staining finished one side plywood?

I got a piece of finished one side plywood and decided to make a desk out of it. i cut a top ,bottom sides and spacers for drawers all out of the same piece of plywood. sanded the top down smooth. all the sides take the stain fine but the top will not. it wont penetrate the wood on top for some reason. can anyone provide some in site on why this is happening. or what i need to do to get the stain to work? thanks.

Question by nagybro 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago



i need help on a way to secure plywood for laying on over the bathtub, the far side has only 1/4" curved and tile wall

I need to do a medical procedure and I want to get it out of my bedroom. I salvaged some 3/4 inch plywood  and need to find a way to securely attach the plywood temporarily  for the procedure and then be able to quickly take apart and store for 2 days latter I realized that working with the smaller plywood pieces was better for my spine. Once I do a couple of procedures I will see if I need to attach them together with  a quick release hinge or plate.  I need to lie down and need to be able to work the water controls ,so I will leave a space open by the controls and spigot . I can put a pillow there if I need to. I also found  out by accident that the home depot orange buckets are almost  the perfect size for use as stabilizer columns, with lids or a shim underneath and filled with water, they would make great  stable columns. So that really helps. The problem I need help with, is every time I think I found the answer a day later I realize it wont work. I am not a carpenter. I need to secure the plywood on the far side of the bath tub so I don’t have a flip over or collapse into tub. The far wall has ¼  inch of  curved bathtub and then the  tile wall. I  think I need to make a wedge device to  keep the board into the tiles and not let them shift or back out. The buckets maybe enough, but I have to move  my body a lot during the procedure  and don't want to take chances.  2 of the boards have 4 inches overhang on the bathtubs entry side, The lip for the bathtub in that side is I think 4 or 6 inches wide so plenty of support for the plywood. I have 4 inches  extra overhang , I could cut  that off . Or  if it would be better attach some quick release wood  for legs or even 2 inch PVC pipe if I could figure out an  attachment with quick release.    I was thinking of attaching a board perpendicular to the plywood to fit in the tub and keeping the plywood from shifting, and  maybe a wooden wedge  and notch system to push the board against the wall and keep it from backing out or shifting. I just had a brainstorm , put wooden perpendicular strips on both sides of the plywood . If exact and with the pails it maybe non shifting. Someone would have to help me with how to measure correctly, as my measuring  skills are horrible. I may have a tool that would carry the measurement over.  I did get a book on my new kindle that is all  about measurement tricks, but I have not had time to even load it up

Topic by escapefromyonkers 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Bending 3/4" plywood into right angles with a 4" bend radius

I have an idea for a stylized plywood coffee table that is all made from a single board of 3/4" Baltic Birch plywood. I've attached a .jpg of a coffee table base-design to this email.  The bends on either side are 4 inch radius bends. Although I have basically no experience bending plywood, I sincerely doubt 3/4 inch plywood is going to bend into right angles at a 4 inch radius. I may be wrong, but if it is possible, I do not know how to do it, and certainly do not have the equipment. I've seen on the internet very flexible sheets of plywood, but wouldn't that just get glued into position and then just collapse once un-molded? I can't believe that I am the only person who wants to do something like this. Any input?

Topic by Dolmetscher007 4 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Equation for accurate bending (kerfing) of plywood

I am planning out my first Instructable. It will be a bent (kerfed) plywood coffee table, There have been a growing number of projects out in the 'makeosphere,' where people are cutting slits or kerfs that go almost completely through a thicker piece of wood, allowing it to be easily bent. I am on a super-tight budget, and cannot afford to ruin my $22 sheet of plywood, so I was hoping that someone might be able to help me with some measurements for cutting the kerf-slits in the plywood. Here is the idea all sketched out. I need help with the measurements that are in bold.  * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  PROJECT DESCRIPTION:  Materials: 1x | 4 ft. x 2 ft. 3/4 in birch plywood 2x | 3 ft. 5/8 in threaded metal rods 8x | flat washers 4x | standard nuts 4x | "end nuts"  Steps: On the sheet of plywood, measure in X inches and mark X number of cross cut lines, X inches apart. Measure in 2 inches from each end of the board and draw a line. Measure in 2 inches each each side of the board, and draw another line. Drill out a 5/8 inch hold at all 4 of these crossed lines. Thread a standard nut onto each end of the threaded rod and screw it on 1-2 inches roughly, then slip a flat washer over the threaded rod. Bend each end of the board up to create almost 90 degree angles. Insert each end of the threaded rod into the holes, slip a flat washer over the threaded rod and screw on each of the four "end nuts."  Use the standard nuts, and the end nuts to fine tune the bends into 90 degree angles.  Flip the table over, and enjoy.  * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  Stability is more important to me than curve radius. I don't know if spacing cuts close together for a small curve radius is more or less stable than placing the cuts further apart for a larger radius. I've never done this, but I have seen that there is an equation for this. I haven't been able to find the equation actually expressed, I've just heard that there is one. Does anyone know about this area of woodworking/physics?

Topic by Dolmetscher007 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


MDF desktop

Hey guys and gals. I'm considering making this computer desk that uses one sheet of 4x8 plywood and was wondering if a sheet of MDF would work. I just got back from Lowes where I was checking prices on plywood and they didn't have the type of plywood thats veneered on both sides. I thought about using MDF instead and wanted to know how much of a difference it would make. My concerns with the MDF are finishing the final piece and attaching the hardware to the two halves. I've worked with MDF before, but it was under complete different circumstances and I didn't have to bother finishing the project with paint/stain. What are the pros/cons of using MDF vs. Plywood?The desk instructable

Topic by smkoberg 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Using quickrete to sound proof walls?

After reading online I thought about an easy cheap alternative to lessen the noise in my garage studio room from escaping to the outside world.  After the new construction the smaller space seems to echo much more than before, thus the need for more soundproofing/deadening.  I though about building forms with plywood backing and filling them with readymix quickrete with wire mesh on top.  After fastening the frames onto the brakets I have that will be firmly fastened to the wall in staggered pattern drywall and carpet padding will be applied on top of the plywood side of the form that would be facing toward the middle of the room thus creating a second relatively thick layer of sound deadening with roughly 1 1/2 inched of dead air space trapped between the outer and inner layer walls.  Has anyone ever tried this?   Thoughts, comments, suggestions welcome.  To clarify:  From outside to inside I would have:  Siding - Standard Wrap and OSB - Stud- Moisture Barrier- Insulation - 5/8 Drywall - 1 1/2 inches of dead air space - Wire mesh side of concrete forms 1 in thick - concrete- plywood backing side of form - carpet padding - drywall - carpet   Thanks.  John

Question by jbutzu 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


crooked?

I was cutting down a 4 by 8 sheet of birch faced plywood and both the jigsaw and circular saw cut crooked.  I clamped a 2 by 4 guide and it still cut the other way.  If i was to use another guide on the other side and make a path, would that work?  Why are my brand new blades cutting WAY off???

Question by sherisauter 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Woodworking angles and edges

Hello, I'm working with some plywood to create the Swords used by the Character Kirito in the Anime Sword Art Online. I've done some woodwork before but my main trouble is that i don't know how to create edges on the wood so that it actually has a blade-edge of sorts. so does anyone have tips to go from having you wood like this: _________  <---top of wood ................| ................| <---side of wood ................| _________|                   ^-------bottom of wood to this? ___ <---top ........\ ..........\ <----edge on side ........../ ____/      ^--------bot all comments appriciated

Topic by CryoFireProductions 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Wooden Go Kart?

*Hopefully this is the correct category..... Hello all! I am quite interested to start learning woodworking (already have some knowledge) And what better way to start that with a gas (or electric) go-kart :-P? I know fair amount of people who have built things out of wood, some younger than I am (14). And it seems like a very good skill to have. Plus, if I am good enough at it and I outgrow the go kart, Ca-CHING! I could sell it for profit (If it is in good enough condition still). I'm currently in 8th grade but I cannot take a woodworking class until 10th grade, So why not start? I was also wondering if the Ibles community could help? I could use some ideas, and I will need alot of info for the engine and frame.(If you can even find PEDAL CART info that would be awesome too). My plan is to have it done by mid summer (July 10 for me). This may seem like too much for me, but I want to build one that, if it doesn't have an engine, one could easily add one (I realize I can not run a gas/lawnmower engine on its side) Please leave your thoughts below!!

Topic by Randomguy65 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


powered pocket door/sliding door using automobile power window motor?

Hi, looking to make something along the lines of this youtube video, using a car power window motor, but would like to be able to use 2 switches or pushbuttons, one for each side of the door. It's not for our house or anything so it doesn't need to look pretty and I probably won't even be using an actual door, but a piece of plywood instead. Any ideas on how to make it happen? Thanks for the help. I'm sure there are better ways, but I'm looking to do it cheap.

Question by payne.kj 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Cleaning windows with magnetic sponge

 I was looking for a solution to clean my roof windows and found this solution: www.supermagnete.de/eng/project136 But I don't know which magnets I should order. If they are to weak the sponge will fall of all the time, but I use this monster magnet like this guy the window might get damaged. Is there someone who got a collection of magnets already (and dirty windows) and want to give it a try? In my case the window is around 10mm thick + lets say 5-10mm sponge on each side + 3-4 mm thick piece of plywood to distribute the pressure.

Topic by HHL 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


How to make a large cage for big SNAKES?

Hi, any of you clever guys has a bit of an advanced DIY knowledge of large vivarium building? I am looking for a but of inspiration/tech tips but if anybody loves a challenge, this is what I will be building. Its for my anacondas and it will need to have these specifications: - to hold humidity in/ have waterproof surface on the inside - definitely for the floor - to hold heat in (any ideas of non-toxic heat insulating/reflecting material that is not too thick?) - be fairly light for the purpose of ocassional moving - it needs to be designed with possibility of dismantling for moving in mind, using screws and similar rather than glue etc - to use as much of environmentally friendly materials as possible (ie solvent free etc) - glass doors at the front, all the other sides dont need to be see-through - economical to build - required dimensions: 31 cm tall x 47 cm wide x 204 cm long (front side with the 2 glass doors on hinges, with a partition in the middle 10 or more cm wide) I would be open to innovative materials/ approaches, the main criteria are re-assembly, reasonably low cost and non-toxicity Thanks to everybody for your ideas! In the photo you can see the right half of their present vivarium made of marine plywood. The cage dimensions are (in cm) 61 x 63 x 216.

Question by Khanga 9 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Portable Drawing Easel

I designed a portable easel out of two pieces of luan (1/8" to 1/4" plywood).  I originally intended to sell them, but decided I didn't really enjoy making them in production levels.  The time vs. cost factor didn't really pan out. Either way, this is a design that might make an artist loved one happy.  It is fairly quick and easy and has a bit of style to it, I think. I added some molding at the bottom to act as a sort of pencil or brush holder.  Just some metal rings to hold the two pieces of wood together and a SWEEEEET woodburning on the front with my name--feel free to put someone else's name on yours! What you don't see in the photos is a leather strap with a small dowel at the end that fits into two notches--one for holding the two sides of the wood from splaying apart when it's in easel mode, and another for when you want to keep it closed for carrying it.

Topic by MakeItWithJason 6 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Need Ideas for my Pond's waterfall.

I'm in the process of building a pond but I've reached a stumbling point for myself. I've just sunk my sealed bathtub into the ground (See picture) and it looks great!  I've also got a tentative arrangement of rocks to work as my waterfall (See picture). The issue I'm having is that I need to suspend the waterfall over the water.  My first Idea was a triangle of 3/4" plywood to cover the far left corner of the tub, but if exposed to water for a long period of time, that might not work so well.  I'm also worried about back flow from the waterfall pouring water onto the rear side of the shelf. I thought thick acrylic might work better, assuming that the price is reasonable and it can support the weight. Any suggestions, anything at all.  From building the bottom up with bricks to creating some other strange shelf, let me know what you think might work!

Topic by Cold Shoulder Media 7 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Kite-powered proa (boat) collaboration/comments

Added 5/26/07: Please read the comments below to see how the project is evolving. Design specs, goals, etc, have been modified after discussion.Hi Folks,For several years I've been wanting to build a kite powered proa. A proa is a kind of boat with a narrow hull and a smaller outrigger. These Instructables are about building a proa with a traditional sail:https://www.instructables.com/id/ERIIBDCCOTEPUCHZ1K/?ALLSTEPShttps://www.instructables.com/id/EZN8M3OCWZEV2Z7IR5/?ALLSTEPSThese are kite-powered proa-like vehicles for land and ice:https://www.instructables.com/id/EPKZ5O80HQEQZJI20F/?ALLSTEPShttps://www.instructables.com/id/EPWWSYZNWIEV2ZKLCH/?ALLSTEPSGoals for the project:1. Make at least one good boat.2. Publish a good Instructable.3. Work with interesting people.I am definitely going ahead with #1 & #2. #3... anyone interested?The Boat: Generally it should be appealing/attainable by as wide a range of budgets and circumstances and skill levels as possible.a. It should be fun to mess around with starting in about 6 or 7 mph of wind (3 m/s).b. A beach boat, not an overnighter. Should be able to carry one or two people, a paddle, personal flotation device and maybe a sandwich and a water bottle.c. Storable in a typical apartment (maybe even a dorm room?). I'm thinking a 2-part bolt-together hull like Wade Tarzia's above. Two halves, each under 8 feet long so they can be stored on end, maybe used as bookshelves as suggested by TimAnderson. What is a typical ceiling height? Mine is about 91"d. Possible to build on a restricted budget ($200? is that possible? $400?). I'm budgeting about $500 but as a cheapskate packrat scrounger type I am hoping not to spend it all. Should also avoid necessitating rare and expensive tools.e. It should be possible to make a "good looking" version if the builder chooses.... sort of financially and chronologically(?) scalable. Someone might want to build something as quickly and cheaply as possible, and another person might want to spend all summer working on the fine details and finish. The boat should be worth building in either case.f. Should be able to take a passenger (is that possible if we rely on weight-shifting for steering?), but be sailable single-handed.g. Possibly be adaptable to a traditional sail? Would this be hard? This is something I don't need for myself, but I bet someone will ask that question as soon as we publish it. If someone doesn't already have a kite, is it easier to build a kite, or a sail and associated mods to the boat?h. Probably plywood stitch-and-glue construction main hull, but maybe carved from a couple of Styrofoam billets with a plywood stringer and/or deck? Leaning towards all plywood. If we fiberglass the whole boat can we use 1/4" interior luaun at $9 per 4x8 sheet? Is that more practical and cost effective than something like occume at $60 per sheet with glass on just the keel and joints? We'd need 3 sheets. Need to do some calculations on this.i. Usable in flat water, chop and small waves (and bigger waves?). Mine will be used mostly at an ocean beach.j. Steerable by weight-shifting, i.e. moving towards the front or back of the boat. No rudders or daggerboards. Maybe paddle-assisted steering when carrying a passenger/helmsman?The Instructable:a. Should be a good read, even for folks who won't undertake the project. b. Doubles as an Instructable on how to collaborate to make a great project and a great Instructable.c. Represents everyone involved in the project in some way.d. Gives the potential builder a rough "how to sail it" as well?e. Presents the reader with several options for materials and/or construction.f. All the regular "what makes a good Instructable" things.The Interesting People:a. Everyone is interesting in some way or another, right?b. Some people like to do research on the web.c. Some people have built boats.d. Some people some know about wood, or glue, or paint, or kites, or sails, or writing, or... e. Maybe someone will build the boat concurrently so we'll have pictures of two or more versions at various stages when we publish the Instructable.Let me be the first to sign up :) I have been using kites to get around fields, beaches, frozen lakes and the ocean for 10+ years. I make my own kite boards and have made my own kites (I use commercial kites now but still love my homemade plywood boards). I've done a fair amount of web research on proas and plywood boats (and some on tarp boats, canvas covered canoes, surfboards, etc.) but I have never built a boat. I experimented with a busted up, rudderless old hobie 14 for a while, but my homemade foot-steerable rudders broke almost instantly, and shortly after that I had to abandon the boat because I moved to a place where it couldn't be stored. It was enough to get me interested. I'm pretty confident I could build a usable boat as a solo project but I want to see how much better it could be as a collaboration, or at least having a few folks commenting on my ideas.I have a small assortment of cheap power tools. I've used epoxy and fiberglass a few times and I have some on hand.I have permission from my lovely bride-to-be to use part of the kitchen, part of the time, as my workshop (that's true love). I also have a small are outside where I can work but I can't leave anything there.The pictures are my initial hull ideas. For each hull one pic shows the hull from 3 angles and the other shows how the side pieces would fit on two sheets of plywood. A third sheet would be needed for the deck and a fourth (of thicker stuff, I would guess?) for the frames, bulkheads, etc. I'll attach the files for the hulls too. You can get the freeware to view and edit them at www.carlsondesign.com.The simple V hull would mean less cutting and joining. The other one looks better (in my opinion) and can float more weight with the same amount of plywood.Could instead go with a flat bottom like Wade's.Let me know what you think.Thanks!

Topic by flywoodkb 12 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Inspiration: Lego lepdesk with storage

I was digging in my closet and found one of these. Basically it is a lightweight sort of flimsy plastic lap desk with two bins on either side and a track setup on top that fits Lego Plates. The plates slide into the middle to build, and slide shut over the bins for transportation. It can be carried like a suitcase. The user's legs sit in between the two bins and that hold the desk steady for building. This is definitely sized for a little kid, not a 6 foot four guy like myself. Lego made these back in the late 90's, no idea if they still do. You can find them online for exorbitant sums of money, $30-$60 US. A great design, and I am inspired to make some kind of work table. Seeing that these things are apparently collectible, I am going to sell this, then build a larger more durable adult version for all kinds of work with the money from selling this one. Sharing this here because I find this to be a nice and simple design that everyone can learn from. Any ideas? Lets hear them! I am envisioning some kind of clone of this made of medium-weight plywood or other material, with the leg space in between the bins used to hold another storage box that can be easily popped out. I really don't have the tools to do this project very cleanly, but hopefully soon I will make an initial model. For those lucky people out there with CNC machines, this is your chance to cut out something awesome. Take the idea and run with it.

Topic by ilpug 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Arcade Cabinet Building

Ok, I've looked around everywhere, but nowhere I found gave me enough information, so I'm going to try on the forums. I am planning on making a Custom Arcade Machine, and I need some help. I know that you need MAME and what not, but I'll tell you what I have and what I want it to turn out as. I have: 5-7 old pcs sitting around, all are windows, and they all meet min arcade requirements. 3-4 monitors sitting around a plentiful supply of plywood, scrap metal, and welding tools for the cabinet. internet As for the cabinet, I want to be able to play most arcade games, and this is my hopeful specs. Upright cabinet every button you can imagine, my plan is for the front of the table having a joystick and 6-8 buttons on each side with a trackball in between them, when a game is selected that needs a steering wheel, a servo moves a mechanism out of the way to allow you to pull up a yoke, with more servos to lock it in certain ways( like lock the y axis in a racing game, but full movement in a flight game), and lastly have some pedals at the bottom. so I am basically going for an ultimate cabinet, and possibly ebay some to cover my costs. I also have some experience in computers and electronics almost forgot, I also plan to put in a coin slot, in case others want that, and to keep my brothers from being on it all day. :D

Topic by Flame3230 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


How could I secure multiple 2-liter bottles for use as emergency flotation for a homemade skin-on-frame kayak? Answered

     I'm working on a Yostwerks-design skin-on-frame kayak, and have seen pictures of inflatable bags that fit in bow and stern for emergency flotation - in case you're swamped, they'll help keep your water-filled boat on the surface.      Part of this project is the joy of spending time making something that I will enjoy.      Part of this project is about not spending a lot of money - I could go out and buy a kayak, but would need several hundred dollars all at once to do so.  I can afford to buy individual components: a sheet of plywood, or a plank, or fabric, so can work little by little on building my own.      The specialized flotation bags, while nice, would be an added expense - I'm assuming on the spendy side.  But I drink cheap diet soda, and believe I could reuse the bottles as cheap (essentially free to me, since this would otherwise be trash) flotation.  It would take lots of these to float a kayak plus any camping gear I might put in it - about 25, I've figured out.      What I can't figure out, though, is how to have 25 empty bottles split between the bow and stern, filling the awkward pointy kayak spaces, and not rolling all around or falling out if I capsize.      So what do you think?  How would you go about this?  Please let me know what you think.  Thanks!

Question by tw0nst3r 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


How To Build an underground sandbag bunker complete with sewer and well and air Filtration system for under $2,000

I,m Planning On Building an underground sandbag bunker that will protect against most natural and man made disasters i would use bricks or concrete but that is to expensive and concrete bunkers are prone to leaking and molding unless you have a proper vapor barrier on all sides of the walls and foundation and the roof i am going to make my walls out of sandbags and have good strong posts every few feet or so to prevent cave ins the posts will be good strong 8 inch diameter logs also for the roof I,m going to use 8 inch diameter logs and on the roof i,m going to put 4 feet of packed dirt on it to act as a radiation shield my walls are going to be covered in plastic sheeting or polyethylene or both on the outside for a vapor barrier to prevent moisture from entering in a layer of plastic and polyethylene sheeting in going to cover the bottom of the hole then the floor frame goes on top of that and then i pack the frame with straw for insulation then another layer of plastic and polyethylene goes over that then the plywood goes on last and is screwed to the frame with woods screws i make sure the whole frame is wrapped in polyethylene sheeting and plastic sheeting then once the floor is in place i caulk where the floor and the walls meet with silicone for the roof i put vapor proof sheeting like plastic sheeting or polyethylene down first then the logs then straw for insulation then more vapor proof sheeting then dirt on top of that for the sewer i will use a pipe running from the toilet into a big pit with a lid on it and a pipe coming out of the lid with a fly screen on it for the vent pipe and of course i will reinforce the sewer pit so that it don't cave in and have a drain field and have a door for the bunker that can be locked or barred from the inside and for heat a barrel stove any ideas you may have any comments and suggestions would be greatly appreciated any problems with my plan please let me know because I,m looking for them so i can fix them in my plans

Question by 10 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


TechShop Menlo Park Open House -- Saturday May 31, 2008 10 AM to 5 PM

Jim Newton at TechShop wants to let you and the other people in the SF bay area maker community know that they're having an Open House at TechShop Menlo Park on Saturday, May 31st from 10 AM to 5 PM, and everyone is invited.NEW TOOLS AND EQUIPMENTYou'll be able to check out all the tools, machines and workspace and see how TechShop can help you build all those projects you've always wanted to make. They have a bunch of new tools, including the brand-new 45-watt Epilog Helix laser cutter with 18 x 24 bed and a rotary attachment for etching bottles and cylindrical objects (now they have two of these Epilog Helix 45 Laser Cutters), 4 brand new computers packed full of 2D and 3D design software including SolidWorks (CAD), a plastics vacuum forming station, and a super easy-to-use computer-controlled ShopBot CNC router that can cut out and carve any piece of plywood or solid wood or plastic up to 4 x 8 feet!BRING YOUR PROJECTSPlease feel free to bring your projects to the Open House to show off...completed or not. It will be fun for everyone to see what you're been working on.THE DETAILS o TechShop Open House, Saturday, May 31, 2008, 10 AM to 5 PM o TechShop, 120 Independence Dr, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (Near Marsh Road and 101) o Guided Tours Will Be Given Throughout the Day o BBQ and Pot Luck -- Please Bring Your Favorite Main Dish, Side Dish or Dessert o Tell Your Family and Friends, and Bring Them With You o Kids Are Welcome Too! o Lots of Parking, All Free o No Need to RSVP...Just Come On By!Event details are available on the TechShop Events Page TechShop Events Page.SECURE YOUR TECHSHOP MEMBERSHIP SLOT WHILE YOU STILL CANTechShop 1-month, 6-month, and 1-Year memberships are available. May 31st -- the day of the TechShop Open House -- is the very last day to take advantage of our special membership pricing...membership prices will go up on June 1st. With over 160 memberships sold in just the last 3 weeks, we are quickly approaching our membership cap of 500 members. Buy your membership online right now or at the Open House...save money, and make sure you reserve your membership slot and don't end up on the waiting list!We all look forward to seeing you at the Open House on May 31st! TechShop120 Independence DrMenlo Park, CA 94025(800) 640-1975[mailto:info@techshop.ws info@techshop.ws]http://www.techshop.ws/

Topic by TechShopJim 10 years ago


What would be the VERY BEST way for me to TRANSITION into my newly adopted off-grid, survivalist, subsistence lifestyle? Answered

A 16'x16'x16', 256-square foot, A-frame cabin on an elevated 3' concrete paver floating DekBlock foundation with a 3'x 6'8" front flush door, one rear 48"x 48"horizontal slider window, and another upper 24"x 24" horizontal slider window for the sleeping loft.I'm thinking that one of those standard U.S. Stove designs might provide just a little too much heat for my needs up in the Copper River Basin region of ALASKA's rural backcountry. Who knows? What are your suggestions for the above described "habitat"? Where can I find the best deals for my 256-square foot space? (Heating/ventilation-wise, we're speaking of subzero temperatures and heavy snowfall, so, I don't believe that "opening a window" is a practical solution for me if it gets too hot and smokey inside my A-frame.) Plus, I've done the HEATING ESTIMATE for the A-frame I'm going to build and the numbers come out to about a 620,000 btuh (heat loss) for the new dimensions I'm finally settling on: 16'x16'x16' or 256sq.ft. This calculation is for -50 degrees F with cold floor, ceiling, and glass surfaces taken into account. (Insulation isn't a factor this early in the design.) "Wow!" I thought at first. "A 620,000 btuh HEAT LOSS! I reckon you can never have too much stove even for an A-frame design." (Being that A-frame cabins retain heat so well, and that my sleeping loft may get really HOT in the Winter, this was a preliminary concern.) Foundation:(4) 8"- diameter cardboard cylindrical concrete forms for pin-point piers;(4) 84" reinforcement rods for pin-point concrete forms;(16) Bricks for base of footing;(24) Layout stakes;(8) 5' batter boards;(1) Spool of wire for joining the two 14" reinforcement rods for each footing base;(1) Spool of line for marking building layout lines;(?) Bags of cement;(?) Bags of gravel;(?) Bags of sand...*A few questions about the amount of concrete needed for the four footings and the four concrete piers: "How much concrete will be needed for four 8"-deep concrete footings poured into four 16"-diameter, 44"-deep holes with each containing four bricks and the four reinforcement rod supports? How much concrete will be needed to fill four 8"-diameter pin-point concrete pier forms to an estimated height of about 80"-inches? How many total bags of cement, gravel and sand (aggregate) will my foundation require? Most importantly, how much will it all cost?"A-Frame Structural Triangle (Theoretical Dimensions):Sides = 16'Base = 16'Angles opposite sides = 60 degreesAngle opposite base = 60 degreesArea = 110.85125168441 sq. ft.Perimeter = 48 ft.Framing:(2) 2"x 10"x 16' girders;(12) 2"x 6"x 12' rafters;(6) 2"x 6"x 8' joists;(4) 2"x 4"x 4' collar beams;(10) 4'x 4' plywood sheets for subflooring;(2) 16' framing braces for structural support against wind damage;(?) 3200-square feet of roof/wall sheathing material for exterior surface areas...*A few questions about the amount of roof/wall sheathing material needed to cover the 3200-square foot exterior surface area: "How much exterior sheathing will I need? How much will it cost? I understand that metal sheathing is preferred in the Copper River Basin region for its snow-shedding ability, so, given everything I've just said, what are my options for the A-frame I recently designed?"My total approach to this whole subsistence lifestyle (i.e. living off the land within a small, confined space) is probably all wrong. I understand that I might need to change my complete "mindset" and adopt a sort of NAUTICAL (or MARITIME) theme with my decor, furnishings and appliances.Since I'm really getting into boats anyway (my one chosen option for escaping the bitterly harsh winters of ALASKA's COPPER RIVER BASIN if all else fails), I feel that marine stoves, composting toilets, and an overall nautical aspect in the "finish work" might help me cope since sailboat cabins tend to be tiny, and I may need to transplant a lot of what I have to my seagoing vessel, "Vera Essie".www.geocities.com/wduncanbinns

Question by Herr VOLKMAR 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago