The forums are retiring and are now closed for new topics and comments. The existing content will remain online and accessible through 2020 to provide everyone the opportunity to save any relevant information. In the spring of 2021, these Community forums will be taken offline.

Search for wire pliers in Topics


Can any one identify these strange pliers?

I have been lent a pair of unusual pliers, and have found them to be incredibly useful for working with wire chains. I would like to buy a pair, but can not find anything that resembles them, so does anyone have any idea as to what these are called? Many thanks in advance!

Topic by ChrisM590    |  last reply


Can someone help me to identify an unusual type of pliers?

I have been lent an unusual type of pliers, which I have found to be very handy to work with wire chains, but I would like to buy myself a pair, but have no idea what to search for. If anyone has any ideas to what these are called that would be brilliant!

Question by ChrisM590    |  last reply


Connection of VERY short nichrome wire? Answered

I have a VERY short piece of 32 gauge nichrome wire that I want to connect to 2 copper wires. When testing, I have connected them like on the picture, using tweezers and a pair of pliers. But I really need to find a more professional and durable way of doing it. It's important to keep as much as "free" nichrome wire as possible in the middle. I don't want to waste all the length inside a butt crimp, or wrapped around the copper wire. Is there a tiny, minitature terminal somewhere, that only steals 1-2 mm of the nichrome wire? Or am I wishing for something impossible?

Question by karolina81    |  last reply


Key chain multitool

I was thinking of getting a multitool that is small enough to fit on your key chain. Here comes the dilemma though... I don't know what tool to get. Leatherman has the squirt and the Micra. Other companies have ones as well... I was thinking of getting the squirt, but if I do, I cant decide if I want the P4 (pliers) or the E4 (wire cutters). Ahhh I cant make up my mind. Any help? The thing about the pliers and wire cutters is I don't have a set of wire cutters. However, pliers would probably be used more often. But if I need the wire cutters, I would wish that I had got them instead. Right now I am leaning towards the pliers, but...

Topic by its a lion    |  last reply


Is repairing a burned tool/drill motor easy?

I assume this applies to all tools. So, I have a burned out grinder motor (wires). The spining axle 'thing' looks fine. Can't I just re-wound those wires on outer ring of the motor and reconnenct it (good as new?) also I may have scraped (with pliers) the replacement/wounded copper wire when bending it away from center . Will I need to rewind it with another set of wire....have I ruin it given there's some sort of non-conductive coating on the copper wire which I scratched off. I would appreciate any specific advice on reconnecting the power source wires to the wire/magnetic field area as well. Or should I just spend $200 on a new one :)

Question by jimboa2020red    |  last reply


What's the best way to bend coat hanger wire, for making a DIY GameKlip?

So I discovered my Samsung Galaxy S3 supports USB gamepads.  Well long story short, I quickly hacked apart an old original Xbox controller, replaced its 10 foot xbox cable with a 1 inch USB cable, and it works GREAT in most gamepad-supported Android games like Dead Trigger and Shadowgun.  The next obvious move was to make a holder to attach my phone to the gamepad, to have a portable gaming device, like an nVidia Shield.  Now I know commercial solutions exist, like the Gameklip, but they're all designed for the PS3 controller, which I don't have. So I've attached pictures of my first two versions.  The first picture showing the regular coat hanger wire wrapped in black electrical tape.  It held the phone just fine, but it was butt ugly, because I used electrical tape to protect the phone from the steel coat hanger wire.  So I made a second one (2nd picture), using a rubber/plastic coated coat hanger, thinking it would look better, because I wouldn't need to wrap it in electrical tape. Well the problem is that I'm so horribly bad at bending wire, and at planning, and measuring, that I had to make so many corrections, that it too looks butt ugly.  It's a completely different design than the first one, for starters.  I can never think of how to design these things on paper.  I always just get a rough idea in my head, and then play it by ear as I go along.  But because steel coat hanger wire is so incredibly tough, every time I try to bend it with pliers, or a vice grip, I end up damaging the nice plastic coating, making it look ugly.  Multiply that by the number of times I had to make corrections, and well, you can see the result.  The second design is the one I'd like to stick with, however.  Mechanically speaking, it is perfect.  Two nubs on the bottom, and a nub on the left and right sides, hold the phone in place using gravity and friction.  Then the whole thing uses spring-tension to compress the left and right nubs inwards, squeezing the phone in place, but without letting these nubs get in the way of the USB port or the headphone port.  One can adjust the width and tension of these left and right nubs, just by squeezing or stretching them apart, to fit different sized phones and cases.  Finally, two support legs are left at the end of the wire to easily place the whole thing on a table. Both versions are attached to the controller in the same way:  I started with two loops, as small as I could make them, right next to each other.  Then I just bolt the whole thing to the controller through those two loops, and two holes I've drilled in the controller's memory slot.  It's an incredible pain in the ass to try and get the nut and washer in the tiny amount of space in that memory card slot, but I managed to do it twice. I want to build a third, good looking one.  So now I've gone out and invested in some proper, straight steel wire (of the same thickness and stiffness as the coat hanger wire), and some heat-shrink tubing to protect the phone from the steel.  But I need advice on how to do this properly, so that it looks good.  The only way I can use the heat-shrink tubing, is to put it on FIRST, BEFORE bending the wire.  I couldn't possibly imagine how to do it AFTER bending the wire.  But the problem is, I'm worried that my vice grips/pliers will damage it the same way they damaged the plastic coating of the coat hanger. Any suggestions/tips would be greatly appreciated!

Question by moeburn    |  last reply


A Good Multi-Tool

I am trying to find a nice multi-tool that include the following features and not too expensive (less $100). EDIT: I meant less than $100. Pliers Wire Cutter Saw File 3" Knife (non-serrated) Scissors Can Opener Bottle Opener 2-3 Flat Screwdrivers (Large, Medium, Small) Phillips Screwdriver I like the look of the SOG PowerLock S60 ($50) with a replaced blade ($8) (1/2 serrated to straight) because of the geared pliers, the replaceable/interchangeable parts, the 1/4" drive and all the tools I want. Can anyone recommend tools that would fit for me?

Topic by DELETED_bertwert    |  last reply


And the winner of the improvisation contest is...

I was just going for a walk, and what do I see? One of those heaters, as shown in the picture.  I immediately saw (pun and hint not intended) the switches, and was anxious to get them home. Unfortunately, I wasn't able to remove the connectors by hand, and didn't have and pliers or wire cutters.  I was 25 meters - less than 5 minutes away from home, and way too lazy to go back and bring some tools. What do I do? Look at the net/grill/cover/protector thing and immediately think that it's sharp and cut through the wires easily, DUH!  Not sure where I got the idea, but I thought that the side, where all of the smaller rods are welded onto the main one, would be pretty sharp. On a second thought, it might not have actually sawed through, but might have ripped through the wires, strand by strand, since it was soft copper. Just thought I'd b̶r̶a̶g̶ share :)

Topic by Yonatan24    |  last reply


What are the basic tools I need?

I have a list of the basic tools I will need for this. If you can add anything that would be great. 1.LEDs 2.Wire 3.Duck Tape 4.Soldering Station 5.Persision Screwdriver 6.Razor Knife 7.O-Rings 8.Springs 9.Batterys 10.Needle Nose Pliers 11.Clamps 12.Screwdriver Any other suggestions would be great. Thanks.

Topic by amature engineer    |  last reply


What is this mystery electronic component? Answered

I bought an assortment of components: resistors, diodes, capacitors, all mixed together on about a meter of cut tape from a reel for an automatic PCB populating machine. The original reel was marked as surplus from DEC and looks to be about 20 years old. One of the components is this black cylinder, like a very fat resistor, about 5 mm long and 3mm diameter. No resistance or diode action. Brittle and crack off with a pliers like ferrite. They do not melt or burn with a candle flame. The wire lead goes straight through and out the other side. Can be picked up by a magnet, but are not themselves magnets. They have no markings of any kind, but have shiny flecks. Are they some kind of magnetic tape position marker to tell the insertion machine what component is next? Say like a binary code?

Question by iectyx3c    |  last reply


GE Microwave Makes Humming Sound with Smell

My GE microwave (JE1860SB 002) made a cracking sound and stopped working. After some research, I removed the cover and checked the fuse and it was good. I then checked the thermal flame/sensor and discovered it was burned out. I replaced the thermal flame/sensor and now the unit comes on but makes a loud humming sound and has a burnt smell. The next step (according to my research) is checking the diode (cable) which is attached to the capacitor. It appears I need to discharge the capacitor before proceeding? --- BEFORE replacing the sensor, the unit had been unplugged for over one week….AFTER replacing the sensor, the unit was plugged in for about 5 minutes on Jan 25, 2018.- What is the best/safest way to discharge the capacitor? Is an insulated screw driver or pliers needed or will a rubber handle tool work considering the time it has been unplugged? (Capacitor pictured below) - Should I remove the two connecting wires and diode before attempting to discharge the capacitor? - If the diode is bad should I still check the Magnetron? - If the diode is good, what is the next item to check/test?

Topic by BayouDude    |  last reply


Tools to get when learning/playing around with electronics???

Hi.   I've recently started making small electronic projects, first starting with a pack I bought from an electronics store that pretty much comes with all I need (resistors, transistors, springs, wires, batteries etc) it's fairly amateurish and for a beginner. But I have some more involved things i would like to start.. and a few little things lying around I would like to play with, take apart and salvage for working parts etc.. So I am at the stage now of wanting/needing tools for jobs. I was wondering if anyone could provide me with a list of things I would need? The electronics repair kits I have found on the internet usually cover computer repair/electronic repair tools for around $80 including screwdrivers, pliers, alligator clips, torch, and soldering iron kit etc... and I have considered buying an all in one kit liked his but if I was too just buy a few things at a time what would be the things I should get first? I'm hoping to over time build up a large collection of quality tools for future long term list so I don't really want anything cheap. And safety is definitely a factor.  If anyone had any idea's or could help that would be great, Thanks. Vulnic

Topic by Vulnic    |  last reply


Longest Comment on Instructables (Possibly)

Https://www.instructables.com/answers/What-essential-tools-should-I-include-in-my-dorm-r/The longest comment on this site is one by Guardian Fox on the "What survival tools should I keep in my dorm room tool box?" If anyone can find a longer one, please PM me the link.Keep in mind, he typed this with his own fingers, not by holding down the paste command for a day. If that's what you want, then go to https://www.instructables.com/community/the_forum_for_spam/ Source: Guardian FoxFor the dorm room, you only need a few tools. You're not going to be renovating, and you're not going to be doing much woodworking. You aren't allowed to do anything at all to the room beyond hanging pictures (if that), and most dorms forbid power-tools in the rooms no matter what you're use them for. Here's my take on what you'll need for the dorm. I've included a lot of things that seem unnecessary, and you can probably live without some of it... but the kit will get you through nearly any problems you'll encounter at school or in an apartment:-At least one decent multi-bit screwdriver. Look for something with a comfortable grip and sturdy construction. Avoid gimmicks like built in flashlights. I recommend the Piquiq brand which comes in a few different sizes and can be found in many hardware stores in North America. You can usually get their three-piece set for less than $20.-A set of jeweler's screwdrivers. Get a cheap set because these little things WILL get lost. Look for something with at least a few unusual bits as well as the usuals. Get a 30ish-piece set for less than $20. Most handy if you've got a thing for messing with your electronics, but also great for changing a watch battery, fixing glasses, etc.-A basic hammer. Nothing fancy needed here, and I've always preferred an ordinary wooden-handled hammer anyway. Go for a smaller hammer if you only plan on hanging pictures, get a regular-sized hammer if you plan on using it to do real work later on. Stanley is a good brand with decent prices, but there are lots of good budget-priced hammers out there. Drop by a hardware store and pick one that feels good in your hand. Less than $20 for a brand name. $10 or less for a bargain hammer. Make sure the head of the hammer is securely attached to the handle, no matter what brand you pick but a little tiny wiggle is ok. Hang a picture or tap a few finishing nails into a small project. Very handy, even when you use it wrong.-Two utility knives with snap-off blades. One with the small size, and the other with the larger size. There are hundreds of brands of these on the market, and a lot of them are junk so spring for an Olfa (the best i.m.o.) if you can find it. Richard is a decent low-cost brand which is often found in paint stores. Again, avoid gimmicks. The most important thing you need to know is if the locking mechanism works well or not, as a utility knife can become dangerous if the blade is going to slide around while you're using it. Good knives can be around $10-20 each. Cheap, "disposable" knives can be found for less than a dollar, but be sure to buy something that seems sturdy. Add a self-healing cutting mat from the dollar store, and while you're there get a metal ruler for cutting straight lines. Smaller utility knives are good for light-duty applications like trimming photographs or opening packages. Larger utility knives are good for harder work like cutting lots of cardboard-A measuring tape. You probably already have a ruler for school, but a measuring tape is much more useful for around the house. Get a 16' tape for good versatility. Choose one that has a sturdy housing and a tape that slides in and out easily. Bennett is a good budget brand you can find for less than $10 and I recommend theirs over any of the name-brand tapes out there. If you can't find that brand, go to the building supplies store and ask what brand the clerks and outside staff use around the shop. You could skip this one during college, but you'll need it one day and it's the kind of thing you can make uses for.-Pliers. For around the house and crafting I find a pair of long-nose pliers more handy than a pair of linesman's pliers, but both tools have their place. Locking pliers (aka vice grips) are also super-handy. Get one or a set, but avoid the bargain brands. Look to spend at least $7 each for basic pliers, and at least $12 for a good pair of locking pliers. -An adjustable wrench (aka thumb-wrench). Pick a smaller-sized model for your toolbox. Most of the nuts and bolts in the house will be small anyway. Go for something that opens up to 1" or 1 1/2" Brand isn't an issue, but make sure it operates smoothly and won't jam or work loose. Spend less than $10. -Scissors. A usable, general purpose pair of scissors can be found at the dollar stores or in an office supply store. Make sure they open and close smoothly and that the blades don't wiggle. Look for one with a metal screw at the pivot so you can tighten it if it works loose. If you're using it routinely for cutting fabric or any other specific task, spend some extra money and get the right kind for the job or at least a good pair of general purpose ones. Less than $5 for cheap ones, $20+ for quality ones.-Sewing notions; A pack of needles, a roll of white thread, a roll of black thread, and a roll of transparent thread, a few safety pins and any spare buttons you find. That should get you through any wardrobe fixes you may need. Each item in the kit should be a dollar or less, and you can save money by starting with a pre-made kit from a dollar store and adding a few of your own extras. Also highly recommended is this, http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.1352 , but keep in mind it is cheap for a reason and needs constant attention.-A soldering iron if it's allowed in your room, and only if you're working with or fixing electronics or jewelry. Get a scrap piece of plywood or something to use as a work surface. $15 for a basic 30w iron. Another $10 for a safer stand.-A toolbox that holds everything. I like the ones that double as a step-stool, which you can find for $20-$30 if you look hard enough (mastercraft and rubbermaid brands). You might like something different, but small plastic toolboxes and even small plain steel ones are all quite cheap so go look and see what you like. You can even use your imagination and just use a plastic tote, a tacklebox, a backpack/messenger bag, shoebox, etc. Just pack your tools in it neatly and avoid putting the heavy or sharp ones on top of the ones that might break.-A plunger. If your dorm room has a bathroom, this is a must even if you never have to use it. It's an insurance policy against one hell of a mess. $10-$15.Anyway, that's all I can think of for tools. Craftier folks need more gear, and less DIY-prone folks need less. Use your best judgment and buy only what you can afford and might actually use. Pick up a few fasteners and adhesives too, usually as needed. Here's what you should probably keep on hand.-A package of assorted picture-hangers and hooks (if hanging pictures is allowed in your dorm). Buy a pack at the dollar store. A few extra finishing nails and small screws would be a good addition to this as well.-Thumbtacks. Buy a pack at the dollar store or office supply store.-Scotch tape, packing tape, duct tape (or Gorilla tape).-Twist ties. Get a bunch from a pack of trash bags.-A package of superglue. Rather than one large tube, get the pack with several tiny tubes so you don't lose your entire supply when one dries up.-Craft wire. Use it wherever you might use a twist tie, but also can be bent into whatever shape you need to become a tool or a piece of art. Dollar stores carry rolls of it often at 2/$1

Topic by DELETED_M4industries    |  last reply


Microwave stopped heating and I fixed it.

Our microwave is about two years old and it stopped heating. The fan ran and the carousel went around, but food did not warm. I took it out of the upper cabinet mount and opened the case. I know about the big capacitor and discharged it with a screwdriver after disconnecting the power. For extra safety I clipped a jumper wire on both terminals. I watched numerous videos at YouTube on troubleshooting a microwave and on testing the various major components at home, but no component showed any signs of failure. Then it began to work again as suddenly as it had stopped working. About ten days later, it stopped heating again. After more testing, still no components showed signs of failure. But, I did squeeze the female spade crimp connectors a little with a pair of pliers before connecting them again so they fit more tightly when reconnected. The microwave has continued to work as it should. My wife remembers a time a few months ago when she ran it and ran it to get something to cook as she wanted it and the microwave stopped because it was overheated. I suspect a connection was weak and heated the metal in the connector enough that it became weak. Later it failed intermittently. We could have called warranty service, but we did not want to wait. Knowing what I know now, I doubt a serviceman would have patiently checked for weak connections, but would probably have simply replaced some parts. When those did not really solve the problem, the microwave would have been condemned and replaced. A replacement oven may not have matched our other appliances as well as our present microwave does. Test procedures for components in a microwave are different than they are for similar components used in (for example) a sound amplifier. This applies especially to the high voltsge diode. Do not connect a voltmeter to the high voltage side of the transformer. When running the microwave, be certain to have a dummy load in the cavity, like a cup of water. A very useful test that checks for power to the transormer primary is to disconnect the primary side transformer connectors and attach aligator clips from a voltmeter to the transformer leads. Then run the microwave for a few seconds and check for a full line voltage reading each time. A clamping ammeter to measure line current helps because the sound with the magnetron working is not too much differnt from the fan and carousel running without the magnetron working, but, it is easy to see the extra needle deflection when the magnetron is also drawing current.What seemed to be an expensive problem had an easy inexpensive solution.

Topic by Phil B    |  last reply