Where to get MEK? Answered

Hey all,A few years ago I used to see MEK (Methyl Ethyl Keytone) in local hardware stores all the time. Don't know what happened, whether OSHA, or EPA, or some other .gov busybody is responsible, but now it's nowhere to be found... and I've finally run out.Any leads on where I could purchase a jug of it for a good price?P.S. In case anybody is wondering, I have some dried-out liquid electrical tape that uses MEK as the solvent. I am hoping to resurrect it. I suppose I could try acetone, but I'm afraid if it goes wrong it could permanently wreck my mix. :P

Question by PS118 1 year ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Multi-function, multi-materials workshops?

I'm on a small rural acreage. My shop situation is that I’ve got two separate, fairly compact spaces for working with wood (or general “handyman” repairs for the home) and for working with metal (cutting, welding, grinding, etc). My metal area is where I also often work with small-engine equipment. These spaces are located inconveniently, separated by nearly 100 feet! I think about how I might like to combine functions under one roof. So I’m posting to try to coax some of you people to show me how you may have done this. Or examples you've found on the internet (give URLs). Obviously, no one wants to get sawdust into an area where torch flames or electric-welding sparks could cause a hazard. And you wouldn’t want to get engine lubricants or solvents mixed up with wood projects. Discussion and description are fine, but I’d really like to see pictures or floor-plan diagrams if possible.  I need examples that represent modest investment, as I could probably only afford to build an enclosure of about 16x24 ft, with a bay door. ( Yes - could probably learn something from shops that are somewhat bigger than this.) In grandfather's day, farm shops were usually multi-purpose. You know, for "bench carpentry", and maintaining or servicing the truck or tractor, welding bailer components back together, etc. Often had a tablesaw, maybe a bandsaw - besides the hoist, welders, socket wrenches. I suppose sometimes a fire did occur in one shop or another, but probably not often.  I'd like to see some more modern versions, rather than just the "version" I have in terms of vague memories. Thanks.

Question by Joel_BC 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


From “garage” concept to multi-materials workshop: ideas, layouts?

The common concept of a “garage” (the ’man cave’ stereotype) is a place to work on cars and/or motorcycles. How could this be adapted to be a place, under a single roof, to work on small engines, and projects chiefly involving wood as the material, and ones made from steel and/or other metals? Situation: I’ve now got two separate and pretty compact spaces on my rural acreage for working with wood and for working with metal (including work with small-engine equipment). These spaces are located at inconvenient distance.  I’m wanting to conceptualize how I might combine functions under one roof. Needn’t be said: no one wants to get sawdust into the area where torch flames or electric-welding sparks could cause a hazard. And you wouldn’t want to get engine lubricants or solvents mixed up with wood projects, or near flames.  There are people who have done this combo successfully, but few available layout diagrams or photos on the internet - I’ve searched, a lot!  I need input, hopefully including some illustrations of examples.  I’ll only be able to afford a modest investment, possibly 16x24 ft building or a bit larger, with a bay door. (Part of what a bay door would facilitate would be taking welding processes just out of the shop, to work on outdoors during fair weather.) I know that just a few decades ago small-farm shops were often multi-purpose, and used for "bench carpentry", also for maintaining or servicing the truck or tractor, welding bailer components back together, etc. They often had a tablesaw and a bandsaw - besides the hoist, welders, cabinets of wrenches… certainly both a woodworking vice and a “bench vise” for metal. Can you help?  Thanks. (For you who think my question sounds familiar, sorry: I'm just trying again with a new subject line and rephrasing some of my explanation.)

Question by Joel_BC 2 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


How do I thin out 2-part epoxy?

I'm wanting to make some micarta-like material, using two-part epoxy and paper. I've done a test run, and the material was rigid after it had cured for a few days, but didn't cut like I hoped it would, because the epoxy didn't penetrate the paper. Part of the issue was that the paper was coated, but I'd also like to thin out the epoxy some so that it will soak into the paper better. I'm inspired in this endeavor by these two instructables: https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-homemade-micarta/ https://www.instructables.com/id/Mokume-Kireji-DIY-Woodgrain-Composites/ The epoxy I'm using is 3M Scotch-Weld DP-190. The label says it contains epoxy resin, polymeric diamine, kaolin, and carbon black. The complete MSDS is here. This is what I'm using, because it's what I have. Got a case of these two-tube dispensers cheap at a yard sale. :-) So, what can I use to make this more liquid? Right now the consistency is a little bit thicker than honey. It doesn't spread out when applied to paper, and doesn't soak in at all. My limited knowledge suggests that toluene, listed on the MSDS, might work, but I'm hoping for something a bit less volatile. I'm aware that whatever I do is likely to extend the curing time, but that's not necessarily a bad thing.

Question by yoyology 6 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago