Solar Energy

If you have any idea about solar cooker than share with ME... 

Topic by ramoliya_ankit   |  last reply


Simple Solar Cooker

Hi,I was invited by GoWithFlo to add this project to the FullBellyProject group. From my understanding this group would be an ideal place to discuss improvements to the design and more importantly test it in the field.Please don't hesitate to ask any questions and provide any comments!Thanks!Kevin.

Topic by yaaaay   |  last reply


Suggestions for another part of the heliostat is needed!

Https://www.instructables.com/id/HELIOSTAT/First of all thank you especially forgesmith for your help. Now is the time for the replacement for the rubber bands (to split the distance) in the plan. Any ideas? My twin spools that retract like a tape measure can work. Also 2 "geared" wires with a gearwheel in the middle would work. The centre of the reflector be joined to a piece that passes through the gearwheel.(I will draw it later!) Anyways, hope to get some answers. Thank you BrianThe part of the question below has been answered!Basically i have to attach the reflector so that it can swivel round the mounting.The way old farm tractor 3 point linkages worked on the back would be perfect. The side arms have a little ball in them and you put a shaft on the attached plough or whatever through a hole in the ball and fasened it with a clip. Imagine the reflector in place of the side arm and you have a perfect attachment BUT there is probably a modern urban alternative. Can you think of one?I am in no big rush myself because I have a big work project to complete but suggestions would be awesome for the near future.Thank you Brian White

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply


Solar panel mounting and tracking.

I have a new video about equatorial mount for solar panels. If equatorial mount is turned slowly at the right constant speed, then the panels point at the sun all the time. I also have a diagram about something to get that constant slow speed. I have it done this way to avoid wind damage. I think if you did it this way and had a sump pump to pump the water back up every morning the thing could be  automatic, cheap  and very accurate. Brian

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply


Need some help on a solar oven design, please.

It's going to be one of those with a box chamber with gathering panels. Should the inside chamber of a solar oven be black, to absorb the heat, or should it be reflective to make sure that the tray and food are the only things that absorb it? What shape should the chamber be?

Question by GigaHertz   |  last reply


"Compound" parabolic solar cooker. Suggest a way forward!

I have a new instructable (Late December) about making your own templates with technical drawing tools. You can basically make the compound parabolic dish to catch 1,2,3 or 4 hours worth of sunlight. I have made a 3 hour dish and it worked great as a solar cooker. I have not however solved the math for exactly how the light reflects to the cooking pot. It is pretty good but not yet optimized. Would anyone like to join in? I can either make the instructable a collaboration or you can post your refinements on appropedia on their wiki.I do not want this project to lie stillborn like the pulser pump did for 20 years but how to engage people? Thats the real problem. Thank you Brian White 21st dec 2008 and it has worked really well. I would like others to try it so I made a template. I chalklined across the dome at 15 degrees intervals, Put clear plastic over it, marked the lines on the plastic and cut the plastic. Basically all you have to do is cut a piece of ply to be like the template, use it to cut out 12 mylar segments and then tape them together. (I do not know how you will hold this umbrella open, thats up to you!)My dimension lines were vertical on the paper, it just looks angled from the picture. Figures (all in inches) are 0.5,15.5,17,31,7,12,2.5 and 3/4 just in case you cannot read them. Its a funny looking template but I think it is good enough of an approximation for this. I devided the 2 long curves into straight lines.Should be fine. I also have a pdf file containing results, etc as the second image file. Just click on it and it should open. (solar for group.pdf) Brian Brian

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply


Kyoto trough 2 wing concept. Try it in a panel cooker?

Panel cookers are simple solar cookers that are made by folding cardboard. When folded, sunlight shines on the panels and gets reflected to the cooking pot. (Normally the cooking pot is painted black and it is often covered in an oven bag to keep heat in better). But, I have never seen a picture of a panel cooker with the side folds in towards the cooking pot instead of out away from the pot. My tests indicate that it will cook for a longer time if you face the side panels in. Anyone want to try it? Also, the tests in software show that a normal panel cooker might give better if it was made with a long tail in line with the path of the sun. Would you like to make small ones and compare this to a normal panel cooker? Small ones heating pint jars of water might be very good for comparison. I have too much cloudy weather to do this. Also, do not worry too much about parabolic. A part circle is just as good for solar cooking and the important thing is to have the axises of curve (Perhaps there is a correct word?) of the troughs or panels at right angles to each other. Brian

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply


Can combined troughs replace parabolic dishes for amateur solar cooking?

I have being doing limited testing of the combined trough shown below and it seems to work as expected. I used a 4ft by 8 ft piece of corrugated plastic for the big trough (too wide but I was reluctant to cut it). Compared to dishes, this was incredibly easy to make and actually gives more reliable concentration over a longer time period. Would anyone like to try it on tiny demo scale? (I mean something tiny made with 1ft by 2 ft paper perhaps) see if you can make a panel cooker with the design as a template? I think it will work with hemisphere curve, or parabolic curve, any curve or panel cooker shape that shines the light on a cooking vessel. Key points. 1 The troughs must be curved in directions that are at right angles to each other. 2 the long primary collector trough must be in line with the path of the sun.And thats basically it! The primary trough concentrates light in one plane and the secondary trough (the little wings round the red pot) concentrate it in the other plane. I then tried to get software to show if it was any good and It seems to show that it would cook for significantly longer than a parabolic dish. But the software showed that it was not as good as I had hoped. From running the software (art of illusion) I came up with the kyoto trough as a possible solution.The kyoto trough is a trough made by taking 2 halves of a parabolic trough and twisting them a little inwards roung the focus. This can focus all the light between the focal line and the bottom of the trough for a time period coresponding to the angle of twist. 15 degrees of twist coresponds to one hour. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uX9Z-nsUHiA. That is a really useful property because it confers reliability. The next part of the kyoto trough can just be an ordinary parabolic trough to do a final concentrationof the light onto the cooking pot. Well 2 small troughs to deal with 2 streams of light going towards the cooking pot from either side of the trough. Are any mathematicians interested in resolving the troughs into a Kyoto Dish? which would give much longer cook times than a parabolic dish.Brian

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply


Old cardboard box wins major "green" prize.

Want to get credit for an idea that is older than you are?Simple - give it a cool name and tie the idea in with trendy green terminology.A cheap solar cooker has won first prize in a contest for green ideas.The Kyoto Box is made from cardboard and can be used for sterilising water or boiling or baking food. It's just a basic solar cooker - cardboard, black paint and aluminium foil - but discussing it in terms of sustainability and carbon credits makes it worth 75,000GBP and potential mass-marketing contracts.(Cynical? Me?)(Story)

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Solar Energy

Hi, i would like to ask for opinion, i am building a solar system where my system start from using a fresnel lense to collect the sun and use it to heat up a boiler, the boiler transfer steam into my tesla turbine and the turbine will turn my generator to produce electricity. Do anyone have any idea of building an own boiler instead of using a pressure cooker that i had seen this idea in somewhere, And, is there any places can provide cheaper fresnel lense as the sun focusing tool?? i will need a cheaper price lense cause of shortage in my budget of my final year project... 

Topic by 000123000   |  last reply


I got another question.

Guys..i got another question. I'm interested in this one project. Here's the link (http://www.tuvie.com/portable-parabolic-cooker-collects-solar-energy-to-cook-your-food/comment-page-1/#comment-19374) It heat up oil using the solar and the oil is the one which produce heat to the coil which will be use for cooking. My question is do you guys have any idea what oil is being used? I'm trying to find out about the oil because that solar cooker is much more easier than what I'm planning to built. That's the only problem about the solar cooker, I don't know what type of oil is used.

Topic by trojanator   |  last reply


Kyoto Trough, is it greener than the Kyoto Box?

The idea behind the Kyoto Trough is to use a parabolic trough (rotated inwards round its focal line) so that all the light it collects over a certain time (1 2 3 or 4 hours) focuses BELOW the focal line. Then you use other troughs (probably facing at right angles to the first one) to concentrate this light further onto the cooking pot. I have done a rudimentary test in software and the concept does work there. I think it will also work as a panel cooker. It is very important to line up the primary trough with the path of the sun across the sky. It should also work as a panel cooker. Just a much longer panel cooker with the v shaped little wings like in the diagram Or perhaps a panel cooker with just one "tail" going up in the air and insulation on the back half of your cooking pot? (taking away one half of the device) Thanks Brian

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply


how i make my solar battery charger but i dont have knowledge ?

you make a own solar battery charger to not buy more battery or new battery.

Question by warengadia   |  last reply


Software for designing solar cookers and reflectors for solar panels

Parabolic dishes are favoured because they are "perfect". Unfortunately they are only perfect if they are kept constantly pointed at the sun. In practice this is very hard to do. A better shape would maintain good reflection of the sunlight for a long time without moving the dish.I think I have found useful easy software to help with this design work. It is called art of illusion and you can see my first results and a downloadable scene file to help you get started on step 12 of this instructable https://www.instructables.com/id/Make_a_quotcompoundquot_parabolic_solar_cooker/Brian White

Topic by gaiatechnician 


Clock based dripper tracker for solar applications (panels solar cookers, etc)

I just made an instructable and entered it in the green competition. Way too late of course. the picture shows the generic driver of a battery wall clock. I have adapted one by removing the 2 concentric pipes in the middle that run the minute and second hand to just leave the hour hand driver that i use to drive a "gear" wheel. Anyway, the idea is to do a little dismemberment of clocks, and use the little drive mechanism to control the turning of a solar reflector to continually have the sun focused on what you cook. My current edition of it seems to be working. I believe a simple tracker is sorely needed for solar applications. Once a reliable one comes on the market, you may see new backyard applications popping up. For instance, I cook soil! I stick it in a big black pot, and steam it in my tracking solar cooker for a day. This generally reaches 60 or 70 C (It is a big pot and soil has a low thermal conductivity) which is enough to kill seed eating bugs and weed seeds. I end up with excellent home made seeding soil. Solarization is also possible. Again, a big pot or can, put in all your rotten insect infested fruit, cook for a day, and next year, less bugs on your trees and less sourse of fungal infection. It might even end up as a stage in the processing of compost. Lots of weed roots and seeds survive the compost heat. But they might not do so good after a day at 70 C! Tracking might even be accurate enough to make quicklime! Quicklime is made from limestone CaCO3 that is heated enough to drive off the CO2. You then slake the lime (add water) and it gives off a lot of heat. Heat storage potential? and you have Ca(OH)2 which is the basis for lime plaster. Parabolic dish concentrators can get hot enough to cook limestone. but I do not know the details. There is more of but that will do for now. I hope people try this and prove to the holy free market that simple trackers are needed! Brian White

Topic by gaiatechnician 


What would you do with a big satellite dish?

That's right. I have just become the proud owner of a big oldschool satellite dish. It is made from fiberglass and has some of its support/mounting hardware. I have some ideas about what I want to do with it but I'd be glad to hear your ideas too! Brainstorm away!

Question by snotty   |  last reply


Cheapest Solar Water Heater and Cooker needed which can keep the water warm for a few hours

I have read many of the instructables about hot water heaters. I am a person living with a really meagre salary so can not afford to find or buy things like refrigerator backs or car radiators. Even though, after having read all these instructables, I have a need as well as a wish to have some kind of water heater that can atleast warm the water in cold / rainy weather to a level which does not feel cold. Something ofthe body temperature level or warmer will do. AND after warming this water, it can be kept for a few hours without much loss in the temperature. Quantity could be like 10 liters or so. Any help most appreciated. The instructable using cold-drink bottles is a nice one but the quantity of water is very small so can't be used for bathing / washing etc. I'm also looking for a solar cooker with very low costs, which is able to cook rice in about 2 hours time. Any and all help greatly appreciated. Thanks, RS

Question by rseni   |  last reply


Rice Cooker Burger, Robot Zombie Figurine, Cup Sphere Lamp

  Rice Cooker Burger Robot Zombie Figurine Cup Sphere Lamp Resurrect a Motorcycle Make Bath Bombs Cheap Masquerade Masks Hybrid Solar Panel Arduino on a Perfboard Rope Bridge Bookshelf Upgrade Your Promo Camera Iron Man Make a Talking Clock Coffee-Stained Coffee Table Simple Microscope Webcam Make a Garden Fountain  

Topic by randofo 


Want collaborators for a solar hot water project

I have had this idea for a while and I decided to try and make it a collaboration instead of just trying to do it by myself. I thought there was a way to start a collaborative instructable, but I don't see that option now. Does anyone out there know how to do a collaborative instructable? Maybe that option appears right before you publish it? I don't know if the best way to share ideas is this forum, or the collaborative instructable (if it exists). ******** Here is the idea: I have a solar box cooker, which is shown in this instructable. On days when I have nothing to cook, I often put a kettle of water in it, so when I get home from work I have very hot water that can be used for cooking pasta, making  tea, coffee etc. I pour that water into a thermos, and it will stay hot until the next day. I would like to design and build a solar cooker that is dedicated to this task with this tentative list of requirements: *It would be fairly small, just large enough to hold a kettle *It would be easy to put the kettle in and take it out *It would be weatherproof, so it could sit outside for months at a time *It would be designed in such a way that it would collect energy from the Sun during a large portion of the day, without need of any sun-tracking mechanism *Ideally, it would have a mechanism that would transfer the water to a thermos as soon as it boiled, or got to a certain temperature. Looking forward to hearing from people who want to collaborate on this. As soon as we have decided on where to share ideas, I'll post mine.

Topic by dlginstructables   |  last reply


Solar reflector mounted on part of an office chair, might give people some ideas.

Http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhpwOD2gZLA is a video that shows a solar reflector that I made from mylar and an 8 by 4 sheet of corrugated plastic. I approximated a parabolic dish by cutting it to  make cones. I used bamboo to make it more sturdy. (Still needs more bamboo). It is on a stand made from an old office chair.  I intend to line up the mount properly and put it on equatorial mount but that will take a while. It might be weeks before I have time to test the thing so here it is for now.   I am slow at the experiment stuff. The dish started last september! And it took me that long to figure out how to keep the shape resonably tight. So here it is at this moment. It will change a lot before it is finished but no reason not to show the current state of the project. Brian

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply


Feedback Can someone test my Instructable "software for solar reflector design"?

I have an instructable about designing better reflectors for solar cookers. (Better than parabolic dishes). Basically you can design your own dish, and compare it to the parabolic dish and other shapes with the software. On step 1 there is a zipped folder for download. It contains an art of illusion scenefile. Art of illusion is the modeling and animation software I used. It is easier to learn than its competitors and it is free. The folder also contains a html file for almost automatic tabulating of your results and comparison with other reflector shapes. I have "starter" jpg images for when you create series of 10 images for comparison. I hope to put in a help html file too but thats all for now. To test it, you do need to download art of illusion too. I know this type of project can be a bit of a pain but with feedback, I can refine it. And where else do you have free tools to test solar reflectors? https://www.instructables.com/id/Use_software_to_design_a_better_solar_cooker/I hope that this will grow. A guy in Finland has already done a rudimentary "sun engine" that will do the shadows from a day as an extension to this project! That could be used to design passive solar houses and to site vegetable and fruit gardens in the best spots. (Depending on the seasons and day length, shadow patterns from trees and houses are very different). This is not something you can imagine just from surveying a site! Anyway, hopefully I will get some input.The instructable has grown and changed a lot as I have improved the scenefile. There are certainly parts that need trimming now. Hopefully I get round to it in the next couple of days. Brian

Topic by gaiatechnician 


"designer" to help make exotic reflectors for unattended solar cooking.

I have been thinking about this idea for a while but there are so many options that  I took a while to pick one.  One idea was to have the 2 laser pointers on a turret like a microscope and move the model around underneath. Before you discount it as rubbish, please look about 5 minutes into this video  And pause it at about 5min 50 to see the "tuba like horns" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSMzKg6fwJ8    HIs design was done by computer and in my view is way too complicated but I hope it opens peoples eyes to some of the failings of parabolic dishes for unattended solar cooking. There ARE other options and they do not look anything like what we imagine. I believe that people can design exotic fairly high efficiency solar cookers (with a range of cooking times)  using the method I show. If anyone wants to help make the instructable more understandable, I can open it and make a collaboration. Or I can credit people for their input.    Also, it is community commons so it is no longer my idea, release and improve it anywhere you want. I will be improving the instructable myself over the coming weeks but do not expect instant improvement. The instructable is at https://www.instructables.com/id/Method-for-designing-reflectors-for-unattended-sol/ and I have attach a pic here to get people started (I will improve that picture too). Brian

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply


Anyone want to do peer review? Open source product devellopment

I made the pulser pump 20 years ago. (A low tech trompe airlfit pump combination to use low grade water power.It never attracted scientific research funding and never got tested because it is simple and doesn't produce electiricity.I put up an instructable about how to make a model but nobody has made one.Last year I made the "mechanical mathematician" which is a new simple device to allow people to make moulds for parabolic dishes from cob or mud.The same constraints apply and official science will never check it out.This year, there is the tracking solar accumulator, the clock based dripper tracker and the 2 bucket dripper tracker. (Guess I am on a bit of a roll because I needed solutions to make the solar tracking accumulating barbecue a reality.)Official science will not be interested in this either.It is all very low tech stuff. Cheap simple trackers have been identified by solarcooking.org as an important part of getting solar cooking widely introduced. The clock based tracker especially could change things a whole lot for many people. It can be cheap and accurate enough to provide all day semi-automatic solar cooking. I have adapted a few clocks for this but there are probably many models on the market and you might find the ideal one or a better way of adapting one to help make better trackers for solar cookers.It takes years for new (even appropriate technology) to be introduced.Please help these things get introduced much faster by making some of them yourselves.And if you already have made some, please post them! Do not be afraid of doing a bad job. Places like the full belly group would be good to post your stuff or video or text responses to my utube videos.I will happily take down my instructables if someone posts better versions! I have made all these things but my versions were just demo's to show what could be done. There are no patents on any of them.Please join in. http://www.youtube.com/user/gaiatechnicianBrian White

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply


Auto-Lacing Shoes, Rice Krispie Treat Watermelon, Bicycle Sidecar

Auto-Lacing Shoes Rice Krispie Treat Watermelon Bicycle Sidecar Applying Henna Touchless Lamp Book Light USB Bike Generator Photography for Dummies USB Mystic Light Paper USB Connector Wide-Angle Webcam Croquette Fix a Flashlight Earbud Volume Control Solar Funnel Cooker

Topic by randofo 


How do I turn screenshots for my computer into acceptable pictures for instructables?

I have an instructable on software to design better curved reflectors for solar cookers (among other things). Anyways, I put in screenshots of how I use the software and of my results tabulated in a html page with the pictures of different reflectors and how good they are in tables. The screenshots are actually fine but when i upload them they turn brutal. How can i keep the quality of the screenshot after uploading. This is really important for this particular instructable. The screenshots show that for a 1 or 2 hour unattended cooktime, there are several curves that are significantly better than a parabolic dish. But they do not show anything much after upload! I have the most recent one below. Brian

Topic by gaiatechnician   |  last reply


Great New Sciplus Products (not spam)

If you've never heard of American Science and Surplus, they're a neat online store that features all sorts of odds and ends. Instructables once had a contest sponsored by them, which is how I originally found them. This week they have some new products that seemed particularly useful to you all:Acrylic Easels - These look perfect for making a Laptop Bubble Stand without all the fancy bending.Aluminum Tape - If you want to make a solar heater or cooker, this looks promising for an easy to apply reflective backing.Polymorph has been featured in plenty of instructables. It melts in hot water, at which point you can shape it to you every whim, and then allow it to cool. It's almost like being a Jedi!

Topic by Weissensteinburg   |  last reply


Green Science Fair Winners

Instructables and Discover Magazine are happy to announce the winners of the Discover Green Science Fair for a Better Planet Contest!We asked you to show us some great green ideas and you responded with a flood of them. Over 200 Instructables were submitted over the past few weeks and tons of useful information has been put out there to help others with their own green projects. You are all an inspiration, truly.Thank you for putting so much time and effort into these Instructables. As always, we wish we had more prizes to give out. Now, on with the winners! First 10 Entries For jumping into the contest early, the authors of these Instructables will receive a Discover Magazine t-shirt. Ways to be green How to get FREE 9 Volt Batteries Recycle plastic grocery bags into Loons! Tips on how to improve gas mileage All-Natural Incense Burner Science Fair Display Board How to recycle an old sweater How to Boycott the Bottle Easy Seed Starter Supercharged Lemon Runners-UpThe authors of these Instructables will each receive a copy of 20 Things You Didn't Know About Everything, a book from the Editors at Discover magazine. Mini Wooden Portable Compost Bin How to build a 72Volt electric motorcycle How to Make an Easy Inverted Planter £5 Japanese lamp from recycled materials Trickle charging auto-switching LED helmet Make your own plastic tote bag from recycled plastic bags From old Tourist Map to Gift Bag How to Make A Solar Powered Fan! solar lawn mower How To Smell Pollutants Third Prize The authors of these Instructables will each receive an Eton FR150 Microlink, a Solar-Powered, Crank-powered Portable Radio with Flashlight and Cell Phone Charger. Cheap solar tracker Organic planting pots from newspapers Bike Generator Recycled Denim Shopping Bag The Green Pail Retained Heat Cooker Second Prize The authors of these Instructables will each receive a Sansa Express 1GB MP3 player, Instructables Robot t-shirt, patch, and stickers. Solar Powered Trike Urban Homestead Garden (squarefoot gardening abridged) First Prize The author of this Instructable will receive a Celestron Skyscout that uses advanced GPS technology with point and click convenience to identify thousands of stars, planets, constellations and more. Plus Instructables Robot t-shirt, patch, and stickers. Make Your Own Biodiesel Processor Thank you to all of our judges for helping to choose the winners. Colin Bulthaup (CTO of Potenco, co-founder Squid Labs)Christy Canida (Instructables)Stephen Cass (Senior Editor at Discover Magazine) Saul Griffith (President of Makani Power, co-founder Squid Labs, MacArthur Fellow) Corwin Hardham (CTO of Makani Power, co-founder Squid Labs)Jeremy Jacquot (treehugger.com, USC student in environmental sciences) Tom Kostigen (co-author of The Green Book: The Everyday Guide to Saving the Planet One Simple Step at a Time)Ed Lewis (Instructables)Corey Powell (Executive Editor at Discover Magazine) Sarah Richardson (Senior Editor at Discover Magazine) Gemma Shusterman (Media Lab grad, Juror for the 2008 SIGGRAPH art gallery)Tyghe Trimble (News Editor at Discover Magazine)Eric Wilhelm (Instructables, co-founder Squid Labs) Daniel Wilson (Roboticist, author of How to Build a Robot Army) Laura Wright (Senior Editor of On Earth Magazine, published by the Natural Resources Defense Council)

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


Amazon.com® and Instructables Science Fair Results!

Amazon.com® and Instructables are pleased to announce the winners of the Science Fair! The entries were sweet, and I personally learned quite a few new things. Check out all the projects here.Grand PrizeThe grand prize winner for will receive a USD $1,500 Amazon.com gift certificate, a custom laser-etched Leatherman Juice S2 multi-tool, and an Instructables Robot t-shirt.The Rubens' Tube: Soundwaves in Fire! by yourtvliesFirst PrizeEach first prize winner will each receive a USD $250 Amazon.com gift certificate, a custom laser-etched Leatherman Juice S2 multi-tool, and an Instructables Robot t-shirt.Build an antique style crystal radio by OhmWiimote Rubens Tube: Control Fire With Sound! (And a Nintendo Wiimote!) by ScaryBunnyManKitchen laboratory II: The CO2 trap by syribiaThe Hilsch vortex tube by thecheatscalcRunners UpThe runners-up will each receive a USD $25 Amazon.com gift certificate, an Instructables patch, and stickers.A simple mechanical resonance demonstrator by 5VoltHow to make plastic by aaPreparing your own thin layer chromatography plates (and then using them) by allanf0Make a Voltage Controlled Resistor and Use It by BioteleElectromechanical Transducer Out of a Polystyrene Conical Section! by BookburnMake Potato Plastic! by Brandon121233The Bio-Battery - Power for the future. (So easy a 10 year old can do it.) by chowdeshellMotor Speaker by guyfrom7upHow to make air muscles! by HonusMeasure the drag coefficient of your car by iwilltryBarbie Doll Electric Chair Science Fair Project! by jessyratfinkMake an Evaporative Terra Cotta Beer Chiller by jolshefskyBe a scientist: make your own force meter. by Kiteman8X10 foldable pinhole camera by lennybBuilding a better Guinea and Feather by Luke LuckGrowing Mushrooms: PF Tek by nakKelvin's Thunderstorm - Create lightning from water and gravity! by NK5Be a Scientist: Learn about Triboluminescence (or Lightning in your by RedNeckOreoLet's go green! Build a Solar Powered Parabolic Cooker! by WeissensteinburgGeodesic Dome Greenhouse by yes2techFamily CollaborationThese collaborating families will receive a matched set of Instructables Robot t-shirts and an acrylic Robot plaque laser-engraved with their names!The Bio-Battery - Power for the future. (So easy a 10 year old can do it.) by chowdeshellLaunch it: the Huffin' Hoopster by KitemanAll winners should watch their inboxes for a private message with prize-claim instructions.The following Instructables were rated high enough to be runners-up, but the authors already had a winning entry:Hack The Spy Ear and Learn to Reverse Engineer a Circuit by BioteleBuild a solar hot dog cooker by iwilltryMeasure the specific heat of water and other fluids by iwilltryBe a Scientist: map your skin by KitemanThe Chaos Machine (Double Pendulum) by Luke LuckKitchen laboratory: Proteins and Cheese making by syribiaMake Rheopectic slime in less than 15 minutes! (It is not Oobleck) by syribiaGive a big round of applause to our awesome judges who spent hours going through each project:Bill Burkland, CameronSS, canida, dan, dave spencer, ewilhelm, fungus amungus, jeffkobi, KaptinScarlet, lebowski, noahw, Peanut, turkey tek, viron, and zieak.From complete voting results, go here.Amazon, Amazon.com and the Amazon.com logo are registered trademarks of Amazon.com Inc. or its affiliates.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply