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Anarchist toolbox

Wow, this site is a great resource.  Much better than your average ebooks on stuff.  More anarchists should post creations, ideas, etc. to this site!

Topic by santony1    |  last reply


I've been thinking of building my own cantilever toolbox? Answered

The toolbox is of the type where the  trays are stacked on top of each other when the toolbox is closed, and while opening the trays slide parallel to each other, like "https://cdn.instructables.com/FH2/5VIC/HJKC7DVA/FH25VICHJKC7DVA.MEDIUM.jpg".and "https://cdn.instructables.com/FW3/2NQ0/HJKC2BEG/FW32NQ0HJKC2BEG.MEDIUM.jpg" But I can't find the measurements for the length of the cantilevers and where they should be placed etc.. Can the toolbox be made out of wood or would metal be better?

Question by rammstein2    |  last reply


how to clean an old steel toolbox?

My dad is giving me this red toolbox that he had since he was in college its pretty old ,but he took care of it. the thing is though i wont be ablt to clean it becuase he said the bottom is really greasy and has oil all over it becuse of all the work. hes giving me this tool box because i love buildiing and i have alot of tools and i now have to use a cardboard box to hold them all. its about a 1 high and 36 inches in length and 7 inches wide.  (also its RED!!!!!!!!!!...................................YAY!!!!)

Question by DELETED_JAZ97    |  last reply


What should go in a Techie toolbox?

I want to put together a gift for a friend - a cool tool box with things he might need but definitely doesn't have (he pretty much only has a drill). I don't want just hammers and such, he works with robotics and computers, as well as building various devices with motors and moving parts. I'm looking for things that might help him, a "Mythbuster's" tool box if you will. Does anyone have ideas? What would you like in your collection? What is a basic list that I could start with?

Question by i.need.instructions    |  last reply


Is there any way to put drawers on my big plastic toolbox? Answered

I want a toolbox with drawers because is more organized but already have one stanley toolbox 26'' but does not have drawers and i want to know is there any way to put drawers?

Question by HADJISTYLLIS    |  last reply


Portable Party box (A.K.A the toolbox speaker)

Hello all, recently I replaced all 11 speakers in my car since after 15 years or so they all had developed dryrot and stopped working. As many of you are aware however car speakers only come in pairs so I was left with one perfectly good (and expensive) speaker when all was said and done. So not wanting it to go to waste I devised a plan- I would use it to make a portable sound system. I went to amazon and purchased a dayton DTA-1, this little T amplifier runs on AA's and puts out 30 watts. Now all I needed was something awesome to contain this all in. Luckily during my  daily commute to school I stumbled across a rusty old craftsman toolbox left out at the curb to die; well needless to say its been given new life. Look at the pictures I provided to see whats what, but my basic plan is to mount the speaker in the lid by building a cradle for out out of plywood, cut to fit the inner contours of the box. I will then secure the board in place by using adhesives as neccisary. I also plan on painting the wood so it matches the toolkit. In the spirit of keeping things as utilitarian as possible I dont want to deck the thing out too much, but if you guys have any suggestions as to what else I should include in the build id be glad to hear them. (Leds, decoritive touches, ect.) 

Topic by homsar57    |  last reply


How can i get into my hubbys locked "popular mechanics" stackable toolbox w-out damaging it?What does its key look like?

My husband locked my wedding ring in his toolbox and he hid the key. its my dead mothers ring, i need it back. how can i open it without damaging it (or without him knowing?) it does open a tiny bit i can see inside,but not enuf to get anything out. what does the key look like?anyone have a pic? its a red stackable metal mechanic toolbox with "Popular Mechanics" written on top left corner.the top flip-up is whats locked.hes angry cuz i caught him doing something really bad, but wont do anything about it.i just warned him.Its all i have of my dead mother . please help! any other women would have left this guy for what he did!!!

Question by tntdrum99    |  last reply



PC to Mobile Workstation Advice

I recently made a old antiquated PC I owned into a mobile work space/storage. Sadly I thought I wasn't living up to it potential, so I decided to ask the always helpful instructables community for help. I am looking for any idea that improves the look, functionality, storage, of efficiency of the workstation. (But mostly the first two) Box Current Specs. 1.5-12V power supply, cant be removed. See picture 1, its the box behind the two probes. Lots of space, Im not afraid to tear anything out of the box to make room for something better. Honestly Its pretty crappy at the moment with just some plastic board shelves holding supplies. I will take any ideas, I would love for this box to become a great instructables project. Pictures,  Picture 1 is current box, again not afraid to change it. Picture 2 is raw space, (minus shelving) keep in mind the power supply case could also rig sliding drawers.

Topic by JosephR107    |  last reply


Know Anything About Toolboxes? I need help!

I am asking for anyone and everyone who has ever had experience storing and/or transporting tools to help me out. I am designing a new  product for tools and I need input. Please take my short (10 question) survey. No personal information is collected. It is totally anonymous. You would be helping out a fellow maker in a major way. Thank you so much. Here's the link: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/BMLTGW5 P.S. If you could also share pictures or your toolboxes/storage areas I'd appreciate the data. Thanks again!

Topic by biggy smalls  


what are the most important electronic parts to have in your toolbox for any project?

Like its stated i need to know what are the basic, most important electronics parts to have in a toolbox for any project. i want to start learning about electronics and i need parts to do projects and i didnt know you ya'll keep basic parts that everyone else have like a common type of LED or something. know what i mean? if nobody knows or doesnt do this, what are some parts to look for that a beginner like me could use later for starting small projects that will help me learn electronics?

Question by leader1    |  last reply


What is this tool?

I ran across this in a toolbox I inherited and have no idea what it does? Anybody have any familiarity with this thing?

Question by DrTurtle    |  last reply


What are these(Allen wrench like thingies)? Answered

I found these in an old toolbox. They are hexagonal like an Allen wrench, but have a smaller diameter round protrusion on one end. They are all the same size in "diameter". That's a standard size Sharpie marker there for reference.

Question by jrh065    |  last reply


12v to 12v lead acid charger? Answered

Is there any way to make or buy a 12v battery charge another 12v battery?

Question by Daniel Deacon    |  last reply


How to make antivirus programs stop blocking my software? Answered

I am in the beta testing stages of a program I recently developed.  One of the problems that I have with it is that anti-virus programs tend to block it due to the fact that they do not recognise it.  Also, microsoft smart screen and google chrome try to block it because it is not a commonly downloaded file (yet... yes, I tend to be optimistic).  In addition to the program not being well known, the program is designed to automate tasks used in computer repair... especially remote computer repair.  This can make good antivirus programs suspicious since a lot of what technicians do to a computer could also be used maliciously (some of the tasks that this program does are editing the registry, turning the firewall on and off, etc. just to name a few). Is there an easy way to get my program recognised as a safe application by these programs?  I have tried sending the file to the antivirus companies for analysis on the programs that support that feature, but evidently they are too busy or just don't care since my program is still blocked. Thanks in advance for your help! Edit: Here is a detailed explanation of what the program does... it is broken into two different parts (1) automated remote access and (2) a technician's toolkit. So basically my original idea was to create a program to automate the sending of remote assistance invitations (since I was just getting fed up with walking people through how to setup a remote assistance program over the phone).  This program just prompts for a ticket number (obtained from the technician on the phone); then creates an .msrcIncident file using the ticket number as the password.  Once the technician connects, the remote program has the toolbox built into it (I am also making the toolbox available separately).  This toolbox prompts the technician to select which tools the technician thinks he/she will need; and then downloads those programs automatically.  Once the programs are downloaded, it allows the technician to launch them from the program, or if the technician later realises that he/she needs more programs than he/she originally downloaded; they can download them directly from the toolbox.  Most of the programs have portable versions that the toolbox deletes on exit; but for the few programs that do not have a portable version, there is a shortcut to uninstall the program.  Any programs that are still installed are automatically uninstalled when the toolbox closes, it deletes the portable versions, closes any pinholes that it opened to allow the remote assistance through, etc.  Basically the same things that we do every time that we go to a computer; only a lot easier and faster. Since the program is not built to allow anything malicious to be done with it, I'm sure that anyone who reviewed the code would find that it is fine.  I'm not asking if there is a way for the antivirus programs to blindly trust my program... I wouldn't want that either.  What I am asking is would there be any way to send these anti-virus companies my source code to have them analyse it? Thanks!

Question by thegeeke    |  last reply


I need to remove spray paint from steel. Do you have any recommendations for me? Answered

I have an old steel toolbox that's been spray painted. I'd like to strip the paint off in the most efficient (and cost-effective) way possible. What say you, Instructables' Smart People?

Question by bajablue    |  last reply


I think I will attempt an hidden blade

I've seen the builds on the internet using a drawer slider mechanism or one from a toolbox. They are cool, but I want to try one with a really powerful locking motion. So as I sat thinking on how to do this, I discovered that the answer was right in my hands. A clicky pen. It shoots out quickly, locks in place sturdy, and then shoots back in. I think that combining this "clicky pen" mechanism with the drawer slider mechanism, I could really do it. Any ideas/tips/criticism/comments on what to do here?

Topic by Zacharoni    |  last reply


What oscilloscope would you recommend for me? Answered

I have been interested in purchasing an oscilloscope for a while now, but I am not sure on how to decide based on my needs. Lately I have been interested in building radio circuits, but it is proving difficult because it is hard to troubleshoot when you can't see what ishhappening in the circuit beyond theory. I also feel that an oscilloscope would be a good tool to have in my electronics toolbox. Can anyone recommend a good oscilloscope that would suite my needs for under 1k $ Thanks Atrum

Question by atrumblood    |  last reply


Low Power pc?

Right for some time now I have been thinking of building a computer that is low power 20w max needs to have some processing power preferable duel core i have been looking at 'intel D510MO' link to spec > http://www.ebuyer.com/product/191127 What i would like is for someone to advise me on what to buy to keep the power low (20w or less) and the performance high at a fairly low price

Question by Daniel Deacon    |  last reply


Am I phsycic?

I've never really believed in the whole phsycic thing, but I have an open mind and I'm starting to wonder. every now and then, I will see something, be it a word, sentence, picture, or sign before I see it for real. It happens with completely random thing I have never seen before. I also get feeling that tell me to do or not do something, and they are almost always right. It can be anything, such as not to bro g a toolbox because I felt that it would work out, and I got one for free, to bringing a screwdriver to school just in time to fix a loose microphone. So, am I mildly phsycic? If I am, are there any sort of exercises to help me phocus or develop my ability. Any help is appreciated.

Question by XOIIO    |  last reply


Project that needs some "originality confirmation"

I had an idea for a portable workbench/toolbox. when i drew it up it looked like a chest, so i called it a workchest. but when i showed my design to my family, my mom said that this was a design that many women use to carry their makeup and grooming things. i dont really think thats true, but i think some outside opinions might be useful here. so a wooden chest with dimensions at 1 1/2' for length, width, and height with the top unfolding to make a workspace thats 3'x1 1/2', this is something that fashionable women would carry around or keep at their house so they can look beautiful wherever they go? i dont think something like that would ever be intentionally created for makeup.

Topic by EngineerJakit    |  last reply


Need help with DIY cooler insulation

Long time fan, first time poster. I'm looking to convert a cool-looking vintage toolbox into a heavy duty lunchbox. I'm currently prepping the metal for paint and looking into what I can use to insulate the box. I've thought of: * spray foam insulation: Good coverage and thermal protection, but not water-resistant enough (think condensation) * fiberglass insulation (pink stuff): Good, but unsure about how cold it will keep things * styrofoam: probably the one inch sheets used for basement walls below grade. Best solution so far. Before I do something that will likely mean stripping the box clean and starting over, I thought it best to see what others might have to say about this. Any and all help is greatly appreciated!

Topic by Jiggsy    |  last reply


Getting started for a beginner

Hi there, I hope this is in the right forum. So, I have always liked to work with my hands, seeing things people made and thinking "I WOULD LOVE TO GET INTO THAT" and I recently decided to make good on my wishes and wish to really get into the DIY scene. I'm looking for help on what tools I should get my hands on to start working on things. An example of something I wish tor re-create would be this: https://www.instructables.com/id/Portable-PC-project-inspired-by-Shadowrun-Cyberdec/ I'm not looking for help on what it takes to make up the end product but rather the tools one would use consistently to make everything fit and what not. Is there a sort of beginners toolbox or something of that sort I should look into getting? Sorry if this is confusing, I'm confusing even myself a bit, haha. On a side note, does everyone here have a garage they work in? I'm in NYC and as many of you know it's not the easiest place to have a workbench. Can anyone recommend me places you would go to work on projects? Thank you in advance.

Topic by Rlahens    |  last reply


Is it safe to use old ornament hooks for jewelry? Answered

I want to use some old, "giant staple-looking" ornament hooks to make beaded charms to hang off a choker, but I don't know what the hooks are made of. I don't really know anything about beading materials or jewelry-making in general. The packaging's long gone and they've been sitting in the toolbox for years. I made one charm and want to make more, but I don't know whether it's okay to keep using these hooks or use wire that's actually sold as wire for jewelry-making. Aside from "don't stab yourself, don't ingest the wire," I'd like to know whether this kind of metal can cause skin irritation or rashes or if that's an issue with any sort of metal (if the latter, is there anything I can do about it?). Unfortunately, I haven't tried wearing the charm I made because I have a bug bite on neck; the charm would brush right up against it. My fingers seem fine, though.

Question by Selceta    |  last reply


How to re use a penknife/folding pliers?

From the bottom of my toolbox I have dug out a pen knife I bought some time ago. Its a silverline micro multi tool. I never used it because although the pliers work very well the folding knives, bottle openers etc. aren't held in place by a spring or locking mechanism. Also the rotation is far too easy, and the rotation stop sometimes slips, rendering the knives, bottle openers and everything else effectively useless (i.e. very dangerous to use). As a result I will remove the assorted knives, bottle openers and other widgets, leaving an interesting space to be filled by something else. That something else cannot really be another set of metal widgets (like knives, bottle openers, etc) because they would have the same basic problems, so my question is what would you use the two spaces for? Approximate dimensions; 9x8x55 mm internal dimensions, (one in each handle) box shaped enclosure open on one side. Openings are on opposing sides of the folding handles (see the google images link to see what I mean). Two holes near the ends of the handles which currently hold the widget axle. One idea to get the ball rolling, a mini multimeter in one side, with probes in the other. I'm looking for something practical or useful, something that could be still considered a tool of some kind, but feel free to throw in any idea's you have anyhow.

Question by andy    |  last reply


123D Design Vs. Rotary Tool. What is better?

When Instructables gave me the opportunity to be part of its Artist in Residence program, one of the first things I thought was "Blimey!* I don't know 123D or any other design program. What am I gonna do?" (*Of course, in my country we don’t say “Blimey!” but something ruder. But I think you get the point) Let me introduce myself: I'm Mario Caicedo Langer, from Colombia (not "Columbia"). Former Colombian Navy Officer, BsC in Naval Sciences, maker focused in trash art and upcycling. You can see my Instructables profile here. My skills: I can transform almost every piece of e-waste and plastic trash in something useful, decorative or funny. My weak point: the only design program I used in my life was... Paint. Yes, that Paint. So 123D would be my first experience with a CAD program. I have to be honest: I'm not a big fan of CAD programs. Yes, they are awesome. But I am an old school maker who loves to use his rotary tool and his screwdrivers to build stuff, at risk of his own hands. I thought CAD programs were reserved for industrial designers or engineers, even one like 123D Design, developed for the DIY community. THE EXPERIENCE A few weeks ago, on a Friday afternoon, I finally decided to take a look the 123D Design installed in my PC. So I started to play with the program. When I got stuck, Randy Sarafan gave me some useful tips. Two hours later, I finished some kind of robot arm. At night, I had finished a "chicken legs" robot. On Saturday morning, I had a futuristic motorbike. On Sunday, I was at the beach in San Jose, eating Deep Fried Twinkies, but that’s not important. By Monday, I had my fourth project ready (not my best work, but still) for the "Show and Tell" meeting at Instructables. I finished my instructable on how to make a transformable robot, my first 3D printed project. And right now I'm working in a futuristic jet. I'm not saying "Oh! I'm a genius! You’d better make a movie about me! (In this case, I want to be interpreted by Ryan Reynolds or Samuel L. Jackson)". No. What I'm trying to say is that, sometimes, we have the tools at reach, but we are too lazy, too coward or too old fashioned to try them. And Autodesk is giving a great tool to the maker community. It's a friendly program (I don’t know how it could be friendlier. Telepathic commands, maybe?) and you can learn it in one weekend or less. It doesn't matter if you are a professional designer or not, you only need two things: the will and visual-spatial ability. And you only get the second thing by being curious about all the things around you: touching, dismantling, cutting, breaking, attaching, opening, destroying and rearming stuff. And, if you are a maker, you are on the right way. 123D Design is an awesome program (and honestly, the only one I learnt), I love it and it's free, but it has two aspects to improve. First, fonts could be very useful. What if I want to 3D-print a plaque with my name? Second, I don’t know if it’s because of my computer, but sometimes the program crashes and, if you didn’t save your progress, you will have a very bad time. So I got the habit of saving on my computer every 4 minutes. That’s all. AT THE END Right now, I’m asking myself “Myself, what do you prefer: a carpal tunnel syndrome for using your computer or a severed hand syndrome for using your jigsaw?”. Then I remember my wise mother telling me “Mijo, don’t say those barbarities because there is no idle words”. Resuming, what is better for a maker, CAD/CAM or traditional crafting? I believe there is no competition, because both are complementary. It’s all about what do you want to do, how do you want to do it and what is the best option for your project. There are a lot of things you will never achieve without a computer. But there are a lot of things a computer won’t be better than the human hands, too. And building stuff with your very own hands is a very rewarding experience. So, it’s up to you! Because for me, 123D Design became just another tool in my toolbox. A powerful, fantastic and awesome tool in my toolbox.

Topic by M.C. Langer    |  last reply


Drill bit sharpener - anything out there that actually works? Answered

I have no problem fixing the bigger drills I have once they get blunt from use.But once we go into the range of 5mm and below it is quite tricky.The grinding wheel that works well for a 10mm drill can be way too coarse to deal with a 2mm drill...I looked a quite a few commercially available sharpeners, even tried a few in store but they just don't satisfy :(Most create a rather rough surface finnish which makes the drill go blunt even fast, although it cuts really well for the first hole LOLEspecially when it comes to producing more than a standard edge this toys seem to be useless.Ever tried to use a 13mm drill that has no back cut and no center cut angle added? It's a pain...Last night I went through some now vintage photos and remembered that my grandfather had a metal rig for the drills.It screwed onto a mount for these stand up and "see through" slotted disk grinders people had in their workshops back then.The drill was fixed in place by a pin in the flute, so stoppers could ensure you are always grinding at the correct angle.Not just the angle for the cutting edge but also the angle in relation to the flute.Once this initial sharpening step was done you clicked the whole thing sideways to get the back cut angle added and a stopper ensured you won't be able to grind off too much.It was not able to do these fine center cuts that allow you to get away without a pilot hole but the drills were sharp as and kept their bite for a long time.Does anyone still have one of these things in their toolbox or vintage collection to provide some detailed images?Would love to design something similar but reall struggle with the mechanical side of things.The original had the option for three different edge angles to be selected.The "lenght" was set by letting the drill touch the disk (off), locking it and then by using a clicking screw to drive the drill up in I think 0.1mm increments.It was very, very easy to get perfectly sharpened drills with it and I would love to be able to use something like it again :(The only thing getting a bit close to this that I found so far comes from China - of course it does...A crappy and cheap grinder similar but smaller than an electric chainsaw sharpener.A grinding disk about twice the size of a dremel one does the cutting.To make sure all is even the drill is aligned so its center is right on the edge of the grinding disk.On the free side is a simple stpping plate.Might work somehow but something tells me tht the center of the drill will never be perfect.

Question by Downunder35m    |  last reply


September Project Contest Winners

The votes are in! Congratulations to the winners of the September Project contest!September Project Contest First Prize winnersAtomic Zombie's ChopWork Orange chopper bicycle by KoolKatCyanotypes - super easy photo prints at home. by ianFloppy Disk Bag by imanalchemistHandbound Book by BrianSawyerA Traditional Jacob's Ladder by ereinEach first prize winner with receive a Digital Spy Camera from Wild Planet Toys.September Project Contest Second Prize winners3D DDR Frame for PS2 by impulse94DIY Home Bicycle Repair Stand by pizzFixed Disc Sander from Angle Grinder by divxnzHydroponics - at Home and for Beginners and Solutions to Hydroponic Problems (Lack of Root-Plant Support) by trebuchet03Insulating Laptop Pad by Bats22pvc kayak by hellokellerStanding Desk Conversion Platform by 5dotsTen Green - modular shelving by royshearerTyvek FedEx Wallet with Change Pocket by cheewee2000Willow Twig Furniture by SlimJimEach second prize winner will receive a Magnetic USB card reader. Some assembly required!Honorable MentionAncient Aeolipile -steam engine, and magnets for good measure... by trebuchet03Can in Can Grill by nabilahmadDaisy Duke Toolbox by SlimJimDisposable camera coilgun by AlfonsVHDIY: EXTREME Power saving wireless mouse mod by Corbin_DallasEasy and tasty stir fry by SupercookieFolding Game Board by degroofFreezing summer tomato crop by shecktorGuacamole by easementHow to build a heliostat parabolic reflector by Tool Using AnimalHow to Build Up a Bike by joeHow to Build your own 1u Linux Server by jonesygoodstuffHow to make a RAILGUN! by AlexTheGreatHow to remove Logos from your PDA / cell phone with sugar by spankvalMagnetic speed sensor by PeterTheUnGreatMagnetic Tool Rack by packrathackerMicrodot - wrist watch LED pattern timepiece by rgbphilMonica's wedding cards by outofthewoodsOpenface Bagel Sandwich and Another gooood sandwich by eraaawghhhParty top-hat made of playing cards by Sergey ChernyshevPay-per-Copy Machine Exploit by nakPower to the Super Rebound by frickelkramSolid Perfume by rapierwittrailor project by trusted smilesVinyl Pencil Case by splityarnEach Honorable mention winner will receive an Instructables patch. It was really tough judging so many awesome projects. I hope everyone had fun building and documenting their projects. I'm sure you'll have fun going through the winners; it's really an incredible list!Thanks to everyone to who entered and to the people who helped judge the challenge: arwen, canida, dan, fungus amungus, intoon, leahculver, lebowski, and rachel.Original September contest instructions here, information about the SpyCam here, and information about the Magnetic USB card reader.

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply


Longest Comment on Instructables (Possibly)

Https://www.instructables.com/answers/What-essential-tools-should-I-include-in-my-dorm-r/The longest comment on this site is one by Guardian Fox on the "What survival tools should I keep in my dorm room tool box?" If anyone can find a longer one, please PM me the link.Keep in mind, he typed this with his own fingers, not by holding down the paste command for a day. If that's what you want, then go to https://www.instructables.com/community/the_forum_for_spam/ Source: Guardian FoxFor the dorm room, you only need a few tools. You're not going to be renovating, and you're not going to be doing much woodworking. You aren't allowed to do anything at all to the room beyond hanging pictures (if that), and most dorms forbid power-tools in the rooms no matter what you're use them for. Here's my take on what you'll need for the dorm. I've included a lot of things that seem unnecessary, and you can probably live without some of it... but the kit will get you through nearly any problems you'll encounter at school or in an apartment:-At least one decent multi-bit screwdriver. Look for something with a comfortable grip and sturdy construction. Avoid gimmicks like built in flashlights. I recommend the Piquiq brand which comes in a few different sizes and can be found in many hardware stores in North America. You can usually get their three-piece set for less than $20.-A set of jeweler's screwdrivers. Get a cheap set because these little things WILL get lost. Look for something with at least a few unusual bits as well as the usuals. Get a 30ish-piece set for less than $20. Most handy if you've got a thing for messing with your electronics, but also great for changing a watch battery, fixing glasses, etc.-A basic hammer. Nothing fancy needed here, and I've always preferred an ordinary wooden-handled hammer anyway. Go for a smaller hammer if you only plan on hanging pictures, get a regular-sized hammer if you plan on using it to do real work later on. Stanley is a good brand with decent prices, but there are lots of good budget-priced hammers out there. Drop by a hardware store and pick one that feels good in your hand. Less than $20 for a brand name. $10 or less for a bargain hammer. Make sure the head of the hammer is securely attached to the handle, no matter what brand you pick but a little tiny wiggle is ok. Hang a picture or tap a few finishing nails into a small project. Very handy, even when you use it wrong.-Two utility knives with snap-off blades. One with the small size, and the other with the larger size. There are hundreds of brands of these on the market, and a lot of them are junk so spring for an Olfa (the best i.m.o.) if you can find it. Richard is a decent low-cost brand which is often found in paint stores. Again, avoid gimmicks. The most important thing you need to know is if the locking mechanism works well or not, as a utility knife can become dangerous if the blade is going to slide around while you're using it. Good knives can be around $10-20 each. Cheap, "disposable" knives can be found for less than a dollar, but be sure to buy something that seems sturdy. Add a self-healing cutting mat from the dollar store, and while you're there get a metal ruler for cutting straight lines. Smaller utility knives are good for light-duty applications like trimming photographs or opening packages. Larger utility knives are good for harder work like cutting lots of cardboard-A measuring tape. You probably already have a ruler for school, but a measuring tape is much more useful for around the house. Get a 16' tape for good versatility. Choose one that has a sturdy housing and a tape that slides in and out easily. Bennett is a good budget brand you can find for less than $10 and I recommend theirs over any of the name-brand tapes out there. If you can't find that brand, go to the building supplies store and ask what brand the clerks and outside staff use around the shop. You could skip this one during college, but you'll need it one day and it's the kind of thing you can make uses for.-Pliers. For around the house and crafting I find a pair of long-nose pliers more handy than a pair of linesman's pliers, but both tools have their place. Locking pliers (aka vice grips) are also super-handy. Get one or a set, but avoid the bargain brands. Look to spend at least $7 each for basic pliers, and at least $12 for a good pair of locking pliers. -An adjustable wrench (aka thumb-wrench). Pick a smaller-sized model for your toolbox. Most of the nuts and bolts in the house will be small anyway. Go for something that opens up to 1" or 1 1/2" Brand isn't an issue, but make sure it operates smoothly and won't jam or work loose. Spend less than $10. -Scissors. A usable, general purpose pair of scissors can be found at the dollar stores or in an office supply store. Make sure they open and close smoothly and that the blades don't wiggle. Look for one with a metal screw at the pivot so you can tighten it if it works loose. If you're using it routinely for cutting fabric or any other specific task, spend some extra money and get the right kind for the job or at least a good pair of general purpose ones. Less than $5 for cheap ones, $20+ for quality ones.-Sewing notions; A pack of needles, a roll of white thread, a roll of black thread, and a roll of transparent thread, a few safety pins and any spare buttons you find. That should get you through any wardrobe fixes you may need. Each item in the kit should be a dollar or less, and you can save money by starting with a pre-made kit from a dollar store and adding a few of your own extras. Also highly recommended is this, http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.1352 , but keep in mind it is cheap for a reason and needs constant attention.-A soldering iron if it's allowed in your room, and only if you're working with or fixing electronics or jewelry. Get a scrap piece of plywood or something to use as a work surface. $15 for a basic 30w iron. Another $10 for a safer stand.-A toolbox that holds everything. I like the ones that double as a step-stool, which you can find for $20-$30 if you look hard enough (mastercraft and rubbermaid brands). You might like something different, but small plastic toolboxes and even small plain steel ones are all quite cheap so go look and see what you like. You can even use your imagination and just use a plastic tote, a tacklebox, a backpack/messenger bag, shoebox, etc. Just pack your tools in it neatly and avoid putting the heavy or sharp ones on top of the ones that might break.-A plunger. If your dorm room has a bathroom, this is a must even if you never have to use it. It's an insurance policy against one hell of a mess. $10-$15.Anyway, that's all I can think of for tools. Craftier folks need more gear, and less DIY-prone folks need less. Use your best judgment and buy only what you can afford and might actually use. Pick up a few fasteners and adhesives too, usually as needed. Here's what you should probably keep on hand.-A package of assorted picture-hangers and hooks (if hanging pictures is allowed in your dorm). Buy a pack at the dollar store. A few extra finishing nails and small screws would be a good addition to this as well.-Thumbtacks. Buy a pack at the dollar store or office supply store.-Scotch tape, packing tape, duct tape (or Gorilla tape).-Twist ties. Get a bunch from a pack of trash bags.-A package of superglue. Rather than one large tube, get the pack with several tiny tubes so you don't lose your entire supply when one dries up.-Craft wire. Use it wherever you might use a twist tie, but also can be bent into whatever shape you need to become a tool or a piece of art. Dollar stores carry rolls of it often at 2/$1

Topic by DELETED_M4industries    |  last reply


Is it worth dropping $400 on a really nice oscilloscope (Rigol DS1054Z)?

I will describe my situation: I am a hobbiest that likes to make cool projects, and plan to get into maybe RF analog stuff, (maybe start out with making a few FM bugs, reverse engineer a simple video transmitter kit, and a few other things.) as well get into arduino some more, AC analysis (learn about Xformers, power factor, maybe some math, etc.) and I so currently have an old 2ch. 30MHz analog oscilloscope that is a PITA to make real measurements with. Not only is it huge and takes up a lots of space, but also I'm not even sure it is in cal!) I will be transferring into UVA (or maybe VT) for EE, and gone this summer for a NASA internship at langley. (maybe I will be able to take it with me w/ a toolbox of some electronics stuff!) The scope I am looking at (what appears to be what many subscribers seem to use, and/or claim is pretty good) is the Rigol DS1054Z. I only know how to use my $30 30MHz BKprecision scope I got on craigslist from the son of a father who was a TV repairman, and have NO experience with the use of the fancy-shmancy digital scope! What little I know is from watching EEVblog review of other scopes in the past. (I do know that they can be useful for 'capturing' waveforms, and can be set up to trigger on a pulse, maybe a certain digital codes, and that could come in handy for reverse engineering crap.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7v-tFYbc7h8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2qdtQkBKhc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETCOhzU1O5A https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gStNYfqMXk What sells it to me, being a complete newbie to electronics and digital scopes is that it has a nice big screen, the specs seem good (other certainly think, I have no intuition of what any of those things mean except the bandwidth, and maybe the sampling rate, 1GSa/s), 4 channels, intensity graded display, and it has loads of functions and stuff for me to grow into, and hacking it to make it think it is a DS1104Z is tempting, but I probably will not do that right away. Maybe once I feel what it offered is limiting. The deal breakers is the $400 price, a bit steep for me (cheap for something this good, apparently but still.), the fear that by the time I really start using it, it will be obsolete and the same money can buy some quantum super duper ASIC tech whiz bang 3GHz 100Gsa/s 1GB segmented memory spectacular scope! I am not really sure if it has a source, or signal generator either. Some sources claim that higher end ones do, or certain models anyway, and it seems like the official site say's no. http://www.rigolna.com/products/digital-oscilloscopes/ds1000Z/ds1054z/ That brings me to my next point. Should I also get a decent function generator? 

Question by -max-    |  last reply


Is it worth dropping $400 on a shiny new Rigol DS1054Z scope?

I will describe my situation: I am a hobbiest that likes to make cool projects, and plan to get into maybe RF analog stuff, (maybe start out with making a few FM bugs, reverse engineer a simple video transmitter kit, and a few other things.) as well get into arduino some more, AC analysis (learn about Xformers, power factor, maybe some math, etc.) and I so currently have an old 2ch. 30MHz analog oscilloscope that is a PITA to make real measurements with. Not only is it huge and takes up a lots of space, but also I'm not even sure it is in cal!) I will be transferring into UVA (or maybe VT) for EE, and gone this summer for a NASA internship at langley. (maybe I will be able to take it with me w/ a toolbox of some electronics stuff!)   The scope I am looking at (what appears to be what many subscribers seem to use, and/or claim is pretty good) is the Rigol DS1054Z. I only know how to use my $30 30MHz BKprecision scope I got on craigslist from the son of a father who was a TV repairman, and have NO experience with the use of the fancy-shmancy digital scope! What little I know is from watching EEVblog review of other scopes in the past. (I do know that they can be useful for 'capturing' waveforms, and can be set up to trigger on a pulse, maybe a certain digital codes, and that could come in handy for reverse engineering crap.)   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7v-tFYbc7h8   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2qdtQkBKhc   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETCOhzU1O5A   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gStNYfqMXk     What sells it to me, being a complete newbie to electronics and digital scopes is that it has a nice big screen, the specs seem good (other certainly think, I have no intuition of what any of those things mean except the bandwidth, and maybe the sampling rate, 1GSa/s), 4 channels, intensity graded display, and it has loads of functions and stuff for me to grow into, and hacking it to make it think it is a DS1104Z is tempting, but I probably will not do that right away. Maybe once I feel what it offered is limiting.   The deal breakers is the $400 price, a bit steep for me (cheap for something this good, apparently but still.), the fear that by the time I really start using it, it will be obsolete and the same money can buy some quantum super duper ASIC tech whiz bang 3GHz 100Gsa/s 1GB segmented memory spectacular scope!   I am not really sure if it has a source, or signal generator either. Some sources claim that higher end ones do, or certain models anyway, and it seems like the official site say's no. http://www.rigolna.com/products/digital-oscilloscopes/ds1000Z/ds1054z/ That brings me to my next point. Should I also get a decent function generator?   

Question by -max-    |  last reply


Where to buy JB Weld

I tend to do a good bit of research when I purchase anything. I will spend hours finding the deal that will save me five cents. While this doesn't make much financial sense for me, maybe it will end up being worth it if you can save a few cents in the process!The only step to this instructable is a list of the best places I've found to purchase JB Weld. For those who are not familiar with JB Weld, it is, simply put, God, in a tube. It is an epoxy that when mixed (and mix quickly, you only have about 20 minutes of pliability) will set within 4-6 hours, and cure within 24. Once cured, it has the strength of steel, can bind with glass, and neatest of all, is actually conductive enough to use as solder!Note that I'm only referring to the original JB Weld, model 8265 (and 8265-S). I find the stick version doesn't adhere as well, and the "Kwick" version isn't as strong. I also tend to be stubborn and just stick with what I'm comfortable with.Since the invention of Duct Tape (genuflect) nothing has been so valuable to mankind. Thus, it's not surprising to find it anywhere from $9.99 a tube, up to $14.99 per tube. So how much should you be paying for your J.B. Weld?If ordered online, you can get it for as little as $2.95 per tube!Note: These prices are only accurate as of the posting of this instructable (29 June 2009)Okay, so if you've come this far, $2.95 per tube sounds pretty exciting. Keep in mind though that you're also going to end up dealing with shipping, so we'll see what the end result will be. When in doubt, if you have a local Ace Hardware, Lowes, Home Depot, etc. look there first. You avoid shipping, and the Ace online outlet sells it for as little as $3.25 per tube (No idea why nobody else, including Sears, KMart, Target, etc. carries it online). If you can find it in the store for that price, that would be your best bet. But assuming you don't have a local Ace Hardware, or since they're locally owned the Franchise Owner is a prick that overprices things, let's see how the following websites work out.First, it's important to note that while you will find many other places online that claim to sell the JB Weld for as little as $2.95 per tube, just try to purchase them. I'll wait... Back? So as you saw, 99.9% of these sites use the Amazon.com checkout system, and only allow ONE TUBE AT A TIME to be purchased. They then hit you with a $4.99 shipping fee for each pop, and now you're back to paying $8 per tube.On to the real suppliers:#1) Tool Explosion - The best price I've found with free shipping, but their free shipping minimum purchase is $100, and their JB Weld was only $3.76 per tube when last checked! One of the better deals out there. Between $100-$130 worth, this was the best deal I could find.#2) Alexandria General Supply - To get the $2.95 price here, you have to buy in 6 packs, otherwise it's more expensive. But hey, more JB Weld can only be a good thing. They seem to have a starting-rate of $17.05 for shipping, which is nearly as much as the 6-pack of JB Weld, making them almost $6 per. However, the more you order, the price of shipping will actually start to go DOWN. At 7 cases (42 tubes), it dropped to $7.41 for shipping making it $3.12 per tube, and at 20 cases, it was only up to $8.16 for shipping, making bulk purchases very much worth it. At $131.31 for 42 tubes, this was the best deal out there, and only gets better the higher you go. They do not accept PayPal, but do accept all major credit cards.#3) Ace Hardware Outlet - Don't ask me why AceHardware.com doesn't carry it, but AceHardwareOutlet does, but I'm not going to argue. At its respectable price of $3.39 per tube, it's not a bad deal if you're buying in bulk. Unfortunately, for just a single tube to ship, you're looking at $6.39 for shipping. The shipping rates only slowly go up the more you pile on, so if you're doing some shopping for some other hardware, Ace is The Place... For Me... (Plus, they take PayPal!) For individual tubes assuming you can't find anything locally, this is the best price going. At least buy 2 or 3 tubes at a time to make the shipping worth it, though.#4) Hands-On Tools - Another site with fair shipping, and a decent price of $3.66 per tube. Not much to say about this one, except that they seem to be one of the more reputable sites selling the weld for a good price. They work with the BBB and have a good rating, accept PayPal, and give you percentage discounts the more you buy. All around a solid company.#5) Castle Wholesalers - One of my personal favorites (since they are located near me, mostly) selling the JB Weld at $3.47 per tube. However, do keep in mind that you have a $25 minimum order here. Their prices are pretty standard for shipping, so you can add about $1 per tube once you've bought the requisite $25 worth. The more you buy, the cheaper the shipping gets per tube, as well. Only Visa and Mastercard accepted.#6) College Toolbox - While their price isn't the best, it's still a fun site with some decent stuff at fair prices. At $4.11 per tube, it's not necessarily worth the purchase here unless you find enough of their gear to get the "$150 purchase gets free shipping" thing. (And they take PayPal)In closing, if needing just a tube or two, your best bet is always going to be to shop locally, and buy from a hardware store. But once you start getting into the $5 and $6 price range, there are some decent places online to pick it up (if you don't mind the wait). Always take shipping into account, and always avoid Amazon.com and their Affiliate's rip-off schemes. If you see the Amazon logo, run far and fast (or at least close the window). E-Bay is equally a rip-off, only moreso as you're starting at the $9.99 level, and then tacking shipping onto that.For the hobbyist that understands the glory that is JB Weld, drop the $130 and get enough JB Weld to last you for a long, long time. For all others, I would recommend avoiding purchasing it online unless you absolutely can't find it for a fair price in your local stores (I can't stress that enough. Shipping is the debbil.)Hope this helps someone, and if anyone finds a better price, feel free to include it in the comments and I'll add it to the list!

Topic by Javin007    |  last reply