Can you recommend sticker printing companies they could check? Answered

My niece and her group mates need to raise funds for their school festival. They decided to sell foods but still need to market them. They are considering printing marketing materials like posters, flyers, and custom stickers. Do you think it's a great idea? Or can you recommend printing companies they could check?

Question by reezegardner   |  last reply


Instructables Stickers in Taiwan

A few months ago Instructables user Cousin Steve contacted us about printing up some Instructables stickers to hand out at a DIY event in Taiwan. We thought this was a great idea so I sent Cousin Steve the source files for the Instructables stickers. He then took some awesome initiative and translated our slogan into Chinese, printed up a couple hundred stickers, and has been handing them out to people in Taiwan ever since!Needless to say we were very impressed and excited with his work. We've told him so, and sent him an Instructables robot t-shirt to thank him for helping us spread the word about Instructables to such a far away place.If anyone else is interested in printing up Instructables stickers in their area you can download the original files below, translate the text as necessary, and print up some of your very own stickers to hand out. We just request that anyone making any changes to the designs below run them by us first so before having them printed up.Nice job Cousin Steve!

Topic by noahw   |  last reply


Instructables Stickers are Multiplying

Squid Labs recently got a Roland 54" Printer/Cutter and we have been using it to print out the first round of Instructables stickers. Our initial batch was mailed out to the winners from the valentines day contest. Then, as we got the hang of how to use the crazy machine more appeared at the Instructables Show and Tell two weeks ago in Alameda, Austin and Boston. Now they are being sighted at the Port of Oakland and in Brooklyn, New York! It seems that our stickers like great views of city skylines, but I think they could be happy living just about anywhere. If you happen to see a sticker living in its "natural habitat", take a quick picture of it and post it up as a comment.If you would like a sticker, and don't have one, attend one of the Instructables Show and Tell events coming up, make a great instructable and get it into the Instructables News Letter, or send me a private message with your compelling story.

Topic by noahw   |  last reply


I need these custom stickers as soon as possible. Answered

I need these custom stickers as soon as possible. So if you can recommend companies that print high quality stickers, please do tell me.

Question by reezegardner   |  last reply


Silhouette Print & Cut Promotion!

**Winner Chosen and has responded!  Thanks for Participating in the giveaway!**   Don't forget that the Silhouette Print and Cut Promotion is still going on and will continue until March 31st!  See below for promotional deals! If you haven't used the print and cut feature before, it is pretty awesome!  If you want some details, you can check out their website or watch this video. Here are your options in this Promotion.      1 Silhouette CAMEO® plus the following print & cut related items: 1 package of temporary tattoo paper 1 package of printable adhesive kraft paper 1 package of printable adhesive gold foil 1 package of printable adhesive silver foil 1 package of printable white sticker paper 1 package of printable clear sticker paper 1 package of printable adhesive cotton canvas All for $269.99 (MSRP $357.92) The Second option is:    1 Silhouette Portrait™ plus the following print & cut related items: 1 package of temporary tattoo paper 1 package of printable adhesive kraft paper 1 package of printable adhesive gold foil 1 package of printable adhesive silver foil 1 package of printable white sticker paper 1 package of printable clear sticker paper 1 package of printable adhesive cotton canvas All for $129.99 ($237.92 MSRP) PLUS all specialty media will be 30% off with your promotion code! Can you guess the code? It's INSTRUCTABLES Want to see what you can do with the Print & Cut feature? Here are some projects: DIY Stickers Clear Playing Cards with Sticker Numbers Have you used this feature?  Share your project here! Ready for the giveaway!  It will go live at 12:00 AM March 20th a Rafflecopter giveaway

Topic by Penolopy Bulnick   |  last reply


What are the important factors to consider when I need to advertise using print stickers? Answered

What are the important factors to consider when I need to advertise using print stickers

Question by reezegardner   |  last reply


Motorcycle Helmets | Motorcycle accessories | helmet stickers | motorcycle decals | sticker printing

Buy Motorcycle Helmets was founded with the commitment to provide Quality Products to the Motorcycle enthusiast. Our philosophy is that true motorcycle enthusiasts only want the best when it comes to their accessories - especially helmets. Unlike our competition, we do not “cut corners” and use cheaper materials to reduce cost because it also lowers quality. We want our customers to be satisfied with their purchase because it makes good business sense. Let us take you through how our helmets are manufactured and you will understand what makes our helmets the BEST! We have best Quality Motorcycle Helmets, Motorcycle helmet, Motorcycle accessories, helmet stickers, motorcycle decals, Custom decals, sticker printing, Custom t-shirts, Paint Protection, Clear Bra, Novelty discount Helmets, Chrome Helmet, Custom Air brush Helmet, Novelty Motorcycle Accessories, Wholesale and Retail Motor Gear

Topic by alexscott97   |  last reply


Questions about Homemade stickers

Hello fellow craftsmen! I have a few questions I'd like to get some clarification on if anyone has tried the Instructable by SirBrittanicvs for Homemade stickers. 1. Can this instructable be applied to pencil/pen drawings without distorting the image? Or must the stickers be printed out by the printer? I'm just worried that the pictures will get smudged do to the mixture of glue and vinegar. 2.) After appliying the adhesive to the paper how long can the stickers be stored before the adhesive is ineffective? There was another question I wanted to ask, but I cannot remember it at the moment. But I appreciate any further assistance with this Instructable before I begin and mess something up, haha. Happy New Year everyone!

Topic by Energyzed   |  last reply


My first Free3D print

Three months ago I submitted instructables into one of the challenges, and was selected to received Free 3D print. I chose to have my 3x3x3" 3D print instead of a famous 3D instructable robot. Two weeks ago, my 3D print got delivered in the 123D box, to my door. Also included in the box are an instructables patch and stickers. My 3D print is the case for my RevIO, an Arduino compatible board. A prototype that I'm made recently. (https://www.instructables.com/id/Build-The-RevIO-Arduino-Clone-My-Way/) Thank you very much for the Free3D Print program and everyone behide this program, otherwise I won't be able to see my project moving forward to this point. Thanks sath02

Topic by sath02   |  last reply


How to apply wet-slide decals?

Passing this question along for a friend: i have been experimenting with wet-slide decals, to do complex graphics, but can't figure out how to make them work. They are essentially a piece of thin plastic on paper backing. You print on them, using a printer, then immerse them in water to get the paper backing to come off. Then, you slide the decals onto whatever surface you have. finally, you use a softening agent, to get them to meld onto the surface without edges. i have spent 10+ hours, trying to make a 3"x2" decal. No dice. And none of the guides online have worked for me. I have a couple of problems: 1. can't get decal to not lose its proportions—i.e., stretches when i seat it 2. can't get print not to bleed (ink-jet version) or flake (laser version)—even when i use a fixative Also, if i try to cut decal to just dimensions of surface i am applying to, the edges tend to curl up and refuse to flatten out—without further causing 1 and 2 above.

Question by canida   |  last reply


Where can i buy thin white vinyl that i can print on my laser/inkjet printer.? Answered

I'm making a decal for my buddy's surf board and i need some thin vinyl. I was hoping some company made sticker sheets of the stuff that i could run through my printer at home.

Question by sensoryhouse   |  last reply


Make it Real Free 3D Printing Giveaway - EXTENDED!

DUE TO POPULAR DEMAND, THE 50 PRINT GIVEAWAY IS BEING RENEWED THROUGH JUNE 4TH! Instructables is giving away FREE 3D prints to the first 50 projects to enter the Make It Real Challenge this week that get featured on the site! Simply enter your project into the contest, and if it gets featured, you get a FREE 3D Print. The Make It Real Challenge is open to any project that was at least partially designed using a computer: it could be a preliminary digital sketch, a sticker, an electronics schematic, laser-cutter files, a 3D design, or even an inkjet printer template - anything digital!  And the prizes are insane - we're giving away a $50k Objet 3D printer, 11 UP! personal 3D printers, and even more free 3D prints.  To win your FREE 3D print, just enter your project into the Make It Real Challenge this week and meet our featuring criteria!  Everyone who does will win a 3" x 3" x 3" 3D print of anything they choose, a 3D printed Instructables robot, or 5 pieces of their choice from the Free Universal Construction Kit.

Topic by randofo 


Geek-Protection Stickers? Call for design suggestions!

So, Star's in jail in Boston for forgetting she was wearing some electronics.I sent this to Xeni Jardin, and she added it to the BoingBoing story:Star was an intern at Squid Labs this summer, and is an all-around awesome geek who loves to build things. FYI, friends at MIT say she wears the hoodie on a regular basis- it's just unfortunate that she had it on while trying to pick a friend up at the airport. MIT students don't really do mornings, or worry about what they're wearing, so I can't imagine she'd even think about her clothes before heading out to pick up a friend at the airport before 8am.When Star gets out we'll have her do an Instructable on 1) how to get arrested at the airport without being shot, and 2) how to package your homemade electronics to look purchased.Maybe BB and Instructables should start handing out some official-looking stickers and plastic covers to make breadboards look more commercial- it will keep our readers away from automatic weapons. I just got email back from Xeni saying, "Let's do those stickers!"Question: what should the stickers look like? What should they say? Make some suggestions, or submit some designs here, and we'll print them up!

Topic by canida   |  last reply


Materials Resources

It'd be helpful if we could create a permanent page to list recommended vendors of common supplies. If you have a favorite website for LEDs, magnets, electronics, or any other parts you could contribute to it. It would be a materials wiki, except one person updates it. An instructable wiki would be helpful as well, but one step at a time, eh?For example:PartsKlockit Clock movements and partspchcables.com One-foot USB extension cables (so common!)Tap Plastics Acrylics. Scrap bins in stores are a great resource.digikey Gobs of electronics.MagnetsK&J; Magnetics Neodymium magnets. Check out their surplus items and eBay auctions for deals.Printing & Cuttingblackbookstencils.com Lasercut stencils. Never used, looks good.[http:///www.calsilkscreen.com calsilkscreen.com] Excellent full-color vinyl stickers with cheap die-cuts (batches of 1,000)psprints.com Stickers are decently priced, but don't have glossy coat that protects them.overnightprints.com Really great full-color, double-sided, round corner business cardsSticker Guy $20 for 250 b/w stickers, but delivery can take up to 8 weeks.Otherocremix.org Great free remixed video game music

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


Is removable sticky invoice paper right tool for etching?

I just received an parcel from UK.the invoice paper come inside caught my attention.it's removable,you could print patterns on it.i want to use it etch portraits.but I don't know what brand the paper is?it should be a common office sticker paper i think.Please identify this. https://youtu.be/4k5K1YeuQ9g

Question by gada888   |  last reply


What's the easiest/cheapest way to print/stamp text onto leather? Answered

I keep my smartphone in a book-style leather case and frequently use it to find things out via Wikipedia. It annoys me that it doesn't have "Don't Panic!" written in big friendly letters on the cover. This needs sorting. However, I'd like to keep the cost down, otherwise I could have just bought a copy of the Encyclopedia Galactica.... So, how can I best apply the wording to the leather? Can I stamp it? Print it somehow? Would vinyl stickers work? Keep in mind, this needs to be: - Cheap - Visible on smooth black leather - Durable (I'll be carrying this in my pocket) If the best/cheapest option is paying someone to do it, I'd still like to hear about that option. If this is a stupid idea, please also point that out before I waste any more of my life on it. Thanks!

Question by SirronTM   |  last reply


"opened & fixed" logo

Hi everybody, I think it would be nice to have something like an "opened and fixed" logo. The purpose being to print it as a sticker, then, for example, when you open and fix an appliance, you can put the sticker on it, and when your friends ask, you can delight them talking endlessly about your endeavor. Irony aside, I think it can be an interesting counterpart to the "warranty void if removed" labels, also encouraging people to open and fix their own devices. There could also be an "opened and hacked" logo. I was thinking in something simple, like an "O&F;" with a circle around, or maybe the circle made of a screwdriver. I'm writing this due to my lack of design ability, in hope that someone with that ability finds the idea interesting enough to give it a try. Also, what do you think about it? is it a good idea? would you use it? Cheers, Andres. P.S.: If you think it's worth trying but nobody with technical skills shows up I can try creating a first version on Inkscape.

Topic by AndresAcena   |  last reply


How would you imprint a graphic or text onto a blank aluminium or stainless steel blank switch plate cover?

I'm making a pedal board/road case with a buddy of mine. It's in its early stages, but it will consist of a pedal board and lift-away lid, covered in tolex with metal corners and such. I'd like to put some sort of small name plate or logo on the front end of it. I've found a blank switch plate cover, normally used to cover up spots where light switches or power outlets used to be, and by some means apply a logo or text to it. It's about the size that I'd like the logo/text to be anyways. I guess I could go and print a sticker and call it done, but I'm looking for a way to make this more permanent. It will be on the outside of what is essentially a small road case, so it will be up against the elements. So I guess if there was a good way to print off a design and put a layer of something over it so it will stay in place, possibly be shiny ( :D ), and be protected from the elements, I'd be all set! For the sake of aesthetics I've decided whatever plate I get, it will be some kind of metal. I've found brushed aluminium, stainless steel, and chrome.

Question by    |  last reply


[Requesting help] Need to dye a lens filter

Just wondering if anyone has any ideas on how I can take clear plastic and totally black it out I am trying to create a shaped bokeh effect in a uv filter for a more permanent setting than cut out paper (what most people do). Now I bought quite a few for different shapes or if I mess up. Last night I printed out on sticker paper a heart and placed it in the center of the filter and used Krylon fusion (spray paint for plastic) on the filter. It took quite a few coats to get it so light never shined through. When It looked good I peeled of the heart sticker and half the paint went with it. An obvious failure. What im trying now is, I took that filter and scratched it up a bit and I found some super glue and just thinly spread some across the lens (to hopefully give the paint something to grip to) let that sit over night it was too late to paint. And today I am now putting a few coats on it and i plan to actually cut the heart shape out of the filter.

Topic by Ampix0   |  last reply


What NOT to do.

Not sure whether this is a contest idea, or just a philosophy, but the idea that we learn more from our mistakes rings true.  Although it might be tediously long at times, I'd kinda like to see some -ibles that include the messy details of attempts that didn't quite work, what was learned, and how. Sometimes tangents xyz come out of an attempt to acheive abc. y'know- the happy accident.  Examples?: I was annoyed with Apple for making a keyboard with light grey lettering on white keys. I like to dim the lights, and am not really a touch typist. So, I photocopied the keyboard, increased contrast, and printed this onto transparent sheet with adhesive backing (available at a photocopy place. Fed-ex, kinkos, i don't recall)  Turns out that the ink on those copies is on the top surface of the plastic. After cutting out my qwerty stickers, I found that the ink wears off the surface.  Not only that, but after peeling the stickers off, the goo remains. (sigh)   So, if u use this technique, put clear tape over the clear photocopy. I just bought a microwave with grey on black keys. I may havta explain to the copyshop why I'm photocopying my microwave. ;) Any other examples?

Topic by Toga_Dan   |  last reply


what kind of water resistant coat should i use ? Answered

Hi Everyone ... i hope someone can help me with this is, or suggest me a solution, i am trying to make a custom sink for my kitchen. so what i did, is that i bought a  metal bowl from ikea, sprayed it with white, and then i drawed some paterns with photoshop and printed them on a vinyl sticker, witch i sticked to the bowl ( see the pictures ) . To not ruin my pattern, and because i have use the bowl as a sink, i need to coat it with somekind of resistant water coating to protect it ( a transparent coating ) .. any idea what should i use ? honestly i've been looking around and i can't find suitable solution.

Question by stregoi   |  last reply


custom made tire cover

Last summer I bought my '07 Jeep Wrangler. The previous owner had added some stickers and a spare tire cover to make it look like he had the "Call of Duty" package. That's not my cup of tea, so I took that stuff off. I would like to add my own design to the spare tire cover. I actually have the design ready to go on Photoshop. I though maybe I could take it to a place like Staples, have it printed as a vinyl sign, and then use a strong adhesive to glue it to the old cover, on top of the Call of Duty stuff. I imagine, though, that there are probably some adjustments to this whole plan that would help things turn out better. Any advice?

Topic by Purple Chez   |  last reply


Photojojo Photo Month Winners Announced

Instructables and Photojojo are happy to announce the prizewinners from the Photojojo Photo Month!We saw lots of fantastic Instructables that covered all sorts of photo tricks and techniques. From classic darkroom methods to photoshop skills to faking a Polaroid picture, the entries displayed an incredible amount of skill and creativity. Thanks for sharing your projects and ideas! Photojojo and Instructables staff judged the contest, then added in the user votes. Winners will receive notifications within the next couple of days.Now, on with the winners! First PrizeThe authors of these Instructables each receive an Eye-Fi Wireless Memory Card, an Instructables Robot t-shirt, and Instructables stickers. In alphabetical order: Forge a Polaroid (kinda) by Seppuko How to Steady a Camera with Stringby marc92 Make your own Gorilla Pod by benthekahn Second Prize The authors of these Instructables each receive a Monsterpod, an Instructables Robot t-shirt, and Instructables stickers. In alphabetical order: 3D Shadow-Box Photo Begin photography and work your way up to pro... How to Take a Picture of the Steam from your Meals Quick and easy macro "attachment" Ten Second Kaleidoscope Lens Third PrizeThe authors of these Instructables each receive Magnetic Photo Rope to display their pictures and an Instructables robot patch and stickers. In alphabetical order: Canon Wired Remote Choosing and Using a P&S; Camera DIY Flash Diffuser with Hundreds of FREE Color Filters DIY PVC $10 underwater light arm Free Alternatives to Photoshop for Editing and Finalizing Your Photos! The Hands Free Bicycle Camera Tripod How to make a Tripod out of a 2 liter How to Print B&W; Photographs in a Darkroom Macro Photography: An Essential Skill for Good Instructables Make any digital image into a tattoo on a photo Panorama: How to Poor Man's Photoshop - Using Powerpoint to make Invisibilia

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


Game: Instructables Robot, World Explorer

The Instructables Robot loves wheeling around all day at home, but it yearns to see more of the world! It's been to a couple of interesting places in the past, but that's not enough.Our challenge to you: what's the coolest place you can bring the Instructables Robot? We want you to take a picture of the Robot in these locations and post them here. Instructables at the top of a tower? Instructables around the world? You decide!If you've ever seen the movie Amelie or heard of the travelling gnome prank, think of the various places the gnomes are photographed. The Robot could take those gnomes any day.The Robot could be a print out (see hi-res Robot images), an Instructables t-shirt, a sticker, a paper model, anything. Then, you simply need to take a picture of the setting with the Robot in it.Final rule: No Photoshopping!See below for some ideas. The Robot has its bags packed and is ready to go...

Topic by joshf   |  last reply


Silhouette Build Night at the Taipei Hackerspace

Hi, We just had our Silhouette Build Night in the Taipei Hackerspace yesterday. It was a blast, I was totally blown away by the many ideas people came with, even though we barely knew how to use the Silhouette paper cutter. We had participants of all ages, and many different backgrounds. The projects that came out of it, in no particular order: Dog silhouette cuts: apparently wiener dogs and corgis were the most popular, most just to keep, but there's an ongoing project to do a corgi-fan (hand-held fan in corgi shape) Custom cut name tags: because it's more fun than writing (Instructable) Cipher grille: because secrets are always fun, and it's easier than with scissors (Instructable); in the future might try circles instead of squares, that would look much cooler (hindsight...) Party props: most popular were lips and moustache, as usual... Flipbook: characters were cut and glued onto the flipbook, called "The missing piece" (Instructable) iPhone sicker: using some kind of 3D effect sticker, cut a it in the shape of the iPhone, perfect fit Pop-up word card: know the kind of greeting cards that you open up and there's a quasi-3D scene or text? That kind! Vitruvian man decoration: use transparencies with printed Vitruvian man, cut it out, then assemble into globes  for home decor (Instructable) Greeting card: creating a design with generous negative spaces, and use two layer of paper to assemble. Font selection is important (Techno Overload works quite well!) All in all it was good fun. I think we've ruined our mat by cutting too deep occasionally, running test cuts without pulling in the mat to the right position, sticking the printed transparency with the printed side down, and these little things. The biggest issues were the cut setting selection (lots of trial and error), and creating the design (now we have much better idea how to make JPEGs that work well in Silhouette Studio, but sometimes it was tricky using images grabbed from the net) Cheers! Greg

Topic by taipeihackerspace   |  last reply


How to make Flip Clock Numbers and build a "like"-counter around it?

Hey All So I've got this client, who's absolutely crazy about the "FLIKE" (A physical like counter.). But he can't have it for another couple of months, and he'd like it to be a little more custom... Long story short, I might end up making a similar product in a few weeks. it will probably consist out of 5 digits and if it's up to me (not sure what the client wants) I'd stuff them behind a long picture frame. Something like this but actually mechanical and not just a picture of it:  http://www.notonthehighstreet.com/thedriftingbear/product/personalised-framed-vintage-flip-clock-print So I started googling every hardware piece I needed and it turns out it's a huge pain to find Flip Clock Numbers / Flip Board Numbers... whatever you want to call them. (What's the right name btw?) You can't just buy these things, let alone in a custom size. So the idea is to build them myself. I found this on wikipedia, which gives a clue about the inside: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Analog_clock_with_digital_display.png So I'm figuring out what needs to go in it to make this work. (I'll end up making an instructable about it) The numbers themselves are going to be made out of vinyl stickers. You can easily buy those from ebay in about any size if you look for them. The stickers will be put on to plastic boards. But I'm not totally sure what kind I should get. They should be thin and must be able to stand up straight, yet "easy" to fold. I'll probably get them lasercut, but you should be able to cut them by hand as well. Currently I'm thinking about gluing small metal or carbon rods on the back of those letters. Although I'm not sure if that would be strong enough. Would it be enough to file one side of the rods to get a bigger contact surface? (What do you guys think?) I'm planning of putting the half letters in a drum of ABS or PLA. it should be shaped like this:  |--------| I'm thinking about 3D printing this. But no idea how it'll do... One side of the drum will be connected to a small stepper motor (5.625° with 1/64 reduction). I don't have real experience with stepper motors, but this resolution seems more than sufficient. The other side will be connected to a metal or plastic positioner. Each digit might end up with it's own "unit" so I can swap them separately if they'd break. I've got great experience with lasercut plexi, so I might use that because it's more accurate than wood and I might have some lying around. I was first thinking about 1 stepper motor and a set of gears. I decided not to do that in the end because I don't have good experience with making gears and I can never find the right sizes online. Also, it'll make everything way more complex. So each motor will have it's own controller connected to it. Those controllers would have to talk to an ATMega or something. (I'm planning on using an arduino to prototype, but then just swap the chip and make a stand-alone version without usb etc) The ATMega has to be connected to the internet of course to get the current number of likes, so I'd connect it to a raspberry pi via I²C. I'm not familiar with the GPIO pins on the pi so I figured this would be a save and convenient way to handle this. The ATMega is robust, and I love the Arduino bootloader. A sketch is written in no time, but I have no idea how to start writhing this code for the GPIO pins. So why the Raspberry Pi? First off, this thing might end up being wireless, and since a wifi module for the arduino costs as much as a Pi, I figured this would be easier. The plan is to make the pi run python script that could ask the number of likes from the facebook API. Once returned, it'll send +1 or +5 or +10 over I²C. The arduino shifts the numbers to the correct position and replies with the total number it's displaying (3012 for instance). The PI can then recheck if everything is in sync. As for the set up. Since we have Pi, we can put on a LAMP stack (I know, this is overkill, but it wouldn't hurt either). So for initial set-up, we'd connect the counter to ethernet, browse to it on a different computer via "http://counter.local". And we'd be presented with a web interface. You'll be able to set the URL of the page u want to get the likes from, set and reset the number that is displayed on the counter, and the WIFI settings. The WIFI settings can be saved in the wpa_supplicant.conf file and on reboot it'll automatically connect to this network. From now on the whole system is manageable over wifi via a html interface. For debugging I might enable ssh though. So I guess you've got the whole outline now. I'd like to get your feedback on this! And this for the mechanics, electronics, and software side of things! 

Question by woutervddn   |  last reply


DIY Vanilla Extract, $50 Laser Cutter, Bullet Time...

Sign-up for our newsletter here. Jan. 3, 2008 Happy new year! We're kicking off our new year with the Lion Brand Yarn Slideshow Challenge. Enter photos of your yarn-based creations to win Lion Brand yarn, patches, and stickers! Don't forget to enter the Homemade Holidays Contest! There's a little over a week left to win great prizes from CRAFT magazine! The Laser Cutter Contest has just closed. Stay tuned to find out who the finalists are. Check out these cool instructables! Make DIY Vanilla Extract Quality vanilla is a tasty and essential cooking ingredient. By making our own extraction we get the highest quality product from the best beans. posted by ian on Jan 1, 2008 Hack mac laptop to be a mac tablet in 15 minutes Combine an old mac laptop and a Wacom tablet to get your own mac tablet. It may not be pretty, but it works and is easy to put together.posted by c4l3b on Jan 2, 2008 Laser cutter for under 50 dollars With a couple of broken scanners and $30 of materials you can be cutting stencils with your own laser cutter. posted by lamedust on Jan 1, 2008 How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) A tutorial on how to build your own cheap, portable and hood-style bullet time camera rig on the cheap and the fly. posted by fi5e on Dec 31, 2007 Dollar Store Parabolic Mic This is a ridiculously easy way to build a very functional parabolic microphone using mostly items purchased from a dollar store. posted by jurtle on Jan 2, 2008 Show off your project and win Lion Brand yarn!Win great prizes from CRAFT magazine! Solid Wood Digital Clock How to build a wooden digital clock powered by an atmega168 (arduino) with a built-in alarm and games.posted by J_Hodgie on Dec 28, 2007 Build your own t-shirt printing press Have a great idea for a t-shirt? Here's how to make a press for making shirts similar to rubber stamping. posted by zieak on Jan 2, 2008 Time Lapse Intervalometer for SLRsCreate your own magical time lapse effect with a DIY timer.posted by eagleapex on Dec 30, 2007 Add INTERNAL Bluetooth Capability To Your iPod With a steady hand and some soldering skills you can be listening to music off your iPod without any dongles or wires. posted by fstedie on Dec 31, 2007 Autonomous, Wirelessly Controlled Hovercraft How to design and create a wirelessly controlled modular hovercraft, that can be controlled with an RC controller, or made completely autonomous. posted by bradpowers on Dec 31, 2007   Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric

Topic by fungus amungus 


Silhouette June 2015 Build Night at Arch Reactor Hackerspace, St. Louis, Missouri

On Tuesday, June 9th, the Arch Reactor Hackerspace (in St. Louis, Missouri) hosted a Build Night with the Silhouette Portrait. There were an excited dozen people who showed up for an introduction to the device. Many members were seeking to discover ways to use the device for current projects.  Others were eager to learn which materials the Portrait could cut, the limitations of the Silhouette Studio software, and how they might go about using the Silhouette Portrait for other projects in the future. Process: I already had the Silhouette Studio software downloaded to my laptop and had the Silhouette Portrait out on the large at the front of the our classroom space.  Those in attendance gathered around as I ran down the features of the device and software and we discussed the use of the cutting mat and how to set the depth of the blade. We then watched the introduction movie and a few others before attempting to use the device to cut a file.  The Arch Reactor already has a large vinyl cutter in our space, however it shares a keyboard, mouse, and monitor with our very popular laser cutter. Due to the popularity of the laser cutter, it is sometimes difficult for members to even learn how to use the vinyl cutter without making a special trip in on a day when few members are present. Plus, being a larger device, the learning curve seems a bit steep for those who have yet to learn how to use it. It can also only be utilized in our space. One advantage that was quickly noted for the Silhouette Portrait is that anyone can download the free software and design their project at home, save it to a flash drive or the cloud, then arrive at our location to complete their project using one of our computers or their own laptop. A second advantage is that being so small, the Portrait could be moved to any desk in our 2400 square foot location temporarily, or even checked out of the space by a member to be used at home for a few days. We can even bring it along with us to local demonstrations and interactively challenge others to be creative while introducing them to our hackerspace.  The Silhouette Studio software seems intuitive and one member remarked that it reminded her a lot of Inkscape, which several of our members are already familiar with. The portability of the unit is not something to be overlooked.  I can see this being very useful for projects that require the same print to be created repeatedly. Such as wedding invitations, or multiple t-shirts. The versatile amount of material that can be cut with it had many present talking about how they might use the Portrait. Troubles we encountered: The night wasn't without problems though. Aside from having trouble playing some of the videos, I had forgotten to bring my pack of white cardstock to the event. This prompted us to rather foolheartedly attempt to cut a file with a normal sheet of printer paper. We eagerly stuck the paper to the cutting mat and inserted it into the Portrait. A member attempted to send a file to it from his computer, but nothing happened with the device and he received a message that the cut was complete. I'm not sure if this was a driver issue, a software issue, or an issue with the cutting mat not having been installed properly. We then connected my laptop back to the Portrait and sent a test file to it. The cutting mat was pulled into the device and it began to cut the paper. The problem occurred once the Portrait was finished with the cut and we attempted rather unceremoniously to remove the cut paper from the mat. Normal printer paper sticks to the mat very well, especially with the first or second use. Of course it ripped the paper as we attempted to remove it from the cutting mat and we realized that a thicker cardstock would be needed. This was more naive beginner user error than anything else.  I do not recommend that you attempt using thin paper. A second issue was the discovery that the free Silhouette Studio software does not allow the import of .SVG files. Many members of our hackerspace are familiar with and use these files for projects. In order to import .SVG files, we would need to upgrade to the Designer Edition for $50 or the Business Edition for $100.  If the Silhouette Portrait gets used as much as I believe it will, this upgrade will likely be a no-brainer for us.  Once the paper had been carefully scraped from the cutting mat using a former plastic gift card, some of our members set out to make a cut from the Vellum that had been sent with the printer.  This proved to be easier to remove from the cutting mat and the members were very happy with the the lace designs they had cut. Additionally, some members used a few sheets of cardstock they already had to cut out some borders from the files that came with the Silhouette Studio software.  We are already looking at purchasing some accessories for the Portrait, such as Pens and additional cutting mats. The later would be a huge advantage because it would allow us to prepare a second material for the next cut while the first was being cut or removed from the mat.  Should the Portrait see as much use as I expect it will, we may be looking at other products from Silhouette, such as the Cameo, the Curio, and the Mint. Being used in a hackerspace by over 50 members, the size and additional versatility of Curio definitely would seem to fit our needs better. The additional thickness and variety of materials that could be used with it are of great interest to the creative tendencies of hackerspace members and makers.  We are also looking forward to Silhouette Link, a new feature coming to Silhouette Studio® that allows customers to send a cut job from any device directly to their Silhouette machine, remotely, through the use of a mobile device app. What I would have done differently:  Not only would I have tested the videos we watched on our projector prior to the meeting, but I would have remembered my cardstock on the night of the event. I also would recommend that anyone else hosting a Build Night use the Portrait to cut out several test files in a variety of materials. Definately take a look at the limitations of the Studio Software and decide if you want to upgrade to the Designer's edition for the importing of .SVG files or not, too. Conclusion: Overall, the night proved to be a successful introduction for several of our members to the Silhouette Portrait. I think all of us were inspired by what it can do for us as individuals and as a hackerspace.  We already have ideas to make a few t-shirts for an upcoming event using heat transfer vinyl and a logo.  I'm sure many projects will be sporting vinyl stickers and other materials that are cut with it. 

Topic by GeekTinker 


External aquarium heater with digital control

I lost about 300 fish just a few days ago when my tank heater decided to stay on when it failed.(examination showed the theromstat contacts were fused together)So far I never worried about failing heaters as so far they just wouldn't heat anymore once the failed.This time I lost about $400 in living creatures and 2 years of breeding.Guess that is the punishment for being away for a few days - a bit over 50°C in your tank...Normal tank heater come in the submersible form or with the clear instruction NOT to submerge them abvoe a certain line - usually under the rubber capEither way they all love to fail within a few years if you are lucky, otherwise sooner.The one thing I always hated is that you need to find ways to hide them in your tank, in some cases you even need to a heat shield to protect sensitve critters in your tank.I though that there should be a cheap and easy way to eliminate most of the annoying factors....Simple, digital temperature controller....You find digital thermostats for your fridge and freezer for around $30-100 bucks, depending on the brand and features.Downside is they all activate the output once the temperature gets too hot.For under $10 you can get universal thermostat controllers- just a tiny white box with the display, two buttons and a few wires...Won't place a link but with the above you should find them on Ebay and Amazon for as said under $10.These can be set with the min temp being above the max temp - this effectively reverts the output state ;)Looks a bit weird when setting the temps this way but after that the power on the output is alive once the temp is BELOW of the set temp.And you can set the differential as low as 0.1°C if you like, but 2-3°C are fine for most tanks.Abandoning the internal heater thermostat....As the number one cause of failure apart from water getting inside we should not use the internal thermostat anymore now.To do this without messing around the temp is simply dialed way above what you will need for your tank.E.G.: If you want 24°C in your tank over the digital controller than the heater thermostat is cranked to 27° or higher.The on-off will be handled through the power our new digital controller provides.Sealing a heater....You should not have to do this but an awful lot of heaters simply fail because water makes it inside somehow.I use a bead of UV curing resin or UV curing epoxy glue for the first stage.The glass won't really expand, so the rubber from the cap won't expand much either.All we do is to add another layer of sealing protection.That stuff however is not always fully qualified for being suberged or just in contact with water a lot.So we add another bead of aquarium grade silicone on top.This also protects our tank from any harful chemicals the UV glue might otherwise release over time.Going external...With an external filter pump it just does not seem to make much sense to have a heater insde the tank.For some reason those filter manufactureres though about almost anything, including build in UV sterilisation - but not a heater...Using a bit of 5mm PVC drain pipe, two end caps and some hose fittings for your aquarium hoses we are set again.A bit of stainless steel wire from the gardeing section of hardware store helps too - the soft, flexible kind, not the really stiff and hard wire please!Design of the external heater:In one end cap you want to drill a hole of the same diameter as your heater tube, a mm bigger won't hurt too much but don't make so small that you need brute force to get the heater through the hole.Seal the inside and outside of the cap with silicone.If you want the heater to be replaced easily in case it does fail again (which it should not!), then you a pipe with a screw fitting and a screw on cap.Keep the assembly steady and secured while the (aquarium grade!) silicone cures - if in doubt let it cure for few more days.The lenght of the pipe should be so that there is enough space left in the bottom so the heater will have about 6cm until it would touch the other end cap.The pipe connections can be for one on the other end cap if you mount the pipe somehwere, otherwise both connectors should on the side of the pump and as close to the caps as feasable.Again, seal the inside and outside of these connections with silicone and let it cure.It helps if the fittings are of the screw in type with a backing nut.Downsides of having an external heater...You need to clean it out when you clean your filter, an added few minutes.If the heater thermostat is set too high and your pump is not running the water in the pipe and hoses will rise to the set temperature of the heater.For a medium sized tank that is no problem, for really small tanks it should be considered though - set the thermostat of the the heater not to the max if you think you might forget the water circulation one day ;)Upsides of having an external heater...The biggest benefit of having and external heater with a digital temperature controller is the lifespan.I used a dirst cheap 400W tube heater like this for over 6 years until finally the actually heating element failed.With the nicely illuminated temp display the times of checking the sticker on the tank or trying to read this tiny floating thermomoter are over as well.Possible upgrade options if you know how to solder or at least know how to correctly wire a relay...With an external tube comes the option to include a UV sterlisation lamp on the other end.The tube will be accordingly longer but a submersible lamp only costs a fraction of these ready made solutions that you still need to attach your your hoses somehow - and they are often quite big...Apart from that there is the option to modify a digital fridge thermostat (about $20-100 bucks) like the STL-1000.As most of them can't be re-programmed for other than cooling use and only have a single output for the compressor the internal relay needs to be replaced.Just select one that somehow fits inside once the original is removed and wire the NC and common output for your heater.Not in mood to fiddle with a controller and solder? No problem either!Just wire another relay to the output.Means the power that the controller switches on it will then switch your additional relay on.This gives you the option to use the proper contacts again to turn your heater on.Using a normal fridge controller this way however requires thinking the wrong way around for the temps.Remember!! : The frige controller "turns on" when the temp goes ABOVE a set temperature!!If you use it like this and connect your heater directly it means it will only turn off once the temp is BELOW the set temp and it will never again go below, only up and up and up....The added or exchanged relay however gives us the option to reverse this to some extent.You set the controller to the MAX temp that you want in your tank.Let's say 24°C , by default this gives a 3°C hystersis, meaning depening on the programming of the controller it will turn on at 27° or close to it - keep that in mind add realise that it means your 24° might need to be set to 21° so the temp won't go over 24° in your tank.Ok, got it, but what exactly happens now and why does it work?When the controller reads below the set temp, like when setting up a new tank with cold water from the tap, it won't provide mains power on the compressor output.It knows the "fridge" is fine right now.Our added relay will be off for the same reason, however we connected our mians power to the common contact of the new relay, the heater on the NC (normally closed contact) and from there back to neutral.Means our heater will get power when the temp controller in the OFF-state.Now the temp start to go up in your tank and sooner or later it will reach the set temp you adjusted the controller to.Suddelny the controller sees a risk for your food in the fridge to go bad and decides to turn the compressor back on to cool it down.As we added our relay it means it will turn on as well.Our NC, normally closed contact, opens and the heater turns off.From ther is just continues within the range of about 3°C....You added digital temp display to your nice fish tank, don't have to worry anymore about your heater prematurely failing and if you like:Some controller offer an alarm output.This can be used with an added relay the same way as before and would then warm you if you heater burnt out and the temp in your tank goes too low.Why so "complicated" if there is microcontrollers?Anyone can use some Arduino and do the same with ease - if anyone can program what it is required.However, even our average Joe with no electronic skills can to the above mods within a few hours excluding the curing time for the silicone.Back to the basics, and after all we already have a microcontroller inside out firdge controller ;)And as said, if in doubt then even a $10 one will do the trick without any mods to it.What about that stainless steel wire?? Don't tell me I wasted 5 bucks for nothing!You did not...Long heaters or UV lamps certainly benefit from it.But even a smaller one is much more stable inside the pipe if you create a simple wire cage for it.The stuff usually comes in a rolled up form of a 10 or 20 meters.With that it is easy to make some loop with the heater ube in the center.Just make a wrap around the pipe with enough left either end to form a ring or spiral that fits inside the pipe.There is not much spring action happening with this wire, so the loops can be quite big and you just push them inside inside while decreasing the diameter until they slide in.If you have a 3D priter you also just print a ring with a hole for the heater and some spokes to cneter it in the pipe.What about heat transfer and even temps in my tank?With the usual in tank setup you have to ensure anyway that the heater is in the waterflow.Otherwise one side of the tank warms up more than the other.With the heater being in the flow of the external pump directly we pump in warmer water and suck out the colder water the other end.Results in a more stable and even overall temperature especially on long tanks.Enjoy!

Topic by Downunder35m