membership! (that lovely ant pic used as an example is by amazing photographer Alex Wild, the other is when you google "honeybee RFID")

Question by blorgggg 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Mad Science Tee Shirts!

Hello fellow instructablers!  I started my first ever teespring.com crowd funded run of tshirts about a week ago, and I'm SO CLOSE to hitting my goal!   I figured Mad Science (being the best science) might be of interest to the rest of the instructables community.  This is my own design, and I'm pretty proud of it.  Perhaps you'd like to share your own love of Mad Science by sporting one of these awesome shirts, or giving one as a gift to the Mad Scientist in your life! As of this posting (December 4, 2013 at 9:00 pm) there's just 3 days and 19 hours to go!  If I get just 10 people to preorder they get printed (I'm at 9 now), and if I get more than that then I make a little scratch to fund future projects. http://teespring.com/bestscience

Topic by depotdevoid 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Any ideas for an inexpensive computer controller for a mad scientist? Answered

I was thinking of a "mad scientist" type of display that might include a keyboard and monitor  to control various aspects.  I was thinking maybe an old computer would do it - possibly tied to arduinos.  Any ideas for a relatively inexpensive solution?

Question by justjimAZ 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Edible Googly Eyes from Evil Mad Scientist

Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories has a great project showing how to make One Hundred Percent EDIBLE Googly Eyes! Googly eyes definitely make anything better by allowing you to heavily personify it. I fondly remember putting a pair on the dishwasher, and suddenly our whole lexicon changed from "don't overload the dishwasher" to "be nice to dishwasher, it's had a hard day."I'm looking forward to making these and putting them on a piece of roast bison or a big salmon fillet! "Please, please don't eat me!"

Topic by ewilhelm 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


New Scientist recreates a robot made by the ancient Greeks

A friend forwarded this along:Ok, this was on slashdot, and it may be a little old, but it was the coolest thing I've seen today.If you can't watch the 2 minute video, the robot works by having a falling weight turn an axel. However, the real ingenuity of 60 AD shines from pegs that are put in the axel that the rope can be wrapped around in order to make the axel turn different directions at pre-programmed intervals.

Topic by ewilhelm 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Scientists plan to ignite tiny man-made star

From www.telegraph.co.uk:"While it has seemed an impossible goal for nearly 100 years, scientists now believe that they are on brink of cracking one of the biggest problems in physics by harnessing the power of nuclear fusion, the reaction that burns at the heart of the sun.In the spring, a team will begin attempts to ignite a tiny man-made star inside a laboratory and trigger a thermonuclear reaction.Its goal is to generate temperatures of more than 100 million degrees Celsius and pressures billions of times higher than those found anywhere else on earth, from a speck of fuel little bigger than a pinhead. If successful, the experiment will mark the first step towards building a practical nuclear fusion power station and a source of almost limitless energy. Full article.This is big medicine, because while we have (more or less) successfully harnessed the power in nuclear fission, we've yet to find a method of using nuclear fusion for power (outside of experimental/weaponry uses). It is important to note, however, that this initial experiment, while big, won't be powering your home or office just yet-even if it does work, there's still quite a lot that would have to be done to build a nuclear fusion power plant.Still, it's heady stuff, the energy source of dreams-a world powered by nuclear fusion fueled by hydrogen, one of the most abundant elements in the universe-only now that dream is looking like it could, possibly, maybe, eventually, become reality.And now, a word from our sponser resident particle physicist:The NIF at Livermore uses small (BB-sized) pellets of liquid hydrogen (technically a deuterium-tritium mixture) encased in a shell. The pellet is illuminated by a terawatt laser split into 192 sub-beams all focused on a poiint. The outer shell of the pellet is vaporized and a shockwave compresses the hydrogen to the point where it should start fusion.The whole process is over in roughly a microsecond. If you keep dropping pellets into the chamber, then you get a series of pulses, but as soon as you stop, everything shuts down.The NIF (like the NOVA laser before it) is being run at a weapons lab, because the kind of fusion it can do (individual microsecond pulses) is most useful for studying the physics underlying thermonuclear weapons. It is probably not a viable technology for continuous power-generation fusion, but it is necessary for understanding how to make that sort of system work.

Topic by Lithium Rain 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


$13 Arduino Boards now at Evil Mad Scientist Labs

Evil Mad Scientist has just released Diavolino, a low cost option for those who like to do arduino development, take a look:   "Diavolino ("little devil") is a low-cost, easy to build Arduino-compatible development board. Diavolino has the form factor of an Arduino Duemilanove or Arduino Pro, but with nicely rounded corners and a striking appearance. It's a low-profile through-hole version, with a simplified design. It's based on a ATmega328P microcontroller, and comes pre-flashed with the Arduino bootloader. Open source design, with bare basics hardware."   You can buy them here

Topic by frenzy 8 years ago


Dry-Ice Martini and Electric Cake - Hungry Scientist and Instructables in the NYT

The Hungry Scientist Handbook, Turkey tek, and Instructables were the topic of Dry-Ice Martini and Electric Cake in the New York Times:WHEN does a recipe become a science project?Is it when the compulsion to create an edible electrical circuit keeps a cook up all night, wrapping Twizzler string licorice in pure silver?Is it when a baker decides to bake 20 equilateral-triangle-shaped pecan pies for Thanksgiving, then attach them together with magnets to form an 80-serving icosahedron? (The recipe begins with 30 cups of flour and 2 large sheets of 24-gauge steel.) More news and press about Instructables here.

Topic by ewilhelm 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Calling all Potato Gun Aficionados and wanna be Combustion Scientists

This is message to anyone who enjoys hearing the sound of forced combustion, or better yet, the loud crack of a potato gun being fired. My co-conspirator and I are in need of some mathematic assistance. Ideally we are looking for a “magic” formula concerning barrel length to blast chamber ratio for optimal performance. The ideal fuel would be propane or butane. We have been using a 4” by 33” blast chamber coupled with a 3” by 44” barrel. So far, we have had significant success with this combination, but are curious if there is a better ratio to use. With our current specs, we are able to shoot a 3 – 4 lb. ball of plaster over 250 yards (this is the carry distance, not the total distance traveled) at a 47 degree angle. If anyone out there knows a formula or has advice on Blast Chamber to Barrel ratios we are greatly interested to hear what you have to say.

Topic by benihana 11 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago



When was the BristleBot invented? Answered

Was the BristleBot invented by Doug Stillinger, Evil Mad Scientist Labs, Ben Jaques' friend, all of them, or someone else entirely?

Question by NobodyInParticular 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


CONVERT IPOD TO RECEIVE TV SIGNAL

HI THERE HIDDEN SCIENTIST IN ALL OF US TO EXPLORE HIS CAPACITIES THE FORUM LIKE INSTRUCTABLES TO ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE

Topic by 646433 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


How to Get Instructables Featured? Answered

Any tips on how to get Instructables featured? Please post your ideas and suggestions below. Thanks.

Question by The Mad Scientists 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Ideas For Instructables Needed

Ideas for making Instructables anyone? Just post your ideas below and we may make them into an Insructable!

Topic by The Mad Scientists 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


PLastic to oil converter

Hello, One year later, I found that video on youtube about a japanese scientist who converted plastic back to oil : Source : http://ourworld.unu.edu/en/plastic-to-oil-fantastic/ I waited for a convenient version for home use but still the smallest system weight 50Kg (100 pounds I guess). For what I read on the subject it's a kind of catalytic pyrolysis (whatever it means for such a non scientist as myself...). As any of you have an idea on how to make this kind of system for everyday use?

Topic by hypelike 7 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Solar-driven Stirling engines for electricity generation

The "Picture of the Day" in today's New Scientist shows a solar power generation test using Stirling engines as the generators.

Topic by kelseymh 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Scientists HELP!!! Ideas/Instructables for installation art celebrating chemistry, new elements, need models of atoms

I am heading a group of teens making ART to be installed in a park in Livermore, CA where the Lawerence Livermore National Lab has commissioned us to celebrate the discovery of the 116th element "Livermorium" - problem is, we artists need help VISUALIZING and making the esoteric idea of atoms into VISUALS that the lay person could enjoy and understand. We have a corner park. We need to make INTERACTIVE science displays that are hardy to the weather and to human touch. -- How to show (the latest ideas) of an atomic model for Livermorium?? -- How to explain/show what that element is for? -- How to display the dynamics of molecules, atoms, electrons, protons, etc. --what machines does a scientist use to discover new elements? Please reply with links to images, explain simply about the structure of atoms/molecules, IDEAS?

Topic by stinastar 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


How do i make a device like this?

Please type this in at youtube japanese scientists create touchable holograms i would like to make something similar to that got any ideas.

Question by Dominator57 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Bacteria excrete oil

Looky!Scientists in sunny CA have genetically altered bacteria so they eat garbage and excrete crude oil. They plan to be in commercial production by 2011. Sweet!

Topic by Lithium Rain 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Interactive LED coffee Table??? How to???

Hey All...Just giving someone an idea for an instructable, the Interactive LED coffee table designed by Evil Mad Scientist is IMO pretty damn sweet but i can by no way afford the kits or table, so I was wondering if anyone could tell me how to go about a DIY. it looks fairly simple but i'm still learning the basics of electronics.here is their websiteInteractive LED Coffee Table by Evil Mad Scientisteven something similar would be pretty sweet.Cheers Guys and GalsAndrew

Topic by TANN-MANN 11 years ago


"D'oh!" or "Oh my God, we're all going to die!" ?

This article from New Scientist raises the question posted in the title. Which response is more appropriate?

Topic by kelseymh 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Egg Bot is here!

Apparently... Actually, this is pretty cool - it's a plotter that can draw on spherical or egg-shaped objects, from the size of a ping-pong ball to the size of a grapefruit. More details here.

Topic by Kiteman 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


has there ever been a coffee contest? Answered

Just curious has there ever been a coffee contest on instructables?  I have something crazy being made, was wondering if i should hold off publishing

Question by iminthebathroom 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


I desperately need empty tins and cigar boxes to use for science kits. Can anyone help me?

I'm a retired educator - I run workshops entitled I'm a scientist - for parents AND their children.

Question by Vintage1942 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago