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What is this hammer axe wedge tool? Answered

It's real old, as you can see the head of it is mushroomed from use. On the bottom it says "Champion tool co. Meadville, Pa" From googling I believe Champion tool company turned into Channellock. I thought it may have something to do with farrying, which is horshoeing, but it looks like its been used pretty hard as a wedge. It has a weird skinny handle. It's definitely a cast piece. I couldnt seem to find any other examples of this particular Champion tool co. 'wedge hammer'. Not on ebay nor google. Just wondering if someone would have any more info about it or possibly know the value of it.  

Question by avocadostains    |  last reply


Thin edge of the wedge in Texan education?

Any Texans out there? Did you know what (revisionist?) plans were afoot in your education system? Even as a panel of educators laid out a vision Wednesday for national standards for public schools, the Texas school board was going in a different direction, holding hearings on changes to its social studies curriculum that would portray conservatives in a more positive light, emphasize the role of Christianity in American history and include Republican political philosophies in textbooks. There have also been efforts among conservatives on the board to tweak the history of the civil rights movement. One amendment states that the movement created “unrealistic expectations of equal outcomes” among minorities. Another proposed change removes any reference to race, sex or religion in talking about how different groups have contributed to the national identity. - A greater emphasis on “the conservative resurgence of the 1980s and 1990s.” - A reduced scope for Latino history and culture. - Changes in specific terminology. Terms that the board’s conservative majority felt were ideologically loaded are being retired. (The new recommendations stress the need for favorable depictions of America’s economic superiority across the board.) - A more positive portrayal of Cold War anticommunism. Disgraced anticommunist crusader Joseph McCarthy, the Wisconsin senator censured by the Senate for his aggressive targeting of individual citizens and their civil liberties on the basis of their purported ties to the Communist Party, comes in for partial rehabilitation. - Language that qualifies the legacy of 1960s liberalism. Great Society programs such as Title IX—which provides for equal gender access to educational resources—and affirmative action, intended to remedy historic workplace discrimination against African-Americans, are said to have created adverse “unintended consequences” in the curriculum’s preferred language. - Thomas Jefferson no longer included among writers influencing the nation’s intellectual origins. Jefferson, a deist who helped pioneer the legal theory of the separation of church and state, is not a model founder in the board’s judgment. ... Heavy emphasis is also to be placed on the founding fathers having been guided by strict Christian beliefs. - Excision of recent third-party presidential candidates Ralph Nader (from the left) and Ross Perot (from the centrist Reform Party). - A recommendation to include country and western music among the nation’s important cultural movements. The popular black genre of hip-hop is being dropped from the same list. None of these proposals has met with final ratification from the board—that vote will come in May, after a prolonged period of public comment on the recommendations. Still, the conservatives clearly feel like the bulk of their work is done; after the 120-page draft was finalized last Friday, Republican board member Terri Leo declared that it was "world class" and "exceptional." First paragraphs from New York Times Headline paragraphs from Yahoo News It occurs to me that it may be appropriate for some members to have a rather forceful word with their elected representatives - at all levels - about the damage these proposals will cause in the American education system...

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Diagonally cutting across a plywood cylinder?

I want to make a couple of identical circular wedged speaker enclosures by cutting a large drum shell (16in by 16in floor tom) in half diagonally and then capping the open sides with discs, what would be the best/easiest method of holding the shell in place and making an accurate straight diagonal cut?i have access to a maker space but i haven't been in since their recent refit so i'm not sure what cutting machines they now have...

Question by ambientvoid    |  last reply


After I build a table of plaster to reuse and wedge my clay on, how do I attach a wire to cut the clay?

In the past I've seen plaster tables used to dry and wedge clay on. Most of them have had a metal pipe attached on the corner. At the top of this pipe there is a piano wire. The other end of the wire is attached to the table, so It is strung tightly at an angle. I'm not sure how to attach the pipe to the table and the wire to the pipe. It must be very sturdy. Thanks for your help.

Question by rosylee    |  last reply


Resin + a memory stick?

I'm trying to make a memory stick out of a cast of a wedge of lime. I will fill the cast with clear resin and place the memory stick in, and wait for it to harden. When the lime wedge is hard, with the memory stick inside,i plan to cut off the end of the wedge for a lid, so that the male part prodtrudes out when the lid is taken off. Does anyone know how i could cover the end bit of the memory stick so the resin doen't affect it? Also, looking at the lego block instructions, I plan to remove the plastic cover of my memory stick. Will the bare electrics be affected by the resin? If this makes any sense i'd be glad of any ideas! Thank you!

Topic by Nicolaclare7    |  last reply


Partial solution to trash in water? Maybe.

 Hey everyone, I had a couple of ideas for getting trash out of our storm drains/oceans/streams/rivers, the first one, this one has a couple of flaws: This is a very basic idea to skimming trash off the surface of water, a net. Preferably one with small holes to limit the amount of trash flowing out of it with the water. BUT, fatal flaw: It can also catch wildlife in it, and I'm still trying to figure out how to work around this. Any suggestions? Second, a filter of sorts for storm drains/streams: Imagine a metal mesh wedge, kind of like a snowplow wedge, that would go in front of drains and such (I'm thinking more for the type of streams and drains that have those big tunnels going under roads and sidewalks and emerge on the other side). The wedge could allow water to flow through, but direct trash off to the sides to collection tanks. I'll try to illustrate it below.                       - - - - - - - - <0 (the lines would be the stream, then the wedge, then the drain/tunnel opening. I couldn't do the tanks...) I'm eager for any suggestions/tips, improvements, and thoughts on these!

Topic by Zem    |  last reply


1970s animated series -innovation

Does anyone here remember an animated series ca 1970somethin, in which a group of people travels back to the dinosaur age and harness geysers, crack rocks by soaking wood wedges in water etc? Kinda silly but fun.

Topic by Toga_Dan    |  last reply


Can LEDs be wired up to replace 12 VAC garden light bulbs?

How do I put them together? Some are wedge base and others are bi-pins. Can they be made water proof? Because they use less energy, can I string more of them using the same 300w transformer?

Question by yopauly    |  last reply


Where are the A and B switch connections on the Wii Motion controller printed curciut board?

Wii Motion controller printed curcuitboard. I want to install remote A and B buttons for myWii controller. I can take the unit apart.  The A button looks straignt forward but the B button is comprised of four wedge shaped pads.  Where to a make solder connections to the PC board for the B button??

Question by maxthrottle    |  last reply


Automatic Solar Dog Door Opener

I have a dog door (http://www.hartleyglass.com.au/images/pet-door/pet-door3.png) but my dog is a bit anxious about opening the door with his head. I can't say that I blame him really. So I want to attached a solar powered device that would open when he is near by. I imagine I would mount it above the black bar, outsize where the is light with the solar panel wedge, attached to the door (see image uploaded).  I don't really know how to go about it.  The major components would be: 1. Solar panel wedge and batter (power source) 2. Proximity sensor (maybe RFID attached to my dogs collar?) 3. Motor (not sure how to detect when the door is opened or closed. etc etc  How does one go about building something like this? Any direction would be great Thanks Wayn

Topic by lucidwayn    |  last reply


Samsung pc power jack looks clogged. Need pic of clean jack lining to know if what I see is clog or part of jack?

My Samsung pc  suddenly is powerless.  Looks like there's a bit of dry leaf is wedged in an opening of the lining of the jack hole. What does the inside of a clean jack hole look like? 

Question by gadsden    |  last reply


Q: how to remove/salvage fixed magnets from dead HDDs?

Does anyone have any tips for removing the powerful magnets from dead hard drives? I have the hardest time prying them off the metal part they're mounted on once I've disassembled the drive. I've shattered one or two trying to drive a wedge under one with a hammer. Thanks!

Topic by gionwhorphin    |  last reply


Bulb problems on iped?

I have an iped electric moped with pedals which I believe has a in hub motor ( haven't looked yet) the problem I have is this the replacement bulbs are almost impossible to find The headlight for example is a 55volt 36/36 which I am finding impossible to find  the rear brake light is 55 volt 15/15 watt unsure of the wedge bulb parking light which is 5mm width and there is definitely no 55 volt wedge bulbs this size The only conclusion I can think of is to insert a dc converter which will drop the voltage to each bulb from 55v to 12v giving me more availability on bulb selection I am just curious if any one on hear knows where I can get 55volt bulbs ? I also noticed a post on here regarding someone looking for extra speed and was answered with disconnecting the grey loop wires under the top cowling Well done that man you gave good advice I done mine myself and yes the increase is there I don't know if I have to keep looking for answers on this but my email is nickcorish@gmail.com if anyone can help Many Thanks all Nick

Question by fosters1967  


Historical chainmaille

Alright a quick glance at my ibles will tell you i'm into armour. I really want to make some historically "accurate" maille, the problem is I haven't found a supplier for the right sized punched washers. At the moment I have started production on the riveted rings, I'm going for flattened rings with wedge rivets, holes are drifted not punched / drilled. My question is how far from accurate would it be to use all riveted rings in stead of half solid, half riveted? Any input will be appreciated (please add sources on historical pieces). Cheers, Knut

Topic by knutknackebröd    |  last reply


Oven blows up and no photos.

My wife was making potato wedges last night when in the middle of cooking the bottom burner catches fire and starts to sparkle like a party sparkler. I run for my camera and when I get back to the kitchen its over my wife turned off the stove and when I turned the stove back on nothing happens. Now that the fun part is over does anyone want me to do an Instructable on how to repair an oven element? The white marks are from the electrical fire.

Topic by Josehf Murchison    |  last reply


What is the easiest way to make a automotive bulb blink, similar to a strobe!? Answered

The bulb in question is a automotive 12 volt GE 904 wedge bulb.  Other bulbs could be used of course as this would be a simple mod.  And, yes, i know you can just buy car strobe kits, but I am trying to utilize what I have access to.  Our local scrap yard, which has several dozen cars in it allows free picking, so.... Anyone recommend what out of a car circuit I would need

Question by iminthebathroom    |  last reply


Smart Phone face glass replacement kit

What this world really needs is a temperature controlled face glass removal and replacement kit. Most of my working friends that have Smart Phones have broken or shattered touch screens. A quick search for touch screen replacement provide a bunch of Youtube videos and DIY kits for under $20. All the vids and kits say that too much, or too little heat will destroy the actual touch sensitive surface under the glass. The only source of heat they use is a blow dryer. I already break enough stuff that is not technology that I do not understand. My brain says a flat aluminum plate with suction holes to hold it in place and act as a handle during removal. Temperature controlled that can be set to the exact temperature for easy removal and replacement without applying too much pressure on the inner touch sensitive part. The online kits offer plastic wedges for popping the glass loose when/if you get the right temperature. An exact temperature face glass removal kit with the necessary wedges or possible strong monofilament fishing line to ease the glass away from the base. Everything I mentioned is beyond my knowledge and/or skills, but DIY Instructables or even kits to help out friends in need would be awesome and probably a good source of income for the entrepreneur.

Topic by GrumpyOldGoat  


Growing Grub

Here in France we suffer a lot with doryphores (Colorado Beetle). For the last few years I have grown my potatoes in straw which does seem to have reduced the number of beetles I've had to put up with. 1) A week or so before planting time (or, if you want to try and conserve water do this in winter), break open a few bales of straw and lay the wedges - tightly together - over your spud patch. 2) Soak for several days until saturated. (if doing over winter then forget this stage. The rain will do it for you) 3) Lay seed spuds over the soaked wedges and cover with loose straw. As the spuds grow just "earth up" with more loose straw 4) From time to time check the bottom is still damp. Water if required. I find that I rarely have to water 5)To harvest, or if you want just a few New Spuds, lift the loose straw and take what is wanted. 6) After all the spuds have been harvested you can either leave the straw in situ and re-use next year, dig it into the ground or move to a manure/compost heap to finish rotting down. Sorry I haven't got any pics. I didn't think of taking any as I've used this method for a few years and I've also broken my camera when I had a fall. Haz

Topic by Hazel Twig    |  last reply


whats a good design for a mini balsa wood bridge? it has to hold 100 pounds!?

Must have: mass- 45.0 grams or less length- must be longer than 38.0 centimeters (2.0 cm by 2.0 cm square rod must be able to pass through full length of roadway surface) height & depth- can't extend more than 12.0 cm above test support surface and 10.0 cm below it. roadway- will support 100lbs load, cannot be more than 2.0 cm above test support surface BRIDGES CAN'T BE WEDGED INTO SUPPORTS) someone please help, i'm stuck!

Question by erikabixby    |  last reply


Would this be illegal

Today while I was walking on the street I saw something that gave me an idea. I saw a piece of tin foil stuck to the road. I think this happened when tin foil flew out of someone's trash, landed on the road, and was run over by cars repeatedly. After the cars run the foil over it wedges itself into the cracks and doesn't come out unless you peel it off. Now here's my idea: buy a ton of tin foil and cover the street with it or write something on the street. Anyone know if this would be legal? Anyone ever done this before? Any suggestions if I do it? P.S. I live stateside if that matters

Topic by sardines454    |  last reply


How you make an invisible mouse?

Wired has an article on Pranav Mistry's invisible mouse. It costs $20 to build and looks fairly simple. It consists of an infrared camera and an infrared laser with a line cap. I assume this line cap makes the laser fan out into a thin wedge of light that skims just above your desk's surface. The camera sees your fingers as hot spots and software tracks the movement of these hot spots. Here is the original article: http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/07/computer-mouse-invisible/ It should be easy to make. Who want's to try it out and upload their code for us? I would if I could program.

Question by snotty    |  last reply


Light up skateboard risers

So i found this instructable on making light up skateboard risers : https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-skateboard-longboard-riser-lights-angled-riser/ and i have a slight issue with following it to the letter. My risers are not slim hard plastic wedges but instead are 1/2" solid rubber flats, so i want to know if anyone thinks there could be an issue with 'dremeling' a bit deeper than is neccessary for the electronics and taking advantage of the soft rubber by letting the exposed side seal itself against the bottom of my board when i bolt it into place so i dont have to glue the batteries as well as the electronics to weatherproof it? To clarify, i intend to hot glue the LEDs, wiring and switch but not the batteries so that they're easy to replace...

Topic by ambientvoid    |  last reply


i want to make a 'shelfing unit' that is an upright with slits across for the shelfs (with matching slits) to fit into.

The shelf will have two purposes: one for putting plant pots on and secondly as security against someone breaking in. I have to keep drilling to the minimum as its rented property so the uprights which are 4 x 1in will be wedged from sill to ceiling with just small (maybe 1in) angle brackets to fasten to wooden sill. Few questions: 1. How can I get a perfect fit between sill and ceiling? I know I can measure but it isnt even. 2. How to get those slits perfect? Would there be a certain type of jigsaw blade that will make the job easier?  3. Are there any other measures I can take eg. to stop the wood splitting at the end of the slit.

Question by merimaid    |  last reply


How could I fix this door-stop?

After a meeting at church in one of the side-rooms, my attention was drawn to the pathetic nature of this door stop.  People frequently come and go from the meeting (bathroom, etc.) and we want to keep the door cracked open a little, but the door stop is useless. it looks like somebody purposefully un-screwed the screw on the right to try to give the stop some more play, but it doesn't seemed to have helped at all.  the big solid door just wants to swing shut all of the time (hence the addition of that second wedge-shaped door stop that only helps a little).  Does anybody have any specific suggestions on how to fix this?  Maybe scuff the bottom of the rubber pad to help it grip more?  The floor looks like it's made of regularly waxed linoleum.

Question by jim5150jvc    |  last reply


Wood working help?

To make this question as short as possible, I'll get straight to the point. I am making a replica of a weapon from a game from wood, however the blade is quite large. Its a kind of battleaxe (see picture below) however I'm having a hard time finding a way to get quite a big piece of wood to slope to a point like a blade would. So basically I want to make a large piece of wood into a long wedge shape but I cant figure out how to do it. As you can see in the picture, using the hand on the handle for size reference, it is quite a large blade. The tools I have in my workshop are: A table saw, a band saw, a scroll saw, mitre saw, drills, handsaws, and chisels. (these are the only tools I think would come in handy, I do not have any tools such as a belt sander, though I do have an orbital sander if that helps) Any help it appreciated! Thanks.

Question by Hiyadudez    |  last reply


How do I determine if something is lead?

I found a hideously fake £2 coin in my change, I bit into it to double check and it left a noticeable tooth mark (also upon closer inspection the gold bits were rubbing off and it had an overall wedge shape to it). Because it's nice and soft and now worthless as currency, I thought I'd try that turn a quarter into a ring instructable with it. After only a few taps I saw a noticeable difference and it now occurs to me that it's probably made of lead. Bottom Line: - Dulled silvery metal - Very soft (can leave toothmarks if I bite hard) - Need a definite way to tell if it's lead before I attempt to make a ring out of it. I know it's not gonna kill me unless I keep attempting to take bites out of it, but I'd still like to know, thanks. (also I don't have access to any chemistry equipment for proper tests)

Question by madmanmoe64    |  last reply


Can you read it?

I've been meaning to show you this for a while, but I finally took some photos when I went to visit my parents. It's a clock. Really, it is. The arm rotates once per hour. The ball on the end is a camera, pointing at the ground. To tell the time, you walk around the clock to find out what hour is circled at the base of the arm, then look through one of the small round windows on the large sphere to see a TV that shows what the camera sees. The minutes are only marked every ten minutes, and in between those times the camera looks at featureless ground and confused people trying to see the time by looking up at the camera. On the hour, the arm raises in the air, and the camera has a look at the shop roofs, which are as ugly as commercial roofs the world over, and the speakers next to the benches (when they're working) make an odd fog-horn sort of noise. It's a bizarre, unfunctional object, in too small a space. Maybe if it was in a wide open square it would work as public interactive art, but here, wedged in a corner of a town with high unemployment it's a criminal waste of money.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Dutchj's Top Loading Rifle

Well, here's my Top Loading Rifle. I built this for the sake of building something after being inactive for such a long time. The original idea was to make a very solid gun that could be top-loaded with rods, so the pusher would never have to leave the gun, which would make for quicker reloading. That didn't work because rods always pull on and push each other, but I managed to complete it with different ammo. Some may find it to look a bit boxy, and that's because I didn't add anything to the gun that wasn't needed. No long barrel, no wedge-shaped stock, none of those things. The stock is strong enough as it is, and a longer barrel would only decrease the range ( dramatically ). Here's some basic stats:Type: RepeaterAmmo: Grey connector - green rod - orange connector - green rodCapacity: 9 without the pusher leaving the gun at all. otherwise 10, or more with mods.Range: Depends. I haven't tested, but I think it gets pretty average ranges for a repeater.Power: It drew blood at point blank.Reload time: Shorter then other repeaters with fixed magazines because the pusher never leaves the gun.INSTRUCTIONS: http://knexinnovation.net/forums/viewtopic.php?f=49&t;=846

Topic by Dutchj    |  last reply


i need help on a way to secure plywood for laying on over the bathtub, the far side has only 1/4&quot; curved and tile wall

I need to do a medical procedure and I want to get it out of my bedroom. I salvaged some 3/4 inch plywood  and need to find a way to securely attach the plywood temporarily  for the procedure and then be able to quickly take apart and store for 2 days latter I realized that working with the smaller plywood pieces was better for my spine. Once I do a couple of procedures I will see if I need to attach them together with  a quick release hinge or plate.  I need to lie down and need to be able to work the water controls ,so I will leave a space open by the controls and spigot . I can put a pillow there if I need to. I also found  out by accident that the home depot orange buckets are almost  the perfect size for use as stabilizer columns, with lids or a shim underneath and filled with water, they would make great  stable columns. So that really helps. The problem I need help with, is every time I think I found the answer a day later I realize it wont work. I am not a carpenter. I need to secure the plywood on the far side of the bath tub so I don’t have a flip over or collapse into tub. The far wall has ¼  inch of  curved bathtub and then the  tile wall. I  think I need to make a wedge device to  keep the board into the tiles and not let them shift or back out. The buckets maybe enough, but I have to move  my body a lot during the procedure  and don't want to take chances.  2 of the boards have 4 inches overhang on the bathtubs entry side, The lip for the bathtub in that side is I think 4 or 6 inches wide so plenty of support for the plywood. I have 4 inches  extra overhang , I could cut  that off . Or  if it would be better attach some quick release wood  for legs or even 2 inch PVC pipe if I could figure out an  attachment with quick release.    I was thinking of attaching a board perpendicular to the plywood to fit in the tub and keeping the plywood from shifting, and  maybe a wooden wedge  and notch system to push the board against the wall and keep it from backing out or shifting. I just had a brainstorm , put wooden perpendicular strips on both sides of the plywood . If exact and with the pails it maybe non shifting. Someone would have to help me with how to measure correctly, as my measuring  skills are horrible. I may have a tool that would carry the measurement over.  I did get a book on my new kindle that is all  about measurement tricks, but I have not had time to even load it up

Topic by escapefromyonkers    |  last reply


Random Knex Challenge 5- Practicals!

Random Knex Challenge 5- Practicals! Don't know what practicals are? Well here is your answer: Practicals are the kind of things you can use every day, such as whatever holders, door closers, ect ect... Meh, I can't be bothered typing more lol :-P Prizes: 1st place- A PATCH, 5* on 3 of their ibles, fave 3 of their ibles, a sub from me! 2nd place- 5* on 3 of their ibles, fave 3 of their ibles, a sub from me! 3rd place- 5* on 2 of their ibles, fave 2 of their ibles, a sub from me! Anyway, that is your challenge, you have to make something practiacal out of knex, here are some ideas to help you decide what to make: Whatever holders (PSP, laptop, DS, ect.) Laptop stands Door closers and openers Small things like door wedges Tape dispencer Pen and pencil pots Furniture (Chairs, tables, shoe stands) You get the idea? Good, here are some rules!- Must be 100% Knex (Tape and string is allowed) Must be practical No guns! Must be entered by Thursday 14th No entries made before the competition started are allowed. Entrants for this round: Shadowman39 Mr. Muggle Killer~safecracker Knex gun builder Chopstx Seleziona Haon Knexfreak95 Pindahoofd So, you in?, good, then let's get crackin'!

Topic by Hiyadudez    |  last reply


BBC Magazine readers give 40 ways we still use floppies

This fun article from the BBC website showcases readers' responses to Sony ceasing production of floppy disks.  There are 40 picked responses, many of which just talk about legacy hardware that still uses them for data storage, but some of them are easily 'ible-worthy.  Highlights: 1. I regularly buy floppy disks. I own a pub with a retro theme and I use them as beer mats. 4. Not as much a user as an owner of a great many floppies, I was planning to tile the roof of my shed with them (using the two existing corner holes to take the nails) until my wife forbade it. 13. I put handles on them and sell them as spatulas. I sell thousands of them a year. 18. I've always used an old floppy disk as an ice scraper for the car, just the right combination of rigidity and flexibility. Just don't use the side with the metal sleeve on. They last about a year before they need replacing from my endless pile from the 1990s. 28. Floppy disks are ideal "floppy table" stabilisers, whether in the dining room or on the patio. They are also good for wedges filling in gaps where wood has to be cut. I have also embossed them in a cement pathway in a splendid "talked about feature" as they are of no use whatsoever for storage. Enjoy!

Topic by yoyology    |  last reply


What kind of material to use?

Okay I've procrastinated long enough to do something with my ibook's heatsink. As some may or may not know, ibooks come with thermal pads, which I unwittedly removed the old one off mine, thinking it could be replaced with good old generic thermal paste..which technically would be better for it.Unfortunatly folks the heatsink wasn't designed to clamp down onto the cpu like a normal heatsink should do, as it has to cover several different gpu/memory chips of different sizes, making a small gap between the heatsink and cpu.I've heard of people using a square or even round piece of steel or copper or something to wedge in with some thermal paste. Well, all I can think of off hand to use that might work is some sheet metal that has some white paint or something coated on one side, and a round steel (?) rod out of an old printer that's been sitting around. I presume the latter would probably be better.Can someone suggest what would be best? Should I try cutting it with a hack saw or try getting someone's bandsaw so I can get a better cut? Right now my ibook is reporting a cpu temp of 53 of Celcious, which really, compared to when it's turned on from a cold start, is really F***** slow and very laggy, it often hangs for minutes at a time. It's horrible to use sometimes, but at the same time it owes me absolutely nothing so I won't cry if it burns out.

Topic by Punkguyta    |  last reply


Giant Match, Laser Flashlight Hack, Wooden Bike, Water Recycling...

Function clickclear(thisfield, defaulttext) {if (thisfield.value == defaulttext) {thisfield.value = "";}}Sign-up for our newsletter subscribe August 9, 2007 Welcome back! With the Go Green Contest going on we've been seeing some cool new Instructables. The hacker spirit is alive and well. Check them out below. Biotour.org Waste Vegetable Oil Conversion Diesel Bus Get a look at how this bus runs on a diet of nothing but vegetable oil.posted by TimAnderson on Aug 7, 2007 Laser Flashlight Hack!! Turn a MiniMag flashlight into a powerful DVD laser pointer! posted by Kipkay on Aug 7, 2007 Iron body - part II. Breaking stones and concrete Learn the secret behind this strongman classic.posted by sam noyoun on Aug 8, 2007 Giant Match Harness the power of 15,000 matches for an 8-foot strike-anywhere match.posted by Tetranitrate on Aug 2, 2007 Hydroponic Bog Garden (Water Recycling) Treat your waste water and grow a nice little garden in the process.posted by Biotank on Aug 8, 2007 Win a hybrid bike! Over $3,000 in prizes from amazon.com! $5,000 top prize! Growing Mushrooms: PF Tek Learn to grow a wide variety of mushrooms with the PF Tek growing technique.posted by nak on Aug 9, 2007 Earbud cord wrapper in 5 minutes or less! Put any old plastic card to use with just a few simple cuts.posted by spacematters on Aug 6, 2007 Recreate a Vanishing Ecosystem: The Eastern Vernal Pool Create your local breeding ground and help the local critters survive.posted by Tool Using Animal on Aug 6, 2007 Wooden Wedge Bike Build a simple bike that fits many sizes of rider. No welding required.posted by Woodenbikes on Aug 5, 2007 Now go build something awesome, and I'll see you next week! -Eric

Topic by lebowski  


Sitar bridge mod (for floating-tailpiece guitars) idea

The characteristic sound of a sitar is created by a bridge that gently rolls away from the strings; this creates a buzzing timbre which quickly depletes higher overtones in the string's vibration (I could draw some diagrams if anyone's interested). This type of bridge is something I'd like to make as a removable modification for a guitar. My guitar has a "floating tailpiece" as I believe it's called, in which the strings pass beyond the bridge to the tailpiece. The segment of the strings below the bridge have no part in tone generation, and so could have an object attached to them (a piece of wood wedged between the strings, perhaps) without affecting the guitar's tone. If some object (the "clamp") were attached to the strings immediately below the bridge, another object (the "sitar bridge") could be affixed to it some minuscule distance from the vibrating portion of the strings. The sitar bridge would not make contact with the strings at rest, and so would not be a node of vibration (and not affect the strings' pitch), but when the strings are played, their vibrations would make them rattle against the sitar bridge - much like the bridge of an actual sitar. So how about it? I think it'd be an interesting and relatively simple mod that could be made to be removable and not destructive at all to the actual guitar. I unfortunately have no idea how to refine the concept any further than what's written, so I leave it up to any willing DIY-ers. It all makes sense in my head, but I may have accidentally left out some important particulars of this kind of mod, so please ask any questions you have. Because this mod relies on the strings below the bridge in a floating tailpiece guitar, I don't think it would work on most solid-bodied guitars, but if anyone can come up with a similar mod for the more common bridge type, be my guest. Also remember that the "clamp" below the bridge cannot rely on the tensile strength of the strings, as not only are they not terribly strong, their tension needs to remain intact so that the guitar can be played in tune.

Topic by Impasse    |  last reply


(newsletter) Animated LED Snowflake, Mocha Latte, Mug Brownie...

Dec 4, 2008 Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup1","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); } Welcome back! Get your tools ready for the biggest building competition of the year!The Craftsman Workshop of the Future Contest is open to any project that uses tools. Share your amazing ideas, and win a $20,000 Sears gift card! Craftsman is also giving you the chance to show off your workspace in the Workshop of the Future Contest: Show Your Space contest! Simply post pictures of your current space, or the space you wish you hand, and you're entered to win a weekly Craftsman tool prize!Homemade Holidays are here again!Sending personalized cards to friends and loved ones? Enter them in the the Homemade Holidays: Holiday Card Contest and win some cool prizes! Making something sweet for the holidays? Then enter it in the Homemade Holidays: Holiday Treats Contest and win a custom laser-etched rolling pin!We're giving you one more week to submit your best creation powered by AA, AAA, C, or D batteries for the SANYO eneloop Battery Powered Contest! The new deadline is Dec. 14.The winners of the DIY Halloween Contest have been announced! See who won! Color a robot and send it in to help us decorate Eric's office! DIY Halloween Contest Winners. See who won! Animated Christmas LED Snowflake by unusualelectronics Save $11,644.07 on designer lighting! by edwinston14 Paper Snowflakes by CYNICALifornia Any project that uses tools is eligible! Extended for one week! Mug Brownie by Spastic Run Video and Data Through Ethernet by mixadj Christmas Ping-pong Lights by amaze1 Bring Dead Ni-Cad Batteries Back To Life by Plasmana Tatted Mask by TotusMel Build a "Baghdad Battery" by IanW Holiday Orange Wedges! by ehensel1 Make a New Keypad for an Electronic Lock by OldGrover Homemade Holidays Contests Share how you send the perfect message Win a custom laser-engraved rolling pin. Ends this weekend! Chocolate Frappuccino Mocha Latte by flio191 Duct Tape Messenger Bag + Hardware by neumaics Delicious Chocolate Chapstick Honey Balm by belsey Nifty 3D Christmas Tree Cookies by DotatDabbled Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric Sign-up for this newsletter: function openSubscribePopUp(src){ var emailValidate = /\w{1,}[@][\w\-]{1,}([.]([\w\-]{1,})){1,3}$/ if(emailValidate.test(src.value) == false){ alert("Please enter correct email"); return; } window.open("/newsletter/newslettersignup?email=" + src.value,"newslettersignup2","status=yes,scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=420,height=250"); }

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


First Day Interning at Instructables

Today is my third day as an intern at the downtown SF Instructables office. I thought I'd recount Day 1 as a day-in-the-life! It starts off with: "Don't come in before 10am" from Eric, and a mention from Noah (my more direct boss): "We recommend that folks bring their computers, a contractor trash bag, a good pair of running shoes, a banana and hard hat on their first day - that way, they are prepared for whatever challenges may await them at Instructables." So I walked out to the office, found the robot-painted door wedged between the liquor store and the Mexican restaurant, and walked up the stairs. It's one big room- open tables everywhere covered in stuff of all sorts: duct tape, paper towels, electronics, crocheted Pac-Man, a giant styrofoam face, an electric toaster. Everyone is at their workstations- one folding a 3D paper alphabet, another fiddling with a breadboard. The devs coding on one side of the room while walking on treadmills at the computer and DJ'ing the room. Anyway, I walked in and looked around, and was greeted with a tentative "Hello?" from someone at a desk*. I clarified that it was my first day of work, and that cleared things up. Bilal, the artist-in-residence, gave me a shoulder tap, and I was welcomed by Eric and Noah. *Apparently random strangers occasionally wander up the stairs. We now have a laser cut "days since a random stranger walked up the stairs" counter for the office. Noah showed me around, introducing me to the editors' corner, the marketing team, showing me the rooms along the back wall: "Office, sewing/electronics lab, office, store room, office, prize room, woodshop/laser cut room, 3D printer. Probably ask someone before you use the 3D printer. Test kitchen, game corner." And that was it. Back at his place in the editor's corner, he nodded. A brief pause, and then I asked, "Is there anything in particular I'm supposed to do?" Noah laughed. "Good question! Since you're just here for the summer, you'll be doing a lot of making stuff. You can use any of the supplies, or if you need to buy anything, let me know." There are a few other things I get to do, too. I can feature Instructables, and am encouraged to do outreach to people who aren't on Instructables but ought to be. But right now, most people in the office are working hard on entries for the Make it Real contest. So I got to work. You can check out my page for the fun things I've begun to make here at the office. A few other key points of the first day experience: -2pm check-in: everyone in the office meets around the lunch table to say what they've been doing that day. -Membership at TechShop- lots of fun toys for making things! -Picking up things from the MakerFaire -Getting project cards Since then, I've gotten some fabric and done some sewing for a project I haven't posted yet and worked with CNC paper cutting, 3D printing, taught myself Google SketchUp and Silhouette, and have begun to list all the things I'd like to work on this summer All right, that's enough writing. Time to make!

Topic by SelkeyMoonbeam    |  last reply


Oodassault 3.7

Yeah, I've done this too much. 3 different models, 7 revisions for this model alone, 2 already posted. The 3.6 was satisfactory but I noticed there were still some problems for some people and it required some tweaking to make sure it worked right even though it was pretty reliable when it was set up right. This one is a lot more user friendly. I changed up some things so it's guaranteed to work without all the tweaking. It was just a few minor mods really. You won't probably catch any changes from the image alone at first so I'm obviously going to list them. -The simplest but probably most effective is adding another light grey in the middle above the magazine. At first I had a gap there to make stripper clip loading easier. However, it made the ammo shoot up a little higher and sometimes would cause it to spin out faster. I also suspect this may have been the reason a second round would be dragged out if the magazine wasn't set up right. -There's a green rod and spacer wedged in between the bottom of the magazine where the tilt bands are placed so that it doesn't squish the mag pusher. This allows for a weaker rubber band on the pusher so there's less chance of it exploding. -I changed how the the magazine rests against the rest of the gun by using mini knex adapters. I'm not sure if this is required as far as reliability goes but I suspect that it may have been why some people's guide rods were shot off. The magazine tilted in ever so slightly but just enough for the ammo to catch the rod. The mini K'nex also have a larger gap so it's a little easier to slide ammo in. Not too much of a difference but hey, whatever works. -The one you guys probably will like best. I changed the tilter just a little. It requires a rubber band to stay up but I didn't think it was a big deal. It allows the magazine to tilt out farther and the red connector can grip around an orange connector on the trigger guard in such a way that it takes some of the stress off your finger. This means you can use more tension on the magazine to make sure it stays shut without wearing out your finger. -Finally, I knew this for a bit but decided I'd finally show you that you can use green rods instead of white rods on the top middle three holes (the bottom pairs and the front and back pairs would be required to keep the gun sturdy). You can use green rods then instead of black Ys to block the green rods in the holes. I used this method for a simple rail like thingy and added a custom sight. It's more for looks than function but it actually works quite well. So yeah that's it. Between all the mods, it's guaranteed to work perfectly now as far as I know. Nothing has gone wrong since building the gun with everything changed. No magazine explosions, double shots, or anything that would otherwise be undesirable. Also, it's a little more accurate and gets a bit more range I'm guessing thanks to slightly more stable ammo. I'm not trying to make this sound super hyped. You should just know that I come from a long line of descendants whose ancestors built the Great Wall of China.

Topic by TheDunkis    |  last reply


A week in a proper car.

I've been driving Womble for exactly a week now, and some things have occurred to me. I thought I'd share them, in no particular order.I enjoy driving again.Because I'm driving, not steering. No power steering, no servo brakes, I am in touch with what the car is doing every second I'm driving. I do something, and I get instant feedback. I'm suddenly redeveloping all the good driving habits I used to have - looking further ahead and watching traffic more, correct hand-position on the wheel, feeding the wheel through my hands as I turn, slowing with gears before brakes.It's a cliche, but it's seat-of-the-pants driving.I drove Kitewife's Focus a couple of days ago, it was a disaster! Taps the brakes, do an emergency stop - steer with two fingers, weave all over the road. There's no feedback, nothing to tell me by feel exactly how much braking I'm doing, or how fast the wheels are turning. I had to look at the dials to check the speed and watch the revs before changing gear.Modern cars, I have decided, are only one step short of video games.Maybe that's part of the reason for the rise in roadrage?There's no need to take pride or care, because the car does it all for you. Spend enough money, and the only thing that will kill you is if you drive at a tree. Even that may not be possible with radar-triggered brakes soon to become more common.If you have abdicated all responsibility for your safety to a mindless mechanism, who do you blame if something goes wrong? Where do you direct your anger? The only target left is the other driver.I seem to have joined a sub-culture.I'm not the only driver of a proper Mini in my area. I pass two or three every day. Amongst others, I've seen a white one, striped pink, with a bubbly blonde driving. I've seen a 70s Traveller in immaculate condition. Several jobbing Minis, in every-day-driving state, and a Mini wedged full of teenage lads, fully kitted out for racing, roll-cage and all.Every single one of them waved, flashed their lights or otherwise said "hello" as we passed. I have never seen drivers of other kinds of car do that. It's pretty good, getting a friendly wave from a stranger. It lifts your day, puts a smile on your face.It's like we share a happy secret. Minis attract comment more than cars that cost fifty times as much.If people see a Ferrari in the car park, they might nudge each other and make admiring comments, but if they see a Mini, they come over, say hello. On Saturday, a huge hairy rocker, returning to his big Japanese family car, children in tow, left his children in his car, and came over for a chat about the surprisingly roomy interior of my Mini, and an idle chat about the type of engine (single-point injection, if you're wondering).People might wish they could afford a supercar, but they are genuinely jealous of people who actually own a proper Mini.Everybody has a Mini in their closet.I'm not really a petrol head, and I don't work with petrol heads, but suddenly everybody wants to talk about cars. They all seem to have had an adventure in a Mini, their own or a friend's. Half of them regret having sold their Mini years ago.OK, so the old Minis don't meet modern safety rules. They're slow, utterly lacking in luxuries (my heater has two settings - on or off), but if somebody started building them new, using the original molds for the panels and frames (they still exist), and charged five or six thousand pounds a pop, they would make an absolute fortune.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Rebuilding NordicTrack ski machine drive rollers

Many people still buy and use a NordicTrack Ski Machine, although these machines are not as popular as they once were. I have talked to people who say they just plain wore out a ski machine. The part that wears is the one-way clutch inside the drive rollers. NordicTrack makes the one-way clutch sound very mysterious. In reality it is a one-way needle bearing and is available from Amazon or locally from a good bearing shop. The internal diameter of the one-way needle bearing used in my machine (Challenger, similar to a 303) is 5/8 inch. The outer diameter is 7/8 inch. The width of the one-way needle bearing from end to end is 5/8 inch. I originally had hopes of being able to install new one-way needle bearings, myself; but, they together with the bronze sleeve bearings on either side of the one-way needle bearing inside each drive roller are pressed into place. Pressing bearings is not a job for the average home tinkerer but requires a bearing press capable of exerting tons of pressure in a very precise manner. You can often have a local machine shop press the bearings in your machine's drive rollers. Or, you can send them away to Nordic Track Guy and have them rebuilt for about $33 with a one week turnaround. The core of the rollers really does not wear out, but new rollers are available on the Internet from $65 to $95, depending on the vendor. From what I can find, some models used an alternate size. Check to be certain you order the correct rollers, if you choose to replace. One of my drive rollers suddenly began to hiccup. It seemed that the clutch did not always release immediately when I pulled my foot forward. Then I noticed a little mush in the response when I began to bring my foot back on the push stroke. Before you rebuild or replace your rollers, try this: Remove one side of your Ski Machine. See the second photo and check the exploded diagram in your manual. Four nuts and two screws, all plainly visible, need to be removed. Slide the washers and the roller off of the top side. The shaft and flywheel can be wiggled out of the other side without removing anything from that side. Remove the washers and the roller from that side, too. Flush the one-way needle bearing by squirting some penetrating oil, like Liquid Wrench, into the bearing. Work it both ways with your smallest finger. Push a facial tissue into the shaft hole in the roller and sop away the penetrating oil and any metallic dust it lifts. Do this several times. Let the rollers air dry. A little lubrication is good. People who comment on lubrication for one-way needle bearings use Tri-Flo (I am not familiar with it.) or they use a little ATF transmission fluid. You want enough to lubricate, but not so much that the bearings slip. (But, see the comments below where the oil impregnated bronze sleeve bearings are supposed to supply enough lubrication for the needle bearings.) Put the rollers back in place on the shaft. Check to be certain they grab on the rearward stroke and release on the forward stroke. Reassemble the machine. Do not forget the washers between the roller and the side board. My machine works again as it should. The day will likely come when this simple fix does not help, and I will need to rebuild or replace the rollers then. But, for now, my rollers have a new lease on life. What follows is for your information. The first photo is of a portion of the back cover of the manual that came with my machine. It shows a cutaway image of the drive roller. The black printing is mine. Notice the three cylinders inside the drive roller. The outer two are bronze sleeve bearings. The center one looks like a roller bearing, but is a one-way needle bearing. A one-way needle bearing is essentially a roller bearing, but the rollers are able to move forward and backward a little in their cage. There is a wedge shape for the axle of each roller that causes the rollers to bind between the bearing cage and the shaft when the rotation is in one direction, but they are free in the other direction. Here is a description of how they work with graphics. This link is for an Instructable about a number of modifications I made to our NordicTrack ski machine, including how it can be stored vertically in a closet. If you do not have a digital monitor for your skier, or need to replace one, here is an Instructable on how to make your own from a digital bicycle speedometer.  Check NordicParts for any parts you need, also Nordic Fitness Ski Machines. Danny at Nordic Fitness Ski Machines has some very nice new rollers for sale.

Topic by Phil B    |  last reply