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Where can I get bulk synthetic hair?

I want to make a plushie My Little Pony and I'm going to need a good amount of hair to do it. The only thing I've found so far is buying hair extensions, which would get very expensive very quickly, and most places don't have the colors I need. I want the colors to match the Friendship is Magical cartoon as closely as possible. The first one I do will be Fluttershy, so I'm looking for a light pink. I would prefer to spend less than $20 on the hair since I still have to get all the other materials as well. Is that possible?

Question by Wolf Seril    |  last reply


Extreme Wig Styling Instructable

I have been searching around looking for a tutorial on how to create an extreme wig hairstyle similar to Ophelia Overdose's wig stylings. Example I have seen a lot of tutorials about adding hair to existing synthetic wigs, but I haven't seen much on creating large gravity defying hair that includes curls.

Topic by kimmydesigns    |  last reply


How to Create Art: TIps

INTROThere don't seem to be any good instructables on how to draw (or create art), so I decided to make one. Here are some tips I've learned in art class.You may be disappointed with the lack of pictures, but remember; this is about YOUR art, not mine. So, happy art-ing!*This was supposed to be an Instructable, but the evil robot jerk thingy deleted it. So here it is, forum-format.*STEP ONE: DRAWING1. Stay LOOSE. Use your whole arm. A good way to warm up is to do gesture drawings; they're fun and they look cool. (Gesture drawings are drawings done with one line. The idea is to capture the movement of the object, and the inside, not just the edges; it's hard to explain.)2. Draw lots. Doodle. Write with funky letters. Honestly, practicing will improve your art tenfold.3. For still lives (drawing things that you can see), draw the object you see, not the object you think you see. For example, if you're drawing a teapot, don't draw what a teapot looks like (or what you think a teapot looks like), draw the teapot in front of you. Draw the bumps and the shadows, the drips down the spout, the angle, etc.4. DON'T SMUDGE. Don't. You can get the same affect with shading, and it looks WAY better. Trust me.5. Draw real things. Don't just draw things from your imagination, draw the things in front of you.STEP TWO: PHOTOGRAPHYLots of people make the mistake of thinking that if their drawing is (to them) craptastic, then their art is. It's no true. You don't have to draw to make art; go grab a camera and take some photos. You'll be amazed at the number of cool designs you can find in your house -- the way the blanket on your bed ripples, the pattern your computer cables make, etc. Take photos of everything: the sky, your room, your walls, your face, your friends, your plants, your cat, everything. And finally, take lots and lots of photos. This is where a digital camera comes in handy. I guarantee that if you take 150 photos (it's not hard -- 150 should take you an hour) at least 25 will be decent. 10 will be good. And at least one or two will be spectacular.So get out there and take some photos! MATERIALSDrawing:Pencils:- Use a good, sharp HB or 4B pencil. Analogue, not mechanical.- Get a good eraser; the best are the rectangular white ones- For pencil crayons, I suggest a well-known brand; Crayola or Laurentien are my two main choicesPaper:- Get good, thick paper. The worst thing you can do is draw something spectacular on a piece of lined paper, so I suggest you carry some blank pages with you, in a binder or sketchbook.Pens:- I suggest Crayola Sketch pens (the ones with the thick tips), or SharpiesPainting:- NO PUCK-PAINTS. Don't use anything that comes dry. If it isn't in a tube, tub, or bottle, don't use it. Liquids have better colour -- they don't look as faint.Brushes:- Shell out for the good ones. Get ones with wooden handles, and tips that look like real hair. No plastic, synthetic-tipped garbage.- Take care of them: wash all the paint off of them when you're finished, and dry them off. Place them brush-ends up, so that the bristles don't get squashed and look like Calvin's head. And finally, mess around with crayons a bit (go Crayola) most people think they're for toddlers, but they're fun, and you can do some really cool stuff with them.

Topic by threecheersfornick    |  last reply