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How could I put oogoo inside a bike tire to make a solid tire?

I think oogoo would be a great material for a solid bike tire, the only problem is it wears away pretty easy so it would be nice to be able to put it inside a regular bike tire in place of the tube. I've been racking my brains but cant think of a way I could avoid air pockets and was hoping someone would have suggestions. Thanks. By the way i know solid tires ride different. I have them on one of my bikes now and they're a lot harder material than oogoo but I'm thinking oogoo would be hard enough.

Question by avocadostains    |  last reply


Where can I buy a 48" bike wheel? Answered

I want make a high wheel bike but I don't want to make the giant wheel. A solid tire would be nice to. thanks

Question by T_T_    |  last reply


Aah please help me solve a little problem with making a nerf gun

I'm also making a nerf gun but I ran in a bit of trouble trying to attach a pump jack (is that what it's called? or maybe a tire valve ) http://img80.imageshack.us/img80/30/dscf0035ve1.jpgI need to attach a cap on the red circled end and in this cap there must be a mounted pump jack (the standard one like I would use with the pump below it), I tried to use a replacement tire one just make a hole and insert the jack with a round rubber end in the back but it would still leak and fall out. I went through at least 2 caps and 3-4 rubber tire valves trying to get it to glue/ceil it but nothing works. So i somehow need a metal/solid pump valve that would be attached to the cap solid and ceiled. Is there a way to attach one to a flat PVC surface so it wouldn't move without much force but enough force to put the pump onto it, anything without worrying of breaking it off and make sure its air tight (some product I can maybe?)Ok hope at least some of it makes sense, looking forward to any advice I've been stuck here for quite some time. Thanks a lot Alex

Topic by sleepwalker0    |  last reply


Rubber "sand" What to do with it?

They market the stuff for installing around playground equipment. It's shredded tires. I got a load free. I plan to use some for backfill in a spot which was very rough to dig out. But I'll have leftovers. Can I vulcanize it into solid rubber? How?  Mix with concrete to make it lightweight? Or will thermal changes cause rubber to expand /contract too much?   What else could be done w/ it?  

Topic by Toga_Dan    |  last reply


TR8

Still using the same old TR8 turret? Tired of tearing apart your hands trying to replace a broken mini pin? this turret is both sturdy and easy to access the pins for easier than ever replacement the last thing you need during a war is to spend time repairing your gun with this mod not only is your turret as solid as it can be but it is also as easy to access and replace parts as necessary! i understand it uses a lot of blue clip connectors so this mod may not be for everyone but i would highly recommend this turret and use it as my standard TR8 turret

Topic by Knex Lego Maniac    |  last reply


And now I'm left feeling slightly empty

Finals are OVER! And I should be ecstatic, but I'm just exhausted. I had Fluids, knocked that mutha outta the park. Modeling Methods (ugh!) think I did good, even a zero on the final would still net me a B in the class. Circuit analysis (yech), somewhere between a 60-90 in that class, the class was incomprehensible, the online test was broken and you can't learn with 220 people chatting over the prof. and lastly Machine Design- I'm worried about that one, I had a 90% going into the final, but I forgot to put J & I for a solid shaft on my formula sheet, oops, that cost me a shaft design problem, and when the heck did we cover welding? dammint. Next up Vibrations, Heat Transfer, Mech Properties of Materials and CadCam. BUT!!!! in between, well I have an interview tomorrow, I'm undecided on if that is a good thing, and then it's a week of floating around the Caribbean. Woot! And I'm now a member of Tau Beta Pi, which I'm pretty darned proud of. But FINALS ARE OVER!!!! No more spending until 1am in the library until we're all so tired we can't even read the problems. YEA!!!!!! nap time.

Topic by Tool Using Animal    |  last reply


Why less memory usage with more memory??

So.... seandogue uses a circa 1995 2005  (doh!) computer as his main desktop workstation (he also has a nearly brand spankin new superduperree laptop, but it's just not gertrude, if you know what i mean...) Anyway... My computer is old, yes, but relatively solid. A bit sketchy since it's XP but whatever. The issue is memory and memory usage. I just added a pair of 2G modules to boost it's effective memory from 2 to 3 G. )XP old and only acknowledge s the first 3 even though my machine can accept up to 8G Prior to the upgrade, my initial memory usage upon completion of windows load (desk is up and no more hourglass backgroundy stuff) usage was about 800M, prior to loading any "actionable" software (Ie, ignoring the sundry processes and applications that run automatically after on at boot...I mean programming IDEs, notepads, calculators, email, browsers, photoshop, cad progs, winamp, labview, music comp, etc.)  And now? darn if my baseline  memory load hasn't dropped over 60%, down to ~490M So. what gives, ibles-sages? Me, I'm stumped (seriously) .At first, I thought to myself, 'hrrrrm... maybe it has something to do with swapping...', but then almost immediately I discounted that, since I hadn't reached threshold for swap to engage. Then I thought,  "Is it possible there was damage on the 1G chips that would go unrecognized  but would cause memory load to be higher than it should have been? Are newer modules more efficient or something?" To add to the confusion, it *seems (I haven't done any serious forensics and really don't want to have to) . applications of various sorts seem to take less memory as well. Then I came here. kinda tired of hashing out every single solution all by my lonesome and I'm hoping someone will be able to clear that confusion up with an authoritative response. Just doesn't make sense to me why my load would drop by such a significant amount, and I'm really and truly tired as hell of speculating and of speculation.. Speculation eats time like dime store candy surrounded by a hundred hungry children. and it more often than not produces erroneous output.. (no, not looking to debate the efficacy of speculation either, My best feature is the ability to speculate, and it pays to know how, but even I get tired of living in a nebula of "there is no like right like answer" 100% of the time.) So heps a mind-worn joe, aye?  Someone please tells me in no uncertain terms why this is? >>>>  More memory added, less memory used? I really don't want to launch another google search that may or may not  yield the answer after reading a few hundred erroneous or misleading posts. To be very clear, the system is behaving BETTER, not WORSE, with the new modules, even when operating at quiescence, where max memory overruns (and the subsequent swapping that such overruns spur) aren't an issue.  thanks gracias danka...

Question by seandogue    |  last reply


Help for completion of Knee Walker Project ?

Hi Everyone I have a problem with a project I started to overcome my unique disability , this project was to basically install low powered electric motor on a kneewalker so I could get assistance / go off-road , yet still use it manually if need be i.e. to get some exercise or more importantly if battery dies ( something I cant do with mobility scooter or wheelchair  ) The problem however is I cant do this myself due my disability ( weld it , use power tools etc ) so I had this person i meet on a another  forum who agreed to help me - but unfortunately he hasnt   - so instead I am trying to find a replacement for him or any one that is willing to help. The motor itself ( Motor - MW12B GoldenMotor  )seems to work fine using a Lyens controller , but  unfortunately there is no direct link to the hub motor whose details are below. Model: MW12B -- 12" Motor Wheel Voltage:36V (Brushless) Power Rate:250W Weight: 4.8Kgs You will have to got to the gm website on the link above click on hub motors and scroll down to find more details , including links to 3d drawings . You can see the motor itself working in following videos that were posted by the person who still has it video1 video2 video3 Due to the size difference of the wheel  ( 16" compared to the front 9" using MTB tires ) amongst other things, we were  trying to find a way to mount it that he suggested would probably involve having to weld on some strong rear forks from a bike  or perhaps something else. Ive included the whole assessment / plan we did based on our mutual ideas and discussions below for reference, but Im afraid thats pretty much it , as I dont have any of the parts here for reference or than the basic facts . If any ones interested in helping , or going me any advice Id be grateful for your suggestions , if any ones wants to offer their services at a price just send me a pm and we discuss things further. thanks for listening , heres the assessment / plan I mentioned.. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I need to figure out a rough plan for the wheel mounting, plus brake mounting. We need to get disc and caliper. We need to figure out what front wheels, how to mount them, and how to fix the sloppy steering. In order to go see a welder we need to know where to weld the dropouts, the caliper mounts, and what, if any welding to do at the front end. Assessment Frame - good, solid, heavy. bulletproof. Wheels - strong, solid, better made with bearings etc better than expected. but hard tires are not nice, and wheels are a little too thin and too small. I expect its easy to get hung up on small obstacles. brakes - crap. none existent basically. Just a bit of metal pushing on the tyre. Also the lever is either crap or a bit broken. need to inspect it. steering - not very good but not crap. whole linkgae is a bit loose and wobbly, just held together by a few bolts. this means it has a fair bit of play in the steering. The whole thing with the bolts is that they have to be a bit loose otherwise the steering won't move. not a very good design. but it will do. handlebars/stem/steerer - designed to be collapsible easily, which is good, but there is also excessive play in this as well. it will do but its not great. ------------------------------------------------------------------ Thoughts.... Because there is four wheels, I found that on uneven floors (just around the front room the floorboards were uneven enough) one wheel is often off the ground a tiny bit. This would be solved by having 3 wheels or tyres with a bit of give in them. I would not want to keep any of the wheels. I would want to replace the front wheels with something a bit wider softer and grippier. like scooter wheels or MTB wheels. Brakes - the center of gravity is quite far forward. if it had brakes only on the front then i feel like it might tip over. then again, with the weight of the frame, the motor, batteries and person, maybe not. I will do some testing. Motors - Golden has the 8" single sided solid tyre motors that would be the easiest conversion, but I don't like the solid tyres and I don't like having 2 wheels at the back. I already ran into my foot. There is also the 8" double sided solid tire. This is not so easy either because it is the same size as the existing wheels therefore the axle would want to go exactly where the existing axles join. Could be done with cutting and welding but would be a pain, plus you still have the solid tire etc. I held up a 12" dinner plate and I reckon it would not look so bad actually. I will take some pics tomorrow. It looks like we would need to cut off a bit of the back section and weld on some dropouts, a bit higher up and further in than the existing axle mounts.. It looks like it will fit under the knee platform ok as well. Controller - because we may well end up with a motor that is not exactly right for the job, I think its all the more important we get a controller with some intelligence. Something programmable where we can set a low voltage, top speed etc. This leads us back to the GM controller, Lyens mini monster, or......I just thought, hmmm the kelly controllers are programmable - well they do a little controller that might be up for the job as well. In fact it looks the most programmable one so far. It is the mini one next to the coke can here: Hub & Wheel Motor Controller | EV Parts They have one that does 12-24v for $79 or $99 depending on max amps. You can get it waterproof for an extra $19 http://kellycontroller.com/kbs2405120a1 ... p-499.html It is fully programmable, see the software screenshots and manual here: Kelly KBS controllers online demo/help-Kelly Controls, LLC http://kellycontroller.com/mot/download ... Manual.pdf You need a serial port on your computer to program it, if you don't have one you need a serial to USB converter. They sell one for $29. Kelly are good controllers. I never thought of them until just now - I usually associate them with high power controllers for cars and motorbikes. When I used to work at Sevcon (who make argubaly the best...and most expensive...controllers you can get.)....kelly was one of the few competitors we kept an eye on. If you look at the setup software, you can fine tune min throttle, max throttle, max amps, max speed, all kinds of things. It will be just the ticket for fine tuning. --------------------------------------------------------------------- So........... This would be my personal plan right now - Electronics: $115 Motor - MW12B (GM) $98 kelly controller waterproofed $29 Serial RS232 to USB converter (from kelly) $20 throttle (max) $20 ebrake lever (max) $50 wiring, connectors, etc -------- $332 Frame / Fabrication: $50 old steel bike to steal dropouts off (maximum, probably less from craigslist or a garage sale) $150 to pay someone to weld the dropouts on and maybe brake caliper mounts plus machine front wheel mounts if necessary for new wheels (maximum) $50 (max) 2 front wheels MTB or scooter 8 inch with pneumatic tyres. $30 (max) new axles, bolts, washers etc $30 box for battery plus mounting bolts etc $50 (max) for respray or powdercoat frame (will be messy after welding. something to put the battery in ----------------------- $360 Brakes $20 (max) brake disk for rear plus screw on adapter for rear hub Brake discs $40 (max) brake caliper (cable ok, hydraulic not needed) $50 bolt on brake caliper mount (seen them somewhere but can't find right now) price is a guess. --------------------------- $110 Battery depends. I am clueless as to the requirements of this system. I can test with my own batteries once it is setup. Then we will know, but at a minimum you will be talking about 18 or 24v 10 amp hour. That is : $199 from ping

Topic by hele    |  last reply


Road Rash

Alright, folks. It's story time. What sorts of crashes have you (or anyone else you know) been involved in while riding a bike? Has anything ever spectacularly malfunctioned with a motorcycle, scooter, or other two or three-wheeled monstrosity? Seen a big crash? Ever bought a bike that had been wrecked? I've got a couple of stories. Which one to tell first..... Oh, I know! One time our '39 Chief set the garage on fire. This was back in the '60s after my grandpa had bought it for my dad, for a hundred bucks cash. 20 year old collector's motorcycle for that kind of money? What was wrong with it, you ask? A lot of things. It needed restoring, and Gramps ran a hotel at the time, and, in his spare time, an Indian museum. Both of the Native American sort and of the American iron sort. Parts were found, damage was fixed, and the bike given a fresh coat of Indian Red before it was fired up. Ran like a dream. Happy, they shut it off and went to bed. Now at this time, that garage was heated by a gas heater. The cork float in the bike's carb swelled up and got stuck, continuing to let gas fill the float bowl, run out the intake, across the floor, and... you guessed it, over to the pilot light. It was a flash fire, but it destroyed the curtains on the door and put a solid layer of char on that brand new purdy paint. Not much else in the garage was flammable, so the fire died nice and quick. The next morning, grandpa and my dad got up bright and early to get to work on the finishing touches, like air in the tires and a test ride. The found quite a suprise, to say the least.

Topic by Rishnai    |  last reply


Thermoacoustic electric generation at high frequency? Answered

The goal: cheap, easy(ish) electricity. The power source: concentrated sunlight or fire. The question: Has anyone here made them self one of these? : a thermoacoustic electric generator which runs at high frequency. I'm not talking about a sterling engine at least not exactly. Rather I'm looking to make something that resonates much faster and could be harnessed with a voicecoil or a piezo electric transducer. This has been done by grad students and researchers but I haven't seen any built by the DIY crowd. There are some startups around who tout this method because it is more efficient than a sterling engine and easier to build because there are essentially no moving parts or sliding seals. The higher frequency seems to be the tipping point in efficiency because there is less gas moving but moving with the same energy: "Minimizing the flow velocity of the gas overcomes viscous losses inside the regenerator, whose tiny pores allow heat to move between gas and solid most efficiently." http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/feature/the-power-of-sound/5 I'm thinking of making something with common materials: a loop of steel pipe and speakers or a bunch of piezo buzzers and a bike tire valve to add compressed air (for higher frequency oscillation). Can anyone lend the voice of experience for us? Here's some reference material: http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/news/2003/01/57063 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermoacoustic_hot_air_engine In greater depth: http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/feature/the-power-of-sound/ http://www.aster-thermoacoustics.com/?page_id=141 Videos: http://science.discovery.com/videos/invention-nation-thermal-acoustics.html http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vv0ulNLRkWM And there's a good explanatory video out of Europe but I can't find it now. Key words for 'bots: TAPEC ECN TAP (Thermo Acoustic power) SCORE (Stove for Cooking, Refrigeration and Electricity)

Question by snotty    |  last reply


Big Band Music Stands

I am the leader of a 17 Piece Big Band. Just like Glenn Miller or Harry James, I need to find a way to make some inexpensive but deco looking music stands. In the old days, they used to make them in all types, sizes and styles. Today, they have one kind. I would like to find a way to make some myself that can fold up and be transported fairly easily. If you have an idea of how to do this, I would love to hear from you. Please feel free to email me if you have questions. The stand should be in two parts, the base and the shelf. The shelf should sit on the base. The shelf should also have a lip for the music to sit on without sliding off. The total height of the back of the stand should be 36". The height of the front of the stand, where the music sits, should be approx 29". The width of the top portion, the part that holds the music, should be 22". The lip should be 3 to 31/2 inches. The base will vary depending on style and shape. I look forward to anyone who thinks they have a way to make these. They need to be strong enough not to blow away in wind, yet easy to fold and carry. After all, I will be moving 17 of them each time I perform. As far as the style, well, the more art deco looking the better. If I could have anything I wanted without the worry of cost, I would choose stands that looked like the front of a car from the 1930's and 40's. It would look as though it had a grill in front along with the large round lights, perhaps a cap on the radiator, large wide fenders and whitewall looking tires on the side. Now, that is just my if I could have anything idea. reality says a simple square or perhaps v shaped stand. Solid colored, perhaps made from corrugated plastic. Thanks for looking and giving this some thought. Blessings! Ashley ideas@mrlivemusic.com

Topic by MrMusic    |  last reply


have i got 1 good driver or 3 bad ones

Hi all, nice to be here I have just finished building my first cnc router and about to start actually doing something with it, during my build I somehow managed to blow up 2 grbl boards and 6 drivers, hey note to myself, don't connect voltages when tired late at night also I have a problem, I think, thanks to YouTube I found how to set the voltage using the trimmer pots on the driver boards, I set all 4 drivers initially to 0.75 volt and it all works and tests fine, apart from having to buy 2 more driver boards when the trim pots fell off that is apart from one of the stepper drivers powers one motor (Y axis) and when it finishes working it goes absolutely solid locked up and sounds like it is groaning, the other 3 are firm but not locked up I tried increasing the voltage on the 3 looser stepper motors to 1.0 volt and it didn't seem to make a lot of difference, but to get the solid stepper driver down to the same stiffness I have had to drop the voltage down to 0.4 volt and it did stop groaning and loosened a bit I swapped over the motors, same result, moved the driver to another spot on the grbl board exactly the same effect on a different motor, so it looks to me like it is the DRV8825 driver board is this a case of I have 1 bad board and 3 good boards? or 1 good board and 3 bad boards ? any help would be more than welcome info on my cnc build and components below basically the cnc has a bed of 900mm x 900mm and is pure self build made up of parts found laying around my workshop, rails bearings lead screws etc, and I added in a new Arduino uno (of which I am novice) and a new GRBL board and ended up using DRV8825 drivers, stepper motors are used (eBay) 4 x identical minebea 23LM-C343-14V wired from 6 wire down to 4 wire with pairs being red & yellow and pair 2 being blue & orange, which I believe is correct LINK TO STEPPER MOTOR SPEC SHEET please correct me if I have made a mistake I have used links to set all drivers to 1/32 micro stepping, also set the mm rate so it is exact at 500mm travel, and set max speed at a sensible 400mm per minute as I am not really expecting supersonic speed and all is nice and quiet, nothing straining I have paired 2 of the stepper motors via the grbl to drive the X axis and used the clone spare on the GRBL to make that work, which it does marvellous The CNC structure does need strengthening up as mostly built on ply at the moment, but everything works as expected, the spindle is a nice almost new RotaZip high speed tool that I bought new about 4 years ago and only used it on one job so keeping stuff does come in handy even if wifey says it doesn't Look forward to sharing info on here as I learn more

Topic by IanT107    |  last reply


Fastest you have ever been.

I have a car, but no permit or license. One day, my brother told me to bring him something while he was at work. I was driving down the street going the speed limit or a little over and under. I turned onto the main road Speed limit, 50mph, and just went 50 or so the whole way. and when i got back onto the highway, this guy is following me to my bumper basically, so in the non passing zone just getting on i am going about 25mph, as you are getting on it is 35mph limit, as soon as it reaches 50mph, i jam the gas, it goes into passing gear and in no time i am doing 80mph. and on an S-curve still doing 80. On the stretch i am doing about 60mph, and decided i should just stick to the speed limit. Got a story? A Nice Morning Drive It was a fine morning in March 1982. The warm weather and clear sky gave promise of an early spring. Buzz had arisen early that morning, impatiently eaten breakfast and gone to the garage. Opening the door, he saw the sunshine bounce off the gleaming hood of his 15-year-old MGB roadster. After carefully checking the fluid levels, tire pressures and ignition wires, Buzz slid behind the wheel and cranked the engine, which immediately fired to life. He thought happily of the next few hours he would spend with the car, but his happiness was clouded - it was not as easy as it used to be. A dozen years ago things had begun changing. First there were a few modest safety and emission improvements required on new cars; gradually these became more comprehensive. The governmental requirements reached an adequate level, but they didn't stop; they continued and became more and more stringent. Now there were very few of the older models left, through natural deterioration and . . . other reasons. The MG was warmed up now and Buzz left the garage, hoping that this early in the morning there would be no trouble. He kept an eye on the instruments as he made his way down into the valley. The valley roads were no longer used very much: the small farms were all owned by doctors and the roads were somewhat narrow for the MSVs (Modern Safety Vehicles). The safety crusade had been well done at first. The few harebrained schemes were quickly ruled out and a sense of rationality developed. But in the late Seventies, with no major wars, cancer cured and social welfare straightened out, the politicians needed a new cause and once again they turned toward the automobile. The regulations concerning safety became tougher. Cars became larger, heavier, less efficient. They consumed gasoline so voraciously that the United States had had to become a major ally with the Arabian countries. The new cars were hard to stop or maneuver quickly, but they would save your life (usually) in a 50-mph crash. With 200 million cars on the road, however, few people ever drove that fast anymore. Buzz zipped quickly to the valley floor, dodging the frequent potholes which had developed from neglect of the seldom-used roads. The engine sounded spot-on and the entire car had a tight, good feeling about it. He negotiated several quick S-curves and reached 6000 in third gear before backing off for the next turn. He didn't worry about the police down here. No, not the cops . . . Despite the extent of the safety program, it was essentially a good idea. But unforeseen complications had arisen. People became accustomed to cars which went undamaged in 10-mph collisions. They gave even less thought than before to the possibility of being injured in a crash. As a result, they tended to worry less about clearances and rights-of-way, so that the accident rate went up a steady six percent every year. But the damages and injuries actually decreased, so the government was happy, the insurance industry was happy and most of the car owners were happy. Most of the car owners - the owners of the non-MSV cars - were kept busy dodging the less careful MSV drivers, and the result of this mismatch left very few of the older cars in existence. If they weren't crushed between two 6000-pound sleds on the highway they were quietly priced into the junkyard by the insurance peddlers. And worst of all, they became targets . . . Buzz was well into his act now, speeding through the twisting valley roads with all the skill he could muster, to the extent that he had forgotten his earlier worries. Where the road was unbroken he would power around the turns in well controlled oversteer, and where the sections were potholed he saw them as devious chicanes to be mastered. He left the ground briefly going over one of the old wooden bridges and later ascertained that the MG would still hit 110 on the long stretch between the old Hanlin and Grove farms. He was just beginning to wind down when he saw it, there in his mirror, a late-model MSV with hand-painted designs covering most of its body (one of the few modifications allowed on post-1980 cars). Buzz hoped it was a tourist or a wayward driver who got lost looking for a gas station. But now the MSV driver had spotted the MG, and with a whoosh of a well muffled, well cleansed exhaust he started the chase . . . It hadn't taken long for the less responsible element among drivers to discover that their new MSVs could inflict great damage on an older car and go unscathed themselves. As a result some drivers would go looking for the older cars in secluded areas, bounce them off the road or into a bridge abutment, and then speed off undamaged, relieved of whatever frustrations cause this kind of behavior. Police seldom patrolled these out-of-the-way places, their attentions being required more urgently elsewhere, and so it became a great sport for some drivers. Buzz wasn't too worried yet. This had happened a few times before, and unless the MSV driver was an exceptionally good one, the MG could be called upon to elude the other driver without too much difficulty. Yet something bothered him about this gaudy MSV in his mirror, but what was it? Planning carefully, Buzz let the other driver catch up to within a dozen yards or so, and then suddenly shot off down a road to the right. The MSV driver stood on his brakes, skidding 400 feet down the road, made a lumbering U-turn and set off once again after the roadster. The MG had gained a quarter mile in this manner and Buzz was thankful for the radial tires and front and rear anti-roll bars he had put on the car a few years back. He was flying along the twisting road, downshifting, cornering, accelerating and all the while planning his route ahead. He was confident that if he couldn't outrun the MSV then he could at least hold it off for another hour or more, at which time the MSV would be quite low on gas. But what was it that kept bothering him about the other car? They reached a straight section of the road and Buzz opened it up all the way and held it. The MSV was quite a way back but not so far that Buzz couldn't distinguish the tall antenna standing up from the back bumper. Antenna! Not police, but perhaps a Citizen's Band radio in the MSV? He quaked slightly and hoped it was not. The straight stretch was coming to an end now and Buzz put off braking to the last fraction of a second and then sped through a 75-mph right-hander, gaining ten more yards on the MSV. But less than a quarter mile ahead another huge MSV was slowly pulling across the road and to a stop. It was a CB set. The other driver had a cohort in the chase. Now Buzz was in trouble. He stayed on the gas until within a few hundred feet when he banked hard and feinted passing to the left. The MSV crawled in that direction and Buzz slipped by on the right, bouncing heavily over a stone on the shoulder. The two MSVs set off in hot pursuit, almost colliding in the process. Buzz turned right at the first crossroad and then made a quick left, hoping to be out of sight of his pursuers, and in fact he traveled several minutes before spotting one of them on the main road parallel to his lane. At the same time the other appeared in the mirror from around the last comer. By now they were beginning to climb the hills on the far side of the valley and Buzz pressed on for all he was worth, praying that the straining engine would stand up. He lost track of one MSV when the main road turned away, but could see the other one behind him on occasion. Climbing the old Monument Road, Buzz hoped to have time to get over the top and down the old dirt road to the right, which would be too narrow for his pursuers. Climbing, straining, the water temperature rising, using the entire road, flailing the shift lever back and forth from 3rd to 4th, not touching the brakes but scrubbing off the necessary speed in the corners, reaching the peak of the mountain where the lane to the old fire tower went off to the left . . . but coming up the other side of the hill was the second MSV he had lost track of! No time to get to his dirt road. He made a panicked turn left onto the fire tower road but spun on some loose gravel and struck a tree a glancing blow with his right fender. He came to a stop on the opposite side of the road. the engine stalled. Hurriedly he pushed the starter while the overheated engine slowly came back into life. He engaged 1st gear and sped off up the road, just as the first MSV turned the corner. Dazed though he was, Buzz had the advantage of a very narrow road lined on both sides with trees, and he made the most of it. The road twisted constantly and he stayed in 2nd with the engine between 5000 and 5500. The crash hadn't seemed to hurt anything and he was pulling away from the MSV. But to where? It hit him suddenly that the road dead-ended at the fire tower, no place to go but back . . . Still he pushed on and at the top of the hill drove quickly to the far end of the clearing, turned the MG around and waited. The first MSV came flying into the clearing and aimed itself at the sitting MG. Buzz grabbed reverse gear, backed up slightly to feint, stopped, and then backed up at full speed. The MSV, expecting the MG to change direction, veered the wrong way and slid to a stop up against a tree. Buzz was off again, down the fire tower road, and the undamaged MSV set off in pursuit. Buzz's predicament was unenviable. He was going full tilt down the twisting blacktop with a solid MSV coming up at him. and an equally solid MSV coming down after him. On he went, however, braking hard before each turn and then accelerating back up to 45 in between. Coming down to a particularly tight turn, he saw the MSV coming around it from the other direction and stood on the brakes. The sudden extreme pressure in the brake lines was too much for the rear brake line which had been twisted somewhat in his spin, and it broke, robbing Buzz of his brakes. In sheer desperation he pulled the handbrake as tightly as it would go and rammed the gear lever into 1st, popping the clutch as he did so. The back end locked solid and broke away, spinning him off the side of the road and miraculously into some bushes, which brought the car to a halt. As he was collecting his senses, Buzz saw the two MSVs, unable to stop in time, ram each other head on at over 40 mph. It was a long time before Buzz had the MG rebuilt to its original pristine condition of before the chase. It was an even longer time before he went back into the valley for a drive. Now it was only in the very early hours of the day when most people were still sleeping off the effects of the good life. And when he saw in the papers that the government would soon be requiring cars to be capable of withstanding 75-mph headon collisions, he stopped driving the MG altogether. Written by: Richard Foster

Topic by Yerboogieman    |  last reply


TR8-2015 Review

I received my TR from Killerk this morning. I've had a little hands on time with it so I'll write up my text review now, though I'll also be making a video review in the near future. For now, here's the unboxing and first impressions video: So just to start, I've never made a TR before. I have limited experience with turreted weapons. So what I knew about them I only got from videos and other people's reviews. I didn't doubt the TR was a great performing weapon, but I was wondering what all the hubbub was about. After finally messing around with one for the morning, I can see where the praise comes from. I also noted some things I'd still like improved, at least to personalize on my variant.   I'm going to use a grade scheme (because everyone's impressions on stars and scales are usually biased toward higher numbers). So, just to clarify, don't think of C as bad. It's average. I'll point out what's subjective. I'll nitpick a lot of little things, and I'll give credit where credit is due. Anywho, on to the review. Aesthetics: C+ My impression of the TR has always been that it's been a rather simple weapon. I'm a rather hard man to please in this category. The front is a tube barrel construction. I don't care for the looks of turrets because they're rather chunky for the amount of ammo they take up. The stock is a little skeletony. And it seemingly has weird support pieces thrown in random places. But it's not bad. It still looks like a good weapon. The stock has a nice design. It has a relatively clean cut design around the outside. Ultimately, I know most was for the sake of a strong, durable weapon, and I'll be sure to personalize it more.   Ergonomics: D+ This one I gotta be honest on. The handle just doesn't float my boat. My hands are shaped oddly so I've always made weird sorts of handles myself. While the tires are a cool concept, they help keep your grip on the weapon, and I thought they'd be comfortable, their edges tends to stick out and dig into my hands. They also bulk up handle in a way that my hand just doesn't easily fit it. Like, I know my Oodassault's handle is also rather big, but my hand still fit around it naturally with a flat back and indents around around my thumb and point finger web. But this is something I can customize in the future, so it's not the end of the world by any means. I can still use it as is without being in total pain.  The trigger is a bit different. Not uncomfortable, but not the way I like triggers. Something I'll want to change, but I don't want to compromise its strength, so I'm going to keep analyzing it. The stock is a bit compact. This is yet another preference thing, but I'd like it at a slightly longer length. The charging handle isn't too comfortable to use either. With the rear sight integrated into it, it's a bit difficult to get a good grip on, which is important when you have the bands loaded up on it.  And again, this is subjective so I'm sure I can improve it for my preferences and it'll be just fine. I otherwise appreciate what Killerk attempted here. The front grip on the other had is rather comfortable. I don't think I'll need to change that ever. Ease of Use: B Things look up from here. The ratchet mechanism wasn't immediately obvious to me, but with previous K'nexing experience, I figured it out. Still, I wouldn't trust a newbie to be able to pick it up and know how to use that part specifically without direction. So that's part of the reason it's not a higher grade, but again, nitpicking. It's otherwise incredibly useful to be able to wind the band without turning the turret itself. It lets you load ammo and then just twist the ratchet, which isn't too difficult, to make sure it loads after each shot.  When I change the charging handle to be more comfortable, I'll appreciate it much more. Having a charging handle on a weapon loaded up with a lot bands makes it a lot easier to use. The rail guides and the pin guide are all perfectly constructed to make sure it's a smooth, straight pullback.  On that note, back to the stock from an ease of use perspective, because it's a bit shorter than I'd like, I don't feel like I have proper leverage on the charging handle. It's one thing I like about pistols, being able to use both arms to pull apart the gun and the pin to make it easier to draw. For this weapon, it's recommended to shoulder the stock and push back against you, which would be a little easier for me with a longer stock. It probably won't be a problem for others. Overall, I think someone strong enough could pick it up and, with a little direction, figure it out pretty quickly. It's something I could easily teach a friend how to use and then they shouldn't have a problem with it. Reliability: A This is one of the areas where the TR shines. It's only not perfect because of a few possible things you can do to mess it up. Now, to be fair, I haven't fired it enough to have a misfire, but I doubt that'll ever be a problem. The nature of the turret itself means that you shouldn't have any problems. However, I'd worry about little things like bumping the turret in such a way it skips a round. The power transfer pins offer a point of failure for the gun if you're not careful. Removing a round requires you to manually push back in the pin to avoid accidentally firing off an empty chamber, which I can imagine might be bad. I'm also a wee bit skeptical about the trigger setup but it hasn't failed on me. I may want to make a safety mechanism for this weapon, though. Something that wouldn't allow the trigger to move out of the way of the pin at all. Construction: A-  It's pretty dang solid. I did notice (more nitpicking) that the handle connection creaks a little bit. So it's not perfectly solid, but Killerk did a pretty good job at constructing this in such a way there shouldn't be many points of failure. It held up in shipping after all. There are some odd support structures here and there, but then some areas that are either neglected, or he just didn't care about. Honestly, I have no idea what he added because he thought it was necessary, what he added because it looked cool, and what he added just because he could. So there are some things I might change for the sake of consistency and aesthetics, but it's otherwise something I'd trust be able to drop, pickup, and use just fine. I'd only worry about dropping it right on the turret.  Performance: A+ This is the one area you can say is perfect for the TR. Basically, it's designed to maximize power, and finned ammo are designed to be stable, thus increasing range and accuracy. The tube barrel minimizes the snag on the pin from hitting any gaps and gives the gun a solid mounting point for bands. The turret treats each round as a single shot. The length of the charging distance is maximized while still being practical. It's as good as you can do for a pin gun, and it's as accurate as you can make K'nex ammo with minimal modification/using entirely different materials.  Overall Thoughts as a War Weapon:  I'm not going to grade this because there's so much opinion thrown in here, it wouldn't be fair. I can see where this thing would be everyone's weapon of choice. It has an 8 round capacity, which seems limiting, but you can reload whenever you happen to find ammo, so in theory it shouldn't be a problem until you're rushed with low ammo. If fin ammo is allowed, then clearly it's the best you can do for a repeater at the moment. Without it, it's got the most effective range you'll possibly find for a pin gun, though it's just not as easy for me to prime as a pistol. It's a weapon more about picking your shots instead of dishing them out as fast as possible. I'll need to do some raw comparisons with my Oodassault pistol to see which I'd prefer after I see all the differences. For example, what if the range really does make a difference compared to the ease of recharging? I'll just have to make it to a war with both weapons sometime and see which I do better with. Overall Thoughts as a Fun Weapon: Its main novelty is the range and accuracy you get in a repeater. It's satisfying to shoot multiple rounds down range and hit your target with ease. Other than that, it's mostly featureless. It's not something I'd dink around with in the house (mostly out of fret of damaging the walls). It might impress my friends the first time they see it and how far it fires. The ratchet mechanism might also be cool to show. But after that, there isn't much wow factor. Not that you'd need much more. It shoots hard. That's all you'll need to wow someone with plastic and rubber bands. I'm personally the kind of guy that likes having things like realistic charging handles, removable magazines, adjustable stocks, etc. just for novelty's sake, but that's just me. This is a no-nonsense weapon built for performance, and in that regard it does very well. I'll keep mine around and make small modifications to it. I won't deconstruct it for pieces to make other weapons. It'll be nice to have a raw performance weapon around all the time so I can focus on new concepts without think "I wish I had something that fired well, I'm going to rebuild my Oodassault." So it's fun enough to be worth keeping.  Overall, I'd highly recommend making it at least once just to experience it, see what it's all about. If you enjoy performance, taking highly accurate and ranged shots at targets, you'll appreciate it. It's also pretty modular in that if you keep its base construction intact, you can personalize it reasonably well. Better weapons can be built just for the sake of having fun, so it's not something everyone might want to keep permanently, but if you have the pieces, I think a lot of people will like to keep it around, as many already have.

Topic by TheDunkis    |  last reply