Search for varnish in Topics


Wood varnish questions

I want to varnish this birch plywood platform to keep it as waterproof and UV resistant as possible but also keep it as close to it's original pale birch colour as possible. i've never varnished anything before so i've been googling for answers and i'm getting some conflicting information, i've been looking at different clear outdoor varnishes and most claim to protect against UV light and not leave a yellow tint but most reviews say otherwise and some general varnishing info articles claim that clear varnish can't protect against UV at all and i'd need a dark stain which i really don't want. so what can i do to protect the wood against the elements and maintain the colour as much as possible? can i combine varnish with other stuff? i found some clear 'marine varnish' is this heavier duty than normal wood varnish or something?is there an alternative to varnish that will have a similar effect?if i need to modify the platform later, cutting bits out or drilling new holes is it ok to just apply another layer of varnish to reseal it or will it need preparing in some way or some additional step?

Topic by ambientvoid    |  last reply


Lacquer or Varnish to finish a guitar?

Hi, I've just had an artist do some work on one of my acoustic guitars. Its done straight onto the sanded bare wood using sharpie, all I have to do is give it a finish to stop the design getting damaged and to give it a glossy shine. A lot of people recommend Lacquer but what type should I use? Nitrocellulose? Poly? Others say Varnish but I've heard it can become tarnished from sweat and heat. This coat needs to stay on indefinitely as I cant sand it down again to apply a new coat without removing the art. Please help!

Question by Boba Jett    |  last reply


How to lacquer or varnish a stone?

I want to lacquer or varnish a stone - it's just granite or similar, not polished, and the intention is to provide protection from staining as it's going to be used as a paperweight What product or type of lacquer / varnish / whatever what should I use please? I'm in the UK so it would help if anyone knows the trade names of products available here. Thanks.

Question by Celticonnection    |  last reply


Can you varnish an oil-sealed garden table? Answered

I'm asking this for a friend, who's recently bought a garden table that needs to be oiled to keep it waterproof. Would he be able to varnish over the top of the oil, to save the regular re-oiling? Would the varnish take over the oil?

Question by alffly    |  last reply


Will varnishing a paper mural cause the ink from image to bleed and ruin everything? Answered

Hello all! so i've been planning an awesome mural project for my new apartment, but i have a few questions to resolve before i can proceed.. first, i was going to use 3M's super 77 spray adhesive to fix it to the wall..terrible idea? second, i've heard of people using some sort of varnish to seal things and protect them from damage, possibly even make it easier to clean..my only question is whether or not this could cause the ink from the paper to bleed, thereby ruining everything and causing me to descent into a childlike rage? i should mention that i was planning on rasterbating an image to create the mural and then having it printed at a copy centre somewhere. does paper and printer type (laser vs. inkjet) make a difference in terms of varnishing potential?thanks! :D?

Question by Pushnik89    |  last reply


Am I able to upload a project in progress, and add new steps over time? Answered

I have a 90% complete foam block model: Should I wait until completion before posting steps? Furthermore, what is the best type of clear, matte/satin, hard setting varnish to use on acrylic paint?

Question by Shadow Of Intent    |  last reply



slow drying art paint varnish? Answered

Can any artist help me find an art paint varnish (clear, matt)  that has a longer drying time? I have nothing to compare with but I'm thinking of ways to mix luminous powder for watches. I really have no idea about varnishes in general so any pointers or websites will be helpful. I need the mix to stay wet and workable for at least 15 to 30 minutes. I am looking at Winsor & Newton varnishes. Any other suggestions and options would greatly help me.

Question by phillyj    |  last reply


When making paper beads, is there anything you can substitute for clear varnish? Answered

Like maybe glue or something? Or is clear varnish the only thing you can use?

Question by Jessie Marie    |  last reply


French polishing a turned item.? Answered

Hello, How would I go about french polishing a turned item. The problem associated with it is that the sanding and polishing (assuming I polish on the lathe) will both be accross the grain which is generally considered the less preferable option. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Question by alexhalford    |  last reply


Wood stains, oils, finishes - Help me figure out what I need, please

I'm currently working on a coffee table inspired by https://www.instructables.com/id/Pallet-Coffee-Table-From-Reclaimed-Wood, and I need to help figuring out how to treat the wood. I love the way the table in the instructable turned out, so something similar would be great. basically I want to emphasize the natural beauty of the wood, not cover it up with color. But I would like the final product to be a bit darker than what the wood is right now. I'm considering oil or water-based stains, danish oil, and other similar products, but I know very little about them. Do I want a stain? Is Danish Oil the same thing as a stain? As far as I can tell, the product in the instructable was water-based, semi-gloss, but doesn't have a color on the label, so it must be a clear coat? It definitely darkened the wood, but perhaps that's normal for a clear coat? Other considerations: I would love for this to be as easy as possible, and environmentally friendly. If we can keep fumes to a minimum that would be great. :-) I also don't want anything that looks glossy as I think that looks kind of fake and doesn't keep with the spirit of the natural wood. I'm totally lost, so please help me out if you can. I'm happy to answer clarifying questions! Thanks in advance! Josh

Topic by joshme    |  last reply


Varnishing, shellacing, or polycoating sugar cookies

What would be the best paint-on preservative (some type of clear coat; varnish, polyurethane, shellac, etc) and the method to use to seal a frosted sugar cookie so that it would be durable, colorfast, and not get moldy or crack? I'm not looking to seal it into a block of acrylic, I want to keep it looking like the original cookie.Yours unpreservedly,- FP

Question by Fusepopper    |  last reply


Recyled rubber dolls paint, dye ?or varnish

I'm at the point of ripping my hair out with this one. Once apon a time I bought used doll and dyed them with RIT dye and got some great colors to use in various projects...(yes, my house is a bit on the creepy side). Lately, the dolls I have been finding, wont take the dye....maybe a new kind of rubber? Anyway, I want dolls that are blue. I painted a few with water based paint and then varnished them...several coats and they look pretty good but some of them flacked off...frustrating. I stripped those and bought some alcohol dyes and added that to varnish and painted them 5 days ago, putting a fan on them...cool color, but the varnish wont dry on the rubber and is now a tacky mess. Any chemistry geeks out there that can figure out a better way to get this "new rubber" to take color ? I am going to use some plastics spray paint as a last resort but I really want them to be durable and not flack or easily scratch...can I varnish over plastics spray paint...will there be another noxious chemical disaster if I spray plastics paint over rubber....help ?

Topic by krex    |  last reply


can i use picture varnish for sealing a printed picture?

Im kinda new to using mod podge dimesion magic, so the first time i used it, it made the picture i printed bleed. I really want to make this anniversary gift perfect but i just dont know if it'll work. The store here doesnt have any acrylic spray so they told me that it was the same with picture varnish or fixative, since they handed me the picture varnish first, it's what i bought, please help >.<

Question by shobe412    |  last reply


Is there a way so that crackle nail varnish doesn't atack the under layer? Answered

I would like to paint my nails but yet again I have found the crackle always attacks my base layer I want to do an instructable with this in mind any Ideas?

Question by Monster Muncher    |  last reply


Tips and tricks for UV curing glue, resin and coatings

Only a few years ago your only option to repair certain plastics, glass or even a broken crystal was epoxy based resin or the good old superglue.You might have already tried one of the 5-seconds-repair pens or tried your own UV curing nail polish art at home.For the later you might be lucky as the resins used here are optimised for the purpose and lights you get with them.Sadly even the best nail polish is no substitude for a glue as the material properties need to be different.One of the most common complaints when it comes to using some UV glue, like Kafuter or similar is that it never comes with instructions.Sould be straight forward but it is not free of problems.For example almost all commercail UV curing glues that you can buy require quite stirct procedures and for the light the right wavelenth(s).Resins and coatings can be even more painful here as they might also require you to stick to the correct temperature.Let's start with one thing you might have encountered already...The glue is definately cured and rock hard but the surface tacky and smeary.Quite annoying if you want to fix a piece of jewellery and can't prevent it from collecting dirt and dust...The next thing you might have encountered is that despite having transparent materials it seems to be impossible to cure the clue.Both problems come down to wavelenght and exposure.UV curing glue is prevented from curing in the presence of oxygen - a factor utilised for example in resin based 3D printers.Uncovered glue is exposed to the oxygen in the air and won't cure easy.The glue or resin below this layer however with fully cure with ease in the absence of oxygen.For the second problem consider that not all materials that you can see through will let UVC light pass through ;)Bonding strenght is another complaint I hear a lot...Be aware that certain things just are no good for UV curing glues or resins.Take the molds you get for that purpose: on the material the glue won't bond!Teflon is another prime candidate here.But in a lot of cases it comes down to surface preparation.Don't be afriad to sand the surface!Not only will the surface area increase but the scratch marks will be invisible once filled anyways.Use sandpaper on your fingernails, then go over with clear nail polish -mirror finish ;)With curing often a problem consider to fully cover the glue.A bit of clear sticky tape, food wrapping foil....If that is not an option then eliminate the oxygen.You can use a container filled with inert (for the glue) gas like CO2 or just place a burning candle in it until it goes out....Either way the amount of oxygen should then be low enough to cure the surface of your glue.Not always is any of the above an option.Then you can still try more power and a lover wavelength.Mercury based lamps for example provide a very broad and powerful light that in most cases will cure within seconds.For a proper surface cure you need a wavelength of 265nm or lower.LED's offering this exist but at prices well out of range for the hobby user.A mercury lamp under high pressure is nothing for short term use and the limited lifespan does not always justify the costs of buying them.Like with most things in life certain inventions can have a dual purpose.Quality germicidal lamp systems for examples often state to go as low or even lower than 265nm.And they come at a fraction of the cost you have with a broadband mercury lamp.Even cheaper is the fre weather forecast.If the sun is siad to be strong enough so you need protection than even the worst glue will fully cure in seconds outside in the sun - tackfree!Don't be fooled and protect yourself!!These tiny LED lamps for your glue stick, the curing thingies for your nailpolish and everything else using UV light comes with warnings.For very good reasons!It might be hidden in the fineprint but you can not really see UV light.The blueish-purple glow you see is on the high end of what comes out and by that in the visible range of your eye.Just because a LED only gives a faint glow you see does not mean the UV light wouldn blind you if you could see it!Even worse for fluoroscent lamps or open cruning systems like those for your nailpolish.Reflected UV light is still UV light and you can still NOT see it!Stories of people getting sunburnt from germicidal lamps in a butcher shop or other people going blind from checking money as their living have a true base...In most cases lamps used well past their lifespan or simply the wrong type of lamp but still: the damage came from UVC light...If you just love creating your own artwork or jewellery with UV curing resins and glues than protect yourself.Proper sunglasses with a stated UV protection for example or just black nitrile gloves for your hands...

Topic by Downunder35m  


Pasting luggage labels to a leather suitcase

Hi everyone, Looking for a bit of advice, I found an old cow hide suitcase and bought some vintage style adhesive luggage labels. Only question is how to I stop them peeling off. Can I varnish over the whole thing? If so what kind of varnish? I’m worried about damaging the already pretty shabby leather case. Is there a special kind of adhesive I should have used rather than relying on the stickiness of the labels?

Question by KateH56    |  last reply


EMAIL: inaccurate notification

I received an email stating that MY question had another answer...first, I was NOT the author of the question, and secondly I WAS the one giving the "answer".....I have copied it as follows:  Hi Goodhart! People are answering your question! You have 1 new answers. --------------------------------------- From: Goodhart Date: May 30, 2011. 6:00 AM Subject: https://www.instructables.com/answers/how-can-i-fix-up-my-old-metal-trunk-get-rid-of-t/ Sorry.....the line that reads: First " --- "'s suggestion of varnishing should ACTUALLY read: First " Burf's" suggestion of varnishing reply: https://www.instructables.com/you/backtalk/?action=reply&commentId;=CGB3VIDGO6VA9QF

Topic by Goodhart    |  last reply


Waterproofing wood

I have painted an outdoor wooden table top. I need to waterproof it. Last summer, at the advice of my sister, I used spar varnish. That did not work in that the top layer of my table completely peeled up from winter rain/snow/ice. How do I waterproof the table?

Question by myrabowen  


Finishing a wooden paddle board

Hey makers, just wondering about how i should finish a wooden paddle board a plan to make, epoxy resin is quite expensive just wondering is there a cheaper alternative, should i use polyester resin or not, also is yacht varnish a viable option

Question by paul the maker  


Magnet Wire

Cutting open transformers (you might call it an adapter, or charger) yields a good quantity of re-usable magnet wire. Motors don't seem to be a very good source, since the windings on those seem to be saturated in varnish to glue em together. Apparently, vibration is more of an issue in the motors, so they make the windings solid. This might be different in little hobby motors. Dunno.

Topic by Toga_Dan  


Egg Rolling

Hey ppl, I am curently a helping Cubs leader and next friday we will be having an 'egg rolling' competition. This basically entails rolling a painted egg down a hill, the furthest egg that doesn't get broken wins! The leaders have also been invited to bring eggs aswel so, i need a way to make the ultimate egg. Does anyone know how to do this, should i varnish it or somthing? Thanks ppl, happy easter

Topic by drummer ian    |  last reply


Magnus Magnusson syndrome

"I've started, so I'll finish"Sometimes I've started a project, and reallised that it's going to involve a lot of tedious work, and a lot of time.But, having started, I've had to finish.I'm interested in other people's projects which may have been a drag for a while, but were finished with persistance under the catchprase above.e.g. This helmet took a long time, and a lot of papier-maiche, and sanding, and varnish etc.Lhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnus_Magnusson

Topic by lemonie    |  last reply


Alcohol bottle in a block of ice: How can I make a mold ?

I tried by making a rectangular wooden box, cut in half, with piano hinge on one side and clasps on the other sealed with silicone on the edges. Very hard to get water tight. I somehow made a successfull mold, but not good for multiple use. Water seeps through the wood (even after varnishing), i am looking for an easy solution.

Question by Dimitrios    |  last reply


preserving wood outside? Answered

I just scrounged a big round slab of a tree from a firewood seller. It is still green and about 32" across and 8" thick. My question is, how can I make it last a long time out in the weather all the time. I am using it as a knife and axe throwing target. I don't really want to spend a lot of money putting expensive varnish or wood preservatives on it! Any cheap recipes out there? Thanks, Triumphman.

Question by triumphman    |  last reply


I've built a skateboard at school and have a problem with the kick wearing out?

I built a skateboard at school and the first time I rode the varnish wore off the kick. I want to make a kick protector out of somthing like nylon. How could I attach it so I can detash it again. also any Sugestions on how else I could do it? (if i cant do it without glue or bolts please still offer suggestions).

Question by David97    |  last reply


Outdoor Pool Table?

There are lots of used pool tables for sale for under $250. Any ideas for how to convert them for outdoor use? I'm thinking of just spraying the whole thing, except the felt, with a few coats of marine varnish. Then just keeping it covered. I live in the NW and of course it's mostly drizzly around here in the winter time. The big thing is keeping expansion and contraction to a minimum and sealing the wood. This doesn't have to be tournament grade, just something to entertain the kids for a few years.

Topic by geppetto425    |  last reply


Wood Chest Renovation

Hi There I have a wooden chest that I was asked to restore. The chest is made of what appears normal pine, but it was painted over with a dark paint. The owner asked me to try and restore it to the original wood. My question is: 1. Obviously I would have to sand it, but what grit of sand paper do I use to get rid of the paint and to get the smooth surface? 2. What would be the best application after sanding, oil or varnish? The client is not a fan of a gloss finish so what would be the best option? Thanks Marcel

Topic by Temple Works    |  last reply


making printed ink on plastic permanent?

Hi, I have transparent plastic and I want to print on it, which works but when the plastic touches something the ink gets wiped out. It doesn't seem to dry, I left it over night and it was still the same. How can I make it permanent and keeping it as transparent as it is? I can't just add normal varnish because it would also wipe out the ink. Will hairspray work(I don't have it in my home right now), or will it make the surface of the plastic uneven so it's less transparent? Are there other ways? thanks

Topic by merijnvw  


Transformer modification? Answered

2 questions about transformers: - If a certain transformer (let's say, for a power amplifier) is needed, and for example, a microwave transformer is available, can the steel frame be cut to take out the secondary coil, to be replaced by a new one, and subsequently be re-attached (by clamps or so)? Would it need some treatment, like putting varnish, or oil over it?  Would this cutting and re- attaching cause a loss in efficiency, or cause heat build-up? Would it cause more noise in the output? - Some amps have a toroid transformer. Is this just fashionable or is it for a reason? Some industrial amps use sheets of copper instead of wire. Why is this better for industrial, why, and if not for common stuff...?

Question by BobS    |  last reply


DC motor core insulation from windings? Answered

I have recently attempted to rewind an old 240V AC drill motor to a low voltage DC one. After winding the 12 coils I found that all of the windings were shorted to each other, I'm assuming this is due to the thin enamel coat on my wire breaking against the edges of the steel core. As a result I need to rewind it, but I am unsure what kind of insulation to use, tape, some kind of glue or sealant, varnish, I was thinking a hardware store type product nothing online or that costs a lot. 

Question by The MadScientist    |  last reply


"The Romaurie-Effect"

I have been using refrigeration compressors for many years as vacuum pumps. When I started in commercial/industrial refrigeration some 30 years ago, all the engineers in "Prestcold" Bournemouth branch made their own small portable vacuum pumps from discarded domestic refrigerators. It almost appeared to me, a newcomer to the industry, a competition of sorts to make the most practical/aesthetic unit possible.Some engineers made varnished wooden cases to house the compressor. These were ideal for all small refrigeration vacuuming requirements. My interest over the last few years has been to use these "home-made vac-pumps" to produce vacuum filled inverted aquaria. "The Romaurie-Effect" as shown on "youTube".This is an on-going project.

Topic by romaurie    |  last reply


Plastic Resin Casting and Molding advice

Hi I'm making my first plastic resin cast and the mold for it using the tutorial here: http://www.b9robotresource.com/plastic_casting1.htm One difference to that tutorial however is that the object I am making a mold of is something I've make in air-dry modelling clay. I've spent quite a bit of time making the original so bit worried about pouring the silicone for the mold onto the clay object - will it break the clay down or is there some way to prepare the clay (varnish or something?). I've put a test of dried clay in water and it has broken down in five minutes. Can anyone who has done this sort of thing before advise please? Thanks in advance. Garrett

Topic by garrettlynch    |  last reply


Replacing wooden handles on a dutch oven?

I got an old Coquelle with black wooden handles, my subscribers probably remember them from some of my recipes. Recently the handles started to crumble and even broke when I tried to detach them. Now I am looking for a replacement, but the only info that I get is that wooden pan handles are made from English Oak. Later they made them from phenolic resin and today they are made of steel. But I am looking for wooden replacements for my dutch oven. And I don't want to use any coating or varnish because I still want to prepare food in the Coquelle at 200°C. Any ideas which unprocessed wood I could use?

Question by Joerg Engels  


Small antique motor running rough, lubricant? suggestions as to a product Answered

I have a small antique desk fan that I am refinishing the art deco base on.  Now keep in mind, in another life I was an antique dealer.  I know messing with it drops the value, however the base was all ready badly corroded.  The motor runs, though rough.  I think it is most likely bearings, and or possible winding's could have a small short, though that is doubtful.  Lubricant for the bearings?   And keep in mind cleaning it with aggressive chemicals like acetone could melt the varnish off the winding's, then I'm really hooped.  Now the obvious would just be to replace the motor, but pieces like this were built not to ever be opened again, at least without hope of putting them back together the same way.  Thanks

Question by iminthebathroom    |  last reply


Which paints work best on metal? Answered

I've become oddly obsessed with painting those little metal hair clips that snap open and closed. I began first just using nail polish. It's thick, but works well. I use a nail varnish to seal it, and they look awesome! But there's really not many options out there for nail polish, so I was wondering what other kinds of paint will adhere to the metal hair clips? Keep in mind the clips bend (slightly) when opened and closed. I'm currently experimenting with model-car enamel, which seems to be working. Any ideas? Also, what type of sealant should I use over top of whichever kind of paint that works on metal? ..Sorry if I'm confusing. It's like 4:30 in the morning. lol Thanks! LL

Question by lenalandmine    |  last reply


Inductive power transmission for electrograf

Hi Guys and Gals,I'm a great fan of both the Electrograf and magnetic fridge lights instructables.Anybody have any idea as to the feasibility of building something similar, but where power was supplied inductively?Something like a large flat coil embedded just below the surface to which the leds are applied, and an AC current driving it? The leds would need careful preparation a la "magnetic fridge lights", but with a more substancial coil.I'm asking as I have no idea how large a voltage/current would be needed in practice in the primary coil to drive the 25mA or so at ~4V for the blue/white leds with what would probably be woeful power transmission.What would be nice is that the coil could be hidden and there be no wear-and-tear on a grid(which can't be varnished etc because it needs to stay electrically conductive).Also placement/orientation of leds could be arbitrary (subject to design of coil).

Topic by ningo  


How to apply a brushed on wood grain on our painted baseboards.?

I am restoring the wood trim in the hallway of our 1850 greek revival plantation manor. The baseboards, door frames and doors have been stripped with a heat gun and there are areas where the original brushed on (painted?) grain sample is visible. I want to reproduce the look. I tried using glase and paint and did the riser baseboard on the stair case. I used a comb and it just doesnt have the right look. I m worried that when i get to the intricate door frame which is approximately 6" wide, that the comb will be too difficult to give the right look. I need to have advice on type of paint/varnish/stain to use and what kind of brush to give me the right look. I would contact a professional, but there is nobody around here that knows what I am talking about.

Question by innkeepper    |  last reply


How to treat acetate (transparency film) to avoid ink from chipping

Hey y'all! I've got an odd issue with some transparency film that I'm sure one of you will be able to help me solve! I have a book of prints which I've been inkjet printing on to acetate. It's a lovely book, but the issue I keep running into is that the ink will rub off should someone or something happen to scratch the "wet" side of any of the prints. The prints also gather dust on this side, which after a while makes for a very dusty book! Does anyone have any idea of a treatment method (maybe a spray or a varnish) that would seal in the ink, protecting the prints from dust and scratches? I realize I could just print it on another type of photo paper and probably not have this issue, but I'd like the prints to be translucent (it creates a layering effect that's important to the finished book). Any suggestions gladly welcomed! Best, M

Topic by mbelle1    |  last reply


Help with building a tesla coil? Answered

I want to build a tesla coil, but I want to verify with the instructables community that it won't blow up, burn down my house, turn into skynet, etc. Here's my plaaaauuuuuuhn: For the transformer, I'll be using an old negative ion generator thing that takes in 120VAC and outputs 7.5kv(pic). For the primary, I'll use old speaker wire in  a cone shape (possibly using acrylic). For the secondary, I'll use 32- gauge magnet wire (pic). And for the spark gap, I'll use two bolts in a box, possibly with a computer fan cooling it. And for the capacitors, I'll just use an array of Leyden jars. My questions: 1. What diameter should the coil form be? I have some random white tubing which has an OD of 1/2 inches, 1/2 PVC piping (which actually has an OD of 7/8 inches), and 3/4 inch PVC piping. And is there a better alternative to these? 2. Should I use chokes on the input/output of my transformer? For those, I think I'll just wrap a bunch of wire around a pen. 3. Should I varnish it? 4. How powerful will the EM be from this thing? Exploding computers aren't that good. If I have made any errrors, please tell me.

Question by Shagglepuff    |  last reply


WANTED: Your Ways to inscribe / label / letter plastic cases 'n stuff REWARD :)

Hi Folks Did you ever successfully apply a small lettering onto something? Your methods of making labeling/lettering on a quite small scale would be very appreciated!Maybe people from the miniature/model scence have some idea?I want to 'casemod' my TI-92 Plus and CBL-2 to look similar AND nicer. They are housed in some not that beautiful grey plastic. I thought of just applying some primer and paint, but that would make all the important small inscriptions disappear and since there are plenty of them, I can't have that. I bought some letraset lettering sheets on ebay, but those are only one color and a bit too big...WANTED:A method to apply small (<=0,1 inch) yet accurate lettering onto plastic/metal/paint. Durability is not important since I will apply about 5-10 layers of varnish. Some opacity/covering power would be good though. And I need to be able to do it in at least two colors.REWARD: I offer two (full) cases of Altoids for the person, whose technique I use in the process. (Of course an instructable will document the build!)This is kind of arbitrary but I want to spice up the deal a bit...Thank you!Maniacy

Topic by Maniacy    |  last reply


Results of Galvanic Etching UPDATE! 2 new plates

Hi everybody, I just tried the Galvanic Etching process described on Jake Von Slatt's website. I wanted to show off my results and offer my observations.RESULTS:1) The etch came out perfectly.. even details that looked WAY to fine to pick up came out clearly.2) The Inkjet Paper (Staples Photo Plus Gloss) took a bit of soaking to get off, but when I got a corner, It came off as one single layer.3) I had to re-iron the corners, so check those before soaking.OBSERVATIONS:1) a PC power supply worked fine for the etch.2) my Root Killer lists Copper Sulfate Pentahydrate... no noticeable issue with this versus plain copper sulfate3) Copper Sulfate Pentahydrate eats alumin(i)um... Using tin foil as the anode was a bad idea.. I went through three anodes over the course of the etch... next time I'll use copper.4) Electrical tape makes a great mask to cover the back and edges of your etch.5) Mr Clean Magic Eraser's make short work of the toner without marring the brass.and now.... the Picture. (this is before paint, polish & varnish, I haven't gotten to those parts yet)

Topic by gschoppe    |  last reply


How to make a RFID bracelet for a travel card (Oyster card)?

Im trying to make a bracelet which incorporates my London Oyster Card (RFID travel card) so i can just swipe my wrist and not faff about with wallets or pockets etc but I am having a few issues. The basic design is going to be simple and effective. I will have a length of regular guage wire around the wrist, secured by a single wire connector/ terminal block (see photo). It will prob be a earth wire, as it is a fancy colour. The RFID will be placed inside the plastic connector and hot glued end end to secure it and keep out the elements. The RFID's aeriel wire will be inside the earth wire heatshrink, it will be a loop of wire and can be as thick as it needs to be. I keep having problems though, I cant get the chip out of the card in one piece. I have been using nail varnish remover but with mixed results.   When/if I do get the RFID chip out of the card, i will need to solder a new aerial and I am unsure about the process. Does the length/gauge of wire matter for the function of the RFID? im thinking about its frequency. Will it need to be ceramic covered wire to avoid shorts? Has anyone put a contactless travel card into other things? Or has any experience dealing with this sort of area? I would very much appreciate any help or advice.

Question by Clodester    |  last reply


How to stretch holes in a steel frame?

I ran into a glitch in rehabing an old park bench.  The wooden slats were rotted out, so I'm saving the wrought iron end frames and fitting them with new poplar slats.  I included a mid-project picture below of one of the end frames. I don't know if you can notice from the picture, the holes in the frame for mounting the slats were not in a straight line, but rather haphazardly.  So each board needs to be custom-drilled to match the mounting holes in the frames. Problem is, I originally measured the distance between the bolts on one of the old slats and used that measurement to drill ALL the new (expensive) hardwood boards.  I had made the careless assumption that the holes in the frames would be in a straight line. Never assume good workmanship! After drilling the slats, I applied about 5 coats of clear urethane spar varnish.  The new slats look supreme, and I don't want to zorkk them up by drilling a second hole in each board to match the stupid end frames.  So the only way out of the quagmire I can see is to drill the frame to match the boards.  OK! Problem is, most of the new holes in the frames would intersect the old holes, and I know that drilling an intersecting hole is problematic, especially in 3/16" steel.  So I need advice on how to stretch holes in steel into an oval shape.  I'm thinking some sort of router bit, or a grinding bit that I could use with a hand drill. Suggestions?  Thanks.

Question by LesB    |  last reply


PVC pipes and winding Tesla coils....

There are still people out there playing with high voltage.And one big problem when it comes to Tesla coils is winding the secondary coil.Now, I won't go into the details and options of the actual winding part, instead I would like to share some tricks that might make things easier for your project.Whether you wind fully by hand or make use of some mechanical winder, magnet wire is a very slippery thing on PVC.For that reason and some others we usually wind as tight and close as possible.Any leftover spaces that you find after the winding is finnished will severly compromise the overall tension of the wire in this region if fixed.Next problem is what many call aging.No matter how good you coat your coil with varnish or paint it will start to degrade over time.I found a simple fix for these problems :)Well, not really that simple but I am too lazy today to make a full Instructable for just an addition that everyone can make in a few minutes....Let me start with idea behind it all:I noticed that no matter how thick the pipe or wire is that there is little to no chance at all to get any of the coating material through the wire and all the way down to the PVC.One coil failed after I abused it so I did some cuts and had a close look with a magnifying glass.The coil itself was really good covered but it was like a sleeve that sits on the PVC with nothing on the underside of the wire except for a few single spots.Some people will now say to just a much thinner mix for the coating to allow the stuff to sweep through but that does not always work.One big issue I noticed is that not all paints or varnishes actually stick to PVC.Especially those non smelling eco friendly ones most places now sell.This means when the coil expands due to the vibrations and heat the wire can simply rattle off the varnish or the coating itself can crack under the stress.So I thought there must be a way to fix this right at the winding stage....PVC is a good insulator too!So why not use PVC instead of messing with other things?My first attempt here works quite well with thin wire and goes like this:Go outside with your winding rig and have a bottle of PVC primer and a little brush or sponge ready as well as some gloves.If you have use a friend, if you have none make a small rig to hold the sponge right in front of your winding area.The key is to keep the sponge wet with the primer so it will wet the pipe properly.Best is to have the speed and distance set so the surface just starts to dry off under the wire.The primer will cause the PVC to soften, so the wire slightly sinks into the surface.An automatic winding rig is best here as it allows for consistency.There is no too much or too little here is nothing drips terribly and your wire sticks without fully sinking in.Once done you can cover the winding with your prefered coating.For thicker wire, lets say 0.3mm or thicker, I now use a similar way but with more preperations:Using some very rough sandpaper on a belt or vibrating sander I create a small pile of PVC dust.If you prefer some fancy color you can use ABS plasic here too and it dissolves in a similar way.The resulting mix should be free of lumps and of even color, if in doubt use more primer.Consistency should be a bit thinner than honey, if yours is too thin you can add more ABS/PVC or let the primer evaporate off while stirring it every now and then.To get a good start I do a few turns dry first with quite a big spacing.When approaching the actual start of the winding area I use some stick tape to make the last alignment and start to apply the mix onto the first bit of the winding area.Some lint free cloth with a bit of primer is used to wipe off any excess towards the still uncovered part of the pipe.Every time the mix on the pipe dries out too fast a brush with some primer is use to wet it.Every time the excess runs out a bit more mix is applied onto the wound area.The key is to only have a small area in front of the winding covered with mix with the most is on the winding and "cleaned" off towards the empty area.This way the entire wire is covered by PVC all around.To finnish off you simply use a brush and paint the mix onto the rotating coil until you have an even finnish.What are the downsides?The primer stinks and is certainly not healthy to breathe in. So good ventilation is a must have and it works better in colder temeratures as it gives you more time.It might require some test runs with braided fishing line or similar to get a feeling for how much mix or primer you need to apply and how much max tesion you can use to preven the wire from sinking in.Any benefits?IMHO using this method makes it possible to get a proper bond between the PVC pipe and the wire.And by using PVC or ABS as the coating there is little to no change material properties.This in return gives far less chances for vibrations or wire expansions that result in failing insulations.The whole thing just is one piece of PVC with the wire embedded in it instead of having a wire on top of the PVC with some coating above. ;)Are there alternatives to the PVC primer?If Acetone is much cheaper than you can use it but the same safety measures apply and the mix might dry a bit quicker.What if I need a break or stop the winding for one reason or another?Simply wipe off all access and stop with just enough tension on the wire so you can star again with no problems.Then start by wetting and applying the mix and continue winding as before.

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


EMT 140 plate reverb transducer & pickups. I want to build studio quality components.

Hello group. I am entertaining a spring project for duplicating the famous German made EMT 140 plate reverb units used at recording studios like Abbey Road. The construction of the plate, supports, box, welding and such is really not a problem for me personally. Even the pickups I don't think are a huge problem as there are many out there ready made and it's probably easier to make a high quality pickup than a high quality transducer. I would however like to build my own transducer but don't know exactly where to start. I don't want to go the piezo route that I see out there as I think that is not going to end up being anywhere near usable in a studio. I'm not opposed to converting a hacked up speaker or something that doesn't look pretty as long as it works. The typical plate reverb build (the main structure and plate) I believe is with a steel plate about 1 meter wide by 2 meters long suspended within another steel frame and tuned (tension even on all 4 corners). Also, there is a damper that you need to build to lengthen or shorten the delay. This general construction I don't see to be a roadblock but the transducer seems to be what I think may trip me up. I would just like to get something working before I dive in on several days of picking up heavy metal, welding and fabrication of the supporting structure and plate. Some things I would like to understand and advice on are: What type of transducer am I really trying to build here or what type of transducers do you think I should consider? Surface? Tactile? Bone? Can I use a regular speaker magnet? If so what is too big or too small for the plate? What gauge varnish coil wire do I use and how many winds for 8 ohm amp? What sort of material should I wind over? Should I just modify a speaker or driver? Are there any other quality units out there ready made to save me the pain of building this transducer from scratch? I do have a Dayton Audio HDN-8 on order to start experimenting but would like to get something better I think. Building a pickup seems to be infinitely easier since I already know how to build guitar pickups and also there are a huge selection of pickups for things like acoustic and mandolin etc. so that I assume is the easy part of the electronics. Still if there are any design ideas you know that would be studio quality I would like to hear from you. My main focus is the heart of the system and the transducer. I have seen a few different methods converting a speaker by cutting out most of the speaker except for the center and then super glue to a metal rod that would touch the plate or whatever but I'm certain that there may be a more simple solution out there. Thanks in advance for any replies! Art

Question by vestport    |  last reply


The more natural way of cleaning things...

At my workplace we basically have a specific cleaner or cleaning product for every task you can think of. From glass over stainless to plastics and desinfectants for lots of different surfaces. After a quick look into my cleaining cabinet at home I started to wonder if I am doing something wrong as I only have a few cleaning things for my use. Asking my friends also showed they have a big bunch of cleaning chemicals, plus the bottle of bleach that everyone down here has. So I though: Your grandma only had a few cleaning products and you learned most of things you need to clean from her. Considering I grew up healthy I guess she must have done something right.... Let's clean up with the cleaning myths, shall we? 1. What cleaning chemicals do you have? For quite a few people the list would start something like this: Dishwashing liquid, window, cleaner, bathroom cleaner, soap scum remover, floor cleaner, oven cleaner, several desinfectants.... If that is true for you too than we might be on to something already. 2. What cleaning chemicals do I really need? This is a good question as everyone is a bit different but I assume a healthy household here. Of course we need certain things to clean our various surfaces properly but it is far less than waht you have been told by the TV commercials.... These days we like to think if there is a special cleaner for something then of course we have to use it to clean properly. Unless you have trades people walking through with their wet dogs several times a day and see dust storms at least twice a week you really only need a few things. So let's get to the basics: 3. Old style cleaning and what you need for it - really the only stuff required to keep all clean and sanitised. a) Methylated spirit b) Clear ammonia - cloudy ammonia works too but be aware that the added soap can be a problem that leaves streakes c) Hydrogen peroxide - pool grade to be cheap in the long run d) Orange oil - citrus oil works great too if you prefer a different smell e) Soap - just basic soap, these stinky, slightly yellow and hard bricks - no fancy smelly soap ;) f) Several cleaning brushes but you should already have those g) Windows cleaning tools - the basic microfibre cloth and squeegee will do h) Several microfibre cloths - bigger ones for floors and walls, smaller for windows and the rest I) Yesterdays newspaper j) Baking soda With those few things we have everything to clean whatever comes up and if bought in bulk comes down to a few cents per bottle compared to a few dollars when you buy all the stuff you don't need. Lets figure out what the stuff does and how to use it: 4. Mixing and what to use it for.... The alcohol is a really good remover for everything greasy and also desinfects the surfaces. A quick spray and wipe on your bench is all that you need to remove oily residue or the mess from the kids. Mixed with a bit of soap and water (about 50-50) also removes sticky stuff like jam or syrup. If we use about 50ml of alcohol, 50ml of clear ammonia and 900ml of water we get one liter of really good window cleaner. The modern way is to use microfibre for the cleaning and a squeegee to get it dry, the old way just uses a cloth and then the window is "polished" with some old newspaper. The black ink reacts with the alcohol and form a mild abrasive while the paper soaks up the moisture, the result is a prefectly clean window in under 3 minutes. Orange oil is not only a powerful degreaser but also lifts old dirt or even glue residue. Used directly it will get rid of the remains from sticky tape, stickers and everything that other cleaners fails to get off - smoth surface and non soaking of course. 50ml of it with 50ml of ammonia and 100ml of alcohol per bucket makes a good florr cleaner and your house smells nice when done. Works best if you can use a microfibre cloth or floor wiper to dry the surface with it. In the kitchen we can find a lot of surfaces that are greasy and we already covered that bit, so lets get to the though stuff. The kitchen sink can become dull looking although it is not scratched. This is due to hard water, food residue, soap and other things. Best is of course to wipe it and dry it after use but who really does this every day? A pot scrubbing pad with some baking soda on it does the trick here. Make the pad nly moist and sprinkle the baking soda on it. Rub over the stainless and if too dry add a few drops of water. Once done rinse off and enjoy the difference. For hard to clean or badly turtured sinks you can try a ball of aluminium foil and coke - use it like a polish. The oven is often our worst nightmare. The cooktop is not far behind. But even here we can have a chance to clean without too much hard work or bad chemicals. Of course the best way is to prevent these spills and boil overs ;) For the cooktop some hot water and baking soda will soften the baked on stuff. Simply remove what you can with the hot water and then sprinkle the surface with baking soda. Cover all with the paper towels and if not wet enough add a bit more hot water so all shets are soaked. Leave ove night and wipe clean the next day. The oven is a bit of a problem once the side and back wall are filthy. If baking soda with a pot scrubber won't do the trick get some of these steel pads with soap in it. The soap in them is special in terms that you only need a little bit of water to remove almost anything with them - and they won't scrath enamelled surfaces. On the bottom we often have badly burnt in things that are next to impossible to fully remove. I suggest to cover the same way as the cooktop but also to add some orange oil. Just make a thick paste of baking soda and orange oil and wrok it into the soiled surface. Cover with wet paper towels and leave over night. Now you don't want to flood your oven, so that means you need to use a sponge or thick cloth that is big enough to wipe off the surfaces you soaked the day before. As the orange oil really is oil it pays off to use some alcohol in the cleaning water to get rid of the oil and grease a bit easier. Don't expect to see a clean and shiny surface after one treatment if the oven was badly misused, you might have to repeat the procedure a few times. If in doubt use the soapy steel pads for last clean and before soaking over night again. Three to four treatments are usually enough to clean even the worst disaster that can happen in an oven unless you baked it in for months... 5. Desinfecting and mouldy spots.... As said, the methylated spirit is basically just pure alcohol and kill almost anything that might harm you. But sometimes that just is not enough. And who really wants to spend an hour or longer to clean some mouldy spots in the shower or try to cover the smell by spraying room freshener? As a lst resort for everything I use Hydrogen Peroxide. The supermarket grade is only 3% and usually badly overpriced, so I suggest to get a small canister of pool grade peroxide. Do yourself a favour and ask them to install a tap on it - you don't want to do it yourself unless you already know how bad pool grade peroxide is! For your own safety when handling it I strongly recommend wearing long rubber gloves, nitrile is better but please no latex as it could start to burn when getting in contact with the peroxide. For high grade desinfecting or the removal of mouldy areas I recommend to dilute 1:5, one part of peroxide to 5 parts of water. Only for the mould removal on tiled, plastic, glass or metal surfaces you can use the peroxide pure from the container - but please add face protection when cleaning! Some spray bottles work with peroxide some just start leaking badly, if you want try an old bottle of chlorine based cleaner after really flushing everything out. The peroxide breaks down any organic material it comes into contact with, so not just the mould you want to remove but also your skin or eyes if you allow contact. On the skin you see white areas after contact and they won't go away until all the oxygen in the skin is gone that was left by the peroxide. If you act too late it means you might loose some skin flakes. The sure sign of overlook exposure on your skin is a burning sensation in the area - this only happens when the amount was big enough or your clothes got soaked. On your surfaces to clean you will notice bubbles forming quite quickly - this mean the peroxide is reacting with something, usually organic material. Let it bubble... Once it stops bubbling the surface is either sterile or the peroxide is used up, if it bubbles when adding fresh peroxide onto it then there is still crap left ;) It really helps to brush off the surface after each treatment as a lot of loose material will be flushed out when rinsing off. Once it looks and smells clean again it usually means it is clean :) 6. Special case: Wood... Be it wooden floorboards, furniture or just your chopping board - always try what the manufacturer recommends first! Untreated wood should never be cleaned with anything wet! Sealed wood, like floorboards or things with varnish on it to make it water proof can be cleaned the same way as mentioned above - but I would leave out the ammonia as some wood treatments simply won't tolerate it and might go dull instead of returning nice and shiny - spot testing required if you think you have to use ammonia as well! Orange oil itself makes a great furniture cleaner if the surface is smooth and sealed, but if it is not it means the oil soaks into the wood together with the stuff you want to clean off! It also takes off several paints and types of varnish if you work it hard enough and give it some time, so avoid this and be quick instead of forgetting to finnish the job ;) Always try to wet the surface as little as possible and wipe fully dry as soon as possible! Ok, good start but what is the real benefit? For me the actual benefit is that I know what I am using and exposing myself to. Just reading what is in most cleaning products we find at the supermarket makes me want to clean again after using them, just to remove their residues... I admit it might take some time to get used to mixing and just having a few ingredients for the cleaning but it does work great. Especially if you or your kids are already sensitive to certain chemicals or just of poor health in general you might see the benefit quite quickly. Some people really don't like the smell of ammonia but unless you are sensitive to it there is nothing to worry when using the household grade as we always dilute it down massively anyway. A good way to avoid the worst stink is by mixing it outside with the wind from behind. I won't say that certain commercial products are bad, harmful or not good enough for the job. Some are actually worth to have in some cases but I just say it is better to only have a hand full of chemicals that are not too bad instead of an endless list of things were we don't even know what's inside. For me the best is your surprise when it actually works better than you expected and report your findings here.

Topic by Downunder35m