typewriter key removal

What is the easiest, and best way to remove antique typewriter keys for use in jewelry without breakage?

Question by squillgm 10 years ago


Electric typewriter to USB keyboard

Is there an instructable that is basically universal that show how to convert and electric typewriter to a USB keyboard?

Topic by metalshiflet 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Can I detatch the cylinder from a typewriter so that the bell and sliding mechanism still properly function?

I have an idea for modding a nerf gun involving attatching a typewriter cylinder to it so that either firing or cocking the gun causes the cylinder to "Ding".  Is it possible to safely detatch the cylinder of an old typewriter so that the sliding mechanism and bell still function correctly?  Also, could someone please provide me with a chart of the individual mechanisms within an antique typewriter? Thank you Instructables.

Question by Spiderdog3000 9 years ago


how do you 'refill' ink tape for a typewriter?

I bought an old typewriter and i can't find any new ink tape, any ideas to re-use the old tape?

Question by lieuwe 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Hitchhiker's Guide Typewriter for Sale

The typewriter that Douglas Adams used to type out The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is up for sale. If you have $25257.94 it can be yours! The price is converted from 12,250 British Pounds. To be honest, I was hoping that the seller would be able to fit the number 42 in the price somewhere. I would buy it, but there are the eating and sleeping in houses things that I've grown accustomed to. Linkvia bbgadgets

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Information about a Mercedes Selekta typewriter

I have an old Mercedes Selekta typewriter that I would like to know more about. It is German, and has a couple of German character keys on it (vowels w/umlats, primarily). I got it from a person that was cleaning out their house; their husband had somehow acquired it in WWII.

Question by peytonjr 10 years ago


Make a mechanical typewriter type to a text file?

I've got an old (circa 50-60's) mechanical typewriter that has a great deal of sentimental value to my girlfriend. Her grandfather was a writer and was always glued to his typewriter. And since I'm a huge nerd I came up with this crazy idea. My plan, and hopefully this can come to life in a few years is to modify (and not break) the typewriter so that it will send text to a file that is typed out on the typewriter. I've seen the tywpewriter, but they use an electric one and it types out tweets that are found on their twitter account. My idea is to use the typewriter as a guestbook in our wedding. People will come in and type on nice pretty paper so they can see what they're writing, and we'll have a text file. I'm pretty much settling for a text file or some sort that I can use later to modify. I'm thinking I'll have to scrap a keyboard and make small solder pads for the metal keys to make contact to. Any ideas where I can get started? I'll post pics of the typewriter when I take some, but for now, just know it's mechanical and not electric. TY!

Question by mrsayao 9 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Can someone help me wire an electric typewriter?

I want it wired in two ways. The first way, I want to use the spell check mechanism (there is one) to make it so that the typewriter roller will only move when the correct code is input. The second way I want is for it to be wired for use as a USB keyboard. I want a switch to be able to switch between these two functions, and I would like a way for it to have power without being plugged into the wall, but that is optional.

Question by metalshiflet 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


How to make your own Enigma Machine?

Hi, I've got an old typewriter that still works wonderfully. Now, not being a big typewriter 'enthusiast', I still have a fair amount of fun using one. It's a manual typewriter, and I was wondering if it would be possible to get a separate set of arms made, with symbols corresponding to the keys. Essentially, my very own Enigma Machine, except it's my own code. Think any of you guys can help me out?

Question by JamesTB13 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


How does one re-ink a typewriter-type ribbon?

I have a Gaylord charging machine (used in nonautomated libraries to check materials out) but fear that the ribbons may be unobtainable in the near future. I'm hoping re-inking the ribbon will prolong the machine's useful life.

Question by 9 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Does anyone know anything about this typewriter interface?

The typewriter is an AEG Olympia ES-95i. It's a big beige electronic machine from maybe the late 70s or early 80s.On the back there is a 20 pin rectangular male connector with 2 rows of 10 pins. If I connect random pins with something metal, it types various characters. I'm wondering if anybody knows what kind of interface this thing might use so I can go about connecting it to my computer.EDIT1:I've found a bit more random information about this type of device which might help:http://www.atarimagazines.com/creative/v9n6/133_Praxis_makes_perfect_Oli.phpApparently Olympia made another typewriter in the same line that was basically the same as a bytewriter model. Irritatingly the article says the bytewrite provides no technical information "other than the pin-out assignments for the connector. "It would appear from the rest of the article that the connector might be some kind of modified centronics interface.I'll try to get a picture up soon.EDIT2:Here's the photo. Whatever it is I hope it turns out to be bidirectional so I can use this as a tty :).

Question by pharoah 10 years ago  |  last reply 5 months ago


are stepper motors from electric typewriters good for cnc projects?

I have 3 old electric typewriters i got from work, one I already condensed to a steel rod and a ziplock bag of motors and gears and screws, the other, a wheelmaster 5 is next, I am going to keep the wpt-160 because its sweet. But Back to the question, are these motors generally any good for cnc machines? I think I will have about 7 or 8 stepper motors of different sizes. anybody used these before, I'm not sure of the specs yet.

Question by bramletabercrombie 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


USB Typewriter, Vacuum Former, Steampunk Mr. Potato Head

USB Typewriter Vacuum Former Steampunk Mr. Potato Head Pipe Lamp LED Table Cards Best Ever Cookie Recipe Easy Lumber Bed Frame Orange and Coffee Liqueur Toe Socks for Toe Shoes Watermelon Deseeding Tricks Motorized Longboard Brickoven-Style Pizza At Home Underwater Video Housing Wooden Rubik's Cube Lego 3D printer

Topic by randofo 8 years ago


SteamPunk Typewriter Keyboard for PC!!! Handmade please look!!

Check out this eBay auction for the following SteamPunk Typewriter Keyboard!!http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item;=170344004923&ssPageName;=ADME:X:AAQ:US:1123"SteamPunk" Typewriter Keyboard for PCThis is a custom made "Steampunk" Typewriter Keyboard that is fully functional and works with any PC! I hand made this over the course of many weeks of hard and meticulous work, using the guts of a very solid Logitech PC keyboard system which I completely rebuilt over many stages, into this solid, beautiful, and unique piece of antique technological art! Three separate sets of antique Royal glass typewriter keys make up all of the keys besides the handmade brass keys (described below). I can personally guarantee this keyboard is completely unique, and you won't find anything like it out on the market! This new beautiful style of combining the old Victorian look with new high-tech products is becoming very popular from young teens looking to be creative and inspired to rich business CEO's wanting something beautiful to match their office. Think about the all the joy and beauty this would bring to your life (not to mention bragging rights!). Right now is your chance to own a piece or art and history which you can put to use everyday!This keyboards design consists of:Solid glass keys from a three different sets of original antique Royal early 1900's typewriters.Hand and naturally aged copper top and bottom rails.Custom, hand punched, leather backing (perfectly fitted and stretched over the top and seamed underneath).Custom bent steel side brackets (which have been properly welded to the copper rails to make a very solid keyboard).Beautiful antique cloth wire loom covering computer connector.Hand made brass Esc key, F keys (done in roman numerals), Arrows, and nine keys above Arrows (because they didn't make any of these keys on antique typewriters).Brief "Steampunk" HistorySteampunk is a sub-genre of fantasy and speculative fiction that came into prominence in the 1980s and early 1990s. The term denotes works set in an era or world where steam power is still widely used usually the 19th century, and often Victorian era England but with prominent elements of either science fiction or fantasy, such as fictional technological inventions like those found in the works of H. G. Wells and Jules Verne, or real technological developments like the computer occurring at an earlier date.Functionality and BeautyAs I keep strongly pointing out, not only does this piece of techno-art look beautiful, but it also works as beautifully too! All the keys were lubricated then meticulously aligned and ergonomically angled with high strength silicon glue, which will stand up to many years of hard use! Keys that weren't available (such as the F keys and arrows) I custom made from brass which was then clear coated for years of protection.A Brief Fabrication ProcessThis whole keyboard started with an idea in my head one day, and then turned into numbers of sketches and design ideas until I filled my notebook and decided it was time to make it! I started with a high quality Logitech PC keyboard, and gutted it down to the bare parts. Then after trimming all the borders off the top frame I perfectly aligned the key frame back together with now a flat surface. Next I had to hand cut all the key tops off and level them for attachment of the Royal typewriter keys. During this process I custom made the copper/steel rails and side pieces making sure the height and angle was ergonomically correct. Next was the custom punching of the leather backing which was quite difficult to align perfectly, but came out beautifully! Finally the smaller things like the light posts, cloth wire loom, painting and copper aging, and electrical work was done. (P.S. Like I said, this is a very brief summary of the complete process! Many, many steps took place during this fabrication!)Level, Sturdy, and Desk Scratching Friendly!This frame was professionally welded together by a hired welder who meticulously made sure was level and solid. Every detail about this keyboard was thoroughly thought through, down to the hidden padded bases so it won't slide around on your desk or scratch it!You Wont Find Anything Like It!Obviously you can tell by now that this is a very custom piece of art that you have the chance to own and display in your office or home! You can't imagine the beauty of this in real life, pictures just simply do no justice! A few other people have attempted to make such type of typewriter keyboards that consist of the original ugly plastic base and just changed keys.... this keyboard goes above and beyond the bar and you will not be disappointed!Reduced Environmental ImpactAs always, I tried to stay eco-conscious while designing and fabricating this keyboard. It was designed with the following features to reduce its environmental impact:High quality polyurethane based Leather alternative (no animals harmed!)Recycled copper pipingOriginal and restored Royal typewriter keys.Highly recyclable parts (although you'll never want to get rid of this!)

Topic by maxter32 9 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Advice needed for complex project - "digital typewriter"

I was browsing kickstarter recently and I noticed a really cool new toy, called the hemingwrite. It's described as a "distraction free digital typewriter". Basically, it looks like a keyboard hooked up to an e-ink screen which lets you write without distractions. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/adamleeb/hemingwrite-a-distraction-free-digital-typewriter Sounds pretty cool, yeah? But for $400? C'mon... It got me thinking; surely you could build that for way less. So why not have a go? It seems to me that it would require just a few simple components: - USB keyboard - E-ink screen (from an old kindle perhaps) - A controller to run the software - Some form of rechargable battery - A printed case from shapeways - Wifi not really needed, but I do have a spare laptop wireless card sitting around I've built a kit keyboard myself before (Ergodox), but I don't have enough experience to do something like this. Basically what I'm looking for is someone - or preferably, multiple people! - who can help me to work out how to do the things I've never done before. I need to know which board to use, how to hook it up to the screen and how can I design some software (or even better, find something pre-rolled) to act as a very basic text editor which could save the files to a USB drive / CF card. How difficult would this be? Is it even possible? I'm really keen to find out if it is. Any advice appreciated! :)

Topic by hap-scrapper 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


What should I do with this fax machine, electric typewriter, and other junk?

I've got this stuff in the hopes of making something. I have not taken these apart yet, I also have a few adding machines that I saved from the way to the dumpster in the hopes of reuse as robotics and what not.

Question by bramletabercrombie 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


(newsletter) DIY Book Scanner, $50 Laser Cutter, The Eyewriter

  DIY Book Scanner How to Solder The Eyewriter High Power Head Lamp Make a NES PC Word Clock Typewriter Computer Keyboard $50 Laser Cutter Wifi Range Extender Make Your Own Lightning Globe RC Nerf Tank Guitar Tube Amp Guides LED USB DIY CNC

Topic by fungus amungus 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


NPR Article: DIY 'Hackers' Tinker Everyday Things Into Treasure

Just read an interesting article about DIY hacker spaces, and the emerging DIY culture around the country.  I love how NPR has always embraced the DIY community, and recognizes the projects of makers alike.  You can read the article or listen to it here: DIY 'Hackers' Tinker Everyday Things Into Treasure Photo taken from npr.org

Topic by Brennn10 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Turn a 1400c into an external keyboard?

Hello! I have an eccentric buddy who can *only* type on 1400c's keyboards, so he's continuously buying up old ones and working on them.. I believe someone, somewhere should be able to able turn said 1400c into a USB keyboard.One person has told me this is impossible, but from what I've seen here, I don't believe them. Hell, if someone can turn an old typewriter into a USB keyboard... Your esteemed advice, pointers and even links would be jolly appreciated!

Question by 9 years ago


resin for large scale pieces...will it work and where to buy?

I've never used resin before, but have ambitions of encasing a number of 'larger' things in resin than the typical 'something in a paperweight'. i'm looking more along the lines of something in a 18in square block. my first question is, what type of resin can be purchased in large quantities affordably (at the craft store a small can was something like $20..i'd need 50 of these) and secondly, will i have to worry about cracking or any other issues the larger i attempt to go (and if so, is there an alternative to resin which is more conducive to what i'm hoping to do)?  *'larger' = typewriter, log, sneakers...

Topic by jeremiah1223 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


PDF downloads differ from updated content

The problem I face is that the "download" link at the top of my instructables does not download the most recent version of my instructable.  In fact, it appears to download the original version, as seen when it was first published, even after many revisions have been made. I use instructables to host instruction manuals for my kit business. When the instruction manual needs revising, I update the instructable with the necessary information. This is a huge problem, because many customers want to print the instructions from PDF, and because the PDF is not the most recent version of the instructable, so all of these customers have problems assembling my kit. As an example, look at the instructable here: https://www.instructables.com/id/USB-Typewriter/ The "download pdf" link at the top of the page clearly downloads a file with text and pictures totally unlike those in the instructable. Please fix this problem!

Topic by jackzylkin 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


My favorites from the week of 2006-12-04

Ski BikeI'm a real sucker for winter weather contraptions, and this looks like a ton of fun.Pocket TripodI carry around one of those mini tripods on my camera bag, but this looks more useful because of the ability to wrap its legs around objects. I'm sure to make one.Typewriter Computer KeyboardAs someone who takes his keyboard and pointing devices perhaps a little too seriously, this makes me smile.Use firefox drag and drop extension to upload imagesThis will save you so much time and mouse clicks both on and off Instructables.Free Yacht Chapter 7: Get an Even Better One and Fabulize it.Who can get enough of the Free Yacht saga anyway? If you're in the Bay Area, come out for sail with us!

Topic by ewilhelm 12 years ago


How to convert a mini laptop (Netbook) with a broken screen to a workable instrument

Hi everyoneI have a Gigabyte Q1000C which recently fell and busted the monitor. The machine still works fine, other than the battery no longer charging. I would like to convert it into my "writing" machine (I write short stories as a hobby), almost like a typewriter with a screen.The main idea is to purchase a smaller second-hand LCD PC monitor and gutting it to fit into a custom built enclosure, I also need to be able to convert it to a direct-power sourced instrument, thereby bypassing the battery, which I have no clue how to accomplish, my electrical skills are dangerous at best.If there is anyone who could help me with the above-mentioned ideas, I'd be very grateful.The design ideas are either a retro feel, steampunk or cyberpunk vibe.

Question by FrancoisG2 5 weeks ago  |  last reply 5 weeks ago


Comment post-processing does not respect line breaks in PRE-blocks

I have just noticed that the post-processing done when a comment is posted does not respect line breaks included inside ... blocks.  See, for example, my reply to https://www.instructables.com/answers/How-do-I-include-code-in-my-instructable-and-not-h/.  The preformatted text is shown as a single line, but entered it as three lines:   The text seen here   is in fixed format,   sort of like source code. Notice the line breaks, which are respected when I type stuff like the above in the WYSIWYG box (so the tags get converted to </> entities).  Here is exactly the same five lines of text entry pasted into the Source interface: The text seen here is in fixed format, sort of like source code. As I'm looking at it now (in the editor), there are three separate lines, all in typewriter font.  However, when I publish this, that is likely to change...

Topic by kelseymh 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Awesome modifications that would allow a person with severe electromagnetic radiation sensitivity to use a computer?

Here's a challenge: My friend cannot be in the same room as anything emitting electromagnetic radiation, so no computer or phone, but she longs to be in touch with people. She's now limited in contact to her husband and people who come to visit, but is about to move away from the city where we live to a small town with cleaner air (she's also struggling with multiple chemical sensitivity), so will be moving 2.5 hours away from most of her friends. I can imagine some awesome solution that would transition from mechanical technology to digital signals (ie. typewriter keyboard connected to computer in the other room), but I'm not the hacker to do it. Is there anything existing out there? This seems like it would be right up the steampunk folks' alley. Any good ideas? Sources for solutions? Any thoughts that anybody has would be greatly appreciated, and probably put to use. Figuring this out will add significantly to my friend's quality of life...!

Question by 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Awesome modifications that would allow a person with severe electromagnetic radiation sensitivity to use a computer?

This is more of a challenge than a question: ! My friend cannot be in the same room as anything emitting electromagnetic radiation -- no computer or phone -- but she longs to be in touch with people. She's now limited in contact to her husband and people who come to visit, but is about to move away from the city where we live to a small town with cleaner air (she's also struggling with multiple chemical sensitivity), so will be moving 2.5 hours away from most of her friends. I can imagine some awesome solution that would transition from mechanical technology to digital signals (ie. typewriter keyboard connected to computer in the other room), but I'm not the hacker to do it. Is there anything existing out there? This seems like it would be right up the steampunk folks' alley. Any good ideas? Sources for solutions? Any thoughts that you might offer will be greatly appreciated, and probably put to use. Figuring this out will add significantly to my friend's quality of life...!

Question by 9 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Make HID (human interface design) beautiful

There are few ubiquitous household items as ugly in form and function as a computer keyboard. They're everywhere. They're an inefficient and archaic visual distraction, barely suited to stamp ink on dead trees, as they were originally designed to do. Computer components need to be elegant, form well married to specific functionality needs, if computers are to fade into the background of life and thus best support it -  and that is nigh impossible with the keyboard hanging out. I'm a hci software guy. I spent almost three years writing a library of code to enable a new generation of input devices… beautiful, simple  and efficient… closer to playing a musical instrument than typing on a typewriter. I need designs for a piece or two of hardware that shows off how beautiful and/or hidden a computer input device can be when you completely minimize its form… If you are an industrial designer or a mid level maker or even a just a for the fun of it 2d or 3d CAD nerd, allowing for the device functionality will be a trivial concern, with 90% of your attention paid to the form of the device… and that's what I'm looking for… a beautiful replacement for the horrible and outdated keyboard and mouse that shows off the features of the software and blends in to people's lives. The designs will be 5-key and 10-key. The electronics area to allow for will be pretty simple -  probably just an HID chip - as tiny as possible - with ports to wire to buttons, etc -  a power source, wireless connector (preferably low power bluetooth), and wires to connect the chip to everything it needs to connect to. While the designs can be created as completely conceptual, we would prefer to be able to physically prototype them using something like 3d printing, laser cutting or other maker accessible options and electronics components that would also be maker accessible. Preferably, the file format will be solidworks compatible. For now, this is an unpaid gig, with the compensation mainly being in the form of some really sweet portfolio designs, hope for a better HID tomorrow, and maybe a makey makey type gift for those times when nothing but a banana piano will do. We do have investor meetings lined up and will credit any prototype designs used to show off the software during those, as well. If we decide to sell the software in various configurations packaged with hardware variations, and everyone feels like a good time was had by all in this trial run, then we can talk about a production partnership. If that were to be a possibility, industrial design related experience or strong enough to heavily research it type interest - sourcing, packaging, etc. - would be a big bonus. (As a note, while the  HCI is all key input based now, there will later be support for things like 3d tracking options - So, the project could get even more exciting on the HID side.) __________________________________________________ If you are interested in learning more, please use the PM system provided through Instructables as first contact. Further contact info will be provided should the initial contacts merit it. Thanks!

Topic by parrleu 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


McMADSAT make and do, show and tell. Scotland's first Maker Event 2009. Full report

Report of the McMADSAT event 14th March 2009, at the Glasgow Science CentreWe had a fantastic day. Outside it was a grey gale of a day, but inside was a riot of colour and activity. The aim was to enthuse the public with the fun of making things from a variety of technologies. Anyone who wanted to, could join in, make something and take it away with them, and all for free. Hundreds of people of all ages came along and had a great time. A general video of the event can be seen at https://www.instructables.com/community/Mc_MADSAT/ (Thanks to Les Oates for making this excellent film for us).I am happy to discuss further with anyone planning their own event, and you can see more about it and the process by which I got the event going, at http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com/ExhibitorsStar Guest, all the way from London, was Professor Maelstromme (AKA Amanda Scrivener), who brought her beautiful creationsWhat can you make from a dead umbrella? Display of the possibilities for reusing the fabric and structure of dead umbrellas.The Tea Party. 1950s style tea party made from a combination of hand made fabric and edible pieces.Cardboard structures from the students of the department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde.Greensteam's steampunkery, 101 uses for a dead keyboard and other examples of her work as shown on Instructables.The Offline Mechanical Blog – a very old manual typewriter with continuous paper available for the public to type their messages and thoughts on for all to shareLemonie (another Instructables enthusiast, who travelled up from York especially) brought his amazing conversion of a VHS player-into-toaster that makes toast with VHS imprinted in it. He also brought his nice LEGO USB stick, a lantern made out of a tin-can & glass. and his *untested* wind-turbine, made from VHS player parts.On the Young Makers stand we had a display of virtuoso Lego constructions and an extensive collection of home made Steampunkery.The self-replicating machine from the department of Design Manufacture and Engineering Management at the University of Strathclyde, the Reprap, was on display and moving but sadly not reproducing on the day.ActivitiesThe public were offered a wide range of free hands-on activities, which ran continuously all day, to 'Make and Take'Soldering - make a solar theremin (or a robot). 16 of these were made and all worked first time. Some were taken for a trial run in the sun and a video of this can be seen at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzUZMon3vpA The Stemnet ambassadors helped visitors to make their own Musical Straw Oboes.One of the most popular activities – especially with children – the Stemnet ambassadors supervised the making of many handsfull of Gloop.The Stemnet ambassadors used the plastic Polymorph for visitors to make a fingerprint keyring to take away.Fishy things - Busy Bees Art studio provided painting and collage fishes to make, particularly for our very young visitors.The Glasgow Crocheted Coral Reef invited visitors to try their hands at crocheting and contribute to the growing coral reef, all made from wool and even strips of plastic bag. Many total novices not only tried their hands but actually completed a piece of coral to contribute to the reef. This workshop area was very busy throughout, with visitors typically spending 30 minutes or more participating. Many thanks to my civil engineer pal who ran this.House of Cards - visitors could make and take their own set of the design classic 'Eames cards', which slot together to form fantastical structures. Ideal for recycling old greetings cards.Cable necklets, keyboard bracelets and keyboard film wallets. All made from recycled/repurposed materials from dead keyboards. Popular with adults and children alike.Risk assessments were provided to the Glasgow science centre, for all the activities. There were no injuries and the 'emergency first aid bucket of water' was not needed as there were no soldering or gluegun burns.Participant Presenters30 people were involved on the day, either as exhibitors or as workshop facilitators. An essential component of the team was the group of11 Stemnet ambassadors, most of whom were there all day. It would have been impossible to run so many activities without them. Another group in the team was the members of the Glasgow Electron Club who, with some friends and a Stemnet ambassador, ran the soldering workshops continuously all day. We were particularly fortunate to have two exhibitors travel up specially to take part. Several exhibitors were entrepreneurs who gave their time for nothing, even though the venue rules meant they could not sell anything, nor charge for the activities being provided. This was especially generous given the harsh financial climate just now. Everyone said they had lots of fun.PublicOver 1,000 people visited the Glasgow Science Centre on the day. The BSA/NSEW assessment forms collected only represent <10% of the visitors to the McMADSAT area. Stallholders and workshop facilitators estimated a total of about 425 active participants (people who did an activity, or asked questions and generally interacted with the displays) by 1530 (GSC shuts at 1700). However, even these only represent a proportion of the people visiting the event which, although not recorded, probably amount to about double that, since most of the activities were taken up by children accompanied by other family members. The numbers at any given time were variable, depending upon the GSC's own activities/talks etc. I would estimate that the McMADSAT area was visited by at least 700-800 during the day. From the few assessment forms returned, and from chatting to the public, it was clear that most had come simply because they were coming to the GSC anyway, but some (mainly young adults) had come as a result of internet and email information or because of the Metro article. The GSC visitors seem to be mainly families with children of primary school age. The University of Glasgow Steampunk Society had come especially to make contact with the steampunk element, as featured in the Metro article. We also collected some contact details for future events. BudgetThe total budget for the event was the £500 grant provided from NSEW Scotland scheme. This had to cover all the exhibitors' costs and the costs for the free make and take activities, plus all publicity etc.In-Kind Sponsors:The Glasgow Science Centre provided free space, tables, cloths, technical assistance, without which the event would not have been possible at all.The publishers of Make and Craft magazines, O'Reilly's, did not feel able to sponsor us in the same extent as they did for the much larger event in Newcastle on the same day, but did send boxes of back issues of their magazines to give away, which probably amounted to an equivalent of about £300 at UK newsstand prices.Clockworkrobot.com provided more theremin kits than contracted for, which were themselves at cost price.Madlabs provided free batteries for all the kits they supplied at cost.Instructables.com assisted with publicity and allowed the use of their logo.VenueNone of this would have been possible at all, particularly on this minimal budget, without the kindness of the Glasgow Science Centre. The Director agreed immediately to offer us the space free, plus the use of tables and technical help to enable this event to take place. We were able to partially set up the night before which was very helpful in avoiding a scramble on the day. We were able to get the loan of 4 GSC soldering irons which avoided us having to get personal ones PAT tested. This was the ideal venue for us as it meant we really didn’t have to do a great deal of publicity as we could be sure of an audience from the GSC's normal throughput.PublicityThe event was listed in the NSEW diary and in the university of Strathclyde's NSEW information. Posters were distributed around venues in Glasgow and information posted on relevant websites. A blogspace http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com was set up as a temporary web presence to refer people to. The Metro published a small piece which was a wonderful boost.Lessons for the futureNeeded more helpers and more exhibitors. Outdoor displays would have been impossible as the weather was dreadful, but it is still necessary to have some more dramatic displays as well as the hands on activities. Successful soldering for novices really needs 1:1 or 1:2 supervision. The budget only worked because minimal publicity was done at low cost and all the participant presenters were generous with their time and resources. Anything more ambitious than what was done on this occasion would need a larger organising team and significant sponsorship.

Topic by greensteam 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago