how do i sew a plush cube without showing any stiches? Answered

How do i sew a plush cube without showing any stiches?

Question by wenpherd   |  last reply


why do i get a stich while running?

I've googled it and one says the liver is heavy and forces down, others say this and that. what is the real reason why you get a stitch? and what is the best way to stop it while running?

Question by NuclearGreyhound   |  last reply


Can someone make~

The "Hobbes" from calvin and hobbes comics? :D

Topic by WhyHello   |  last reply


how to convert a sweater to a backpack?

I need to convert an old hoodie sweater into either a backpack, bag or babybjorn of some sort. Any suggestions on how to? Preferably without cutting alot, or adding to many new stiches/zippers

Question by    |  last reply


How to add stiches to the outside edges of an Amaerican Flag so it will last longer at high speeds?

I need to be able to drive while fling the American Flag and the flag of the Branch of service of the Veteran we are escorting. The Flags don't last very long as the wind wipps them and causes them to fry along the edges. What type of stitch or other idea could I use to prevent the material from starting to fry. Once I have enough stitches in the edges I have been told that using "super Glue" along the stitches helps prevent the material from starting. Any Ideas would be appreciated.

Question by jim_mcelroy   |  last reply


How do I sew or stitch a patch onto a t-shirt? Answered

I'd like to know how to sew or stitch a patch onto a t-shirt. There is an instructable but I'm not sure what technique to use.

Question by EPL   |  last reply


Anyone know of a good panorama autostitch software (Mac)? Answered

I have taken a lot of panoramas as of late, and ive not gotten around to stitching them together. I am looking for a good panorama autostich software, mac compatible, and preferable in my price limit (free). Just something to stich together a few 360s and the odd 4 pic pana. :) Thanks! -Astroboy907

Question by astroboy907   |  last reply


Can I turn my digital SLR into a large format grid scanner?

I am an artist and want to make prints of my large paintings. I have been using a flat bed scanner to scan artwork in multiple chunks and "stich" them together in photoshop thus far with success. However, using over 2 separate chunks, it is hard to get lines and shapes to line up. Also, the larger the image, the more akward it is to try to get the work on the scanner. So i was thinking of some way to use a digital camera to create the same affect. Ideally, the camera would be mounted to a rig floating over the painting and scan it into chunks. I can manually do the "stitching" but it would be sweet if some software would do it for me ;) Anyone know of anything like this? I have a very low tech version in mind, but would love a sort of automated plotter setup.

Question by blainegarrett   |  last reply


How do I rewire my mouse to make a pistol mouse? Answered

I found this tutorial and I would love to know how to rewire my mouse to make into a pistol mouse? www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Pistol-fps-Mouse/ I have a Gateway MOAKUO optical mouse. On the back of the circuit board my mouse has the left click switch in a vertical position and the right click switch on a horizontal position right next to the switch for the wheel. My problem is that I don't know in which of the terminals of the switch do I connect the cables that come from the controller, the switches have 3 little thingies where I can connect them.  In the instructable would be step # 3. I have some pics of my mouse. LC stands for left click switch, RC stands for right click stich and the red little squares represent where the little red push button on the switch would be placed on the other side of the picture. thank you very much for your time. Please help.

Question by eduardoh   |  last reply


The cost and downside of modern life

In another topic we noticed that times have have changed in terms of repairs, spare parts or just finding a replacement for something. It not only seems that a lot of people no longer bother to repair their broken things but also that for those who still want to the available options are disappearing fast. Take the common lawn mover as an example: We can buy them in dedicated shops, the local hardware store, supermarkets and sometimes even at Aldi. But if you need such a simple spare part like a fuel hose or gasket for the carby you are usually lost unless you can order the parts from some online store at the other end of the world. Electronics are even worse, here a broken charging plug or just loosing the charger can mean people throw it in the bin to buy a new device. Splicing a rope? Why bother if a big bunch of knots does the same LOL Do you still remember these little repair shops that used to fix your waching machine, TV or sometimes even your electric drill? Where are they now? Or all these small electronics shops selling resistors, wire and complete kits? I still remember the times when I could take my radio to the local shop, the guy listens to the sound and lack of available stations and knew right away what parts I needed - and they were right at hand. For a few bucks extra he even replaced the broken bits if he had the time. After thinking a bit about all this I came to realise two things: a) We are getting lazy and no longer learn vital skills because modern life makes us think we no longer need these skills. b) Unless you can repair something yourself, labour costs mean a repair is often not worth it. Who here, under the age of 30 still knows how to make a good campfire from scratch, dares to take the lawnmower apart to fix it himself or simply bothers to stich up a little rip in his fancy tent instead of buying a new one? For crying out loud, a lot of kids don't even know how operate a washing machine by the time the lease the parents home for good... Schools seem to support these life changes by no longer teaching the use of pen and pencil, not to mention ink... All the kids get is a tablet or laptop and that means they don't even have to learn the language anymore - that what the spell checker does. If I dare to spin this further by another 25 or so years I only see chaos. Everyone is highly specialised, noone bothers to cook anymore and the third generation in the family no longer has any clue what the first generation is talking about. When my grandfather grew up life was hard. When my parents grew up life was all about expressing yourself. When I grew up life was intersting because everything was changing so fast. When my kids leave the house what will they say about this?... What do you think ? How much has modern life affected since you grew up ? And of course: Do think it is the right trend ?

Topic by Downunder35m   |  last reply


UHF CB radio antennas or scanner antennas anyone?

For a while now I am back to experimenting with various antenna designs for my UHF radio.Started as something entirely different but who cares LOLAnyways, we usually have either a standard whip antenna or a vertical dipole design for mobile use, like on your car.This is a very good design for both types of antennas, mostly due to the short wavelenght compared to the "old" 2m or 27mHz CB radios.Fun fact for at least AU in this regard is that back in the day everyone jumped onto UHF to get away from the overfilled chatter on 27MHz, now the old 2m band is basically dead except for marine use.One thing I really miss on UHF though is distance!Line of sight communication sounds fine at first but then you really have to realise the limits once out and about.As a result we often have to choose between a high gain antenna or a stubby for going into the mountains or being in a convoy.Only way out seems to be the golden middle by opting for one of the 4.5 - 6-5DBI antennas.Neither solution really satisfies me though :(To get around the limitations and have some fun again when sitting high on a mountain I compared various commercial antennas I had.You know, pick someone with a weak signal coming in and hope he hears you and has some time for a chat.Turned out there is not really that much difference in terms of receiving a signal.Quite huge differences though when it comes to the other side being able to hear you!So I jumped onto a basic SWR meter and actually checked my so called factory tuned antennas - all but one were way off the charts here.At least if you are like me and like optimised instead of compromised antenna systems.A Standing Wave Reflection ratio of 1:2 or even 1:2.5 is seen as very acceptable thing on UHF for some weird reason.Back in my glory days no one I knew would have accepted anything above 1:1.3 for his 27MHz system, be it mobil or a station at home.Sure enough, repeating my long distance tests a few days later with tuned antennas resulted in far better results.An antenna for long distance calls or emergencies?!The easiest way to get more distance on UHF is obviously getting the antenna as high as possible.From a nice mountain top you have it way easier than in any urban areas for example.Explains why so many of the long and sturdy antennas are just simple dipoles on a long pole.If you ever checked the feedback for these double quad TV antennas you realise they are literally in the same frequency range.Similar story for all the Yagi antennas for our TV sets that you find on so many roofs these days.Only problem with them is that they usually don't give a damn about transmitting qualities.And of course that they are usually providing around 300Ohm instead of the 50Ohm our radio expects.A TV needs 75Ohm and a balun is used to provide a isolation as well as a matching for the TV.Needless to say I could not accept this ;)My first design was made from aluminium foil glued onto some printed and stiched pages for a double quad.1MHz bandwidth is quite narrow, so the basic square design with about 13.8cm for the sides of the squares was easy.To my surprise by just adding standard RG58 cable this design was very close to 50Ohm already, I had around 60.A few glue sessions later I was able to match it to 52Ohm - close enough for test.Did not want to risk anything with my expensive Icom so I used my cheap Baofeng handheld for the initial tests.Indoor mind you...To me disappointment I seemed to be unable to pick up anything.So let the sanner run and waited...After being bored enough I decided to pick, starting with the antenna and when I moved it the handheld suddenly had a clear signal.Desperate as I was I grabbed the radio and waited for the chat to continue - nothing again...Then it finally hit me: The double quad is quite directional....Sure enough by just turning it slowly I was able to pick up chatter on various channels.Once brave enough to risk it I even got confirmation that people about 10km away could hear me just fine.Time to scale it up a notch...Next design already had the directional problem included as a design feature.I added a director in the front and a reflector in the back.The endless hours of glueing and cutting were replaced by using 12mm wide copper tape and sturdier cardboard.A test with my car on a little "mountain" and the antenna on 2m pole mounted to roof rack gave me, for the first time ever, conversations with people that were over 30km away.I am currently trying to make the entire thing omnidirectional.The omni quad....If you take two double quad antennas and mount them at a 90° angle you end up with very nice 2-lobe pattern, 4 lobes if you don't use a reflector.Problem here though is that these designs really mess with your antenna matching.Not to mention that using it while driving only works at quite low speeds.One day I will do the final design in stainless steel wire though...Anyways, using the directional properties to get an omnidirection radiation pattern meant using 4 seperate antennas with a reflector for each of them.Still left a few dark spots at short range but otherwise really nice for long distance if you don't want to constantly turn your antenna.Getting 4 antennas down to 50Ohm on the connection to the cable was painful to say the least.The problem of taking care of distances to be in the sweet spot for the 477MHz range also meant the design ended up to be quite bulky.One of my lightbulb moments providing good ideas caused me to use one reflector with a double quad either side.Worked almost fine but again provided totally different values to somehow match if it ever should transmit a signal without damaging the transmitter.Obvious conclusion was to buy a new roll of copper tape and to try to get four single antennas into one "housing" without stacking them.Bad idea here was to cross the antennas :(Better idea was to make 4 pyramids out of carboard and aluminium foil.Sadly this resulted in a failure because the 4 sides of the pyramid reflect the signal not flat bt at their corresponding angles.Had to make it really big and use 90° angles, resulting in the signal being reflected like light in these cat-eye reflectors on your bike.After wasting a few days to create the real thing it turned out to not really work properly for the reception already.Even close range signals came in really distorted.I guess the double reflection meant the phase is shifting and cancelling out what the antenna gets.My last desing idea for testing will be with a different approach.Instead of 1/4 Lambda elements I will use small 1/64 Lambda elements.Only about 2cm long means that matching is pain in the behind but if the purpose is just receiving it should be fine.The reflector will be four flat sides like a box with antennas in front of the sides and the cables joined in the center.If you like to fiddle with antennas and don't mind trying a weird looking base antenna on your roof I might be willing to write up a short Instructable based on my designs - let me know in the comments....By the way: it is quite easy to desing this for the common 2.4GHz Wifi bands ;)

Topic by Downunder35m   |  last reply