The indestructable bike lock! ...Idea

The indestructable bike lock: the forum topic that was posted undeniably just to annoy the future patenters!So I had this weird idea for a product come out of nowhere. Y'know how aluminum is supposed to make cutting wheels on an angle grinder gum up, stick, and shatter - when trying to cut it, that is? I was wondering, what if a company engineered a special type of aluminum alloy or a similar material that would do just that: gum up abrasive cutting wheels and make them stick/bind and shatter. Then like with layers of plywood, it would be sandwiched together with hardened steel, in the shape of a U-lock bike lock, making it: Impossible to cut through with a hacksaw, reciprocating saw, TCT bladed portaband , because it's hardened and would wreck the teeth. Impossible to cut through with an angle grinder or rotary tool with an abrasive wheel because the aluminum would gum it up. Impossible to cut through it with bolt cutters - obviously... Impossible to freeze it with freezing gas? I don't know. I heard that's what thieves do. Maybe that aluminum alloy would be a super-insulator and wouldn't allow the hardened steel layer to freeze and become more brittle?I think it might just be invincible until the portable cordless battery powered waterjet is invented!Thoughts?

Topic by Yonatan24   |  last reply


$2 Dollar Bike lock.

I have recently been searching for a cheap bike lock or a way to make one. Yesterday I went to a garage sale with my friend, what we found there where combination locks for $1 dollar each. I quickly bought one, and then the lady asked what I needed it for. I told her now I just needed to buy some chain and I wouldnt have to sped a lot of money on a bike lock. She out of nowhere handed me the chain and let me have it for $1. Well anyway thats how I acquired it but does anybody know if theese locks can be picked or if the chain can be broken. The chain is in moderatly good condition and is as thick as the stuff used for swings. I dont have a pictrue because my camera needs batteries

Topic by Matt21497   |  last reply



Challenge: A key defroster for opening bike locks in winter.

Hello all.So I live in Montreal, winter is long here. Every morning opening our bike locks is problematic. We fixed it partially with lube, but this post is not about these solutions.I have been looking for a device that could heat the frozen core of the lock. You can see an image attached of a product not available anymore to get the idea. I guess it was not working very well...I have zero knowledge in electronics/electricity. I thought this question could be interesting/challenging for some of you. So ideally the gadget would be:Small enough to be carried on the key chain or in a commute bag.Able to be inserted in any type of locksBuilt with a safe way to prevent unwanted switch on (to avoid burning bags/pockets/houses...Lol)Able to produce enough heat to defrost the lock Rechargeable would be best (USB best best), capacity of 5mn maybe to operate twice a day...Reasonably quick to unfreeze the lock, so you don t freeze yourself (That s why I abandon using hot pouches around the lock, pouring hot water will fix it quickly but then it will freeze again)As I said, I don t have the skills to even begin to find a solution, but I saw a lot of smart stuff here and I am curious to see what you guys would answer to that. My guess is that it must be very difficult, if not I can t see why a similar product is not widely commercialized. I think a lot of people would buy it.Thanks for the reading, I hope I picked your interest. Have a good day.

Topic by Ericmont   |  last reply


How do you install a mounting bracket for a surelock u-lock bicycle lock?

How do you put the mounting bracket for a u-lock on the seat stem of your bike?

Question by hpalmer2013   |  last reply


how do i use a mounting brackets which come with the lock i just bought?

I bought a U and Coil lock for my bicycle, which come together with 2 mounting brackets. What is the used for these brackets actually? Do i need to use them with the lock?

Question by    |  last reply


Need help choosing a good bike lock?

So I have this really nice 2010 specialized mountain bike, and I need a good bike lock for it. I have looked into making a chain lock, but I don't feel so good about it. right now I'm looking at both the Kryptonite evolution mini U lock and the Kryptonite New York Fahgettaboutit mini U lock. both seem to have their ups and downs. the new york is considered the most secure lock in the world, but seems to be heavy and more expensive. the evolution is cheaper, but had been known to be able to break into with a pen. I can't really choose between the two. any suggestions? aslo I would like to hear of other good locks also. preferably sold secure gold. Thanks. *sorry to be picky.

Question by frisbeechamp1983   |  last reply


Bicycle security!

Hey hey, so the other day i came up with a way that i thought might work well for a bicycle security...thing. anyways, since just about all bikes are made of metal, except the carbon ones, and metal conducts electricity, what if you had some way of making your bike, electrically charged? i guess (i dont know all the proper words heh) so if a person comes up to your bike and wants to take it, at some point in the process of taking your bike, he would come in contact with some metal part and get shocked. i thought if you made it properly, and made the shock strong enough, it would be a great way to keep your bike safe...cause i know if i went to take someones bike, and all of a sudden i get zapped all of a sudden every time i touch the bike, i would not want that bike! i figured you'd need some batteries with enough voltage to give him a good shock, enough to make him not want to take the bike, but not so much that you would kill him...that obviously would not be good.  but i'd imagine that more powerful batteries might be to big, and not fit anywhere on your bike. i thought that maybe you could hide everything in the seat tube after you take the seat post out, and maybe have a hidden switch somewhere on the bike so you could turn it off. im sure there's more issues i havent thought over, just an idea, and im far from an electrical expert, so i dont know how rubber shoes might ground the person, or how you would go about wiring it, and other stuff like that. i just wanted to see what some people here thought about it, and if it is even possible for me to do

Topic by sirshmoopy   |  last reply


Preventing Kicked-in Bike Wheels?

After purchasing the toughest bike lock I could find, I got the wheels kicked in by a frustrated would-be thief who could only get through the plastic coating with whatever tool he was using. (he incidentally got all of the other bikes locked up outside my dorm.) The closest lockers are a 30 min walk away, and they only allow for a small, easily cut padlock. I have an uncharacteristically small dorm room, so racking it in my room isn't really plausible. Any ideas? Maybe a couple of spokes reinforced with steel bar, or a cheap homemade bike shed?

Topic by langleyLGLF   |  last reply


Bike pump problem?

I was using my bike pump today to fill a pneumatic launcher, and finally I just got fed up with the leaking around the pump base. On every stroke, the first 3/4 of air would be leaked out of the base, and it would only compress the remaining 1/4 of air remaining, and that would only compress if you pushed down very hard, and quickly, otherwise it all leaked out. And no matter what pressure the launcher was pressureized to, the pump handle/piston would slide down slowly, getting pushed down under it's own weight, meaning that there was almost no resistance to it. I think the leak is occuring where the tube meets the pump base, and you can feel air rush out with your legs as you pump. I'm pretty sure there is a one way valve in the gauge portion of the pump, which connects to the base with a hose,  and the filling hose is coming out of it, which is allowing me to compress at least a little air before the rest leaks out. I disassembled  the pump, starting with the base. Turns out, the leak was from an oring on the tube which was not tightened down enough by a screw on ring around the base of the tube. Put it back together, and voila, pushing my finger against the schrader valve connector and pushing down on the pump handle created pressure against my finger and no leaking. As soon as I hooked it up to my launcher, i realized something was up, I could pump down once, but the pump handle just got pushed upwards as soon as i let go. This is what I can't figure out how to fix. It seems the one way valve in the gauge portion is locked in the open position. Anybody know how to fix this? EDIT: Okay I took pictures of the pieces. I now cannot figure out if the valve is in the base, or the gauge portion, so i have included pics of both. Hopefully someone can help me figure this out. EDIT 2: Turns out the valve is in the base, and the ball just fell out when i first disassembled it, i have now found the ball and it is working fine.

Question by LiquidLightning   |  last reply


Is it a crime to padlock someone's belongings?

Examples: locking someones backpack/suitcase zippers together, thus impossible to open adding an extra lock to someones bike at a bike rack so they can't unlock their bike etc. is it illegal?  or just extremely annoying/inconvenient to the recipient?

Question by guyfrom7up   |  last reply


Key Fob for a Bicycle

Hello all! I'm going to be shopping for a bicycle here in a week or two, and based on a conversation I had with someone I'd like to know if anyone has done this, or if it's even possible: Making a key fob for a bicycle. Even though having a locking mechanism on a bike itself is a dumb idea I'd just like it for kicks. Y'know, after I've chained up my bike somewhere outside a store, turn around and "lock" it like a car as I'm walking away. Seems possible, but I just don't know how to go about this. Anyone have any ideas? Thanks for your time and effort!

Topic by Energyzed   |  last reply


magnetic bike pedals DIY? Answered

I'm Brainstorming a better magnetic pedal .   I know Proton and Mavic already make them But I'd like to have a Mag-Pedal that can be used with any shoe .    ... IDEA:  Using recycled neodymium magnets glued recessed into a gel insole  and magnets on pedals I'm hoping to make it easier than cleats on special shoes.  Of course you won't get the locked in power of straps or clippless cleats .This would be ideal for mud,gravel, quick commuting on regular bikes,bmx,mtb,people who what some full leg power on the up stroke but want to put your foot anywhere on the pedal you want.  Question: Might there be extra bearing ware from magnets?  Will there be enough magnetism through an inch of rubber to work??   Please critique my idea . 

Question by BtheBike   |  last reply


How To Prevent Brakes From Being Stolen?

I just had both set of brakes stolen off my mountain bike. Cost me about $80 to have them replaced. Is there any way I can lock the brakes to the bike so they can't be stolen again?

Question by    |  last reply


Ignition switch for an electric bike in the UK.

Hi folks. Does anyone in the UK know a dealer who could supply an ignition switch/battery lock for a Thompson Classic electric bike? I've had a look around the interweb & ebay & cannot find a suitable replacement switch anywhere, there are plenty that would fit but none of them seem to be the correct one as they only have one "On" position the one I need has two, one is for pedal assisted & the second for fully powered. The switch also locks the battery box onto the frame it looks similar to the larger of these two on ebay. I have called the importers & their quote for a replacement carries an outrageous price compared to the third party ones I have seen at over eight times the price plus postage & although I expect to pay a bit more for a slightly more complex part I certainly don't expect it to be THAT MUCH more. I'm sure there must be other bikes that use similar switches but haven't as yet been able to find a dealer who can help. Any suggestions would be gratefully received. Thanks in advance for your help. N.G.

Question by Nostalgic Guy   |  last reply


Ignition switch for an electric bike in the UK.

Hi folks. Does anyone in the UK know a dealer who could supply an ignition switch/battery lock for a Thompson Classic electric bike? I've had a look around the interweb & ebay & cannot find a suitable replacement switch anywhere, there are plenty that would fit but none of them seem to be the correct one as they only have one "On" position the one I need has two, one is for pedal assisted & the second for fully powered. The switch also locks the battery box onto the frame it looks similar to the larger of these two on ebay. I have called the importers & their quote for a replacement carries an outrageous price compared to the third party ones I have seen at over eight times the price plus postage & although I expect to pay a bit more for a slightly more complex part I certainly don't expect it to be THAT MUCH more. I'm sure there must be other bikes that use similar switches but haven't as yet been able to find a dealer who can help. Any suggestions would be gratefully received. Thanks in advance for your help. N.G.

Topic by Nostalgic Guy 


Collapsible bike camper trailer

A friend of mine once told me about a camper that his grandfather had built for his truck. It was about 8x4 and folded out to hold a kitchen, a living space, a batheroom, 2 single bunks, a hammock, and a queen sized air mattress. It was made on a wooden base with canvas for the expansion. I don't really understand the details, but it and stumbleupon gave me a marvelous idea (see picture below for stumbleupon's imput). I would like to design a bike trailer that uses two bike wheels and is about 3' tall by 4' long  by 2' wide when collapsed, excluding tires and tire attachments. It would fold out with a tent material for walls, and be about 6' by 8' by 4', respectively. I don't know a whole lot about how to support it, but i was thinking something that would slide out on rails, or collapsible poles which would have poles that could come down to an adjustable length at all the corners, then lock as to provide added stability. A problem i foresee is the tires getting in the way of folding out, so i might want it to be 4' wide to start with and then not have to deal with expanding that way, and just have a method to extend it lengthwise. I'll be posting an instructable on it when i finish, but i would like some community input on the project as i'm working on it. Flaws in my plan, materials that would be useful, experience in sewing materials, things to consider are all welcome. I'll also upload pictures of my designs as i go through them. Thanks for reading, and i hope you comment. Unless you just read the end. Then you're lame.

Topic by mister2   |  last reply


How NOT to Secure Your Ride

It's good to learn about the best way to keep your ride secure. The only time I've had anything stolen from my bike in several years in San Francisco was because I was lazy and didn't lock up my wheels with a cable. I figured that they were crappy wheels and weren't worth much, but he replacement cost for a new set sucked and they never rode as well as the first. Live and learn.Speaking of which, here are some great locking mistakes that mostly apply to cars. I wonder where these are from because I've never seen anyone do stuff like this in the States ever. 15 Strange Moments In Anti-Theftvia Neatorama

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


How to arm a British nuclear bomb

All you need is a single bike-lock key - no codes, no Presidential authorisation.[http://customersupport@cpwplc.com Watch the video]Read the article.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Does any one know how to couple a fine thread 6mm bolt to a non-metric one of approximately the same diameter?

I am trying to construct a bike powered blender and need to build a new drive shaft for it. I have plenty of threaded rod to use for the drive shaft, however it is all English and the head of the drive shaft, the piece that locks into the base of the blender and spins the blade, is threaded to fit a 6mm fine thread bolt, of which I've found a short one, but what I really really!! need to be able to do is connect the threaded metric bolt to an English threaded rod. Thanks

Question by swupuws   |  last reply


Unique Way to Get Around A University Campus

Hey there Instructables Community! I've used this site for years and years for everything from building my computer, making a crossbow, to feeding myself even this day at my University. Now speaking of which, the University of South Florida has a wonderful landscape. Plenty of paved walkways, foliage, and mild inclines here and there. The top 3 most common methods of getting about seem to be Walking, Longboards, and Biking. Now my question is: What sort of unique device or contraption could I fabricate for getting around campus?  I've come across custom decks for skateboards and recumbent bikes, but they just don't really give me that creative spark to make it. I want something unique and practical, let's not forget there are a few good slopes here and there I have to overcome. I'm a very fit individual so stamina won't be a hindrance in what I'll be willing to make, although funds are tight. It also has to be something I can either lock up at a bike rack, or carry into class and place it along a wall or carry it up stairs if I can't lock it up outside. Thanks for any advice, suggestions, tips, and such! P.S. Although it may be a bit off topic from the Rides sub-forum, here's my latest creation thank to Instructables! http://tinypic.com/r/217bqa/5

Topic by PatentPending   |  last reply


Park Tool Bike Month Winners Announced

Instructables and Park Tool are happy to announce the winners of the Park Tool Bike Month. We asked you to show your love and support of bikes and you all did with some amazing Instructables.As per usual, we wish we had more prizes to give out because there were so many deserving Instructables. The 20 winners below are all worth checking out as are many more of the entries. If you haven't had time to look through them all, do it now. The weather is warm, gas is expensive, and you should be out pedaling. Seriously.On with the winners with each group presented in random order. Voting Prize The authors of these Instructables will each an I-Beam Mini Fold Up HexWrench / Screwdriver Set from Park Tool and an Instructables Robot t-shirt. Seriously Comfortable Bike Saddle Bike blender for less than $25 FlashBack whippersnipper motor Basic Bike tricks and Skills Judges Prize The authors of these Instructables will each an I-Beam Mini Fold Up HexWrench / Screwdriver Set from Park Tool and an Instructables Robot t-shirt. Crush All Those Who Stand Before You Trickle charging auto-switching LED helmet How To End Bike Theft Bicycle Survival Kit Solar Powered Trike Runners-UpHow to Build a $10 Bicycle Whip Light: Be seen and be safe by Mr. Rig It Repainting An Old Bicycle by Dr.Paj A bike trailer? That's unheard of! by MN218 Bike Generator by dbc1218 Cell phone battery powered bike lights by chargeman fischertechnik Bicycle by ftking_83702 Safety Penny Fakething by Wobbly John Add a bluetooth adapter to your GPS device by Sudija How to lock your nice bike up at work by joe wiper glove by mikeasaurus

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


Guerilla Knitting

There is a lot more knitting out there beyond the standard stitching that is crazy and wild and even a bit subversive. Some of it is called knit graffiti like at knittaplease.com and some of it just likes to be more playful and make bizarre and fun new objects. In San Francisco there was a guy who would wrap abandoned bikes and bike locks with thick and chunky yarn. It was a beautiful way to reclaim what was a pretty grim reminder that bike theft is prevalent here.I may not be compelled to learn how to cast on and make some stuff of my own, but you have to respect the people who feel compelled to take the craft and keep on running with it.To find out more, check out this article on we-make-money-not-art.com to read some history, watch a video discussing current issues, and see some cool examples of the styles.

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


(newsletter) Wireless Power, Bike-Powered USB Charger, 6 Cent Throwie...

Sign-up for this newsletter: Welcome back! Get the LED Out! Contest - New contest! Enter any Instructable that involves LEDs and win some amazing lights from Monkeylectric! Mother's Day Contest - Closes for entries on Sunday! Make something special for Mom and win a sewing machine from Singer! Vote for the entries in the Earthjustice United States of Efficiency Contest to help decide who will win a MacBook Pro! Vote now!Help the Robot travel in our Cutout Contest. Post your photos and get a patch!Become a fan of Instructables on Facebook and get updates from the Robot. Laptop Bubble Stand Charge any USB Device with Your Bike Build a Woodworker's Workbench Pie in a Jar Make it glow, and win Monkeylectric lights! Closes for entries this Sunday! Wireless Power Web Based Water Metering 3D Anamorphic Street Art The LED Lightbulb Felt eeePC / netbook Pouch for $8 3D-Printed Combination Lock Make a Diamond Engagement Ring Make a Solar iPod/iPhone Charger Get outside! Vote for your favorites! No-Sew Duct Tape Zipper Pouch Portable 12V 17 Watt Wind Generator 6 Cent LED Throwie Urban Prospecting Detector Sign-up for this newsletter:

Topic by fungus amungus 


Attachable wheels for any shoes? Answered

Every day on my way to and from school I have to walk a long way to the bus stop, and i often come too late because i miss the bus. the way is asphalt-only, but there are some small stones on the sidewalk too. I was wondering if I could build a jig attachable to any shoe that had 3 or more wheels on it, so I could skate to the bus stop and not be late. The wheel jig should be able to hold quite some weight because of my backpack and should be able to fit inside it for me to take it to school. I cant take a skateboard or scooter because I don't have any and it's not allowed to chain it to the bus stop and I don't even have a lock or a bike. I have access to the local skateboard shop as well as the hardware store and a Tailor and carpenter too (if leather or string or even wood is needed), and also to the local supermarket. Thanks!!

Question by sky0   |  last reply


How I turned my Huffy BMX into a great stunt machine- and a question about decals

An ongoing project- the lost Huffy.chapter 1- Why people will think this is funnychapter 2- How I got itchapter 3- How I did itchapter 4- a questionChpt 1- Why people will think this is funny-Huffy is known(alledged) to be a cheap crummy Wal-Mart bicycle. I have a limited budget. I turn cheap crummy Wal-Mart bicycles(alledged) into great stunt bicycles.Chpt 2- How I got it-I was riding my bike, a six speed automatic, to school, and saw something reflect as I went by the weeds. I stopped, because I go the route almost every day and never saw anything reflect, and what should it be, but the most destroyed Huffy Rock-It I have ever seen in my entire life. I went on to school, as I was runnimg late and don't have a cell phone(I don't want a tumor). At lunch, I came back. I went into the Snak-Shak, and called the sheriff using a pay phone. Well, I waited. And waited. Lunch ended, so I left a note with my contact info at the scene, and left. At three, I came back. It was still there, note and all. I went home. Waited. No phone call from police saying they found the owner, nothing. Seven o'clock. I hitched a ride with my neighbors, over to the scene, and I got the bike.Chpt 3- How I did it- The handlebars were bent back at the stem in a 90 degree angle. I took them off, easily, because they were so busted that all I had to do was jiggle them a little, and they came off. After several attempts at riding without a handlebar, I got one off another frame I have. They wouldn't work. So I got the handlebars off another project(that failed)- an older Next Wipe Out that had been run over, bent frame. I put them on, and they worked great, apart from some adjustment issues- the rusted bolt needs replaced. I aired up the tires, and sat down. Painfully. Old Huffy seat, narrow as heck. I left it on there for for a while. Then, I thought, and thought, and finally asked what I should name it. So, Phoenix, arisen from the ashes of destruction, was about to be made into a really good bike. I recently replaced the seat with a plush, comfortable seat from a brand new (yet busted, due to cheap manufacture) Mongoose Rebel, but for the sake of the budget, the Bell "Little Rider" seat is as good or better than the seat I used. I only used that seat because our Wal-Mart sold out. I rode around, and it worked out great with the parts I had so carefully picked out. Things still need to be replaced, like my front tire, shaped about like this- ), and the pedals, I'll use the Wal-Mart kind. Pegs, also from the Wal-Mart, but I personally don't want pegs, as people tend to jump on the back of my bikes as they are, with no pegs, and I don't do those kinds of stunts. It rides great, except some things need a bit of oil, and just yesterday I adjusted the chain incorrectly, and now I'm in lots of pain from it locking up and throwing me off. But I fixed that, and am thinking about stenciling her name onto the frame.Chpt 4- A question-How do you get the decals off the frame? I sat there with a hair drier for about an hour and got a quarter of one off, but that's to slow, and is very uncomfortable. I want to stencil her name onto her.

Topic by extremegtafan   |  last reply



Has anyone used/made a Schrader-valve (tire stem) adapter for a Coleman mattress pump?

I'm getting too old (or out of shape) to use a manual tire pump on mine and my wife's bicycles. We own a Coleman air mattress with their wall-plug inflation pump. The latter comes with their custom "air lock" adapter for the mattress, and a "pinch valve" adapter.Before I go out and buy a compressor/electric pump for the bikes, I wanted to try using this one that I already own. Has aynone ever used this pump with a valve-stem adapter (Schrader valve) to inflate tires? If so, where did you get the adapter? Or did you make one?

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


Do you live in East Bay?

Don't mind me - I'm just tapping all my resources :D I'm looking for a place to hang my hat in the East Bay area for the summer. I just need a place to sleep, cook a meal and park a car (and lock a bike) :) My goal is pack light for this trip. To be honest, I probably won't be around too much as I'll either be at work or exploring the area - this is my first adventure on the west coast (I'll miss those east coast ocean sunrises :P). I've been watching craigslist (more like waiting for replies :P) and I found the "420 compliant" person to be hilarious... But I'm not interested in being around it... So if you have an extra room (hell, even a camper - as long as I can take a shower somewhere) or anything - let me know. Or, if you know someone that may have a place - do share :) Feel free to ask any questions. If you prefer, my eMail is trebuchet03 at gmail dot com . Oh... and the hat I hang... it's a fedora - just because the top hat was too expensive.

Topic by trebuchet03   |  last reply


Contest Entering Bug

I just entered my video into the new Forbes contest. When I published it I made sure to only check the box for the Forbes contest. When I checked my inbox I found this message:Hi Gjdj3,This is to confirm that your entry 'Unlock A Bike Lock' for the 'Forbes Teach Me Fast Contest' has been received and will be reviewed. The contest closes on Sep 13, 2009. 12:00 AM.Thank you for submitting your Instructable to the Gorilla Glue Cardboard Contest. The contest is moderated, and so your entry is waiting to be reviewed. This process can take up to 48 hours.If after 48 hours or so your project has still not been accepted, then it did not meet all of the requirements for participation in the contest. You will then need to make the appropriate changes to your project so that it meets the contest requirements and re-submit it to the contest.Requirements: - Entry is 30 seconds long or less - Contest image is shown in the beginning of the videoThanks again for entry and good luck in the competition!'I'm not sure if this is an issue with the email, or if somehow my video was entered into both contests.

Topic by Gjdj3 


How to ride DH safely

1. Always wear a helmet, wear body armor as well when needed (how much depends on course, and what you find to be suitable) at all times. 2. Look ahead of you. The faster you are going the further ahead you should look. 3. Stay focused and try not to concentrate or think while you are going at high speed, this tends to slow you down and/or cause accidents...practice alot and everything should come naturally with flow! - Before a run get a song or something that gets you "in the mood" in the back of your mind,and go for it - before you know it you'll be through the track/race no problem...you should all ready know the track turn for turn before doing this. 4. Make sure your tires have appropriate tread on them and are not cracking/damaged 5. Check your bike over in the parking lot before going up the lift. Ride it around and check the brakes and tire pressures. 6. Get enough sleep before riding and especially before racing. 7. Don't drink or get high before racing or riding (you can do it, and seen it done, but if you want to win or want to be safe...don't) 8. Stay relaxed and dialed in on the bike, be as relaxed as possible mentally before you start a race but be pumped physically at the same time. 9. Know the track as well as you can before racing it (the later steps will go into greater detail on how to do this). 10.Learn to 'pump through the ruff stuff'-pull up on the face and push down on the back side of bumps/rocks/landing trannys, etc... 11. Stay light on the back brake as much as you can and try to lock it as rarely as possible if at all...it may cause you to wash out. Only lock the brake on extremely sharp turns or to get into a turn if a cuttie won't be efficient enuff. 12. Try to go as fast as you can when you can-->PEDAL PEDAL PEDAL like a bat out of hell in the open or out of turns when/where ever you can. 13. Practice "cutties". 14. Buy the "Fundamentals" DVD available here on pinkbike.com or at most bike shops and study it...take notes if you have to. You will find how to do "cutties" on the DVD as well as many many more "fundamentals" for DH riding-----> BUY IT, you will be glad you did. 15.Off camber: make sure you weight your outside foot and stand the bike on the egde of the tire, that way it will stick 16. Rock gardens: the faster the better- you will bobble across the top and be on you way before you know it, rather than getting packed down and ending up with major arm pump. 17. Braking: only ever do real braking in straight lines, you can brake on corners but do it conservatively and only to slide around sharp turns better as it may cause you to wash out as mentioned above. The less you brake the faster you go and fast riding is a winning formula- think about that. 18. >>>Don't Crash It can have you out for the rest of the season and that can prevent you from winning races----obviously. Just dont ride like an idiot and attempt things that will probably end in you getting hurt. Ride within your limits! 19. (Words of Pro Down hiller Steve Peat from the "fundamentals" DVD mentioned above) "Stay as light as you can on the bike and pump through the back side of rocks or rough sections as a skateboarder pumps a vert ramp" to gain or maintain speed and momentum. 20. Trust your tires throughout the course. If you believe and have faith in your tires grip, chances are they will have grip fine. If you don't trust your tires and BELEIVE that they wont grip and you will probably fall, chances are they won't grip and as a result you will indeed fall. 21. Walk the track and look for new lines or which lines are best to take and are the fastest 22. Tuck when ever possible to conserve energy. Pedal hard in the open spots before the ruff stuff then tuck and pump and repeat. 23. True your wheels to increase your speed and pedalling efficiency 24. Don't use big fat mud bog tiresfor DH(i.e. 2.6"-3.0") EVER...unless your DH course happens to be a downhill mud swamp 25. Learn to brake with out losing traction , this helps in straight line braking before turns. 26.Push yourself in the warmups, (not stupidly) and give 95% of what your maximum was when you were pushing yourself, in the actual race. This way you wont fall, but you are still hauling a$$. 27.Practice shift points, it is very important to be in the right gear at the right time or youll be sucking wind trying to pedal a flat stretch in too high of a gear. On a fast stretch where you need to begin pedaling to maintain that speed, youll be spinning out. Know what gear to start in and what gear you need to be in at every point in the track. 28. If all else fails look fast across the finish line where everyones watching. 29.When learning, set your fork/and or shock harder than you would normally, this will teach you to use to body rather than relying upon the bike. 30. Try to pick memory markers for your self; tree stump, odd looking rock, etc... and break the course down in your head so you can become very quick overall. 31. Practice simple skills such as manuals (good for roots), Hops, roots/rocks) and of course cutties 32. Commit to berms, brake on a berm and it will end it tears, aim to "rail the berm" to do this - hit the berm at a speed that isnt too fast (this will cause you to slip up it) and not to slow (you will slip down and is slower duh) The ideal speed should carry you round as g forces will push you into the berm. 34.Take a couple of the "Learn to race" clinics offered before many of the sanctioned races. 35.Play with your set up, everything from seat angle, to brake postioning- it can all make a big difference. The more comfortable you are on the bike the faster youll go, the steepness can be different for each course(for instance) so tweak it a little each time but dont EVER change your entire setup before a race. 36.When walking the course, look back up at it. You will find new lines looking up rather then down. 37. While riding (including in the air) never squeeze the seat with your knees. This makes it impossible to flow smoothly, and makes you a ridged weight to be tossed around at the mercy of the trail. It may feel safer, but it will cause you to wreck and lose speed when you would not otherwise. In the air also, it you pinch your seat then you can not compress the lip and extend for landing. Also you can not whip and prepare for upcoming turns and bumps. The ONLY time that pinching your seat would be appropriate is when doing a suicide no hander which, if you can do it without loosing speed, is a cool way to entertain the crowd. 38.Learn to crash,it is an important skill to have that will save you alot of trouble in the long run. 39. Work your way up to the big stuff. Even if you are a good rider always warm up on an easier trail then go for the harder stuff you set out to conquer. Same for riding in general- dont go tackle the hardest trail on the mountain without first being able to do the easy ones---this may sound somewhat obvious but alot of people just cant get this bit of logic into their skulls without being told directly. 40. If the drop doesn't have a great tranny, hit it with more speed. this will cause you to have increased foreward momentum and less downward ( static ) momentum and make the landing smoother. let your bike go off the drop first. 41. If you are in the air ( off a jump drop or whatever... ) and your back end starts to dip too much, tap your back brake, this will cause the front end to dip forward. ( this is used all the time in Motocross) WARNING: Use this with caution and only when its a neccesity. 42. XC riding will make you faster. I always love watching the out of shape downhillers crossing the finish line and nearly having a hear attack. The more tired you are the more mistakes you make and the more likely you are to get hurt. Pedal! Then pedal more! 43. Train like a mofo. During my DH racing times I would spend the summer mornings doing 5-8 runs on local dh trails then dirt jumping and XC riding in the afternoon= Legs that were strong/fast as hell. Dont forget to train in the off season too. 44. Develop a training schedule not just for biking and racing but to keep in shape in general. The more you ride the better you will be. Like Ito was saying, do as much of each mountain biking discipline as possible with emphasis on Down hill. Cedric Gracia wins because he is a great all around rider as is Minaar. 45.Commit to the front end of your bike in corners. Watch Sam Hill, no-one does it better. NOTE: BEFORE DOING THIS, make sure you have practiced it and know how to do this technique at speed (Note is courtesy of Iceboy) 46. Don't pedal like a mad man out of the gate. Pedal, but let your bike gather speed and focus on keeping it. Racing comes down to one thing - exit speed , in particular your speed out of corners. Wait until you feel the flow before you start pushing it harder. If you pedal too hard from the start you'll flip in 60 seconds and get back on your bike a go harder to make up the time. Then you'll flip again. Speaking from experience on this one! It's all about being 'zen'. At least that's what all the dudes who keep beating me are telling me. Learn how to go as fast as you can through turns and sections to know your limits. 47. Make your riding FEEL slow when you are going fast! If you feel fast it's because the trail is catching up with you too quickly for you to process all the info in a comfortable time frame. Probably because you are too busy worrying about going fast and not feeling the flow. Look out, you are about to flip. It's that zen thing you're missing. 48. Practice having FLOW in all your riding, down hill (speed as well as flow), Dirt jumps (flow), XC(speed and flow), what ever (FLOW)... 49.Dont be intimidated by other riders, stay focused on what you have to do not what they are doing, if they crash pay atention to why, and try not to make the same mistake. 50. Learn to go over jumps at as high a speed as possible with out overshooting or losing speed by going too high. Jumps and learning to land them without thinking is a VERY beneficial skill to have... (if you want to stay low coming of jumps learn to soak up the lip...you will go just as far but you'll stay lower) 51. When doing a j-hop, bunny hop or going up the face of a jump don't forget to push into the ground and then come up to get more air. 53. The rougher the place you are riding the more ralaxed and flowy you should be trying to go . 54. Spend time at the track and just watch other riders(especially how they are going through the tricky sections that you are having trouble with), see what they are doing wrong and try to not make the same mistakes, also watch for where the speed spots of the section are. 55.Read Brian Lopes's & Lee McCormick's book " Mastering Mountain Biking Skills", this book covers everything you need to know in great detail from top to bottom, it is with out a doubt the most comprehensive guide for how to ride/race mountain bikes and how to handle and practice everything involved in riding. I HIGHLY RECCOMEND IT, and would say that it is the BIBLE for Mountain Biking! 56.Look where you want to go not at what you are trying to avoid. if you stare at the tree you are trying to go around instead of the trail around it you will more often than not hit the tree. 57. As mentioned previously-The faster you are going the further ahead you should look, always look at what lies further ahead when riding downhill AND avoid staring at your front wheel--staring at your front wheel will slow you down drastically and often will lead to crashing. 58.To re-inerate what Harding.Thomas was saying; do not focus on obstacles like stumps logs and rocks, because thats were you will go instead of where you want to go. In essence, keep an eye on where you want to go and you will go there. Do not look down at what your riding over, let your bike deal with the terrain, thats what its for. This is a very important tip to increasing speed and improving flow. 59. Before you go riding, I find that a simple 10 minute warm up on flat land and practicing tight turns and j-hops helps loosen you up and calms you down If you have any other tips, tell me! ill post them in the list.

Topic by struckbyanarrow 


Is working with your hands better than just with your head?

I saw this on the BBC, and was so impressed I've reproduced the whole thing here: By Tom de Castella Journalist If the new year and inevitable return to work leaves you yearning for change, is working with your hands the answer? The time for reflection is nigh - a new year, a new you. But is that workstation you've slotted back into looking depressingly familiar? As millions of workers drag themselves back into the office to contemplate another 12 months of drudgery, many will be wondering if they are in the right job. Writer and mechanic Matthew Crawford thinks a lot of us would be better off trading in our mouse for a screwdriver. His recent book, The Case for Working With Your Hands, has been a huge hit in his native United States, praised by critics and politicians alike. Mr Crawford, who used to run a Washington think tank but now mends motorbikes, says it is no wonder people are miserable at work. Jobs have become so specialised and process driven that it is hard to see what difference you are making. And in those rare cases where one's impact is obvious, the result may seem pointless. Jealousy "A lot of us are plagued with a sense of uselessness," he says. "I've created a brand - what good is that? So I've persuaded people to buy something they didn't need." When running a think tank, he says he honestly could not see the rationale for being paid at all, and wondered what tangible goods or services he was providing to anyone. Then he opened a motorbike repair shop and was surprised to find he was not just happier, but more intellectually stimulated. The life of a tradesman is a varied existence, mixing practicality with logic and problem solving, he says. "Imagine you're an electrician, you're installing a conduit pipe and have to bend around the corners to make everything line up. It's the kind of work that requires improvisation and adaptation. It can never be reduced to following set procedures." Not only that, the earning potential for a tradesman is greater than in many office jobs. For instance, a skilled mechanic is likely to earn more than a sociology graduate working in publishing, he argues. Not everything about manual work is rosy. He warns that furniture making is not a good career move - Ikea can undercut you by employing workers in China for a fraction of the price. But a range of trades that need to be done on site cannot be outsourced to low wage economies. After new year introspection, January and February are traditionally one of the busiest periods for moving jobs. Mr Crawford believes doing a trade can make you happier. 'Middle-class paradox' "It offers small moments of confirmation, like when the bike you're mending starts up and runs. Small satisfactions like that can be elusive at a huge organisation with vast layers of management, where the criteria by which you're measured are ambiguous." The Times columnist Giles Coren recently tried working with his hands for the BBC Two show Giles and Sue Live the Good Life. Despite his on-screen schtick of appearing to hate everything the duo are asked to do, he fell in love with it. "I found chasing the chickens and weeding the allotment immensely satisfying," he says. "The pain... was making the television show." He agrees with Mr Crawford that modern life has been blighted by a series of alienating processes, often carried out on mobile phone, laptop and e-mail. In this way, his chosen career - journalism - has been stripped of its sense of adventure and human contact. "Even 15 years ago when I started as a reporter, you left the office to do a story. You went to investigate, visited people and used the cuttings library. Now I just sit... and Google. It's terrible, I wish I was a fireman." Despite his columnist's salary, he is jealous of those whose jobs have a clear purpose like the gardener and cleaner. "My gardener Brian comes in to do the garden every two weeks. He takes his shirt off in the summer and smokes a rollie. I can see him through the window, but I'm sitting indoors, staring at the screen to pay for this guy - it's the classic middle-class paradox." Rory Sutherland, vice-chairman of advertising firm Ogilvy UK, agrees that working with your hands does offer greater satisfaction in the short term. But manual workers lack something many of us crave - influence. Jobs like advertising where you "work with your head" may seem futile, but the ideas they come up with really do change the world, he says. "Five years ago someone worked out that you could have one size lid for the three different sizes of coffee cup that cafes have. Ok, it's emphatically not the cure for cancer, but it's through millions of little ideas like this that we get richer as a society." Perception of value Television dramas like Mad Men depict the office to be a place of invigorating competition, sexual tension and creativity. However stylised the portrayal, Mr Sutherland says there is a definite buzz to working around like-minded people - one that tradesmen miss out on. "People partly enjoy work because it's social, but working with your hands can be lonely." And he believes that experienced trades people are often economically undervalued due to the perverse way that consumers ascribe worth. He cites the behavioural economist Dan Ariely's story about a locksmith. As a young apprentice, the tradesman used to take half an hour to mend a lock, at which point he'd be thanked wholeheartedly and given a tip. When he became more experienced, the locksmith could fix a similar problem in a minute. He charged the same rate and completed the job much faster. But instead of being pleased at his speed, customers complained about his rates and refused to tip him. "It's about our perception of value." And in this respect the skilled tradesman will often struggle, he says. In the course of researching his book The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work, Alain de Botton concludes that we all want to make a difference in our job, however banal that change may be. "At the end of the working day we want to feel we've left the planet slightly healthier, tidier, saner than it was at the beginning," he says. "I'm not necessarily talking of huge changes - the difference might merely involve sanding a stair banister, removing the squeak on a door or reuniting someone with their lost luggage." And yet, it is a mistake to romanticise working with your hands, he warns. "At heart, what you're talking about is the charm of craft work. And it's my sense this can happen in places far removed from the workshop. If you're writing computer code you are in a sense displaying many of the same skills as a craftsperson, even if the finished product can't be held or touched." But following the financial crisis, Mr de Botton says attitudes to all types of work may be changing. He detects a move away from the middle-class idea that work lies "at the heart of our self-fulfillment", to the working-class view of employment as a means of feeding yourself and your family. So maybe job satisfaction is slipping down the list of what is important when it comes to work.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply