Does anyone have instructions for constructing a human strolling table, for serving appetizers, etc.?

Need instructions on how to build a human strolling table. Thanks

Question by    |  last reply



Bio-mechanical electricity - 13W per knee.

A stroll around the park may soon be enough to charge the raft of batteries needed in today's power-hungry gadgets.US and Canadian scientists have built a novel device that effortlessly harvests energy from human movements.The adapted knee brace, outlined in the journal Science, can generate enough energy to power a mobile phone for 30 minutes from one minute of walking.A slow walk can generate an average of 5W of electricity, but they have models that will produce 13W - enough power for a one-minute stroll to provide half an hour of talk-time.The prototype makes you sound like an extra in Terminator, but the inventors are predicting saleable products within 18 months, probably powering (in the first instance) modern prosthetic limbs.Soldiers may also benefit from wearing the knee brace to power the multitude of devices they now carry ,such as night vision goggles and GPS."They treat batteries like they treat food and water - they are so essential to what they do," he said.Link to BBC articleLink to BBC VideoLink to Science Magazine articleThis whole idea seems like a "Good Thing" to me - even without the computer-control, I don't see why a pedestrian or jogger couldn't wear a pair of generators similar to those in wind-up torches, charging phone and PDA as you stroll around doing the shopping or jogging across the park. Get them with a Nike or Motorola logo, and we'd see hundreds of people wearing batman-style utility belts, stacked with all the gadgets the modern human "needs". It could really help wearable computing take off as well.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Wanted, Electronics/LED expert for Commission or Request for links

I'm looking for someone who's good with electronics, specificly LED's and a way to make a programable stroll sign.  I want to make a 8x40 screen of LEDs, with several pre-programed displays, but I'd like a hand held controller I can attach to them so I can change them on the fly or type out messages to scroll across the screen. Anyone feel up to it ? OR know links to tutorials ? I'm willing to pay for such a comission ! Thanks for looking. JERMS !!!

Topic by JERMS3633   |  last reply


JamLegend. Not quite Guitar Hero but it's free!

Recently my friend & I were just strolling the internet looking for something to do, talking to each other on MSN and telling each other what we found.We turned up with a number of things, which kept us occupied for about an hour, until we found JamLegend. It's kinda like guitar hero but you play it on your key board and it only has 3 notes. I believe you can plug in a Guitar Hero or Rock Band controller but I don't have one, so I guess that's up to you. I believe that if if some one who has an account refers people (me, referring you,) then both people get "bonuses". http://www.jamlegend.com/refer/rf/272549 go here if you're interested, it's good fun and a great way to waste an hour or two.XD ---- rock on!

Topic by Kryptonite   |  last reply


Desktops of March

We all use computers to access this website, which means were all most probably sat infront of a computer.Many other forums do a monthly 'show off your desktop' thread, so i intend to bring the same to here.Some of us are more than happy strolling along with the default windows xp skin, and a few icons on our desktops, others want and need to customize it as much as possible. Some of us, like myself, appreciate the extra efficiency with some of the tools available.This is a place for people to share their desktops, and to ask questions about other peoples, so if you see someone else with a kick ass wallpaper, ask them where they got it!I do not want any flaming. We accept ALL operating systems as equal.So, on with the show, here is my march desktop features include - Running Mac OS X LeopardiStat Menus for temp, and memory usage in menu bariPulse for further activity usage in the desktop.Adium, with a custom black text transparent backgroundGeektool, displaying RSS feed of recent Ibles comments, and the timeMy own home made wallpaper, featuring a snail picture i found.I look forward to seeing yours!- gmjhowe

Topic by gmjhowe   |  last reply


What was the first food-thing you ever made?

Memory is truly the most precious and valuable gift we possess.  Love, contentment, spirituality are all up there in the top 10, but without the memory of these things, they cannot be appreciated. As I was taking an enjoyable stroll down memory lane this morning, thoughts of my childhood BFF came to mind... which lead me to this topic.  I thought would be a great brain exercise and a fun discussion for us foodies. ;-)  So what's the first thing you ever made?  (Mud pies don't count. ;-) My first almost-solo (no bossy mom!) was a Cheese Souffle. I remember my bff had a duck... and the duck laid eggs... lots of them!  We found a mouth-watering Cheese souffle in some illustrated cookbook and the plan was hatched. ;-)   Like good little 11 yo girls, we waited for her mom to go to work before commandeering the kitchen.  Our creation wasn't nearly as beautiful as this one.  I recall being quite disappointed as I watched the whole thing droop miserably when it came out of the oven. lol... souffle FAIL, if there ever was one... but ya gotta start somewhere! ;-D So what was your first cooking project?

Topic by bajablue   |  last reply


Need help making a CAPD/Dialysis bag warmer

We are doing a lot of traveling right now to a bunch of different hospitals and I need a heating device I can plug into the car or preferably run off a battery. I have a hard platt suitcase which will hold 2 bags and am toying with the idea of just insulating it and putting a heating pad in there to plug into an inverter. The problem there is I don't always have access to an outlet in the hospital, and you tend to look very much like a terrorist and scare the holy jeebus out of people strolling around the hospital with this wired suitcase thingy. I am unaware of  IED or ordinance requiring an electrical outlet, but hospital security knows all about them and are just itching to go all *observe and report* on you.  I picked up one of those black and decker heat/cooler's at a yard sale with the intent to pop it open and see if anything can be repurposed, but I am not real confident on how to cover the elements so they don't melt the bags.  Temperature regulation is really important, and I really don't have the foggiest idea how to best do this. It's a 4.4lb bag of fluid, so it would have to heat 2 of them without turning them into boiling lava. It also can't be so weak that it takes 12 hours to heat the bag. It would need to get to 37*C/98.6*F (or near to it in any event) in about 4 hours. This is the real McCoy I am trying to rinky dink replicate: http://www.kidneystuff.com/warmers.html Keeping her alive ain't cheap so I simply don't have the 400$ to hand over for it.  Nutshell: I need help with (everything :P ) 1. Heating element 2. How to best secure bags  3. Best/most efficient way to power it 4. What material and in what fashion to insulate the case. 5. How to regulate temperature. I'm sure I missed some things, but really any and all advice would be more than greatly appreciated. 

Question by orphicdragon   |  last reply


From the Editor: International Buy Nothing Day

A few years ago I started celebrating International Buy Nothing Day, which falls on the Friday after Thanksgiving in the United States (and the following Saturday everywhere else). I typically celebrate by going for a walk on the beach in the morning, and then spending the rest of the day eating leftovers and working on projects. I find it's a pleasant way to start the holiday season, and helps put the season in perspective. Using one of the busiest shopping days of the year to take pause and go out of my way not to spend money made me very conscientious of many of the absurdities of the holiday season. It also helped me become aware of all of the small transactions that I typically made throughout the day, and the importance (or frivolity) of each one. Another unexpected consequence was that it limited travel, and forced me to stay local to my neighborhood. This made me engage with my neighbors in a way that did not require spending money. Not to mention, there were no pushy crowds elbowing for deals, no parking spots to fight for, and no unbearable register lines created by poorly trained seasonal staff. Don't get me wrong, I am not saying that all transactions are bad. If no one ever spent money, our economy would probably collapse pretty quickly. We can't all avoid spending money every day, but we can choose where and how we spend our money. After a few years of celebrating International Buy Nothing Day, I am much more likely to spend money with local businesses, and support local artisans and craftspeople. This decision was arrived at while I was strolling about aimlessly a few years ago, and noticed how empty some of the local stores were on one of the busiest shopping days of the year. It was my conclusion that local businesses needed my money much more than the ubiquitous large retailers I typically purchased from. After all, these stores are more likely to sell the wares of local makers, and are an important part of the DIY community. I highly encourage everyone to celebrate this holiday to the best of their ability. I understand that you may need to go get some food, or put gas in your car, but, if you can, try avoiding the magnetic pull of shopping malls and Amazon deals. Instead, I would encourage everyone to try spending International Buy Nothing Day crafting thoughtful gifts for people, reading a good book, playing board games with friends, or simply going for a walk. Have you ever celebrated this holiday? Do you think you might like to try? Do you have any plans to make your own gifts this year? What are your thoughts on this phenomenon?

Topic by randofo   |  last reply


I feel...

As is becoming traditional for new folk in The Office, it's time for me lay down some thoughts on my first week as Artist in Residence. I feel old.  As I staggered up the stairs last Monday, luggage on my back, I looked and round at a room full of young people.  I haven't been so crass as to directly ask, but I immediately sure that there is a full generation between the people that I was looking at and myself.  Many of them are far closer in age to my sons than to me. I feel welcome. Everybody smiled at me, even if my arrival interrupted whatever they were doing, and quite a few folk that first few minutes weren't sure who who I was, but were still welcoming.  Everybody is very helpful, nowhere is out of bounds. Stumpchunkman Matt went out of his way to make sure I had a base to work at, Noahw sorted out the legals in moments, Jessyratfink gave me a tour (the place I had previously referred to as "HQ" is actually in three different places, a brisk stroll apart). I feel valued. Almost immediately, my opinion was being asked, used and acted upon.  I've helped choose contest winners, and been part of the development process for the future of the site (interesting!).  I have been included in everything. I have not been punched by a member of the dev team. I feel trusted. I have a key to the office hanging on my belt, and I know where the coffee is. I feel ignorant. These people, these young people, know so much more than I do about the high end of Making.  But, they're also keen to teach - I have had lots of offers for help to learn.  As a teacher, that feels weird, weirdly good... I feel happy. The walk from my apartment to the main office takes about 50 minutes, and goes through a somewhat dodgy area of the city, but every day I smile the full way, even singing and whistling.  The bus-ride back (it's up-hill - I may be happy, but I'm not daft) is crowded and sweaty, but I am still smiling, and still ready to sing (but quietly).  I've never been like that on a commute. I feel productive. I've only published two small projects this week, but I have two larger projects in development that will involve staff, and a bunch of other things to make as well.  It's really useful that conversations with staff go along the lines of "Can I have a...? Yes" ------------------------------ Basically, all this adds up to this being a really good experience.  It is by no means a free ride (thank goodness for credit cards!) - if you're young and single you could do this for a lot less than I have, but I could not get away with spending a month in California without bringing the family along. If you ever, ever get the chance to do this, or something similar, then grab it with both hands!

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Open Call: Pier 9 & Market Street Prototyping Festival Keystone Project

MARKET STREET PROTOTYPING FESTIVAL OPEN CALL Autodesk Keystone Project Call Opens: July 11, 2014 Call Closes: September 2, 2014 Shortlist Interviews: September 17-19, 2014 Proposal Selection: October 1, 2014 CALL SUMMARY: The San Francisco Planning Department has partnered with Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) to produce the Market Street Prototyping Festival: an innovative, hands-on, publicly sourced approach to creating the next chapter of San Francisco’s public life. The Market Street Prototyping Festival builds upon a five-year, multi-agency effort for a Better Market Street to re-establish San Francisco’s civic spine as a place to stop and spend time, meet friends, people watch, or just stroll and experience the scenery. As a formal piece of the planning process, the Prototyping Festival will commission and exhibit up to 50 design projects that aim to improve lives by improving public spaces. Each of the selected prototype projects will be installed on Market Street for the full duration of the three-day festival, which will take place in April 9-11, 2015. Matched with one of five Festival Districts on Market, selected teams will work directly with community members to shape the direction of their designs. The call for applications for those 50 projects is currently open and will close on September 2nd, 2014. More information on that process can be found on the Market Street Prototyping Festival website. Market Street will be broken out into 5 districts along the corridor: Civic Center, Central Market, Retail, Financial, Embarcadero. Each district, or "Block," will be represented by a Block Captain. Each Captain will mentor 10 selected prototyping teams and will be responsible for developing their own Keystone Project that will serve as the primary focal point for each district. As the Block Captain for the Embarcadero district, Autodesk is seeking proposals from engineers, industrial designers, architects, artists, and interactive designers for a large-scale Keystone Project to serve as a physical, visual and social anchor for the Embarcadero section of the festival. While there is no official theme for the festival itself, the Autodesk Keystone Project should relate to the ethos “Inspire, Design, Create.” Additionally, it should connect to the character of the Pier 9 Workshop where artists, designers and fabricators are empowered to test the limits of existing technology, both digital and mechanical. Special consideration may be given to projects that incorporate the following themes related to place-making and the unique social and spatial conditions of the Embarcadero district: • site specificity: social, cultural, geographic, and civic histories • connecting digital and physical realms • daring experimentation/playful prototyping • edge condition: city + waterfront • wayfinding and transportation networks LOCATION: Over the course of the festival, the city anticipates foot traffic of over 300,000 visitors. The Keystone Project may be installed anywhere within the festival’s Embarcadero district, which starts at the intersection of Market and Spear Street, extending to the traffic island at Embarcadero and Market, possibly including Jimmy Herman Plaza. See the map on the Market Street Prototyping Festival website for more details and note that Autodesks main San Francisco office is located at 1 Market. PRECEDENTS: The following projects are examples of what the application review committee is looking for in terms of scale, tone and available resources. These samples are meant to serve purely as a reference and are not works that will be featured at the festival. - Sukkah City, Various, New York - 21 Balançoires (21 Swings), Daily tous les jours, Montreal - Light Drift, J. Meejin Yoon, Philadelphia                 (Note: Projects for the 2014 Urban Prototyping festival cannot be installed in the bay.) - Digital Empathy, Julianne Swartz, New York LOGISTICS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SUPPORT: The selected project and team will be fully supported by the Pier 9 Workshop! We look forward to having you join our creative community of Artists in Residence, other Creative Projects Teams, and the folks who make Instructables.com go. We provide ample opportunities to collaborate with other designers and makers, to receive training on any of the machines in our workshop, gain software support for all Autodesk products (including free software licenses), and call upon the expertise of our fantastic Shop Staff. We can supply a modest office workspace and 24-hour access to the workshop. All basic workshop supplies will be covered, including hardware, sheet goods, finishes, and prototyping materials. Additional funding will be provided at an amount to be determined. We expect to support an innovative and inspiring project that reflects the use of our world-class facilities, at a scale similar to the precedents listed. For more information on the amenities available at Pier 9, see the Pier 9 Overview and Machine Catalog Instructables. Your project will also receive support from Autodesk’s public relations team, marketing team, video and photo documentation team, software specialists, and workshop fabrication specialists. There will be an expectation that you will work collaboratively with all of these groups to share the progress and product of your work. Finally, we have an Advisory Committee representing expertise in areas of landscape architecture, sustainability, and digital fabrication that can be called upon for consultation and critical feedback at particular points in the project timeline. The selected artist or team will be expected to formally share their progress throughout the development and fabrication process with the creative community at Pier 9 and beyond. This includes: • posting Instructables related to the making of the project • 2 presentations to the Advisory Committee for feedback • 1 lunchtime presentation to the full Pier 9 community, near project completion TIMELINE: July 11, 2014 —RFP Release July 22, 2014 —12pm lunchtime RFP Info Session at Pier 9 September 2, 2014 —Proposals Due September 17-19, 2014 — Semifinalist interviews October 1, 2014 —Keystone project announced October - December, 2014 — periodic consultations with members of Advisory Board Early December, 2014 — Presentation and critique with the Advisory Board Early February, 2015 — Follow-up presentation and critique with the Advisory Board 2 weeks before festival —Dress rehearsal (deadline for full assembly and functionality) April 9-11, 2015 —Installation and three-day festival presentation APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: - 1 page statement regarding the concept, siting, and fabrication strategy for your proposal - Up to 5 photos/videos of mock-ups or prior work - CV including exhibition history (if applicable) - Proposed budget outline (Please include direct costs, materials, artist fees, contractors, and any additional project contributors or contractors) - Draft project calendar including proposed dates for prototyping workflow, workshop production time, completion time(s), and out-of-town dates (if applicable) - List of anticipated machines and materials needed ABOUT PIER 9: Autodesk’s Pier 9 workshop is a world-class fabrication facility on the San Francisco Bay. The Artist in Residence (AiR) program gives artists, designers and Instructables authors a chance to work with us in our lab and workshops to explore, create, and document innovative projects with our tools and resources and share them with the DIY community. AiRs are invited to come for a period of several weeks to several months, during which they will work on projects that are shared across the Autodesk Studio Communities. The primary goals of the residency program are to produce top-level inspirational content and to connect innovative and creative individuals with our unique set of tools and resources. Questions and inquiries are encouraged. We look forward to learning more about your work. Please submit applications with all materials compiled in a .zip file titled with your project name to: P9PublicPrograms@Autodesk.com. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: Market Street Prototyping Festival Homepage Autodesk Engagement Announcement Pier 9 Overview Pier 9 Machine Catalog

Topic by brinstructables