Homemade Pet Strollers

I would like to make a pet stroller for my in-laws. They have 2 Yorkies who can never "finish" their walks, but end up having to be carried. This is wearing on the humans, as they aren't young anymore. I've been laid off since April, so I can't afford the $99-$249 it costs in the stores. Has anyone made one of these? I haven't been able to draw up a plan that really worked. Hope someone out there can help.

Topic by sgsidekick 10 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Need dog stroller for diabetic dog

It must be low to the ground, so he can step off/on to it at his will. Open on one side, sides for putting a bed or bedding. 4 wheels, must be sturdy. Easy to push. I walk a 2nd dog, both miniature Schnauzers. The male can only walk so far and then is too tired. The female still wants to walk, and also, my knees need me to walk, The male does NOT want to stay home alone!! Thank you! PS, my son can weld, we just need design ideas and ideas of what material to make it from. We are thinking of a milk crate for the 'bed.'

Question by 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Need Recommendations for cheap frame materials

I have a scheme to build a kid carrier that is sort of a combination of a rickshaw, a stroller and a bike trailer. I'm thinking about using PVC for the frame, but wanted other ideas from you clever, creative people. Here are the requirements: - cost effective: titanium molded rebar may be nice, but I don't have that kind of money. - fairly strong: I'm hoping to fit 4 kids in this thing, and as such I need something that will be strong enough to hold them. - light weight: I'll be pulling this by hand, possibly over uneven terrain, so it can't weigh a ton. - easy: I have no skills or equipment for welding, so I need something that will be fairly easy to cut and assemble. - available: It needs to be something that can be procured fairly easily from a hardware store, online store, junkyard, etc.So far, the best ideas I've come up with are: - pvc - fits all the above criteria, with the possible exception of structural integrity. Anyone ever used this for framing stuff? - angle iron - could get a little heavy if I'm not careful, and I'd have to cover it to prevent injuries. - bamboo - strong and light-weight, and reasonably easy to work with, but not very readily available.Any other recommendations?

Topic by Llama Nerds 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


How do you make a folding shopping cart out of a double stroller?

I have a double stroller, and with gas prices the way they are (and further going), I want to make a folding shopping cart out of it, and want to know if anyone has any ideas of how I could alter it to carry all my groceries, fold, and not look too much like I should have babies in it? I don't know...maybe this is more of a challenge than a burning question...lol

Topic by Silveroriginal 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Remove axles from jogging stroller wheels?

I have a pair of twenty inch wheels from a jogging stroller with "sealed" bearings that I would like to remove the axles from. I've loosened or removed all of the nuts including the locking nuts from both sides but the axles are still firmly seated/connected to something inside. They came from the frame/carcass of a stroller similar to this, but they are not the quick release.

Topic by MeanUncleBob 3 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


How would you use Stroller Wheels for a bike trailer? Answered

Question by Yerboogieman 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago



jogger to bike trailer?

I have the Baby trends expedition double jogging stroller with the fixed wheel. I just want to attach it to my bike. Is it possible?

Question by lvk-plus 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Brutal Baby Carriages

With a stroller like this, nobody's going to complain about your baby crying in the restaurant or wherever else you go. Hit the link below for more images. It's worth it. Link

Topic by fungus amungus 9 years ago


Convert a standard adult trike to a cargo trike to carry two toddlers - anybody know how?

I'm considering buying an adult trike to convert to carry two small children. I'm sick of pushing a stroller the whole time but can't stand those trailers that people pull through the traffic. Anybody got any ideas of where to start?

Question by zme 9 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Are there any legal suggestions for getting people to slow down on our street?

I'm talking guerrilla warfare. We don't have sidewalks and narrow country roads so walking with a stroller or a dog means you risk life and limb to leave the house--no one drives the 25 MPH speed limit (except me). The town police and the town traffic commission are useless and totally closed minded to any traffic calming suggestions, especially those that cost money. I just want them all to slow down. Any suggestions??

Question by TeaQueen 9 years ago  |  last reply 6 months ago


Lots of electronic parts FOR SALE - super cheap!

 Hi,  I  have a surplus of electronic components left over from when I worked with my dad. We built stroller vending machines for shopping malls. some of the parts are kind of specific to vending machines (bill acceptors and coin hoppers), however some of the parts can have infinite uses in the hands of the instructables community. I will list what I have and please feel free to email me with any questions. I can send photos upon request. All  of these parts are brand new in the box. I live in the chicagoland area. You can email me at Kellensmetalart@comcast.net.  Check out my metal sculpture at Kellensmetalart.blogspot.com Coinco bill acceptor Mag50B - $60 ea. (27 available) Crouzet 30amp 50V relay - $7 ea. (330 available) Money Control coin hopper / part # 40-4600-78 - $50 ea. (26 available) Meanwell power supply (240w 48V 5A) / part # S-240-48 - $75 ea. (25 available) Idec power supply (50w 24V 2.1A) / part # PS5R-D24 21 - $40 ea. (20 available) Idec I/O (20 terminal breakout module) / part # BX1D-S20A - $8 ea. (72 available) Idec I/O (26 terminal breakout module) / part # BX1D-S26A - $10 ea. (23 available) Aromat reset counter / part # LC2H-F-DL-2KK-B   - $25 ea. (20 available) Microsmart PLC (output module) / part # FC4A-T16S3   - $45 ea. (27 available) Microsmart PLC (input module) / part # FC4A-N32B3   - $55 ea. (35 available)

Topic by KellenB 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Back from the Big Peach

Back from Ole Southey, The Sweaty Apple, Ted Turners Bidet. Yep, talking about Atlanta Ga. and thanks to the interweb I can annoy millions with my travel log.If you like you can check out my pix, I took over 1400, but didn't put all of them online, sorry about the low quality and the image tag, I get tired of finding my pix on other's pages.So my wife and I stayed in an inexpensive best western in midtown, alright hotel, great location, thin walls.We visited the Ga Aquarium, we were underwhelmed, perhaps spoiled by multiple trips to the Shedd Aquarium we were disappointed in that it took only three hours to tour the whole facility, TWICE. The whale sharks are cool, but the cafe is to be avoided, the "burgers" I ordered still had ice in the middle.The Atlanta Botanical Garden is an absolute jewel, I've visited dozens of gardens and this one tops the list, the highlight being the Fuqua Conservatory where you share the environs with poison arrow frogs, along with an outstanding orchid house.The High Museum, is hard to judge, we visited the special exhibits only, it was interesting to see a Rembrandt in person, and the Annie Leibowitz gallery was nice.The Fernbank Museum of Natural History, this one I sadly say, pass on. I LIKE dioramas and natural history museums, but without the Imax movie, it would have taken 45 minutes tops to see the whole thing.Finally the Zoo, a must visit, be sure to visit on a week day, Atlanta seems to be populated entirely with soccer moms witha sense of entitlement and double wide strollers. The zoo has pandas, but the red pandas have greater charm and charisma to them, and you don't need a special ticket.FoodThe only restaurant we dined at worth noting was the South City Kitchen, the food was so good you'll mourn that you will never eat that good again, the She Crab Soup and Catfish Ruben are delicious.And Weissenheimer hambergerler, PM me, Okay ?

Topic by Tool Using Animal 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Born to Run the Oakland Marathon

On Sunday, I ran the Oakland Marathon, finishing in 3:54:29, and placing 215th out of 945 runners.  I know it's cliche, but I read Born to Run and got inspired me to run a marathon.  It's the best book I've read in years:  the characters (all real people!) are fascinating, the setting and story are fantastic, and it just made me want to get out and go.  Halfway through the book, I decided to run a few miles to the grocery store in the rain just to run out back, not because I needed anything. Prior to reading Born to Run, I had been running a 2-3 miles twice a week to vary my preferred morning exercise routine of biking or swimming (the kitesurfing season hasn't really started yet).  Running was something I did if I couldn't get to a pool or didn't have the time for a long enough bike ride; it was exercise I did while traveling and when there were no better options.  Born to Run made me question that assumption, and I decided to see how longer runs would feel. Over a year ago I read "You Walk Wrong", a New York Magazine article on going barefoot.  It convinced me that I should be able to go unshod, or at least with minimally foot coverings.  Why would 30 years of running shoe development be able to produce better results than millions of years of foot evolution?  So I bought some Vibram Five Fingers  to protect my delicate soles, and had been doing lots of hiking and a bit of running.  The difference between running in running shoes and Vibram Five Fingers was profound for me.  In running shoes, I typically stopped running because my knees and hips hurt, not because I was exhausted.  The Vibrams forced me to take smaller, faster strides without heel strikes, and suddenly I was getting closer and closer to being able to run long enough to catch exhaustion without any joint pain.  The concept of going barefoot was initially tough because of my flat feet and overpronation, and the possibility of re-dislocating a kneecap. I never went anywhere barefoot, and after I initially dislocated my kneecap in 2000, I was told by a sports medicine doctor that I should never walk without the aid of custom orthotics in my shoes.  However, barefoot websites and forums are full of stories about people's arches coming back, and how kids raised without shoes never have flat feet.  Amazingly, it's all worked perfectly for me.  I now run without my orthotics without any knee pain, and my arches appear to have (re?)formed.  After hopping out of the pool, I always inspect my wet footprints, and they now have distinct arches.  I wish I had taken photographs every day to plot progress. With the characters and race in Born to Run still fresh in my mind, I looked for nearby races to give myself some motivation and something to train for.  When I discovered that Oakland was holding its first marathon in 25 years, and that the route literally went through my neighborhood, I immediately signed up for the half-marathon and convinced Christy to do the same.  I researched training regiments online, and discovered many were 4 and 5 month plans; since I had 50 days before the race, I decided simply to run longer and longer distances at a comfortable pace, and not worry about a rigid structure.  I ran most of my miles on trails in the Oakland hills, and some on the streets, but all of them in my Vibrams.  During a practice run on the half-marathon course three weeks before the race, I completed the half in less than my target time for two hours and felt so good that I opted to do the full marathon. In the marathon, I ran with GEICO-sponsored pacers aiming for a 3:50:00 time (8:46 miles on the flats, and slower miles in the hills; course elevation PDF here).  Of the three pacers, one was running his 34th marathon, and the other two were ultra-marathoners training for a 200 mile race from Calistoga to Santa Cruz; their normal weekend run was 50 miles, so a marathon was like taking a break.  Running in a group is awesome and way better than running by myself listening to audio books.  On multiple occasions, I imagined that we were the hunters of a tribe out running down game -- water stations every couple of miles broke the illusion, but I still eagerly grabbed cups, and the community support was tremendous.  There were bands, drummers, DJs, and gospel choirs making music along the route; families with full brunch buffets setup in their front yards offering all the runners fresh fruit and homemade baked goods; and many people just thanking us for running in Oakland.  The second image shows all my runs in the 50 days leading up to the marathon.  The first 5-mile run on the chart was the longest I had ever run at that point.  While I was coming from something of a limited endurance background (I've biked 135 miles on a tandem from Boston to Provincetown in a single day), I didn't really know my limit.  At mile 23 of the marathon, I finally caught up to exhaustion, and fell behind the pace group.  The last three miles were painful, but in the last quarter mile, I couldn't stop grinning and felt like I might laugh and cry at the same time.  When it was over, I just wanted to sit down. I was aiming for a sub-4-hour marathon, and I'm really proud to have done that on my first try.  Everyone made fun of me for walking like a zombie the next day at work, and I have some pretty large blood blisters on my feet, but nothing that won't disappear in under a week.  Go and read Born to Run, it might inspire you, too. Christy says: I'd always had to run as cross-training for other sports (I swam competitively for 13 years) and ran when I needed quick exercise, but hated it - my joints hurt, and it just wasn't fun.  I was a distance swimmer and can hike nearly forever, but could literally swim farther than I could (or would) run.  The most I'd ever run before was about 4 miles.   I got my Vibrams with Eric, and really enjoyed hiking with them on my feet.  I hadn't run in nearly a year and a half (pregnancy loosens the joints, which made running feel even worse) so when Eric announced he was signing up to run 13 miles I was dubious.  However, I read Born to Run and was suitably inspired - I was in good cardio shape from swimming and stationary biking, and would happily hike 13 miles, so why couldn't I run that far?  I decided to go out for a 5k jog to see what running felt like in my Vibrams. Long story short, I accidentally ran 6 miles, stopping not due to fatigue or joint injury but because of a blister from a poorly-adjusted shoe strap.  I signed up for the half marathon that evening, and started taking increasingly pleasant runs through the parks and across the city.  I ran the half-marathon course with Corvidae in her jog stroller, stopping to feed her periodically.  Eric finished while I was on mile 8, so he backtracked along the course and met us at mile 10, by which time she was thoroughly done with this stroller nonsense and had migrated to the sling.  I left the two of them to their own devices and jogged the rest of the way to the finish, about 3:25 after I started in the morning.  Not terribly speedy, even given the breaks!  The next day the bottoms of my feet were sore, and one of my Achilles tendons was a bit inflamed - I'd describe it as having overused my springs - but even though I was limping, my muscles were still in good shape. My pace is still quite slow (I ran the half-marathon in 2:42, for roughly 12:26 mile splits) but it's frighteningly consistent - I negative split most of the race, and at the end discovered I still had plenty of energy to sprint past a dozen exhausted runners.  Clearly I didn't run fast enough or far enough, but I was specifically setting a pace I felt able to maintain indefinitely.  The weak link is still my feet!  While I had plenty of muscle and energy left at the end of the race, the bottoms of my feet were tired from use - more practice is necessary to balance out years of shoe-wearing.  However, I recovered much more quickly this time, and was able to run again by Tuesday morning.  No zombie shuffle for me!  Of course, this means next time I'll be running the marathon, and at a faster pace!

Topic by ewilhelm 9 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Funny Labels

These are hilarious!!! There all REAL funny product lables that people have found. Here's the link to where I got them: http://www.rinkworks.com/said/warnings.shtml Product Warnings: • "Do not use if you cannot see clearly to read the information in the information booklet." -- In the information booklet. • "Caution: The contents of this bottle should not be fed to fish." -- On a bottle of shampoo for dogs. • "For external use only!" -- On a curling iron. • "Warning: This product can burn eyes." -- On a curling iron. • "Do not use in shower." -- On a hair dryer. • "Do not use while sleeping." -- On a hair dryer. • "Do not use while sleeping or unconscious." -- On a hand-held massaging device. • "Do not place this product into any electronic equipment." -- On the case of a chocolate CD in a gift basket. • "Recycled flush water unsafe for drinking." -- On a toilet at a public sports facility in Ann Arbor, Michigan. • "Shin pads cannot protect any part of the body they do not cover." -- On a pair of shin guards made for bicyclists. • "This product not intended for use as a dental drill." -- On an electric rotary tool. • "Caution: Do not spray in eyes." -- On a container of underarm deodorant. • "Do not drive with sunshield in place." -- On a cardboard sunshield that keeps the sun off the dashboard. • "Caution: This is not a safety protective device." -- On a plastic toy helmet used as a container for popcorn. • "Do not use near fire, flame, or sparks." -- On an "Aim-n-Flame" fireplace lighter. • "Battery may explore or leak." -- On a battery. See a scanned image. • "Do not eat toner." -- On a toner cartridge for a laser printer. • "Not intended for highway use." -- On a 13-inch wheel on a wheelbarrow. • "This product is not to be used in bathrooms." -- On a Holmes bathroom heater. • "May irritate eyes." -- On a can of self-defense pepper spray. • "Eating rocks may lead to broken teeth." -- On a novelty rock garden set called "Popcorn Rock." • "Caution! Contents hot!" -- On a Domino's Pizza box. • "Caution: Hot beverages are hot!" -- On a coffee cup. • "Caution: Shoots rubber bands." -- On a product called "Rubber Band Shooter." • "Warning: May contain small parts." -- On a frisbee. • "Do not use orally." -- On a toilet bowl cleaning brush. • "Please keep out of children." -- On a butcher knife. • "Not suitable for children aged 36 months or less." -- On a birthday card for a 1 year old. • "Do not recharge, put in backwards, or use." -- On a battery. • "Warning: Do not use on eyes." -- In the manual for a heated seat cushion. • "Do not look into laser with remaining eye." -- On a laser pointer. • "Do not use for drying pets." -- In the manual for a microwave oven. • "For use on animals only." -- On an electric cattle prod. • "For use by trained personnel only." -- On a can of air freshener. • "Keep out of reach of children and teenagers." -- On a can of air freshener. • "Remember, objects in the mirror are actually behind you." -- On a motorcycle helmet-mounted rear-view mirror. • "Warning: Riders of personal watercraft may suffer injury due to the forceful injection of water into body cavities either by falling into the water or while mounting the craft." -- In the manual for a jetski. • "Warning: Do not climb inside this bag and zip it up. Doing so will cause injury and death." -- A label inside a protective bag (for fragile objects), which measures 15cm by 15cm by 12cm. • "Do not use as ear plugs." -- On a package of silly putty. • "Please store in the cold section of the refrigerator." -- On a bag of fresh grapes in Australia. • "Warning: knives are sharp!" -- On the packaging of a sharpening stone. • "Not for weight control." -- On a pack of Breath Savers. • "Twist top off with hands. Throw top away. Do not put top in mouth." -- On the label of a bottled drink. • "Theft of this container is a crime." -- On a milk crate. • "Do not use intimately." -- On a tube of deodorant. • "Warning: has been found to cause cancer in laboratory mice." -- On a box of rat poison. • "Fragile. Do not drop." -- Posted on a Boeing 757. • "Cannot be made non-poisonous." -- On the back of a can of de-icing windshield fluid. • "Caution: Remove infant before folding for storage." -- On a portable stroller. • "Excessive dust may be irritating to shin and eyes." -- On a tube of agarose powder, used to make gels. • "Look before driving." -- On the dash board of a mail truck. • "Do not iron clothes on body." -- On packaging for a Rowenta iron. • "Do not drive car or operate machinery." -- On Boot's children's cough medicine. • "For indoor or outdoor use only." -- On a string of Christmas lights. • "Wearing of this garment does not enable you to fly." -- On a child sized Superman costume. • "This door is alarmed from 7:00pm - 7:00am." -- On a hospital's outside access door. • "Beware! To touch these wires is instant death. Anyone found doing so will be prosecuted." -- On a sign at a railroad station. • "Warning: do not use if you have prostate problems." -- On a box of Midol PMS relief tablets. • "Product will be hot after heating." -- On a supermarket dessert box. • "Do not turn upside down." -- On the bottom of a supermarket dessert box. • "Do not light in face. Do not expose to flame." -- On a lighter. • "Choking hazard: This toy is a small ball." -- On the label for a cheap rubber ball toy. • "Not for human consumption." -- On a package of dice. • "May be harmful if swallowed." -- On a shipment of hammers. • "Using Ingenio cookware to destroy your old pots may void your warranty." -- A printed message that appears in a television advertisement when the presenter demonstrates how strong the cookware is by using it to beat up and destroy a regular frying pan. • "Do not attempt to stop the blade with your hand." -- In the manual for a Swedish chainsaw. • "Do not dangle the mouse by its cable or throw the mouse at co-workers." -- From a manual for an SGI computer. • "Warning: May contain nuts." -- On a package of peanuts. • "Do not eat." -- On a slip of paper in a stereo box, referring to the styrofoam packing. • "Do not eat if seal is missing." -- On said seal. • "Remove occupants from the stroller before folding it." • "Access hole only -- not intended for use in lifting box." -- On the sides of a shipping carton, just above cut-out openings which one would assume were handholds. • "Warning: May cause drowsiness." -- On a bottle of Nytol, a brand of sleeping pills. • "Warning: Misuse may cause injury or death." -- Stamped on the metal barrel of a .22 calibre rifle. • "Do not use orally after using rectally." -- In the instructions for an electric thermometer. • "Turn off motor before using this product." -- On the packaging for a chain saw file, used to sharpen the cutting teeth on the chain. • "Not to be used as a personal flotation device." -- On a 6x10 inch inflatable picture frame. • "Do not put in mouth." -- On a box of bottle rockets. • "Remove plastic before eating." -- On the wrapper of a Fruit Roll-Up snack. • "Not dishwasher safe." -- On a remote control for a TV. • "For lifting purposes only." -- On the box for a car jack. • "Do not put lit candles on phone." -- On the instructions for a cordless phone. • "Warning! This is not underwear! Do not attempt to put in pants." -- On the packaging for a wristwatch. • "Do not wear for sumo wrestling." -- From a set of washing instructions. See a scanned image. ________________________________________ Assurances: • "Safe for use around pets." -- On a box of Arm & Hammer Cat Litter. ________________________________________ Small Print From Commercials: • "Do not use house paint on face." -- In a Visa commercial that depicts an expecting couple looking for paint at a hardware store. • "Do not drive cars in ocean." -- In a car commercial which shows a car in the ocean. • "Always drive on roads. Not on people." -- From a car commercial which shows a vehicle "body-surfing" at a concert. • "For a limited time only." -- From a Rally's commercial that described how their burgers were fresh. ________________________________________ Signs and Notices: • "No stopping or standing." -- A sign at bus stops everywhere. • "Do not sit under coconut trees." -- A sign on a coconut palm in a West Palm Beach park circa 1950. • "These rows reserved for parents with children." -- A sign in a church. • "All cups leaving this store, rather full or empty, must be paid for." -- A sign in a Cumberland Farms in Hillsboro, New Hampshire. • "Malfunction: Too less water." -- A notice left on a coffee machine. • "Prescriptions cannot be filled by phone." -- On a form in a clinic. • "You could be a winner! No purchase necessary. Details inside." -- On a bag of Fritos. • "Fits one head." -- On a hotel-provided shower cap box. • "Payment is due by the due date." -- On a credit card statement. • "No small children." -- On a laundromat triple washer. • "Warning: Ramp Ends In Stairs." -- A sign, correctly describing the end of a concrete ramp intended for handicap access to a bridge. ________________________________________ Safety Procedures: • "Take care: new non-slip surface." -- On a sign in front of a newly renovated ramp that led to the entrance of a building. • "In case of flood, proceed uphill. In case of flash flood, proceed uphill quickly." -- One of the emergency safety procedures at a summer camp. ________________________________________ Ingredients: • "Ingredients: Artificially bleached flour, sugar, vegetable fat, yeast, salt, gluten, soya flour, emulsifier 472 (E) & 481, flour treatment agents, enzymes, water. May contain: fruit." -- The ingredients list on a package of fruit buns. • "100% pure yarn." -- On a sweater. • "Some materials may irritate sensitive skin. Please look at the materials if you believe this may be the case. Materials: Covering: 100% Unknown. Stuffing: 100% Unknown." -- On a pillow. • "Cleans and refreshes without soap or water. Contains: Water, fragrance & soap." -- On the packet for a moist towelette. See a scanned image. ________________________________________ Instructions: • "Remove the plastic wrapper." -- The first instruction on a bag of microwave popcorn; to see the instructions, one first has to remove the plastic wrapper and unfold the pouch. • "Take one capsule by mouth three times daily until gone." -- On a box of pills. • "Open packet. Eat contents." -- Instructions on a packet of airline peanuts. • "Remove wrapper, open mouth, insert muffin, eat." -- Instructions on the packaging for a muffin at a 7-11. • "Use like regular soap." -- On a bar of Dial soap. • "Instructions: usage known." -- Instructions on a can of black pepper. • "Serving suggestion: Defrost." -- On a Swann frozen dinner. • "Simply pour the biscuits into a bowl and allow the cat to eat when it wants." -- On a bag of cat biscuits. • "In order to get out of car, open door, get out, lock doors, and then close doors." -- In a car manual. • "Please include the proper portion of your bill." -- On the envelope for an auto insurance bill. • "The appliance is switched on by setting the on/off switch to the 'on' position." -- Instructions for an espresso kettle. • "For heat-retaining corrugated cardboard technology to function properly, close lid." -- On a Domino's sandwich box. ________________________________________ Requirements: • "Optional modem required." -- On a computer software package.

Topic by LoneWolf 8 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago