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How to make a 737

Southwest has put out a video showing the construction of one of its newest Specialty Planes. It's all done in just 2 minutes, 30 seconds, too. It's like watching a kit being put together. Also love seeing the application of the paint job in a succession of masking and painting. Check it out and be sure to mute the soundtrack. via Core77

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


South By Southwest (SXSW) 2009 Interactive Review - It's a Party Masquerading as a Conference

It's no secret that SXSW is more about the parties than the conference, but when you have so many smart people who run interesting businesses together, it's a pretty significant lost opportunity that the conference isn't better. Christy and I attended the 2008 SXSW Interactive conference, and decided it wasn't worth coming back. However, Instructables was a finalist in the Web Awards "Classic" category at the 2009 SXSW Interactive conference, which netted us two free passes. So, we attended again this year. This is my review of the interactive portion of the conference.High level - I'm glad we didn't pay. If you go, admit that you're going for entertainment, not to learn something about the interactive industry. The keynotes were excellent -- even if I didn't come away from them with anything actionable to do --, while the rest of the panels and talks were terrible. Having the resources to get to Austin doesn't mean that most conference attendees will have done their homework -- otherwise interesting panels with smart people were nearly always hijacked by stupid questions, and unfortunately it was rare that a moderator would shut down the stupid questions and get back to anything engaging. For example, at How Safe is Your Domain Name? someone actually asked "What does ICANN stand for?" If you're the type of person who reads reviews, and tries to determine if a conference has value for your business, SXSW does not. It's a party masquerading as a conference. If you go, think of it as a vacation, enjoy the evening events and keynotes, and when you learn one or two interesting things by accident, you won't be disappointed. Longer Review:Plan B: Can an Ad Guy Bring Bike Sharing to America?The story of how an advertising agency exec. was able to start up a bicycle sharing venture. Worth checking out just to understand how Crispin Porter+Bogusky works, and to see how they keep their thinking fresh about advertising.Spying 2.0: Can America Compete With Web-Savvy Enemies?Quickly devolved into an I-use-Twitter-so-should-you panel. Yawn. Is Privacy Dead or Just Very Confused?Academics talking about websites they use, and privacy issues they think might apply. A discussion of "experiences"; nobody on the panel is actually doing anything real, nor do they have any insight into major players' privacy policies or how those policies affect users. How did they get a panel?Change v2Lawrence Lessig's non-keynote-scheduled keynote on how money reduces our faith in politics. Excellent. Find a video of this and watch it.Opening Remarks: Tony HsiehTony Hsieh has given this identical talk at other conferences, but the message is so good, it's worth seeing twice. Slides available here.Feed Me: Bite Size Info for a Hungry InternetThis had an interesting set of people on the panel, but it nonetheless turned into a why-Facebook's-new-homepage-sucks-because-it-copied-friendfeed fest. Then, the panelists started openly wondering why they hadn't invited anyone from Twitter to be on the panel.Collaborative Filters: The Evolution of Recommendation EnginesThis was one of the biggest disappointments. Anton Kast of Digg is clearly top notch, and has spent deep hours thinking about recommendations and the math behind them; and, the people making up the rest of the panel were no slouches either. Unfortunately, they spent more than half of the time describing in layman's terms how each of their websites work, and we never got to anything juicy. "On Digg, users rate up a story they find interesting by clicking the Digg button..."! Edupunk: Open Source EducationThe description of this panel really got me pumping: DIY teachers around the world are using open source course management systems, open access textbooks, and other open source tools to buck the chains and limitations of corporate education software. What the panel really turned out to be was a bunch of ineffectual academics having a cat fight over who was more ineffectual. They all tried to outdo one another with stories of how management at their university prevented them from having any impact, and the winner seemed to be the panelist who accomplished the least. Seriously.This was only topped by the first question from the audience, which opened with: "I've learned a new word at this conference, and I'm going to use it here: monetize..." Seriously? I now have a new rule for conferences: Stay away from all education topics. The ratio of people with opinions to people who can/are having impact is way too high. How to Create a Great Company CultureThis is a tough topic, and one in which there's no right answer or overarching theory. The only way to get data is to listen to anecdotes, and this session gave me a few more. Although to be fair, I probably could have spent the same hour reading blogs written by company founders and gotten more out of it. Sunday Keynote: Stephen Baker / Nate Silver InterviewInterviews with really passionate people are always a treat. Nate Silver fits the bill.From Flickr and Beyond: Lessons in Community ManagementI was baffled why Metafilter was invited to be on this panel. In a discussion of privacy policies, the director of operations from Metafilter said "We don't have one. We're not there yet." Despite obviously having the most to contribute, the representative from Youtube didn't share anything; his lawyer must have told him to keep his mouth shut. Overall this was let down.New Think for Old PublishersThis panel was deceptively described, and the audience was annoyed to find a group of publishers simply looking to scribble down suggestions rather than having a conversation about the industry. Fortunately, Clay Shirky was animated enough to heat things back up.Presenting Straight to the BrainRunning a panel on better ways to use slides and graphics where each panelist presents slides might seem a bit hubristic, not they pulled it off. Take home: Use your slides to tell a story.How to Protect Your Brand Without Being a Jerk!This powerhouse panel was interrupted a mere 15 minutes in by a self-described-artist-from-Europe who raised (and shook) his hand for 5 minutes until the moderator eventually gave in. His question: "Do I need to copyright my songs? No really, do I need to copyright each one?" This softball opened a pandora's box of stupid questions from audience members clearly unable to format their questions into that tricky search engine text box. Monday Keynote: Virginia Heffernan / James Powderly InterviewJames Powderly is a friend and deeply fascinating individual. I wish this interview had been longer so they could have gotten deeper into his motivations and experiences. Advertising is Entertaining - Who's Selling Out?I came out of this session thinking it was pretty good. However, on further reflection, since it was more conversation than lecture, and lots of people had the opportunity to speak their mind, I was just happy no one said anything particularly stupid. This should give you a sense of my expectations at this stage at SXSW.New Threats to New Media: Fair Use On TrialThis was an excellent panel, particularly because Jason Schultz ran a very tight ship, kept things moving, and prevented questions from derailing the session. In my opinion, all three videos shown were clear examples of fair use, and I would have appreciated one that was a little closer to the line, but the session overall was still both enjoyable and useful. Building Strong Online CommunitiesWhile too general to have any actionable items, this was still pretty good. It's also fun to hear Drew Curtis's irreverent opinion on community. Tuesday Keynote: Chris Anderson / Guy Kawasaki ConversationThis made me really look forward to Chris Anderson's coming book Free. Guy Kawasaki did a fantastic job moderating, especially with respect to mocking people who ask questions just to insert a pitch for themselves, and limiting meaningless follow-up "questions."Nom Nom Nom: The Secrets of Successful FoodbloggingGet a DSLR, all other rules of successful blogging apply.The parties and evening events were good. I enjoyed Dorkbot Austin and Plutopia, and still think often of the food at The Salt Lick. The Web Awards were surprisingly fun. We were up against some much bigger names, and Flickr won (which in my opinion, was the expected value; I use Flickr at least weekly, if not more). Baratunde Thurston emceed, and he kept it spirited and fast-paced. His interludes were funny, and when no one from Flickr showed up to claim their award, he claimed it for them. "I remember really wanting to share some photos online..." I've been to other conferences where the parties are fun, the talks are engaging, and you come away with a laundry list of actionable items that will make measurable improvements in your business (or life). The SXSW interactive conference has all the ingredients to make that happen, which is why it's so disappointing when it doesn't come together.

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply


would ironwood and mesquite be good for building a bass?

I'm planning on building a six string fretless bass and the wood I'm planning on using would probably be mesquite and desert ironwood. obviously I live in the desert so find this wood wouldn't be a challenge but I'm not sure if its good tone wood. give out some tips also if you guys can what would be good for a fingerboard I was planning on using ebony if I find any in Las Vegas. I'm prefer using southwest desert wood since its easy to find out in the desert.

Question by capt. caveman    |  last reply


classic car parts

I'm looking for old car parts. Grills, fenders, hoods, headlights, anything external. Not wanting to pay to much, but reasonable.  tell me what you have and send me a few pictures!  I live in the southwest Michigan area.  Thanks!

Topic by elliot5445    |  last reply


SXSW To BE covered by NPR

The South by Southwest music festival and conference is rapidly approaching (Mar. 16-20) and NPR Music will be there again this year, webcasting a bunch of full concerts, live online. This year, you'll be able to watch the shows with our live video stream from three shows: two official SXSW showcases and our annual NPR Music party... by Robin Hilton   The (not so missing) link....

Topic by Goodhart    |  last reply


[REQUEST] My Coke Rewards - Codes under Caps!

If anybody has any Coke codes (found under your bottle caps, on the cardboard boxes, under the Dasani cardboard), I would really appreciate it if you could PM me them!  My Coke Rewards is a fun program with (sometimes) cool prizes! I'm trying to get some $20 Southwest Discount Codes with my points to help fund my travels!

Topic by Brennn10  


Find or How to Replace Old Dried Out Gaskets in a Set of 4 Ceramic Kitchen Canisters

We have a set of 4 ceramic kitchen canisters that are so old the foam seals, or gaskets, have dried out. I cannot find replacement gaskets anywhere. They were made by an individual, so there is no company to write to for replacement parts. Does anyone know who sells such gaskets? Foam or rubber or silicon will work.Or, is there a way of making replacements? I've seen amazing things done on "instructables" with silicon; molds, fake heads, toy octopus, etc. But I have never worked with it. Is it OK for a seal that will be in close proximity with salt, sugar, flour?The canisters are glazed ceramics that some individual has made.Attached are photos of the canister, mating surfaces, and existing gasket.Any suggestions will be appreciated.Thank you.Phil Brown, Southwest Wisconsin

Topic by oghk2000    |  last reply