Search for solvent in Topics


Sourcing solvents in michigan

Ok, so I'm having some trouble finding solvents in quantities of under 5 gallons (5 is too much, and  for this project 1 gallon is too) that arent acetone, MEK, or xylene (home depot and lowes carry those). Specifically I need Perchloroethylene because thats the solvent that E6000 glue is made with and is the glue I want to thin out. The datasheet indicates that  1,1,1-Trichloroethane, Cyclohexane, Methylene chloride, Chlorothane NU, Chevron solvent 1100, gasoline, Propyl acetate, or Toluene will also dissolve it, but I'd really like to stick with its manufactured solvent.  I presume it would have some sort of pricey hazmat shipping charges or the necessity of some sort of licence and I would rather pick it up, so where (or who) can I order some from in the Detroit area?

Question by The Ideanator    |  last reply


what is a slovent solution thingy ma bobey?

(for science exam)

Question by leo rox ur sox    |  last reply


how to manufactture pvc solvent cement?what are the ingredients?

I want to manufacture pvc solvent cement.can anybody guide me?

Question    |  last reply


I want to take a standard inkjet printer and turn it into a solvent ink printer any ideas?

I want to use this for making full color bumper stickers on vinyl. etc

Question    |  last reply


Where to get MEK? Answered

Hey all,A few years ago I used to see MEK (Methyl Ethyl Keytone) in local hardware stores all the time. Don't know what happened, whether OSHA, or EPA, or some other .gov busybody is responsible, but now it's nowhere to be found... and I've finally run out.Any leads on where I could purchase a jug of it for a good price?P.S. In case anybody is wondering, I have some dried-out liquid electrical tape that uses MEK as the solvent. I am hoping to resurrect it. I suppose I could try acetone, but I'm afraid if it goes wrong it could permanently wreck my mix. :P

Question by PS118    |  last reply


Butane recovery

I have instructions for extracting pure essential oil from plant material using butane. The problem I have with it is that at the end, the butane is vented. I just don't feel right about venting unburned hydrocarbons into the atmosphere. I've been looking at glass lab equipment (distillation tubes, connectors, etc). I have no background in chemistry, but it seems to me it shouldn't be too difficult to put something together using standard glass lab equipment to capture, distill and reuse the butane. Butane boils at 31 degrees Fahrenheit and is heavier than air. At the end of the process, the oil is scraped from the bottom of a drying dish. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to put something like this together? Thanks

Topic by GlobalVillageIdiot    |  last reply


Essential oil/Alchohol/Solvent purification and separation

Hi,I have a lot of impure essential oil that has a lot of water in it and was thinking about ways to get some of the water out. Would salting out with Epsom salts work? I've seen an Instructable where a nonpolar solvent is used to extract nepecatalone https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Kitty-Crack%3a--ultra-potent-catnip-extract/ would one be able to use a solvent that is immiscible (I swear that's a word) in water to get the constituents that are not water soluble out of the water?Also can common solvents (I'm thinking alcohol, acetone, and toulene) be salted out to increase the concentration? Would this work with dilute hydrochloric acid?-mitch

Topic by fearofsquirrels    |  last reply


How to dissolve wood glue of a brush? Answered

After I used a brush to apply Gorilla© wood glue I forgot to clean it and, I need to know if there is a solvent that can remove the wood glue of the brush.

Question by blkhawk    |  last reply


Butane distillation

I have instructions for extracting pure esential oil from plant material using butane. The problem I have with it is that at the end, the butane is vented. I just don't feel right about venting unburned hydrocarbons into the atmosphere. I've been looking at glass lab equipment (distillation tubes, connectors, etc). I have no background in chemistry, but it seems to me it shouldn't be too difficult to put something together using standard glass lab equipment to capture, distill and reuse the butane. Butane boils at 31 degrees farinhite and is heavier than air. At the end of the process, the oil is scraped from the bottom of a drying dish. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to put something like this together? Thanks

Question by GlobalVillageIdiot    |  last reply


how do i remove the printing from a plastic shopping bag?

I'd like to remove the logo/printing from plastic shopping bags to use in a prop. I imagine there's some solvent that might do it, anyone know what it might be? Thanks

Question by chambrey    |  last reply


How to make a 3D printed Montana face mask

The internet is now literally flooded with these great face masks.People are even selling them for profit in blatnt violation of the creators intentions.A lot of people like me, with a 3D printer have abandoned their projects and ressources for the greater good.If is now us "geeks" making a huge difference in our local communities.I have accumulated few tricks when it comes to these masks over the last few weeks and kg of filament.The number one complaint if you dare to call a nice request a complaint is that the printed surface is often too hard to clean.The Montana mask needs to be printed in either PLA or PETG as other plastic can't tolerate the harsh sanitizer requirements over a long time.Nylon would work fine as well but is too difficult to deal with in the machine and severly limits the options to glue or stick anything onto the material.Be aware that PETG is a true pain here as well!Ok, PLA it is but how can we all speed the printing up and produce an even better surface finnish?The key like with ABS to use a solvent to either perform a vapour cloud smoothing or to brush or even spray the solvent onto the surface.Added beneift is that you can repair minor damages or imperfections quite easy instead of wasting the mask.PLA is "organic" to go with the food hype here.That means common solvents used in biolabs will work just fine.Hey! You forgot to tell us what solvent to use!!Sorry, my bad :(Use Ethylacetate the same way you would use Acetone on ABS.Dissolve some PLA in it to make a thin slurry or as said just brush it on with a suitable brush a few times until you get the desired surface quality.No Ethylacetate at hand? No problem ;)One word though: Please use level 3 PPE when dealing with the ingredients or concentrated solvent!That means chemical and acid proof gloves, apron and face shield.For making it you should also use a fume hood or at least a breathing apparatus/filter maks with acivated carbon layers.You need concentrated Acetic Acid, also called Glacial Acid is it will freeze at about 17°C.You also need ethanol of at least 98% - no methylated spirit, denatured alcohol or such things if you can as the end product will contain the contaminants.Slowly add the acid to a small amount of the alcohol.Use a glas stirrer or similar to mix it a little bit.Use indicator paper to check for the acidity.Once it gets acidic add a small amount of alcohol to get into the neutral zone again.You can dry the product using the common drying agents for solvents that contain water as by your chemical book or preference.Again: Please be advised that Glacial acetic acid is not only extremely harmful but also highly flammable and that it can explode under the wrong handling conditions.Whenever possible you should obtain Ethylacetate solution from a proper chemical supplier to avoid the hazard of making your own.Do not attempt if you are not used to and trained to handle dangerous chemicals!Once the mask has the required finnish let the solvent evaporate off over nigh in a well ventialted area.After that a simple wash with soapy water followed by a sanitation with bleech solution makes the mask reay to pack and seal.

Topic by Downunder35m  



How non-toxic is CA glue? Answered

Hi gang, I know CA glue (Krazy glue, Cyanoacrylate) is solvent based, and inhaling the solvent is bad for you, but how safe is it after the glue cures? As I understand it, after curing the glue is basically a plastic.  Can I use it in a baby's crib (Assuming it's allowed to cure)? Thanks!

Question by Morgantao    |  last reply


Can I Use H2O2 As A Solvent An Dmix It With Aluminum Oxide?

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Question by tmonk11    |  last reply


Propan-1-ol vs Propan-2-ol as laser lens-cleaning solvents? [Answered elsewhere]

I was going to buy some propan-2-ol (isopropyl alcohol) to clean my laser cutter lenses. Before I went and bought some, I found a small bottle of propan-1-ol (so, I'm a hoarder!). I know they have different structures, and slightly different chemistries, but I can't find anything about their comparative properties as cleaning solvents. Will the 1-ol do the job of cleaning laser-gunk off lenses and mirrors, will it do nothing, or will it damage them? I'd rather gather your wisdom before I risk having to buy new optics...

Question by Kiteman    |  last reply



How do I know what solvent to use to etch plastic travel mugs?

I am in charge of a not for profit and don't want to pay the $50 set-up fee for getting our logo onto 30-40 travel mugs. I'm kind of crafty and wouldn't mind doing it myself if I could find out how.

Question by ahuntress    |  last reply


what can be used to thin Dap Kwik Seal Plus for spray coating

I am trying to figure out what solvent would be safe and suitable to thin Dap Kwik Seal plus enough to be applied to a latex coated foam surface via a HVLP sprayer. does anyone have any thoughts on this?

Topic by lunchbox739    |  last reply


what could I use for.....

Hello! For a project that i will transform into an instructable I would need a color with following properties: - Stick to metal - Possible to remove using solvents - Water resistant - possibly sprayable - Protect sprayed material from direct contact with water. (not long term.. half an hour is enough.. ) - NOT heat resistant. if heated the color should be damaged and come off the metal without the use of any solvents. - must be as dark as possible any Idea of what could be used? Thanks!

Topic by sharkyenergy    |  last reply


Cleaning the oil for a vacuum pump

Was too lazy to do an Instructable about it and think a lot of pics or even videos won't help much if you know what I mean ;) Some of us use rotary vane pumps not for the purpose of evacuating refrigeration systems but for all sorts of fun and experiments. This means quite soon or often we face the problem of the oil taking in a lot of water or even worse particles and solvent fumes. I don't know about you but I was getting sick and tired of replacing the expensive oil every few weeks or sometimes even days if something got too wrong. There are many different blends of compressor oil out there that will work very well in our rotary vane pumps. The main difference is whyt the oil is designed for. Some are perfect for aircon systems, others for the work with solvent fumes and there are even those special oils that bind moisture. Unless you really need to evacuted special gases or solvents basically any low viscosity oil will do us just fine! So instead of paying 20 bucks for special compressor or even vacuum pump oil we can select the cheap everyday oil. Well, not exactly... We also want to be able to recycle our oil to save even more money. That means we don't want an oil that binds to water to keep it out of harms way. We also don't want any oil that has special coating abilities for example these oils claiming to reduce wear and tear on your engine. But any other low viscosity mineral oil or if you prefer synthetic oil will do - just stay away from silicone based oils!! If you have not used your pump for a few days you can often see a slude at the bottom of the viewing glass. If the rest of the oil is clear you can simply drain this worst bit and top up with fresh oil if required. This simple procedure saves you a lot of oil already, at least if your pump has some rest every now and then. Once your oil looks wasted it is time for the recycling and cleaning: Release the oil into a high glass jar or these facy spaghetti glasses. Fill with fresh oil and give it a short run. Release this oil as well and wait for it to properly drain. You now have the inside of your pump nice and clean again, time to fill one last time with fresh oil to keep using the pump. The filthy oil we now have in our jar should be covered with some fine cloth or filter paper and placed somewhere warm. After a week or two the oil, filth and water will have seperated and you pump, drain or siphon out the now clean oil for further use. Don't be too exact here trying to get all the oil out, just remove what you can without risking to suck in the filth from the bottom. Simply leave the rest in the jar and add the next oil change to it for the same recycling process. Solvents.... In some cases we will work with solvents and that means the oil might bind to them. Acetone for example is quite nasty here and can change the oil itself by breaking down certain components. In most cases it means the viscosity will be reduced, which is not really too bad for us. What is bad however is the fact that these solvents often refuse to fully seperate or evaporate. Once the oil looks clean do a smell test and if it smells like solvent then for sure there is solvent in it. Next step to confirm is to do a lube test. Simply place on some smooth metal or glass and smear it with your finger - a drop is enough here. If it feels sticky on the surface, gives you a rubber like feeling when sliding over the surface or is far less "slippery" than the fresh oil you also have a problem. I found that filling this contaminated oil into a proper container and applying a strong vacuum will remove all solvent residue in a very short time. Downside is that the oil in the pump is contaminated again, so it pays off to collect solvent contaminated oil seperately and once you got enough for several refills use the pump to get rid of the solvent. When done do another smear and smell test, if still smelly repeat if no longer smelly but still the same bad feeling on the surface: Discard as the oil might be broken down by the solvent.

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


Capsacin?

I have a bag of dried cayenne peppers lying around here somewhere. Is there any way i can extract the oils to make a kind of spicy fire liquid? What solvents (isopropyl? denatured alcohol? acetone?) would dissolve the oils? Thanks.

Topic by John Smith    |  last reply


How can I remove sun deteriorated plastic decals from a painted bicycle frame without damaging the paint?

Peeling off is not an option, I have tried scraping off with a plastic scraper to no avail. Have also tried Goo Gone (citrus based solvent) and Oops! (a stronger solvent) with a non scratch scrubbing pad. I was able to peel the decals that werent' cracked from the sun but the others are basically baked on from the Arizona heat. Would a heat gun work? How careful do I have to be not to damage the paint? What about something like 2000 grit wet/dry sandpaper?

Question by goodgnus    |  last reply


How to remove model paint?

OK, my little brother sprayed Testors paint all over one of my best nerf guns (Vulcan EBF-20) and I need to know how to remove it. sandpaper is out of the question, so I'm looking for some solvent that will remove it.

Question by GearsOfAwesome    |  last reply


How to remove model paint?

OK, my little brother sprayed Testors paint all over one of my best nerf guns (Vulcan EBF-20) and I need to know how to remove it. sandpaper is out of the question, so I'm looking for some solvent that will remove it.

Question by GearsOfAwesome    |  last reply


Stop sign clean up? Answered

What is the best solvent for removing spray paint from stop signs?  Would mineral spirits or acetone work? Would a quick coat of car wax help prevent future spray from sticking?

Question by mole1    |  last reply


18V Dewalt Battery rebuild - how to remove the paper/fiber?

I know how to remove/replace individual cells in the Dewalt battery.  Most of my time doing this is removing the insulation pad.  I haven't found any solvent for the glue yet.  Anyone have a good way to remove the sticky pad?

Question by horsebroke  


Removing rust from a motorbike's fuel tank?

My dad has got a yamaha xs650 but the fuel tanks got rust in it. What solvents can I put in to remove the rust without removing the tank or messing up the fuel? The pics are of 1)in the tank 2)The motorbike 3)a blurry pic of inside the tank

Topic by thermoelectric    |  last reply


Solvent that 100% dissolves gorilla glue? need castable material to chemically to "burn out" for a ceramic shell casting Answered

Hello. I am working on doing an aluminium lost foam casting of a small part. I read although hazardous, some had gotten successful results from using polyurethane foam (great stuff) in a mold, and proceeding as usual. I don't normally use great stuff, so I mixed gorilla glue with 1/3 water, stirred till I had small bubbles, poured into a silicone mold, and got a pretty good few castings that were VERY dense and hardly burned at all. In fact it was practically fire resistant. I threw it on hot coals and it took a long time to shrivel into a hard little mass So next time, I used dollar store foam board next, a la Grant Thompson, but with terrible failures. It seemed the foam board didn't burn very well either. A foam board riser had actually melted off and looked like it floated away in a bubble, although a regular styrofoam block I had cut to shape cast perfectly, but was too thick and the texture was too poor as the foam was so much less dense. It was mentioned in this blog post that someone used acetone to burnout a tricky patten for a lost foam casting, so I figure I have to do the same. My pattern is curing at the moment. But my silicone molds are far more precise and more detailed than my 2d representation I made with a wire cutter. So my question is there another material that is castable but water resistant, like styrofoam, that I could use a solvent to melt out. I can't really do  lost wax because I don't have the equipment and live in an apartment and have to do this stuff out on the beach. Also due to family reasons I can't be away from home for the time it takes to do burnouts, 6 hours for a full flask, but that's also the reason why I am doing the shell casting because I can't spend too much time away from the fam. Thanks for your time, sorry if I rambled. And thanks for all here and elsewhere who teach and inspire, even if they don't know they are doing it.

Question by sk8er6    |  last reply


Fibreglass resin catalyst - any easy thinners available?

I am in the need to make a quick decision before the weekend. A local shop is closing down and I was offer a massive amount of good quality resin for price that you could call stealing LOL Only problem is that there is no catalyst included as the owner realised the container had a leak the stuff was long gone. Buying the required amount of catalyst down here so I consider making my own. For obvious reasons I won't go into the details of making... Problem on my end is that the catalyst needs to be thinned down to 40-60% to prevent unwanted results handling and using it. All the commercial products use thinners based on very hard to obtain organic solvents. From what I could read they are added to prevent mis-use of the product, which means there might be other solvents that work for the thinning without affecting the resin or curing process in a negative way. Big question: What type of easy to obtain solvent can I use for this without compromising the resin or curing? And before anyone asks: No I won't tell you - if you don't know what I am talking about you don't need to ask on how to make it as I won't tell. And no again, I am not looking for ways to make the resin thinner - I need to dilute the pure catalyst to make it useable and safe. My sole intention is make a good deal but unless I find a suitable thinner I won't buy close to 300 liters of resin....

Question by Downunder35m    |  last reply


Does anyone know an adequate way to melt plastic for pouring into molds?

I've tried in a pot with some oil as a quasi-solvent/medium and also a double boiler; both end up with a "goo" that is almost impossible to work with. The type of plastic is #2HDPE and #4LDPE. I have also tried a hot plate and a propane burner; both ways also yeild the same results.

Question by samboy3    |  last reply


Can I remove vinyl tile adhesive from concrete by some sort of power sander machine?

I see that people recommend using different kinds of solvent (and lots of elbow grease) to get the adhesive residue off, but I have an area that is north of 500 sq. feet.  Tile is off and we'd like to stain the concrete.  Thanks for any suggestions.

Question by TracyS131    |  last reply


Nylon and substitutes on a cold bed

It's been some time and I made progress with Nylon. Aldi had some cheap craft glue with methanol as the solvent - this stuff works great for PLA, ABS AND Nylon. The common problem with nylon is that it has no real adhesion to anything, except cardboard and bakelite. Cardboard makes a clean up nightmare and bakelite is not always easy to find, especially not the right type. So I tried various glues, paints and primers but none was really suited for all printing needs. And the cleanup of the bed is imoprtant too as I did not want to spend hours scrubbing with acetone or similar nasty solvents. After the first great succes with the clear Aldi craft glue I checked the local 2$ shops and carft stores and found similar glueswith methanol as a solvent. Since not everyone is lucky enough to get these specials I will tell you what to look out for if you try clear craft glue: Don't buy anything that can be cleaned up with water - you want methanol or ethanol as the solvent in the glue! Do a test with the glue on something that usually does not bind well to cheap glue, like glass and blister packs. Let the glue dry and peel it off - it should be a clear film that is quite strong and barely streches when you pull it. It almost feels like hard paper. All good so far? Check if the nylon, pla or abs really sticks to it: Spread a very thin layer on a piece of cardboard and let dry. Add another, thicker layer and let dry again. Now hold it under your nozzle and extrude a bit of filament while moving the cardboard around. Let cool and check how good it sticks. In a perfect world the cool plastic should peel the papaer off with the glue. Time to prepare your print bed the same way and to start printing ;) Just use a very thin first layer and for the first layer much lower speeds than usual. I print nylon with 60mm/s and the first layer at just 25mm/s, any faster and the first layer does not look right. ABS and PLA are much more forgiving here.

Topic by Downunder35m  


Ultrasound Cleaning

For maintenance purposes, I would like to construct an ultrasound cleaning tank. Preferably an encapsulated ultrasound transducer and generator that could be used in an old solvent cleaning tank which now should not be used. From reading a little about the subject, its application would find a wide use as a clean and environmentally friendly solution in many industrial and domestic applications. Is it feasable and cost effective to build a generator and an encapsulated transducer, and are there any websites to go to to find out more?

Topic by brianeggar  


Film Adhesion? (How do I get old camera reel film to stick to itself in a clean way?)

I need some kind of clear glue to get old camera film, the kind you find on reels, to stick together. I was thinking of finding a volatile solvent and pouring that over two pieces on top of each other. Anyone know what old camera film dissolves in?? Thanks, -Josh

Topic by T3h_Muffinator    |  last reply


How to remove old adhesive from Bakelite plastic? Answered

Recently put back in to use an old Northern Telecom rotary dial telephone.  It works awesome and ironically it has the best sound out of all my phones, huh..  Anyway, the case is Bakelite plastic.  On it was an old label that had its phone number, contact info, yada yada yada...  I peel it off, but under neath the old adhesive made the plastic look matte, as opposed to the original glossy black that the rest of the phone has.  Any idea as to solvents to gently break down the adhesive, yet not effect the old Bakelite plastic?

Question by iminthebathroom    |  last reply


Etching, staining, or wildly coloring plastic

I own too much plastic, that I use regularly, but want to decorate. Is there a SAFE method to chemically or otherwise "mottle" plastic with colors? Not looking to use paints, as those will just peel off. I know that plastics react to some solvents and such, but is there anything that you could 'wash' plastic with that would just outwardly alter the appearance? If I could get an "oil on water", or even just a "camo" sort of effect, that would be wonderful! (I tried searches for what to AVOID using around plastics without risking such an effect, but can't get the right search parameters...) Thanks for any ideas! I'd really prefer not to have to throw stuff out.

Topic by Dragon Maze  


What is the best way to clean out a coffee maker? Answered

I recently bought a Coffee/expresso maker for my girlfriend from Goodwill for Christmas. It's super cool and professional looking but it's kinda dirty inside. Normally when I'd wanna clean something, I'd run like barsol or laquer-thinner through it because I love high powered solvents, but I also would prefer not to kill my girlfriend. Anyone know of anything I can run through a coffeemaker that isn't toxic but kills germs? They make coffee maker cleaner, but it doesn't seem like it'd kill germs. I was thinking vinegar.

Question by Funk_D    |  last reply


How to remove static electricity from plastic surface?

I've put PlexiGlas (acrylic plastic, I think) in my roof in my bathroom. The surface is high- gloss black and should look great. However, these sheets are huge and there is a protective film on the surface which has to be removed and when I do that, the plastic will be loaded with static electricity, which will gather dust. (When I removed the protective film on the back side of the plastic, I saw this result and it isn't good. Is there a way to eliminate/reduce the static electricity before/during/after I remove the protective film? -Because of the black surface, I'm afraid that waterstains and cleaning- solvents might leave stripes/spots that won't look good...

Question by Slugg0    |  last reply


What can I use to dissolve inkjet ink that won't harm mylar? Answered

I have a stock of large sheets of translucent mylar that I want to use as tracing medium. The trouble is that I got them from an engineering shop, so they have plans printed on them. I've had some success "erasing" the drawings using either alcohol hand sanitizer or acetone, but both require some elbow grease and some kind of abrasive, which leaves the surface mottled. Is there a solvent that will dissolve the ink and leave the surface of the mylar more-or-less undamaged? My research suggests that the ink was laid down by an inkjet printer, though I can't be entirely certain.

Question by yoyology    |  last reply


how do I paint on rubber?

I found this adorable rubber dragon in the bargain bin of my local toystore and would like to paint it to give it a costumized look. Unfortunately the toy is made from a material i'm not to familiar with. it's very stretch and it seems to me like it is made from supple rubber. It's sort of reminds me of a dog toy. so now I'm trying to find out what type of paint I can and can't use as I don't want it to start flaking. I'don't mind if the toy becomes stiff. I'd will be more of a display item anyway. Could I use spray paint? should I prime it? should i strip the current paint, and which solvent would be best that wouldn' destroy the toy. Any help will be very much appreciated.

Question by lpringiers    |  last reply


How can I get my power supply to stop blowing fuses?

I built a power supply using a 25.2 volt 2 amp transformer to use for etching projects.  It worked on my test plate but then started blowing the 1 amp fuses I was using with it.  I switched to 2 amp fuses and it works but my transformer is getting too hot.  I have experimented with different amounts of solvent and different size plates, which definitely makes a difference, though my 1 amp fuses are at most lasting about 10 seconds.  I have read about building a control box with a halogen light and a variable resistor to control the amperage, but would it allow me to take some of the load off of the transformer?  And if it would work, how would I connect it to my power supply?

Question by Nordovita    |  last reply


Can the large amount of sodium acetate decrease the stability of the glow of TCPO?

Sir we had made the TCPO by ourselves and we used the dye DAPN(diaminp phenazine) instead of 9,10-bis(phenyethyl) anthracene and use the solvent ethyl acetate for this and procced as your procedure but we didnt't get the glow for minutes.It lasts only for seconds(i.e. 3-5).Is this due to the use of DAPN rather than the use of anthracene? We had made the DAPN with the mixture of OPDA(orthophenylene diamine) with Distilled water and the addition of the HRP(horse radish periooxidase). We had used the amount as: 15 ml of Ethyl Acetate 1gm of Sodium Acetate 3mg of DAPN 3ml of hydrogen Pero-oxide 800mg of TCPO Sir, we are the student of Nepal studying Biomedical Engineering and we are doing our final year project and we need your help in this, as our project is based in the che miluminescece method for the pregnency detector.Please,please sir help us sending your reply.We will be very thankful towards you if you will be kind to us.Eagerly waiting for your reply.?

Question    |  last reply


How to make a large cage for big SNAKES?

Hi, any of you clever guys has a bit of an advanced DIY knowledge of large vivarium building? I am looking for a but of inspiration/tech tips but if anybody loves a challenge, this is what I will be building. Its for my anacondas and it will need to have these specifications: - to hold humidity in/ have waterproof surface on the inside - definitely for the floor - to hold heat in (any ideas of non-toxic heat insulating/reflecting material that is not too thick?) - be fairly light for the purpose of ocassional moving - it needs to be designed with possibility of dismantling for moving in mind, using screws and similar rather than glue etc - to use as much of environmentally friendly materials as possible (ie solvent free etc) - glass doors at the front, all the other sides dont need to be see-through - economical to build - required dimensions: 31 cm tall x 47 cm wide x 204 cm long (front side with the 2 glass doors on hinges, with a partition in the middle 10 or more cm wide) I would be open to innovative materials/ approaches, the main criteria are re-assembly, reasonably low cost and non-toxicity Thanks to everybody for your ideas! In the photo you can see the right half of their present vivarium made of marine plywood. The cage dimensions are (in cm) 61 x 63 x 216.

Question by Khanga    |  last reply


How do I thin out 2-part epoxy?

I'm wanting to make some micarta-like material, using two-part epoxy and paper. I've done a test run, and the material was rigid after it had cured for a few days, but didn't cut like I hoped it would, because the epoxy didn't penetrate the paper. Part of the issue was that the paper was coated, but I'd also like to thin out the epoxy some so that it will soak into the paper better. I'm inspired in this endeavor by these two instructables: https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-homemade-micarta/ https://www.instructables.com/id/Mokume-Kireji-DIY-Woodgrain-Composites/ The epoxy I'm using is 3M Scotch-Weld DP-190. The label says it contains epoxy resin, polymeric diamine, kaolin, and carbon black. The complete MSDS is here. This is what I'm using, because it's what I have. Got a case of these two-tube dispensers cheap at a yard sale. :-) So, what can I use to make this more liquid? Right now the consistency is a little bit thicker than honey. It doesn't spread out when applied to paper, and doesn't soak in at all. My limited knowledge suggests that toluene, listed on the MSDS, might work, but I'm hoping for something a bit less volatile. I'm aware that whatever I do is likely to extend the curing time, but that's not necessarily a bad thing.

Question by yoyology    |  last reply


Oops!

Over the years I've done a lot of things that didn't work out well, and I try learn something from them  hoping to avoid similar problems in the future. I think ibles  needs a place to share these 'educational moments'  to help others avoid pitfalls and to console with laughter anyone who is sitting amidst the ruins of their own project.   So here's the  place to share.    I'll go first........... My first dramatic failure at about age 8 - Gluing glitter onto balloons. Not a good idea. The glue popped the balloon (I think it was 'airplane glue' ) The result was glue and glitter everywhere (including in my eyes) and a lot of unhappiness. Then there was the hot glue surprise -  Using a glue gun to close drip irrigation holes in a garden hose.  It plugged the holes and worked just fine in the overcast cool spring weather. Then a rare sunny day  heated the hose, and all those plugs melted and the holes started jetting water.  I hadn't realized how hot a green hose in the sun could get. And I have made some just plain stupid moves - like spending hours pulling all the shreds of paper out of the toothed wheels on the paper shredder.... you know how they get sucked inside.  After getting it all clear I thought I might as well lubricate the thing with spray silicon stuff.  So far so good. And then I was so excited to see how it much better it would work, I turned it on.  Flash of flame, slightly singed eyebrows, and a TOTALLY dead smoking shredder.  Ummm.... it's really worthwhile to let solvents totally evaporate before turning on electrical things.

Topic by mole1    |  last reply


Multi-function, multi-materials workshops?

I'm on a small rural acreage. My shop situation is that I’ve got two separate, fairly compact spaces for working with wood (or general “handyman” repairs for the home) and for working with metal (cutting, welding, grinding, etc). My metal area is where I also often work with small-engine equipment. These spaces are located inconveniently, separated by nearly 100 feet! I think about how I might like to combine functions under one roof. So I’m posting to try to coax some of you people to show me how you may have done this. Or examples you've found on the internet (give URLs). Obviously, no one wants to get sawdust into an area where torch flames or electric-welding sparks could cause a hazard. And you wouldn’t want to get engine lubricants or solvents mixed up with wood projects. Discussion and description are fine, but I’d really like to see pictures or floor-plan diagrams if possible.  I need examples that represent modest investment, as I could probably only afford to build an enclosure of about 16x24 ft, with a bay door. ( Yes - could probably learn something from shops that are somewhat bigger than this.) In grandfather's day, farm shops were usually multi-purpose. You know, for "bench carpentry", and maintaining or servicing the truck or tractor, welding bailer components back together, etc. Often had a tablesaw, maybe a bandsaw - besides the hoist, welders, socket wrenches. I suppose sometimes a fire did occur in one shop or another, but probably not often.  I'd like to see some more modern versions, rather than just the "version" I have in terms of vague memories. Thanks.

Question by Joel_BC    |  last reply


From “garage” concept to multi-materials workshop: ideas, layouts?

The common concept of a “garage” (the ’man cave’ stereotype) is a place to work on cars and/or motorcycles. How could this be adapted to be a place, under a single roof, to work on small engines, and projects chiefly involving wood as the material, and ones made from steel and/or other metals? Situation: I’ve now got two separate and pretty compact spaces on my rural acreage for working with wood and for working with metal (including work with small-engine equipment). These spaces are located at inconvenient distance.  I’m wanting to conceptualize how I might combine functions under one roof. Needn’t be said: no one wants to get sawdust into the area where torch flames or electric-welding sparks could cause a hazard. And you wouldn’t want to get engine lubricants or solvents mixed up with wood projects, or near flames.  There are people who have done this combo successfully, but few available layout diagrams or photos on the internet - I’ve searched, a lot!  I need input, hopefully including some illustrations of examples.  I’ll only be able to afford a modest investment, possibly 16x24 ft building or a bit larger, with a bay door. (Part of what a bay door would facilitate would be taking welding processes just out of the shop, to work on outdoors during fair weather.) I know that just a few decades ago small-farm shops were often multi-purpose, and used for "bench carpentry", also for maintaining or servicing the truck or tractor, welding bailer components back together, etc. They often had a tablesaw and a bandsaw - besides the hoist, welders, cabinets of wrenches… certainly both a woodworking vice and a “bench vise” for metal. Can you help?  Thanks. (For you who think my question sounds familiar, sorry: I'm just trying again with a new subject line and rephrasing some of my explanation.)

Question by Joel_BC    |  last reply


Other uses for a Caramel Wheel....

I had to clean up large sized decals that used a 3M adhesive.Instead of filtering the solvent fumes with my lungs I decided to listen to the guy in the hardware store that suggested to use a Caramel Wheel instead.Have to say I was very sceptical...Ever had this extra heavy duty 3M tape to get off again??No matter what you try it is a battle of will and endurance...To my surprise using the Caramel Wheel was like using a big eraser on paper.The things rubs over the surface, takes the goo off and leaves a totally clean and stick free surface.What otherwise took me at least a full hour was done in under 10 minutes - great...Once done with the hard work I examined the now well used up wheel.Does not really work as a proper eraser for a pencil as the rubber is much harder.Does not even scratch galvanised surfaces.Does not like it at all to be used on wet surfaces :(It is not just rubber in a fully solid form, more like flaky bits stuck together.First misuse I tried was polishing a piece of acrylic plastic.A cloth or similar always soaks up a lot of the polishing compound, which makes the process costly.Friction was a real issue at first because the wheel just had no grip at all.But on hindsight it helped to spread the compound fine and evenly.When it started to grab I noticed two things.a) The plastic warms up quickly.b) It polishes really good.Downside is that you need a low speed and very little pressure, too much of either and you risk stripping off the surface.Second misuse was on my knife.It is old, it is abused, it is loved tool I prefer, so it does not need to be razor sharp.The burr on the knife edge after sharpening should be removed.Usually I work my way up to 1000 grid, then use a leather strop.Not for this old knife though.In most cases the burr comes off with use.The Caramel Wheel had no problems removing the burr while leaving the edge sharp.And with a tiny bit of polishing paste applied it even managed to produce a extra sharp edge.Last misuse so far was to clean off old silicone from my bathroom tiles.Silicone does not like to stick to silicone!Means when you refurbish for example the silicone around your bathtub it never last long.Chemicals to remove the fine layer of silicone are harmful to say the least.I did not bother with the entire groove, just the outer parts where the new silicone needs to grab.First the wheel slips and slides off a lot but you see how it cleans the surface of the tiles.Then it starts to grab, indicating the tile is clean in this area.Won't do much in the grooves with the grouting though...What I really liked is that the wheel took off what you can't really see.The oily feeling when going over removed silicone was gone, just nice grippy tiles.

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


Heated print beds - are they overrated gimmicks?

For years now I use my old, trusty Mega Prusa with the bare basics in terms of hardware. But basically every new printer out there comes with heated print beds and most users "upgrade" to one to get better quality prints. So I started to to check the reprap forums and other websites to find out why a heated would be a "must have". Quite a simple task you might think, but not so for someone who prints every material on a cold bed with success... What are the official pro statements for a heated bed? 1. Better bed adhesion of course. 2. Less warping of parts. 3. Far less problems with layer seperation. 4. Better print results. And of course there are a few more but not worth listing them. Why do I think most of the four statements are actually unrelated to using a heated bed? Bed adhesion is a matter of print material and surface of the bed / bed preperation, like tape, glue and such. If you filament peels off a cold bed with no adhesion at all it simply means the surface is either unclean or unsuited for the print material. Warping of parts happens because the material shrinks when it cools down, a heated bed is only able to keep a certain height of the print warm. Higher prints won't have any benefit in terms of better layer adhesion with a heated bed. Same goes for seperating layers. Unlike the common believe a heated bed does not fix this problem - it only masks it! Layers seperate because there is not enough bonging between them. This can be due to insuffient extrusion width, too high print layers, wrong print temperature and of course wrong z-axis stepping and wrong extrusion multiplicator. And how good a print comes out of your printer depends on a good calibration and proper print settings - again a heated bed only masks problems ;) Ok, so heated beds are nonsense, right? Well, wrong again ;) They take a lot of worry out of the daily print life to start with. Especially prints with big foot print will benefit, although PLA should never be a problem on a cold bed. If you print long parts in ABS or even Nylon you can have a hard time forcing the plastic to stay on the bed all around the print. A heated bed, with the right settings of course, can make sure your print keeps the shape until it is high enough so the bottom part won't be affected by shrinking anymore. My opinion on how to get the best results... Manage to print on a cold bed first! Smaller parts don't need a heated bed anyway, so use them to improve on your skills of finding the perfect bed material / coating! You will find that once you have really optimised your printer and settings most parts won't need a heated bed anymore. Once you are really happy with the result of smaller prints on a cold bed try something bigger and pay close attention to any problems on the way. For example a big print might start out perfectly but after about 5-10mm of print height you see the part starts to warp and slowly peels of the print bed - especially long parts or thin areas are affected. The infill also affects how a parts reacts during the cooling, so try the same problem print with solid infill as well as only 15% infill to compare - you can stop the print once the problem is identified, don't waste filament. Now comes the magic of the heated bed... You want the temp as low as possible but still high enough to prevent the warping! Why go low if high would help more?? Simply said: If the bed is too hot the part stays soft for a long time, which can badly affect layer bonding and shape. Imagine you squish the plastic on an already "hard" layer - the plastic is pressed flat to be within the set specs. Now if the the layer is still too hot and soft the plastic will push the lower layer in - which of course will expand outwards. So the layer can actually end up to be lower than it should be - layer will still peel ;) Start with around 50° C for ABS and turn the heat down gradually every 10 layers or 25 if you print really thin layers. If the part still prefers to warp go 10 degrees higher. But again: If the stuff would not stick properly on a cold bed work on that first! How do I print on a cold bed and claim it works fine? To be honest, with a lot of time spent on trying, calibrating and finding the right "magic" to put on the glass to make things stick. Nylon, if the part is big, can still be a frustrating task unless cardboard or Bakelite is used but I still prefer the glass bed. I no longer bother with tapes as it can be costly and I hate changing the entire setup just because I use a different material ;) As said, the main key is a proper calibration of hard- and software! If your prints look messy and you spend as much time cleaning your parts as printing them you know what I mean ;) At the moment my "bed magic" is a clear craft glue with methanol as a solvent, mine is from Aldi but similar products can be found in every craft store. The bed is sanded with 600 grid diamond blocks to be as flat as possible and to provide a bigger surface area for the glue. When mostly printing Nylon is first clean the bed with alcohol and put a layer of plastic primer on it before re-applying the glue. With the right temp settings this glue surface can be reused several times with increasing bond to the part. Once the glue start peeling off the bed it cut the area clean and apply another coat just in the spot. A single bottle of craft glue, diluted down by 20%, lasted now about 3 rolls of filament - not too bad for a 2$ investment LOL Seriously though, squeeky clean your glass bed using alcohol and / or acetone and play with different types of craft glue. You want the stuff that is clear and uses either methanol or ethanol as the solvent, don't bother with water based glues! If the glue sticks well to your part but peels off the bed easily try a layer of plastic primer on the bed first - do this outside! However, if your printer is only capable of using PLA anyway you might not want to bother at all and stick to tape ;)

Topic by Downunder35m  


Pure cacsaicin from chilli peppers

I already had a quite long Ible in the making when it downed on me that not too many people should actually create such a dangerous substance at home.So instead I decided to just write a bit about the history, general procedures and what is possible or not.If you already made your own chilli exptract for a special hot sauce or your home made pepper spray then you feel right at home.Those who never done anything like it or at least some essential oil extractions might just find some other interesting stuff to read.I won't go into all details here as those with the basic knowledge will already know the precautions and most things.Capsaicin...The stuff that makes your exes run, clear you nose and makes you sweat like you on fire.At least if it comes within you favourite dish.In the pure form it is a severe irritant and should be handled like explosives or concentrated acids.You just won't make a mistake with this stuff twice - trust me!What really harms you is not the capsaicin itself, it is your bodies reaction to it!It stimulates the same nerves responsible to feel heat and pain, sometimes those for a severe itch as well.And unlike a normal reaction you would get from hot water, it won't stop until it is fully removed.Even after this the body keeps reacting for bit longer.On the skin you can end up with blisters like from a real burn, in your airways it can make breathing impossible!And lets just say that swimming goggles won't look as dumb and funny on your face once you realise you got some fine crystals on your face....If you dare to continue then I assume you are well aware of the risks, dangers and PPE requirements!Pure or extract?I checked tons of so called instructions on how to make pure or 99% pure capsaicin from chilli peppers.They all just produce a really crude mix of goo that happens to have a lot of capsaicin in it.If it is red or even darker it is nowhere near pure.If it has a weird smell that has really nothing in common with chilli than it is even worse.If it is more or less colorless, with a very strong scent that your nose does not like at all then we are getting somewhere.So why is it that we always end up with this color that is impossible to remove?Extracting chilli peppers....A thing most people ignore a bit when in a hurry is that an alcohol extraction requires DRY alcohol.You just won't tolerate water in it, which is why often methanol comes easier and cheaper than ethanol.Some people even think just because the alcohol is either evaporated or distilled off that all is good when using things like methylated spirit.Ever had the problem that you used that stuff and your hot sauce made you vomit after realising that it comes with a bad and extremely bitter after taste?That is the stuff that makes your home depot ethanol unuasable ;)If you use homegrown or otherwise fresh chilli you need to fully dry it first!Don't be fooled by people stating they did it with fresh peppers.What you get this way is some of the worst extractions you can get.Don't be fooled to think you need some Carolina Reaper either.A big bag of chilli powder from your grocery store will do just fine.So what is all in our extract?Alcohol or any other solvent usable for a capsaicin extraction also dissolves a lot of other things.Like the beta carotenes that give the extract the organge to red color.The skin and the entire fruit also contains oils, plus the shiny outside is mostly due to wax...All of this ends in your extract....You not only get what you want and might not mind but also everything else you don't want.Making the difference....The impossible we do right away, for miricles or wonder allow a day or two of processing ;)Assuming you end with a rather large qauntity of alcohol the concentration of everything is relatively low.If you used something like a Soxhlet extraction you already degraded a lot of the capsaicin due to the heat.And even after the best filtering you might have a clear solution but whatever is not a solid is still in there.Imagine you would put it all into a freezer....Surprisingly a lot of stuff won't stay in solution once cooled down enough.Especially if you give it a few days.Depending on what you started with you either get a slimy looking sludge or some crystals showing.Either way it needs to be filtered out and washed.For the washing use the same pure alcohol as before but make sure it is well cooled.If any cacsaicin was already forming crystals then they will be washed into your solution again now to a little extend.But you removed an awful lot of the wax if it was not capsaicin already. ;)Testing the slurry we collected.When using chilli powder from the shops I noticed that there is often no wax to be found at all.While for fresh produce the content is significant.Once dry you make a simple test with water.Capsaicin basically does not dissolve in water, so it would sink to the bottom while wax floats ;)I assume you ended with little to no wax but fine capsaicin instead.From the natural form it is very hard to get crystals bigger than a dust particle.This only happens if the temperature is cold enough and the concentration high enough.As my entire setup is quite small I usually prepare several 500ml plastic bottles that I fill to one quarter by height with chilli powder and then fill up to half with methanol.In the end I use a full 1kg bad of chilli powder but only a may of 5 to ten bottles.Making the most of it.When using alcohol extraction you want to use a little of the solvent as possible.Use means here wasting it instead of recycling it.Once I filtered my white slurry out I destill the remaining solution to reduce it by 50-75%.An almost dark red color is usually when it is time to stop.After this I place it back in the freezer for a day to check if more crystals or slurry forms.If so then I filter it off again.What is left is then mixed with recycled and fresh methanol to soak more chilli powder in my bottles.Means I discard the filtered of chilli poweder once washed, recycle what I can from the methanol and keep whatever the slurry produces that is not wax or dissolves in water.Depending with how much chilli you start you will get to the point where your filtered solution is already dark red.Since the final capsaicin won't dissolve in water you can destill with some added (destilled) water.This way you recover the alcohol without risking to get a sticky goo everyhwere that you need to clean off.It is quite possible to get some more capsaicin this way as with the alcohol leaving it will participate out.Simply filter the solution once the alcohol is recovered.As the beta carotenes won't dissolve well in water either it is best to perfom this destillation while all is mixed.If you can't do this then don't worry to much, it just means a few more minutes of cleaning later ;)Testing the final product....What you have left once the slurry is dried should be almost colorless with maybe a pale yellow in it.Fully dried it should appear as basically white.There should be no smell to it, nothing to tickkle you nose.Colorless and odorless.For whatever reason I still sometimes end up with a very faint smell.Not really chilli though...Depending on the temperature the products is either quite hard to almost britlle (when frozen) to almost wax like at room temp and above.I highly recommend against testing whatever you have on your skin or to ingest it!!!Waste some sauce base like ketchup (you can add it later to your sauce again) or some butter - I prefer the later.Butter become liquid well below the 65°C celsius decomposition temp for capsaicin, so it should dissolve very easy in it.Take a shot glass with just enough butter for a sandwich and dip a toothpick into your product.Make sure there it a tiny bit on it and not that the toothpick has a thick coating!Once cooled down while mixing every now then spread it on some sandwich and take a bite.After a minute or two you should definitately feel a difference to just butter - hopefully not too hot.If nothing happens repeat with a bit more on the toothpick.Still nothing at all usually means you filtered out only by-products and for some reasons managed to make the capsaicin disappear.Hints and tips that might safe your bacon....Methanol boils at about 64°C, ethanol at about 77°C.Capsaicin starts to decompose at 65°C.Not a big deal but if you get to the 80° mark, which is easy which ethanol you might have to use evaporation instead of destillation and waste the alcohol to your surrounding air...Water...For the final product it is not a problem but during the extraction process it is.Despite some people claiming otherwise both the quality and amount of what you end up with are lower.It seems some of the capsaicin binds to the water molecules with the help of some other stuff that the plant material provides.And when you try to destill a solution that was contaminated with water from the chilli it tends to foam up quite badly.While with pure alcohol and fully dried product there is no foaming.What to expect when collecting the end product...At room temperature you can dissolve what you get in product from one kg of dried chilli powder in under 10ml of pure alcohol.However at -20°C next to nothing dissolves in the alcohol.That means as long as you have still over lets say 1000ml alcohol extract then very little will participate out.Just one reason why I prefer to work with small batches - keeps the concentration higher from the start.The more you destill off and re-use the higher the capsaicin concentration in the alcohol will be.So before you start to add any water for the destillation you need to be aware of the consequences.I found out that first destilling most of the alcohol off the single rounds that got too dark in color helps.I just collect this conentrate for the final destillation process.Key is to destill this off to the point where it just starts to thicken up a bit.It should still be liquid but act almost like a thin oil.You don't want it so thick that is crates a coating on the walls when you move the liquid around.In case it did happen just add a tiny amount of alcohol again.Put in the freezer for a few days....Empty into your filter and let as much as possible drip out.Rinse with as little alcohol as possible - have the rinsing alcohol at -20C as well .Do not wash the filter with water but with the frozen cold rinsing alcohol.Cover the filter up and leave in a cool place for the next run - have something under it as it might still let a drip or two off.The remaining liquid leave to evaporate off until it just starts to thick up again a tiny bit - back in the freezer for a day or two.Filter out again then while still a bit wet turn the filter over to remove most what is in it.I prefer to empty onto a teflon sheet and to wear full PPE here....While still wet you try to remove more from the filter with a fine but short brush, knife or whatever you find suitable.Do not continue any action once the stuff starts to dry!Place the filter into a sealed bag and leave in your freezer for when you do anthoer extraction - this way you loose far less product ;)When doing a final destillation with added water to cover all the alcohol you are left with the remains of the original product, minus all solids.Beta carotene is quite beneficial, so it would make sense to include it into your hot sauce.Plus there will always be some leftover capsaicin in it.If you want to use this part of the extract as well to really get what is possible then IMHO slow is better.You can't just destill off or boil off the water to get a nice "sauce" base.The capsaicin that is left would be mostly decomposed and with no effect anymore.A clear sign of too much temperature is bad smell that really turns you off.Hard to define in words but trust me, if you smell it you know what I means as you woul refuse to have this smell coming from your final hotsauce.During the summer it no problem to just leave it out to evaporate in the shade !You can do it in full sun but must make sure no sunlight gets into the liquid.UV decomposes at least a lot of the karotenes....Special equippment at hand? If you happen to have a vacuum pump or at least a salvaged fridge compressor you can safe a lot of time.A buchner filter for 500ml in the top is quite cheap but you can build something similar with a normal funnel.Look it up it you want...A proper buchner filter however already comes with a very fine glass filter built in.Means you don't really need any filter paper - I still add it as it makes the cleaning easier.Instead of waiting several hours for gravity to do its work on a coffe filter you are done in a few minutes.Well worth trying out!For the water destillation of the remaining end product, or by-product if you like, vacuum also helps.CVD or Closed Vacuum Destillation sound complicated but is really simple.One pressure vessel is filled with the solution to be conectrated, the other is kept empty.Connected with a suitable pipe or hose and fully sealed.The extract is heated to about 40°C while the empty vessel is placed into an ice bath.With the pump and the help of a valve create just enough vacuum so create small bubbles in the heated vessel.Close the valve and a few hours later there should be far less water in the hot one while the frozen one builds up ice.Every now and then check the vacuum gauge and if require start the pump again.You can do with just the pump and one vessel....Problem is that the oil in your pump will quickly get far too contaminated with water.You could add a conatainer with something like an absorbent but it would have to be sufficient for all the water you need to remove.Most of all it must be able to absorb it fully before the airstream enters the compressor.The benefit is that the capsaicin can't decompose at all.In a vacuum or close to it anyways, a lot of the things that procude smell also disappear through the compressor.Won't help it was already a stinky mess but will certainly reduce the smell of the concentrate.If you prefer to keep this aroma for your final sauce then do not use a vacuum.Why not a Soxhlet or similar device as used for essential oil extraction?The benefit seems to be clear:You have a relatively large vessel to hold a lot of chille powder and can let the alcohol cycle and wash it out completly...Theory is not always reality.....Firstly the alcohol runs through it many times while it dissolves what it can from the powder.That means each round you actually wash with a higher concentration until there is equal amounts in the alcohol and the powder.You waste about 50% of the end product unless you repeat it all several times with fresh alcohol.Worst of all however is the temperature, even if you use methanol.To make the alcohol evaporate enough to make the process work properly and in a timely fashion it must be heated to above 65°C, in most cases even with a proper heating mantle you won't have the temperature control tight enough.It is quite possible to destroy 70% of the capsaicin this way....The condesers used are also not really suitable for these low temperatures.Means you should use ice water to cool.Either way you will loose a lot of what could otherwise be product.Funny things that might stumble you along the way.In the freezer the solution will participate out a bit.However, when back to room temperature most if it will still be there, only a fraction goes back into solution.I could not figure out why this happens but once heated to about 40°C it all dissolves again.Filter fully blocked by the product?The fine sludge can be a problem even with a proper vacuum filtration unit.Especially if the product is still not really a solid once fully dried.A paper filter can be re-used many times but whatever makes it past and into the glass filter is tricky.You should not get much here if the paper filter was fine enough but if it builds up to the point where it makes the filtration long and slow:Remove the paper filter and add a small amount of luke warm alcohol.If it does not start to trickle through already give it a minute or two before turning the vacuum on.Starts a bit slow but should clear up quickly, if in doub repaet with a large volume of alcohol.I prefer to do this cleaning before I start a new bag of powder or whever I need to restock.Means I can use the same alcohol I had to clean the filter to add to the bottles with powder ;)Nothing gets wasted if you are prepared....If you find any typos in the above then feel free to keep them.However if you decide to use the typos for monetary gain I would kindly ask for 5% of the net profit made from my typos.;)

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