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The proper circuit for ultrasonic transmitters?

Hello I am new with ultrasonic sensor related works. This time i am going to use ultrasonic transducers which are not ultrasonic sensors(with board module) that people use. I have there transducers named v33an16t and arduino uno module. So i need a proper circuit to connect these transmitters to the arduino module.I can find many circuits from google but i need the proper one to save my time.Because my purpose is to design machine learning method using the transmitters. And the reason why i did not buy ultrasonic module is that i would increase the number of transmitters like an array. Also shape of the array may be changed depending on my research.So to save my time by avoiding building various of circuits i need your help to build the proper circuit.I appreciate any comment.

Question by 박사강    |  last reply


Ultrasound 3D positioning

How would you use an array of ultrasonic sensors to determine the 3d position of an ultrasonic transmitter. Basically i want an ultrasound transmitter on my hand that gets picked up on an array of 5 or so receivers that outputs the position via usb.

Topic by redshirtdeath    |  last reply


<5mm distance sensing, <100micron accuracy, GUI, RasPi or Arduino?

Hi there, I am trying to keep my hardware/ coding skills alive and spruce up my bicycle wheel truing stand. I need to figure out the required hardware + software for the following: I want to build a non-contact distance measurement sensor system and get the output "into" my computer for display in a graphical user interface. I know I could omit the latter step with going directly onto a mini-LCD screen, but trying to use this a learn-another-programming-language learning experience (I've coded Matlab galore, pondering Python for this project). General system components: Sensor - [something - RasPi or Arduino I guess] - laptop (running debian) - GUI displaying continuous sensor reading Sensor: I've web-searched the hell out of this, but not finding anything quite answering my questions. I want to continuously measure the distance from the sensor to a bicycle wheel rim braking surface. Material is aluminium, shiny, though not smooth. Biggest problem with the web-search is being swamped by proximity sensor results (on/off) rather than a distance proportional output signal and much lower resolution projects. I rule out IR or optical sensing, now stuck between ultrasonic and inductive sensing, though tending to the latter for a faster response/adjustment to change time. Sensor criteria (other than reasonable $$): - total sensing range: ca.5mm - sensing accuracy 10 to 100micron/ 0.01 to 0.1mm - don't ask if that's needed, a bit of overkill, I know, but a bit of OCD doesn't do any harm, eh? - fast-ish sampling rate (so that when I turn the wheel, the number on the screen updates nice and fast, guess >25Hz is sufficient). [Something - RasPi or Arduino]: I know that I could omit the laptop GUI part (mini-LCD, LED array, etc), but keen to learn/ practice a little Python with this project, so I guess I am tending to the RasPi, but I am open minded. All I want is the analogue sensor out to end up as a digital reading "inside" my computer to be passed to my GUI as a reading. Essentially a mini A2D converter. Not fussed whether the output is in actual distance units or in arbitrary units/ current units (I guess the sensors put out a proportional current signal?). GUI: Depending on the above, how do I best get the signal "into" a Python program? A moderate fast sample rate >25Hz should suffice.  Any help with this would be greatly appreciated! LaserCycle

Topic by lasercycle    |  last reply


Ultrasonic cavitation as way to create impossible alloys?

I played around with ultrasonics now for a while and noticed that when it comes to certain things then logic seems no longer to apply.In the normal household you might find some ultrasonic cleaner and that's about it.A few people might have some distance measuring device or sensor array somewhere.As far as the normal human is concerned that is more than enough ;)Playing with certain metals like Bismuth or Gallium is not only but also a nice way to create nice alloys that you can play with even more.Take a portable and simple hydrogen supply as an example.Just make an alloy with lots of aluminium and a small amount of gallium.Cut it into strips, blocks or grind into a powder if you dare.Either way you just add water in a sealed container and get lots of pure hydrogen.The waste product is aluminium oxide, which has additional uses.The gallium itself is not affected by the reaction and can be reused many times.However, with some metals things are just different.As you might know it is hard to impossible to create certain alloys and other wouldn't make any sense.For example an alloy made from Calcium and iron...One of the big problems with alloys is that you need to have both metals in a molten form, then mix them properly and hope it turns out as planned.And well, if the metals in question just on't want to combine we cheat by using slats as a flux for example or by blowing hydrogen through the molten mix to act as a sacrificial binder until the metal cools down.Through ultrasonic cavitation we can not only clean surface, the same effect also destroys cells as the power from the implosion and the intense heat is more than what a cell can handle.There are even tests now to determine how safe and effective it would be to sterilise hospital equippment.A few seconds in an ultrasonic bath would safe the hours in the autoclave...On an industrial scale ultrasonic vibrations are used to weld plastic parts - like the head and tail lights on modern cars or just sealed plastic housings of any kind.With all this in mind my experiments with ultrasonic soldering made me wonder...Science papers state that that for example ceramics are not actually soldered.Appearently it is again hydrogen bonds provided by the ceramic or trapped air inside that provide the means to stick permantly.There is also an effect based on the implosion of the cavitation bubble.Here the solder literally is shot at well aboce ultrsonic speeds onto the surface of the ceramic.Together with the vacuum effect the solder is then pushed into the tiniest of cracks and cavities.Surface tension and other effects finally prevent the solder from just flowing off like it would do if we use just heat.What it means is that there is no real soldering at all happening.In reality it is like millions of big hydraulic presses would push the molten metal onto the surface.Going back to the fun of Gallium with Aluminium....Aluminium does not really go to well with steel.And gallium does not that good with steel either.Melting an Aluminium-gallium alloy is quite simple.With an excess of Gallium in the mix it should be possible to add fine steel powder (steel, not iron!).Of course it would neither mix well nor really melt at these low temperatures.With ultrasoic cavitation however we could force the stuff to not only mix but also create the same effect as used by ultrasonic soldering.The additional metals and minerals in a steel alloy should hopefully prevent any unwanted reactions in the final step...If the steel powder is ine enough then the assimilation of the steel into the aluminium-gallium mix would result in the breakdown of the steel.Once cooled and hard again the big question what would happen if we let water attack it?In theory all aluminium would react to form aluminium oxide and aluminium hydroxide.The gallium again would not be affected and as it is also bound to the steel should form a nice gallium-steel alloy.But what hapens to the voids where the aluminium was???The alloy would either be only affected on the surface or through cavitation and time all aluminium would be transformed.In the best scenario we would get a steel-gallium sponge where the voids are filled with alumium oxide.Forging such a mix could result in a ceramic steel..... !?? ;)Imagine a safe...There is always forceful ways to get in.Like drilling or using a big angle grinder.The pro might use a magnesium torch rod though....The common approach to improve penetration resistance is by filling a space between the outside and inside walls of a safe.Whatever you can imagine that is nightmare for your tools can be used, like thick glass plates, hardened steel bits, carbide studs, concrete with glass fibres....But even diamond tipped tools would already struggle if the steel itself would contain high amounts of a hard ceramic like aluminium oxide.The remaining gallium would also cause very high friction and through this heat - which these tools really can't stand unless you can provide water cooling as well.With the right balance of aluminium and gallium most of the original properties the steel had can be preserved.Just and idea though....

Topic by Downunder35m  


how xbee serial work?

Hello i read ultrasonic sensor serial connected to arduino but when i connect xbee between sensor and arduino and i configur my and dl matching and same id what i need to config else i work on 3,3v what i need to do to make it same as i read direct from sonar . this is my code reading from sonar and convert to distance ,i need same work on 2 xbee between sonar and arduino. #include SoftwareSerial mySerial(8, 9,true); // RX, TX int BW=4; char *buffer; byte x; char array[3]; int counter=0; void setup() {   // put your setup code here, to run once:   // set the data rate for the SoftwareSerial port   Serial.begin(9600);   mySerial.begin(9600);   pinMode(BW,OUTPUT);   digitalWrite(BW,LOW);   delay(250);   Serial.println("Calibrartion Cycle ");   delay(150); } void reading(){   mySerial.println(1); while (mySerial.available()) {    x= mySerial.readBytes(buffer,1);    if(*buffer==0x52){    x= mySerial.readBytes(buffer,1);    array[0]=*buffer;    x= mySerial.readBytes(buffer,1);    array[1]=*buffer;    x= mySerial.readBytes(buffer,1);    array[2]=*buffer;    } } delayMicroseconds(220); } void loop() {   // put your main code here, to run repeatedly:   reading();   int Final_inch=(array[0]-48)*100 + (array[1]-48)*10 +(array[2]-48) ;   float Final_cm=Final_inch*2.54;   Serial.print(Final_inch);   Serial.println(" Inch ");   Serial.print(Final_cm);   Serial.println(" cm ");   delay(200); }

Question by adiga123    |  last reply


Distance between two electronic systems sensor for the Arduino

Hello. I've been thinking about this for months and haven't figured out how to do it... Don't be frightened by the wall of text, it's a VERY entertaining read! You'll fall down laughing! ______________ The basics: Imagine two systems: A and B. Both A and B use the Arduino as their "heart". I want A and B to know, at all times, the distance between them. The distance is 3-dimensional, ie, it doesn't matter if A is in front of B, if A is on top of B, etc. The distance ranges from about 10cm to 2m. It's not that strict, though. Something around that... The final project (which is not the sensor; the sensor is just a piece of it, just like the Arduino or an LED or a resistor) is a gift, so it has to be 'good-looking'. Because of that, the sensor has to be as inconspicuous as possible. Problem 1: Linear solutions can't be used, like Infrared LEDs or Ultrasonds. Besides being too linear (which makes sensing in 3 dimensions too hard and expensive because of the use of arrays of LEDs or sound generators), the only way (that I came up with) they could be used is this (because it can't be based on reflections): 1- A emits signal (IR modulation or Ultrasonic frequence) and starts timer (microcontroller function). 2- B receives signal. B waits 2 milliseconds. B emits signal (different from the signal emitted by A, so they don't get messed up). 3- A receives signal and stops the timer. A then calculates the distance through a simple formula. That's how A would know the distance between itself and B. B would do exactly the same thing to know the distance between itself and A, but with signals different from those used by A (so they wouldn't get messed up). This is infeasible because: Using IR, every millisecond (the smallest unit of time a general microcontroller can measure) is equivalent to 30,000,000cm (or 300,000km or 186,400 miles). Using sound, every millisecond is equivalent to 34cm (or 13.4 inches). With such a short distance range (10cm to 2m), 34cm is too much, which makes the sensor incredibly inaccurate. Problem 2: Using the sensor with the Arduino The sensor would have to output something to let the Arduino know the distance so that I could then do stuff like: If distance is between 0 and 20cm, do this. If distance is between 21 and 50cm, do that. If distance is 51 and 200cm, do that. Else do nothing. etc. :) Problem 3: It has to be simple (and cheap) I'm no programmer nor do I know a lot about electronics. I'm a simple hobbyist with the dream to finish this project, so it can't be overly complex. :) So, after reading this wall of text, what do you think I could use? Do you know any wireless technology that lets me do this? Oh, sorry about claiming it would be a fun read.. It was the only way I found to make you ACTUALLY read this. :p THANK YOU! :D

Question by pedrotome    |  last reply


Sub-mm precision ultrasonic or inductive distance sensor for use with Raspberry Pi?

Hi there, I am trying to keep my hardware/ coding skills alive and spruce up my bicycle wheel truing stand. I need to figure out the required hardware + software for the following: I want to build a non-contact distance measurement sensor system and get the output "into" my computer for display in a graphical user interface. I know I could omit the latter step with going directly onto a mini-LCD screen, but trying to use this a learn-another-programming-language learning experience (I've coded Matlab galore, pondering Python for this project). General system components: Sensor - [something - RasPi or Arduino I guess] - laptop (running debian) - GUI displaying continuous sensor reading Sensor: I've web-searched the hell out of this, but not finding anything quite answering my questions. I want to continuously measure the distance from the sensor to a bicycle wheel rim braking surface. Material is aluminium, shiny, though not smooth. Biggest problem with the web-search is being swamped by proximity sensor results (on/off) rather than a distance proportional output signal and much lower resolution projects. I rule out IR or optical sensing, now stuck between ultrasonic and inductive sensing, though tending to the latter for a faster response/adjustment to change time. Sensor criteria (other than reasonable $$): - total sensing range: ca.5mm - sensing accuracy 10 to 100micron/ 0.01 to 0.1mm - don't ask if that's needed, a bit of overkill, I know, but a bit of OCD doesn't do any harm, eh? - fast-ish sampling rate (so that when I turn the wheel, the number on the screen updates nice and fast, guess >25Hz is sufficient). [Something - RasPi or Arduino]: I know that I could omit the laptop GUI part (mini-LCD, LED array, etc), but keen to learn/ practice a little Python with this project, so I guess I am tending to the RasPi, but I am open minded. All I want is the analogue sensor out to end up as a digital reading "inside" my computer to be passed to my GUI as a reading. Essentially a mini A2D converter. Not fussed whether the output is in actual distance units or in arbitrary units/ current units (I guess the sensors put out a proportional current signal?). GUI: Depending on the above, how do I best get the signal "into" a Python program? A moderate fast sample rate >25Hz should suffice. Any help with this would be greatly appreciated!

Question by lasercycle    |  last reply


Food Creator and dispensor

This project is currently in the research stage. Having been reading the books 'Zero to Maker' by David Lang (OpenROV) and 'The Toaster Project' by Thomas Thwaites I have realised what I need is a project with a goal to take me out of the Arduino blinky light and solder kit zone, in to real making/hacking. Lang suggests an 'Unknown Project' which as I understand it is one that has been unexplored or under-explored, and he also suggests that using a popular forum to log, share and discus ideas would help the process along. So my idea, is an open hardware food creating machine, that will produce a large array of food, from a limited array of ingredients (approx 50) that can be made easily, and a ingredient markup language. 3d food printers in current development are either impractical or unappealing to me. They range from candy makers, ones that still need to be hand finished and cooked or the one publicised for receiving NASA funding recently used dead bugs. They seem all to focus on the gimmick, and not the food, and I like food. The other approach is the barbots, which seem to mostly perform flawlessly, but are unable to produce food. So my approach is to work through the process logically and break it down to sub projects. Design meals by hand using the limited ingredients for proof of concept, choose the ingredients to provide the widest possible range of nutrients and transpose the recipies to psudocode that can be easilly transformed in to a markup language later. Design a process for mixing and cooking ingredients. I envision a system of different food processors, steamers, boilers etc. and a range of extruding dies. Design a self cleaning system. Possibly ultrasonic or ionic. To that end, here is my preliminary list of ingredients. sugar, salt, oil, water, co2,Alcohol 37.5%,pectin,bicarb,nutritional yeast coffee,tea,mint,cocoa,garlic,oregano,chilli powder, paprika rice,soya,corn,wheat lemon extract,orange extract,tomato powder,dried apple,dried carrots,dried peas,potato powder. These ingredients can be used to make among other things, sausages, burgers, curry's, pasta, fries, soups, cereals, 'cider', cocktails, deserts, sodas, sauces, egg cheese and milk substitutes. So that's my plan. What do you guy think, and what ingredients would you add and why? And what would you call it? There are loads of things I left out as everything will change as I work through the process. Thanks for reading, Haydn

Topic by HaydnJones    |  last reply