Search for tone generator in Topics


DTMF Generator with Arduino

Hello mate, I have telephone with only receiver and no keypad. So, i need to generate DTMF tones to dial the number. Is it possible for me to generate a DTMF tone generator by programming arduino with the frequencies and attaching speaker to it? Also, how can i club two tones which are required to be sent at a single moment? Thank You. 

Topic by anuragkanase    |  last reply


Waveform Drawing Software? Answered

Is there any cool software that allows you to literally draw the waveform for music (specifically a longer tone ex: >10 secs)   To add some clarity -I want to draw sort of a the "rough" waveform, and have it filled in by a computer synthesizer; I know the extreme complexity of sound. I also have many audio editing programs, and I know of FL Studio and all of that. I want to have a sound that if looking at the waveform, you see the shape drawn. I don't want to draw all of the individual peaks and valleys. Looping an individual drawn minuscule waveform is simple with a wavetable synthesizer application. I'm saying that if i draw something like "^", the computer will fill that in with that synthesizer's pattern without the "steps" (_-_) that are created with instruments.

Question by DIY Emilio    |  last reply


Any good designs for a tone generator using 555 or 556 ic chips?

I've seen a few on the web but I was wondering if any of you out there have put anything together that you really like.

Question by bigdeee    |  last reply


How to control the laser pulse using audio?

Well, what i wanna do is to control the laser pulse for my lasershow i built. I would like to make the laser PULSE using a tone generator program i have here.

Question by belgvr    |  last reply


how to make a guitar tone stack?

Im making my own amp, but it occurred to me that i'll need gain, bass, mid, and treble controls as well. i know these are generally part of the preamp but i cant seem to find one that is simple, with few parts (small opamp , 4 or 5 pots and some caps/resistors). oh yeah if you could show me a site that carries all the part too thatd be nice, becauseive always used all electronics, but thay seem to be lacking... they dont even carry a 250k pot!

Question by tigerdog330    |  last reply


555 Timer Tone Generator. Which capacitor should I use, and where do I add the power source? Please help! Thanks!

I'm wanting to make a tone generator with a 555 timer that is a frequency humans can't hear. I'm going to follow this schematic. My R1 (potentiometer) will be 10k. R2 will be 33k. C1 will be .001mF. What should capacitor 2 be? And would the resistors i mentioned work for making a tone within the 17-20 Khz range? Also, how and where would I attach the power source? I'm thinking about using a 9 volt battery. Or would something else work better? I want it to be able to run for several hours straight. Thanks! http://www.reconnsworld.com/audio_tonegenerate.html? Thanks you!

Question by darkforest    |  last reply


555 Timer Tone Generator. Which capacitor should I use, and where do I add the power source? Please help!?

I'm wanting to make a tone generator with a 555 timer that is a frequency humans can't hear. I'm going to follow this schematic. My R1 (potentiometer) will be 10k. R2 will be 33k. C1 will be .001mF. What should capacitor 2 be? And would the resistors i mentioned work for making a tone within the 17-20 Khz range? Also, how and where would I attach the power source? I'm thinking about using a 9 volt battery. Or would something else work better? I want it to be able to run for several hours straight. Thanks! http://www.reconnsworld.com/audio_tonegenerate.html? Thank You! EDIT: Also, I want it to be a constant tone, not a beap. If I have this completely off please let me know and guide me in the right direction. I'm new to this and would greatly appreciate any advice you may have. Thanks

Question by DivadWaldoss    |  last reply


How to connect tone control stack switches to amplifier

I have a late 50s general electric am radio it doesn't work I've replaced all of the capacitors and a rusty transistor and still nothing so I've just decided to completely remove all components from the board and mount a daughterboard in the center of the board but I'm not sure how to connect tone and volume control to my circuit it's a stack switch with volume power and tone combined into one knob

Question by ShilohS4    |  last reply


Can I send Parallel Port outputs/Record Parallel Port inputs with Batch files?

Is there any way that I can do this? If possible, can you please specify how I would accomplish this, and any other things you may know about Parallel Ports, Batch Files, Maximum Input Voltages On A Parallel Port, and the functions of the leads on the Parallel Port socket. If this isn't possible, I would be grateful if you were to point me in the right direction(Ex: other languages and programs that support output/input, info about coding, etc.). Thank You in advance!  I was planning on developing a simple blinking Led or Tone generator, and the only feasible way of doing this may be a Batch file (feasible because Batch files are the only things I can create on my own without trouble. :( ). I am also going to attempt to record the codes on a remote using an IR sensor so I can develop "An ultimate computer-based remote control".

Question by =PhysicsGuy=    |  last reply


Generating 40K Hz Audio with a 555 timer Answered

I'm looking for ways to generate a 40K Hz signal with a 555 Timer. I've been through the 555 timer calc and I'm not liking the values its wanting me to use for R1 and C2. So i found the schematic shown below. Will i be able to replace the IR LEDs with a small amp and speaker and get a good 40kHz tone out of it? Are there any better options i should be looking at for creating a 40K Hz audio signal?

Question by mpilchfamily    |  last reply


Is my hearing wacky?

I was just using a tone generator and I chose a sweep mode. I can here 2.1mhz, but when I did a sweep down to 100Hz there was a long pause when I couldn't here anything, and then I can here it. Is this normal?

Topic by guyfrom7up    |  last reply


3 Separate speakers 3 separate outputs from 1 sound card

Hello everyone. I'm working on a project right now that requires me to send 3 individual tones to 3 individual speakers without any overlap. I had decided that I was going to use the program audacity, as it can generate the tones and frequencies that I need, and a 6 channel amplifier connected to the 3 speakers I'm using. However, after I played around with it, I found that I could only generate 2 tones at a time, and could only get them to play out of the individual speakers I wanted by adjusting the L/R balance on the individual settings for each tone, but I can't create more than 2 without getting overlap. I was wondering if anyone knew if there was a plug-in that would solve the problem that I'm having. Thanks in advance for any and all help.

Question by Guccisgizmos    |  last reply


Separate speakers different outputs from one computer

Hello everyone. I'm working on a project right now that requires me to send 3 individual tones to 3 individual speakers without any overlap. I had decided that I was going to use the program audacity, as it can generate the tones and frequencies that I need, and a 6 channel amplifier connected to the 3 speakers I'm using. However, after I played around with it, I found that I could only generate 2 tones at a time, and could only get them to play out of the individual speakers I wanted by adjusting the L/R balance on the individual settings for each tone, but I can't create more than 2 without getting overlap. I was wondering if anyone knew if there was a plug-in that would solve the problem that I'm having. Thanks in advance for any and all help.

Question by Guccisgizmos  


Dial-up internet server

Hi everyone, I am trying to connect my Sega Dreamcast to the internet with it's 56k modem, without using telephone lines. From what I understand, I need to connect my my Dreamcast to a tone generator, then to a USB modem plugged into a laptop with which to forward the connection over wifi. My question is: Is this is a plausible solution, and if so, could I simplify and shrink this set up. Ideally I would like to figure out if I could build a tone generator instead of buying one and how can I replace the laptop with something like a raspberry pi. I think that once I figured out how to forward the connection on my laptop, it would be fairly straightforward to do the same with a raspberry pi. I would prefer a relatively compact solution if possible. Thanks in advance for any help or thoughts.

Topic by wamj99    |  last reply


Is there an easy way to find a short or open circuit in a car?

I am trying to find a open or short circuit that is on a wire which is in a harness with other wires, on a 1986 Mazda B2000 truck. With so many of you having expertise in electronics, I thought here would be a good place to post my question. Does anyone have any suggestions how to find this open or short-circuit?I am open to the idea of getting a short-circuit-finder. Though I am not sure what features I should look for if I decide to get one. Does anyone have any suggestions?a) Does anyone know if these work well?b) What features should I look for If I get one?c) Do you have any other on a short circuit finder? type, manufacturer, model etcBelow is a link to a site that uses a short circuit finder to find a short circuit, and has information on using one: http://inliners.org/tech/tech6.htmlBelow is a link to a site that tells about how a tone generator is used to find a short circuit, in a home environment (I think this is how most short circuit finders work): http://askville.amazon.com/tone-gene...uestId=5912724I found some links that seem to show that it is possible to make a signal generator and tracer, but the pages with the schematics would not load. A list of tools with links to tools and their schematicshttp://www.qsl.net/kc4gzx/kc4gzx/project20.htmCircuit tracer (neither of these would not load 4-3-09 kept getting message "the Connection was reset."):should have schematic:http://circuitos.tripod.cl/schem/r111.gifand the signal generator:http://circuitos.tripod.cl/schem/r25.gifA little paranoid voice thinks this Instructable has some clues to the solution: How to prevent thefts steal your motorcycle for less than US$ 2 Thank-you in advance,

Topic by Jonque    |  last reply


what are the problems i can face in this project? Answered

My goal is transmit square wave with certain frequency from fm transmitter and receive this square wave by fm receiver on the other side in order to be measured by pic microcontroller and the range between TX and RX is 100m or 120m max  i want it to be as simple as i can so i made a research and my plan is : 1) square wave generator using 555 IC so i can control the frequency and amplitude the circuit is in the following link: http://www.learningaboutelectronics.com/Articles/Adjustable-square-wave-generator-circuit-with-a-555-timer.php 2) the output of square wave generator i will use it as input for Fm transmitter the circuit is in the following link :https://www.instructables.com/id/The-Ultimate-FM-Transmitter/ 3) i will use small radio i have to receive the square wave on radio speaker the sound should be like the following link : http://onlinetonegenerator.com/ to be sure that my square wave has reached the speaker  4) then i will hack the radio :) and remove the speaker and use the radio output as input for pic microcontroller to measure the square wave frequency   so eventually the stages will be like this: sinwave genetrator > FM transmitter > FM receiver > microcontroller used to measure frequency and display it on LCD screen  i made fm transmitter before and received sin wave tone by fm radio so i expect the problem will be in using FM receiver as input to microcontroller to measure frequency  what do you think about this plan ?? 

Question by ShadyM1    |  last reply


Low voltage AC power for thermocouple tube?

I am trying to make a readout for a DV-6M thermocouple gauge tube to measure vacuum. The tube requires 380mV (0.38v) AC across its filament to operate, and anything more could burn the filament. (I was reading up on this tube, and found the filament has a resistance of 18ohms but if you tried to measure it with a multimeter you could burn the filament). I have modified a 555 tone generator circuit, to accomplish this, and have measured the output to be 380mV AC with my fluke multimeter, and 0mv DC. When I put an LED across the output leads however, the LED is able to light which should take around 3v, which makes me wary of trying to connect it to my tube. what is happening, and is it really producing 380mV AC or is something else going on?

Question by Higgs Boson    |  last reply


EFF 17th Birthday Party

It's time for EFF's 17th birthday party!They're a great organization, worthy of a donation even if you can't make the party in person. From their website:Join EFF in celebrating our 17th year of defending digital rights! Since 1990, EFF has been there fighting for freedom and civil liberties.The birthday bash will be on January 15, 7-11 PM, at 111 Minna Gallery in San Francisco. Headliners Adrian & the Mysterious D (A+D), the DJ duo that founded the seminal mashup party "Bootie," will be dropping a shameless, genre-smashing blend of tracks, backed up by DJ sets from Bay Area copyfighters Ripley, Kid Kameleon and EFF's own J Tones and Qubitsu.The EFF party will also feature an exclusive chocolate sampling with TCHO, "a new chocolate company for a new generation of chocolate enthusiasts." Founded by Wired co-founder Louis Rossetto and legendary chocolatier Timothy Childs, himself a former technologist, TCHO will be bringing a "beta release" of its best dark chocolate to the party table. Attendees are invited to vote for their favorite TCHO beta chocolate flavors at the party -- feedback that will help define TCHO's next steps as they gear up for a national release.We'll be asking for a $20 donation at the door. No one will be turned away for lack of funds, but all proceeds will go toward our work defending your digital freedom.What:EFF's 17th Birthday PartyWhen:January 15, 7-10 PMWhere:111 Minna Gallery111 Minna StreetSan Francisco, CA94105www.111minnagallery.comTel: (415) 974-1719This fundraiser is open to the general public. 21+ only, cash bar.Please RSVP to: events@eff.org

Topic by canida    |  last reply


Super Complicated Code (playing music and moving servos at the same time)

Hey all! I'm trying to make a present for a friend and it's not working out at all :( (due this tuesday). So I ripped up a teddy bear, put some servos in it's arm, and a speaker in it's stomach. I'm trying to use my arduino uno to play tunes over the speaker while make it's arms wobble. My problem is that the song contains delays for getting the notes on beat, which means that I can't have other things going on at once. Is there anything else I can do? I'm stuck with just making it's arms move, then having the tunes play while the arms are still, then having them move again.  Now I did figure out a method to get the servos to move without using a delay function. That's at the very bottom void move(); I know it's probably about the worst way to make servos move slowly without delay but it works. I'm not worried about that. I'm just wondering how am I going to play music and have the servos move at the same time? Thanks! Here's my code.  int speakerPin = 5; int buttonPin = 6; int buttonPress; int buttonCount;  int leds = 13; #include int servospeed(100); Servo servoleft; Servo servoright; int val = 20; int val2; boolean state = true; unsigned long currentMillis; unsigned long previousMillis; int songLength1 = 7000; int songLength2; /*****************************************************************************************************/ /* Smaller value -> all tunes play faster; bigger -> slower. Recommend you don't change this, but instead use playTune() to pass different beatLength values to parseTune() for different songs */ const int beatLength = 50; // Generate a tone by passing a square wave of a certain period to the piezo void playTone(int tone, int duration) {   for (long i = 0; i < duration * 1000L; i += tone * 2) {     digitalWrite(speakerPin, HIGH);     delayMicroseconds(tone);     digitalWrite(speakerPin, LOW);     delayMicroseconds(tone);   } } /* This works out what period, in microseconds, to use for the square wave for a given note. To calculate these, p = ((1 / freq) * 1,000,000) / 2. We divide by 2 because the signal will be HIGH for p microseconds and then LOW for p microseconds. Frequencies for the notes obtained from http://www.phy.mtu.edu/~suits/notefreqs.html The range defined below covers 2 octaves from C4 (middle C, or 261.63Hz) to B5 (987.77Hz). Feel free to modify. */ void playNote(char note, int duration, boolean sharp) {   char names[] = {     'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'a', 'b', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'A', 'B'         };   int tones[] = {     1915, 1700, 1519, 1432, 1275, 1136, 1014, 956, 851, 758, 716, 636, 568, 506         };   // these are the "sharp" versions of each note e.g. the first value is for "c#"   char names_sharp[] = {     'c', 'd', 'f', 'g', 'a', 'C', 'D', 'F', 'G', 'A'         };   int tones_sharp[] = {     1804, 1607, 1351, 1204, 1073, 902, 804, 676, 602, 536         };   // play the tone corresponding to the note name   if (sharp == false) {     for (int i = 0; i < 14; i++) {       if (names[i] == note) {         playTone(tones[i], duration);       }     }   }   else {     for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {       if (names_sharp[i] == note) {         playTone(tones_sharp[i], duration);       }     }   } } /* Take a string representing a tune and parse it to play the notes through the piezo. Parameters: char notes[]: a string that represents the notes of the song. The grammar for parsing the string is described at the top of this file. int beatLength: changes the tempo. Smaller value -> quicker; bigger -> slower boolean loopSong: if true, the song will loop indefinitely (until you press the microswitch) */ void parseTune(char notes[], int beatLength, boolean loopSong) {   boolean play = true;   // 1 iteration of this loop == 1 note played   for (int i = 0; notes[i] != '.' && play == true; i++) { // stop iteration if '.' is the next char       if (notes[i] == ',') { // ',' signifies a rest       // Look at the number (max. 2 digits) following from the ',' to work out the duration of the rest       char len[3];       int count = 0;       while (notes[i+1] >= '0' && notes[i+1] <= '9' && count < 2) {         len[count] = notes[i+1];         count++;         i++;       }       len[count] = '\0';       int duration = atoi(len);       delay(duration * beatLength); // rest duration     }     else { // play the next note, represented by a series of characters e.g. 'c4', 'a#12'       char note = notes[i];       boolean sharp;       // if the next character is a '#' then we must make the note a sharp       if (notes[i+1] == '#') {         i++;         sharp = true;       }       else {         sharp = false;       }       // Look at the number (max. 2 digits) following from the note name to work out the note duration       char len[3];       int count = 0;       while (notes[i+1] >= '0' && notes[i+1] <= '9' && count < 2) {         len[count] = notes[i+1];         count++;         i++;       }       len[count] = '\0';       int duration = atoi(len);       playNote(note, duration * beatLength, sharp);     }     delay(beatLength / 2); // pause between notes   } } // Write your tunes in here using the grammar described at the top of this file. Can have up to 4 tunes. void song1() {   char notes[] = "d4g4g2a2g2f#2e4c4e4a4a2b2a2g2f#4d4f#4b4b2C2b2a2g4e4d2d2e4a4f#4g8,8.";   parseTune(notes, beatLength * 1.25, false); } void song2() {   char notes[] = "b4b4b8b4b4b8b4D4g6a2b12,4C4C4C6C2C4b4b4b2b2b4a4a4b4a8D8b4b4b8b4b4b8b4D4g6a2b12,4,C4C4C6C2C4b4b4b2b2D4D4C4a4g12,8.";   parseTune(notes, beatLength, false); } /**********************************************************************************************************/ void setup() {   pinMode(speakerPin, OUTPUT);   pinMode(buttonPin, INPUT);   pinMode(leds, OUTPUT);   servoleft.attach(8);   servoright.attach(7);   servoleft.write(30);   servoright.write(120);   Serial.begin(9600); } void loop() {   currentMillis = millis();   move();   song1(); } /**************************************/ void move() {   if (currentMillis - previousMillis > 50)   {     if ( val <= 60 && state == true)     {       val++;       servoleft.write(val);       val2 = map(val, 20, 60, 80, 120);       servoright.write(val2);       if (val >= 60)       {         state = false;       }     } //     if (val >= 20 && state == false)     {       val--;       servoleft.write(val);       val2 = map(val, 60, 20, 120, 80);       servoright.write(val2);       if (val <= 20)       {         state = true;       }     }//     previousMillis = currentMillis;     Serial.println(val);   } // if millis }

Topic by HavocRC    |  last reply


Sitar bridge mod (for floating-tailpiece guitars) idea

The characteristic sound of a sitar is created by a bridge that gently rolls away from the strings; this creates a buzzing timbre which quickly depletes higher overtones in the string's vibration (I could draw some diagrams if anyone's interested). This type of bridge is something I'd like to make as a removable modification for a guitar. My guitar has a "floating tailpiece" as I believe it's called, in which the strings pass beyond the bridge to the tailpiece. The segment of the strings below the bridge have no part in tone generation, and so could have an object attached to them (a piece of wood wedged between the strings, perhaps) without affecting the guitar's tone. If some object (the "clamp") were attached to the strings immediately below the bridge, another object (the "sitar bridge") could be affixed to it some minuscule distance from the vibrating portion of the strings. The sitar bridge would not make contact with the strings at rest, and so would not be a node of vibration (and not affect the strings' pitch), but when the strings are played, their vibrations would make them rattle against the sitar bridge - much like the bridge of an actual sitar. So how about it? I think it'd be an interesting and relatively simple mod that could be made to be removable and not destructive at all to the actual guitar. I unfortunately have no idea how to refine the concept any further than what's written, so I leave it up to any willing DIY-ers. It all makes sense in my head, but I may have accidentally left out some important particulars of this kind of mod, so please ask any questions you have. Because this mod relies on the strings below the bridge in a floating tailpiece guitar, I don't think it would work on most solid-bodied guitars, but if anyone can come up with a similar mod for the more common bridge type, be my guest. Also remember that the "clamp" below the bridge cannot rely on the tensile strength of the strings, as not only are they not terribly strong, their tension needs to remain intact so that the guitar can be played in tune.

Topic by Impasse    |  last reply


Arduino alarm with LDR and RFID disable feature?

Hello. I understand that this sounds like an unbelievably simple idea, and so I thought it would be. I have successfully written this first code, that detects an RFID tag and sounds a beep, but I am struggling with getting the second to work. Any ideas? First Code -- this one WORKS! Code: /*------------------------------------------------------------------ This is a sample code for RDM630 RFID reader by Spekel(Spekel.se) This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ -------------------------------------------------------------------*/ #include #define rxPin 2 #define txPin 3 #define SPKR 7 char code[20]; int val = 0; int bytesread = 0; //------------------------------------ //create a Serial object RFID SoftwareSerial RFID= SoftwareSerial(rxPin, txPin); void setup() {   Serial.begin(9600);   Serial.println("Serial Port Activated");   RFID.begin(9600);   Serial.println("RFID Reader Activated");   Serial.println("Scanning...");   pinMode(rxPin, INPUT);   pinMode(txPin, OUTPUT);   pinMode(SPKR, OUTPUT); } void loop() {   val = 0;   bytesread = 0;   while(bytesread < 12)   {     // read 12 digit code     val = RFID.read();     if(val == 3)     { // if header or stop bytes before the 10 digit reading       break; // stop reading     }     if(val != 2)     {       code[bytesread] = val; // add the digit       bytesread++; // ready to read next digit       code[bytesread] = '\0'; // add the NULL     }   }   if(bytesread >= 12)   { // if 12 digit read is complete     Serial.print("RFID Detected - Tag: [");     for(int i=0; code[i]!='\0' ; i++)     {       Serial.print(code[i]);     }     Serial.println("]"); //print the whole 13 bytes     for (int i=0; i<200; i++) {  // generate a 1KHz tone for 1/2 second   digitalWrite(SPKR, HIGH);   delayMicroseconds(300);   digitalWrite(SPKR, LOW);   delayMicroseconds(300);   }     Serial.println("Scanning...");   } } --- You didn't even need that but I assume you understand the setup now --- The second code is exactly the same, apart from it contains and LDR that decides whether or not the value it receives has changed enough to sound the alarm and does so, allowing the alarm to be deactivated by an RFID. This does NOT check to see if the RFID tag is the correct one, that is to be written in later. At the moment I get a constant beeping whether or not the RFID tag is used to dissarm, or there is no beep at all. Any ideas?? ^^ Please actually read this before answering my Question!! Code: #include #define SPKR 7 #define rxPin 2 #define txPin 3 char code[20]; int val = 0; int bytesread = 0; int lightPin = 1; int variable = 0; int secondVariable = 0; int differenceVariable = 0; int ledPin = 13; SoftwareSerial RFID= SoftwareSerial(rxPin, txPin); // --- Initiation Complete --- void setup() {   Serial.begin(9600);   RFID.begin(9600);   pinMode(rxPin, INPUT);   pinMode(txPin, OUTPUT);   pinMode(SPKR, OUTPUT);   variable = analogRead(lightPin); } // --- Setup Complete --- void loop() {   variable = analogRead(lightPin);   Serial.println(variable);   delay(50);   secondVariable = analogRead(lightPin);   differenceVariable = variable - secondVariable;   if ((differenceVariable^2) > 200) {           val = 0;       bytesread = 0;       while(bytesread < 12) { // read 12 digit code           val = RFID.read();           if(val == 3) { // if header or stop bytes before the 10 digit reading               break; // stop reading           }           if(val != 2) {               code[bytesread] = val; // add the digit               bytesread++; // ready to read next digit               code[bytesread] = '\0'; // add the NULL           }           for (int i=0; i<200; i++) {  // generate a 1KHz tone for 1/2 second               digitalWrite(SPKR, HIGH);               delayMicroseconds(300);               digitalWrite(SPKR, LOW);               delayMicroseconds(300);           }         }       if(bytesread >= 12) { // if 12 digit read is complete           Serial.print("RFID Detected - Tag: [");           for(int i=0; code[i]!='\0' ; i++) {               Serial.print(code[i]);           }           Serial.println("]"); //print the whole 13 bytes           for (int i=0; i<200; i++) {  // generate a 1KHz tone for 1/2 second               digitalWrite(SPKR, HIGH);               delayMicroseconds(300);               digitalWrite(SPKR, LOW);               delayMicroseconds(300);           }           Serial.println("Scanning...");       }    } } Thank you very much for any help that you can give, AMouse197 (I accidentally posted this in the wrong forum so have moved it)

Question by anonymouse197    |  last reply


Ring a bell? (Special event for British members)

The Olympics are coming, and although I will miss most of it, it would be cool if I could take part in some way. It turns out I can, and so can every other Brit reading this, in an event called All the Bells. The short version is, on Friday 27th July, at 08:12am, UK time, as many bells as possible, from doorbells and bike bells, all the way up to full cathedral bell-towers will ring, all across the United Kingdom. Taking part is easy - just stand on your doorstep and press your doorbell - but why not go the full hog?  Are you in a cycling club?  Get them all out in the street, ringing their bike bells. Live near a church?  Even if you're not religious, get in touch and get them involved. Go to school?  Talk to the music teacher, borrow the hand bells or the tubular bells. Are you an engineer?  Hang up the biggest lump of steel on the site, and beat it with a hammer. Heck, just get all your friends to set an alarm on their phones and iPods with a bell-tone at 08:12, or turn up your PC speakers and play with sound effects. Pass the website around your friends and contacts by Facebook or Twitter, put a poster up at work, add graphics and links to your blog, and generally spread the word. [BLOGGED]

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


security system (not responding after combining ultrasonic sensor code and esp8266 code )

The base of this project is https://www.instructables.com/id/SIMPLE-ARDUINO-ULTRASONIC-SENSOR-DOOR-ALARM-/ &http;://randomnerdtutorials.com/door-status-monitor-using-the-esp8266/ I changed according to my uses from above links I tryed by dividing into two parts one for ultrasonic sensor and other for esp8266 they worked fine while separating ultrasonic and buzzer are working in (Tools and wifi module is working in onlt(Tools when i mix ultrasonic and buzzer nothing happening) any idea here is the code #include #include #include #include #define USE_SERIAL Serial #define trigPin 9 #define echoPin 10 #define piezoPin 8 ESP8266WiFiMulti WiFiMulti; int normalDistance; boolean triggered = false; long duration, distance; void setup() {   USE_SERIAL.begin(115200);   pinMode(trigPin, OUTPUT);   pinMode(echoPin, INPUT);   pinMode(piezoPin, OUTPUT);   long duration, distance; while (millis() < 5000) {   digitalWrite(piezoPin, HIGH);       digitalWrite(trigPin, LOW); delayMicroseconds(2); digitalWrite(trigPin, HIGH); delayMicroseconds(10); digitalWrite(trigPin, LOW); duration = pulseIn(echoPin, HIGH); distance= duration*0.034/2;         normalDistance = distance;       USE_SERIAL.print("Distance: "); USE_SERIAL.println(distance);         digitalWrite(piezoPin, LOW);    for(uint8_t t = 4; t > 0; t--) {         USE_SERIAL.printf("[SETUP] WAIT %d...\n", t);         USE_SERIAL.flush();         delay(1000); } WiFiMulti.addAP("username", "pass"); } } void loop() { digitalWrite(trigPin, LOW); delayMicroseconds(2); digitalWrite(trigPin, HIGH); delayMicroseconds(10); digitalWrite(trigPin, LOW); duration = pulseIn(echoPin, HIGH); distance= duration*0.034/2; USE_SERIAL.print("Distance: "); USE_SERIAL.println(distance); if (distance < normalDistance-5) {       triggered = true;     }     else {         triggered = false;     }     if (triggered) {     tone(piezoPin, 635);     delay(500);     tone(piezoPin, 912);     delay(250);     if((WiFiMulti.run() == WL_CONNECTED)) {         HTTPClient http;         USE_SERIAL.print("[HTTP] begin...\n");                 http.begin("iftt link.........................."); //HTTP         USE_SERIAL.print("[HTTP] GET...\n");         // start connection and send HTTP header         int httpCode = http.GET();         // httpCode will be negative on error         if(httpCode > 0) {             // HTTP header has been send and Server response header has been handled             USE_SERIAL.printf("[HTTP] GET... code: %d\n", httpCode);             // file found at server             if(httpCode == HTTP_CODE_OK) {                 String payload = http.getString();                 USE_SERIAL.println(payload);             }         } else {             USE_SERIAL.printf("[HTTP] GET... failed, error: %s\n", http.errorToString(httpCode).c_str());         }         http.end();     }     } } any idea about whats going on Thanks Hemanth

Topic by hemanth kumar reddy    |  last reply


Arduino Uno Synth project - Audio output questions

Hi! I am developing a synth/sampler project based on the Arduino Uno r3. This is my first electronics project ever and because of that reason I have some questions which I can't find a definite answer for on internet. The synth has two function. It has a tone generator using the ToneAC library. With code I have mimicked LFO and VCO functions, using potmeters I can adjust the frequency and LFO speed realtime. The other function is that I can trigger samples stored on a SD card using the TMRpcm library. The device will be used in nightclubs on high end soundsystems and PA. I am afraid I will damage the equipment with my device because I do not send a pure audio (AC?) signal. Currently the flow is like this: PWM output (pin 9, 10) -> voltage divider to 2.5v -> RC Low Pass Filter 15Khz -> LM386 amp with volume control -> mono jack output -> mixing desk -> amplifier -> speakers (the TMRpcm and ToneAC library share the same pin (9), I have fixed this by disabling the TMRpcm when the ToneAC is playing and vice versa. The mono jack is wired as follow. pin 9 goes to plus side of mono jack output, pin 10 to negative side. The TMRpcm pin 9 also needs to go to plus side of mono jack output, and mono jack negative needs to go to ground. Because I disable the ToneAC at that time I consider port 10 grounded because it not generating any sound so there is no signal/voltage running out of it, aka the IO pin is set to LOW) I am hoping that using the voltage divider I am within range of the Audio Line levels of a default mixers Line-IN (like Pioneer, Behringer, etc). The RC Low Pass Filter is used to filter of inaudible frequencies and clean up the sound a bit, the LM386 audio amp is used to amplify the signal and (hopefully) make it a real audio signal. The lowest frequency you can play with the synth is 100hz and the highest frequency is 3100hz. Because I lack a lot of knowledge in this field and because I do not own a oscilloscoop I can't say for sure if my output signal is harmful for the equipment and was hoping to get some guidance on my project on this forum.

Topic by erik404  


Need advice for adding aux-in/line-in to Philips AE2160/00-A AM/MW/LW portable radio

Hey there, this is my first post! :) I'm from Germany, so please excuse my grammar! :D The reason why I'm opening up this new topic is, I didn't find any instructable or guide on how to add an aux-in/line-in to my simple mono AM/MW/LW radio Philips AE2160/00-A. There's not much to find out about the technical specifications besides the standard product information: Tuner • Analogue tuning • Wave ranges FM 87.5 - 108 MHz MW 525 - 1606.5 kHz /04 LW 150 -255 kHz /00c FM/MW /04 FM/MW/LW /05 FM/MW/LW • Ferroceptor for MW (and LW) • Telescopic aerial for FM (and SW) Amplifier • Max. output power 300 mW RMS • Tone control Music /News Sound system • Loud speaker 100 mm • Metal grill Power supply • External supply /00c, /04 230V /05 240V AC • Batteries 2 x 1.5V , type R20/D cell/UM1 Connections • Headphone socket 3.5mm General • Material Polystyrene, metal grill • Weight (g) 520 • Dimensions (mm) 210 W x 150H Here's a link to a photo of the device: http://images.philips.com/is/image/PhilipsConsumer/AE2160_00-_FP-global-001?wid=2000&hei;=2000&$jpglarge$ I didn't even find schematics/circuit diagrams for this or a similar device. There are lots of tutorials on how to add such an input to a car radio or a boombox/stereo cassette player a.s.o., but not for a simple AM/MW/LW radio. My questions are: 1.) Are there any similar hack projects here in the step-by-step or forum section? 2.) How do I find the right connector or place to solder a 2-way-switch between the sections (tuner, amp, speaker)? After the hacking job, it should be possible to switch between normal radio listening mode and aux-in/line-in mode from an external mp3 player, notebook, a.s.o.. 3.) Is there anything else to know for this project? Yesterday I've opened up the case for the first time and looked over the circuit board and the connections. I had no cam to take pictures, but I try to take some mobile phone cam pictures of the circuitry and parts at the next opportunity! Cheers, arok1

Topic by arok1    |  last reply


Sennheiser audio question?

So I've owned a pair of Sennheiser HD555's for about 4 years now and while they haven't broken in any way, I'm looking to buy another pair of Sennheisers that are more portable than the HD555's (10 ft. cable and bulky 1/4 inch jack + open design -_-)   I've been considering 2 choices in the Sennheiser 400 series.  The HD439's and the HD449's While I know they are both very similar, there are big differences in my opinion.   HD 439's: I really like the detachable cable on these, and I've always been in love with the cloth ear pads from my 555's, so i know these would be super comfortable.  Also these present a bit more bass than the others in the 400 series, which i don't know if I'll enjoy, because I really only have the HD 555's to compare audio quality to. HD449's: These headphones are apparently a bit more powerful than the 439's because of stronger magnets in their monitors, which is a plus because I mostly listen to music on my laptop, phone, or zune (YES I SAID IT AND I SAID IT PROUD--ZUNE).  Also I'v e heard that they have a better range of sound quality not just regarding the bass and treble.  The one thing that scares me to death about these cans is the pleather or "leatherette" material for the ear pads.  While i know that these are better at blocking outside noise, I can't help but feel like they'd be very uncomfortable.  The only other cans i've used with the pleather are the Bose AE2's, so one question is how do they compare? also to beats leather pads? In general, I listen to a broad range of music from classical to rap to indie rock.  Pretty much anything but country.  I like to have a bit more bass and high tones than mid, but not too much.  For this reason, I think the HD439's would be better in regards to sound quality and better design/comfort.  The only thing that keeps me looking back at the 449's is the offer of more powerful magnets and better sound when playing from a mobile device or something with a low power output.  I also really like the fact that even if i do like lows and highs better, I can always put an equalizer on the HD'449's to tailor their more balanced sound to my wants.  But I'm still afraid of the comfort the 449's offer compared to the cloth pads of the 439's.   Again I own a pair of Sennheiser HD55's and love their sound quality and comfort.  I also own a pair of AKG K181DJ series, but those are mostly for listening to house, dubstep, and drub&bass.;  I've owned the Bose AE2 (second edition) and have used beats studio for a time.  These are really all of my reference points for sound quality and comfort. Anyways, I digress.  I'm very torn between the two and I've given all of the info I can.  Any suggestions/ratings/opinions would be greatly appreciated.

Question by bobert610    |  last reply


"Sonic" drilling or cutting

If we look up sonic drills today we usually get some fancy machines driving pipes in the ground, preferably softer ground.But the term includes all types of machines that use sonic vibrations to advance through a media.With the ancient and claimed to have never existed technologies in mind I did some digging...In the food industry vibrating knifes are quite common, same for "air knifes" on softer food.Even in the meat industry they find more and more uses now.Ultrasonic cutting or welding is the same thing and included in "sonic".Same for some experimental sub sonic drilling methods currently being tested.The general idea might be as old as using vibrating equippment to compact stuff, like concrete, bricks and so on.What you can compact by vibration you can also make "fluid" by vibration.Industrial feeder systems utilise this to the extreme by even making light and fine particles like flour move like water without causing any dusting.What all the techniques have in common that a suitable tool or tool head is used and that it is attempted to use the most suitable vibration frequency for the job.Anyone operating an ultrasonic welder knows the pain of finetuning for a new electrode or just new part to be welded.What does that tell us now that makes the understanding easier?Take a bottle of ketchup, preferably one that is still quite full.Turn it upside down and noothing comes out.Shake it a bit and you are either lucky or drowned in red.But hold it at an angle and start tapping it and the red sauce flows out easily.What it true for most newtonian fluids is in some way also true for non-newtonian fluids.Ever mixed corn starch and water to make these funny experiments with it?Hit it hard and it reacts really hard and is not sticky at all.Leave your hand resting on it and in sinks in and sticks to it.Stirring it very slowly is easy, go faster and you get stuck.You can do similar things with by using an external source for vibrations.For example a vibration speaker mounted to a smal cup of the goo.If you place sand on a sloped piece of plastic or sheet metal then at a low angle it will pile up easy and stay.Start vibrating the plate and the sand will start to flow off.Works fine with a vibration source mounted to a piece of steel bar or rod and a bucket of sand too.Trying to press it into the sand requires a lot of force, especially once you are a bit deeper.Let it vibrate properly and it slides rights down.If we can do the simple stuff as well as really complicated stuff in the industry then what about other materials?So far we use vibrations to make things move out of the way, compact things, transport them or to heat them up for welding plus some cutting applications.Considering the variety one might wonder why no one tries it for "difficult" materials.Machined surface can be found throughout ancient history.Finding "machined things" were vibrations was clearly used is a bit harder.The great walls are not a perfect example here as the views differ quite a bit on how they could have been created.But if we leave things melting them or a secret concret like recipe for creating for example granite then vibrations start to make some sense.You find some interesting videos on youtube where people use speakers, wires and rocks to confirm you can actually "machine" them by vibrations.Especially granite has some quite musical properties, big boulders as well as smaller ones produce destinct sounds when you hit them hard.Tests and measurements were made on granite and other hard rocks to check how fast sound travels in them , how it is refeclted and where the sound comes out or affects the surface the most.Lets just say every sample gave different results.Shape, density and dimensions affect not just the resonant frequency but also where and how the sound travels in the rock.What if??We can use a simple speaker, a plate and some rice to see how patterns form under various frequencies.Works with sand or other granules as well.The interesting patterns are the so called harmoncis.Here we see clear and destinct patters, sometimes with extremely fine lines and areas of softly vibrating granules.Some people say these harmonic frequencies have all special meanings and uses.We mainly used them to avoid problems.Imagine your new TV would not have a housing tested to be stable with all frequencies the speakers can produce.All of a sudden your back of the TV might start to rattle ;)Same for car engines.Harmonic vibrations are eliminated wherever possible.Otherwise they could multiply and affect other things in the engine or around it.Simply put it means we have various options to detect and measure vibrations on a surface or in a system.Back in the day every half decent backup generator had a mechanical indicator for the frequency of the supplied electricity.A set of tiny forks with the desired on painted red and several on either side of it.These forks were designed to get into harmonic and therfor quite intense vibrations at their set frequency.If the one for 50Hz looked blurry then all was good ;)The same principle god be applied on a big boulder of granite.Place the "vibration meter" at the desired spot and start moving around the vibration source on the surface until you find a spot that causes maximum response on the meter.Best thing here is that if you then place that surface area onto another peice of fixed in place granite both pieces will start to loose substance if vibrations are applied.The fine sediment forming is then usable as an indicator where to move the vibration source to continue once the effect literally wears off.Is it feasable?Well, if we trust mainstream science then the answer is no.A huge amount of vibration energy would be required for such a hard material, despite ancient proof that says otherwise.Semi industrial test also seemed to confirm the theory as only with very high amplitudes (loudness) and while automatically adjusting for the resonant frequency changes a measurable amount of material was removed.I struggle a bit with that as for the testing tool heads made from hardened steel or carbide were used.And that with little or no regards on how the head and tool itself affects the output.I mean in terms of having the max possible movement happening right t the tool contact surface!There is a huge difference between applying a vibration to a tool and using a system, tool and tool head DESIGNED to work at the desired frequency!Otherwise we wouldn't need a computer to design and test a horn for welding purposes or shade a knife spefically so that the vibration go along the right axis and in the right direction.You not break a hard thing with a very soft thing unless it travels fast enough to become harder as the target!This complicated explanation basically just confirms that if you hit water at a too high speed then it will just break you into pieces instead of offering a soft splashPlease do not jump of bridges or such to confirm this yourself!!If that is really true and science says it is, then how about the other way around?Works fine too, or we wouldn't have pressure washers or water cutters.Now for the part where I hope some really smart people leave helpful comments:If we can cut steel with just a stream of water, then I ask:Isn't for example copper much harder than water?Steel is much harder than copper but water cuts through it.The answer here it simple or complicated, depending on how you want to expain how it works.Comes down to speed and pressure plus the right nozzle shape to prevent a beam expansion.But then water is indeed "harder than steel".Questions:Lets say we would use a copper pipe that in lenght, thickness, hardness and diameter is optimised to transmit a frequency so the pipe end sees the max vibration like a feed horn for ultrasonic welding.Not to hard to calculate these days :)Now imagine said "main frequency" would be optimised for the pipe but also be a harmonic frequency of the rock to be worked on.The pipe end would deform quickly, abrasion does the rest and it fails before even making a decent sratch that is not copper metal on granite.No matter how hard we press nothing good enough will ever happen.BUT: If we would add more hormainc frequencies to feed our pipe we can multiply the amplitude quite easy!Just try with a sound generator from your app store, needs 2 or more channels to be usable.Pick for example 400hZ on one and 800Hz on another, then finetune around these number to hear how the tone changes ;)My theory goes like this:If all "working frequencies" would just harmonics of the resonant frequency of the granite, then they can be tuned so the effect on the pipe end is minimised.The overlaying frequencies however should result in the same effect a water cutter has: The pipe becomes ultra hard.The better the match and the more you have to get it right the harder the pipe will be.Adding now a "drilling frequency" or multiple could be used to drive these harmonics slightly out of phase.Like with the sound generator on your phone we end up with a pulsating sound, or vibration.While the pipe still vibrates at the same "hardening" mix the drilling frequency creates a peak like a jackhammer.Try it by using the heaphone output on a small speaker and placing some light and tiny things into the cone.The will violently jump around during these pulsing tones.For a drilling system the output can be mechanically maximised by utilising a pitchfork design.A head holds the vibration speakers and the tynes are tuned good enough to the frequency of the speakers.Always two would have to operate in sync though as otherwise the pitchfork movement that transfers the sound down the center bar won't work.This head could then be desgined to act as a holder for a quick change of work out pipes that are no longer long enough for tuning.I guesstimate that a well tuned design would result in a copper pipe being able to drill at least 10 to 15cm into solid granite before it wears off too much.And we are talking here about just a few mm to get the thing out of tune!But would dare to desing such a thing just to confirm a theory that no one ever really dared to test? ;)And if friction welding works as good as ultrasonic welding, then what would happen if we try this with the right frequencies and vibrations instead of wasting tons of energy?

Topic by Downunder35m  


Nine Points to Consider in Licensing University Technology - A nicer way to patent

Earlier this month, a group of 11 research institutions signed a pledge to take a different approach to licensing intellectual property, titled "Nine Points to Consider in Licensing University Technology". My read of the whitepaper amounts to this: Universities are realizing that their aggressive licensing behavior comes at a cost, and they're toning it down. However, of the nine points, absent in my mind is consideration of the students involved in any licensing deal. For many, graduate school gives the first meaningful introduction to the patent system, and often the first introduction to the system of licensing intellectual property. When a research project turns into a patent, and a patent turns into a startup company with a student in a founding position, the alignment between the student and the university, particularly with what's often called the technology licensing or transfer office (TLO or TTO), ends. Knowing the high failure rate of startups, it's the TLO's job to immediately extract as much value from the startup as possible.During my time there, MIT was no different in this regard, and I went through this process personally with a company based on some of my research as well as seeing the same thing happen to friends. The TLO would approach the negotiations in the same way it would approach negotiations with an established IP giant, like IBM or Intel. The burdens placed on nascent companies were incredible, and included things such as direct cash payments -- things that can increase the chance of failure or require the founders to give up more control to VCs into return for badly needed cash. So, while the whitepaper discusses costs that are, in general, more societal, the aggressive behavior I've witnesses also comes at a cost. My propensity to give to the endowment has been severely impacted. The licensing offices must know that second-time entrepreneurs have a higher success rate, so maximizing the TLO's return comes at an overall cost to the university. My choices in what projects Squid Labs pursued were also impacted. Colin, Saul, and I were all in the same research group while at MIT, so one might think Squid Labs would have pursued projects in printed electronics -- something we spent a combined nine years working on. Not so. Knowing the roadblocks that the TLO would put in front of getting access to those patents, we intentionally went after ideas out of MIT's control. Good thing we did, otherwise I might not have a place to share these thoughts with you!Here's the original article, forwarded to me by my Mom, that brought this to my attention:A Nicer Way to PatentBy Eliot MarshallScienceNOW Daily News7 March 2007Universities have plumbed a rich source of cash in recent years by aggressively patenting and licensing faculty inventions, but some schools now want to set limits on the practice. An elite group--11 top research institutions and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC)--have signed a pledge to take a kinder, gentler approach to licensing intellectual property. Yesterday, they released principles on the sharing of patented discoveries, urging other universities to follow their lead.The manifesto, drafted at a meeting last year at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, makes nine key points. First on the list is that universities should not agree to deals that would curtail access to new technology by researchers at nonprofit institutions. In the past, for example, biologists complained that Harvard University granted a company too much control over its patented "oncomouse," an animal designed to be cancer-prone (Science, 17 May 2002, p. 1212). This impeded its use in research, some claimed. In other points, the guidelines say that universities should steer clear of deals that give one licensee highly exclusive control of a discovery; that they should avoid making claims on "future improvements" of a discovery; and that they should take into consideration the special needs of "neglected patient populations or geographic areas." The specific issue that led to the drafting of these principles, according to physicist Arthur Bienenstock, former dean of research at Stanford and an organizer of the Palo Alto meeting, was a flurry of concerns about license restrictions on the use of human embryonic stem cells from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The university's technology manger, the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) initially required some university-based researchers to take out a restrictive commercial license. After many objected, WARF dropped the policy (Science, 26 January 2007, p. 449).WARF's director, Carl Gulbrandsen, acknowledges that the stem cell licensing requirements caused a backlash. But he says Wisconsin has never sued a university or a researcher over a patent license disagreement. And he praises the new Palo Alto licensing guidelines--which WARF itself has endorsed--although he notes they are "very broad" and nonbinding. Gulbrandsen adds: "We have been following most if not all of these policies" for many years.What impact will the new document have? AAMC Senior Vice President David Korn, who helped draft it, concedes that the guidelines are "a bit arcane" but hopes they create "a buzz" among university patent officers at their annual meeting in San Francisco this week. Korn says the position statement will remind everyone that university licensing deals should "always be guided by the public interest."

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply