A Woven Life Contest

Hi Everyone, Please stop by my blog: http://www.awovenlife.com and enter to win an adorable tote made by me full of goodies! Thanks for your support.  Good luck! With Love, Elkie

Topic by elkie 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


my grandaughter has a potholder weaving kit w/ no instructions.

We know how to weave the potholder on the frame using the stretchy round pieces. we do not know how to finish our project. how do we knot the edges, get it off the frame?

Question by 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


What is this plastic tubing called? Answered

Hi all, I came across these woven plastic tubing which when squeezed on either end turn into toy rockets in a science and technology museum and I was wondering if anyone could point me in the direction of where I could source more of these things. I recall they were named 'boone rockets' but that's been a fruitless internet search. I would love to apply this product to jewellery/sculpture so it would be good to know what the process/technology is called. Cheers!

Question by jarris 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


carsoncool's gift exchange entry PLEASE READ

My skills include- sewing, weaving (potholders) What I'd like to make for someone- Hand woven potholder purse I'd be willing to make this size gift package for someone else- (choose all that apply): (S,M,L) I'd be willing to receive a smaller or larger size gift package from someone than the one I make for someone else:  yes What i like- toys, trinkets, recycling, mostly anything What i don't like- umm.... nothing? I absolutely can't have: (due to allergies, pets, etc) food items Type of thing I'd love to receive- wooden doll, recycled items, basically useless but cool items, etc.

Topic by carsoncool 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


woven bamboo subsititute for fiberglass cloth

I spent a lot of time in the Philippines and saw that they use woven bamboo mats to make the walls of houses. While at the hardware store I saw fiberglass resin and remembered the wired.com article about the guy and the bambo bike. This got me to thinking if there was a way to use woven bamboo mats as a subsitute for fiberglass cloth. Mainly because I am cheap and not for environmental concerns. maybe hand woven bamboo mats laminated together for plywood, or use as a boat hull? maybe housing material?

Topic by KungFuChicken 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago



How to weld a broken woven wire fence?

I am trying to fix a stretch of woven wire fence that was broken by a car running into it about 3 months ago. The wire itself is completely broken in two. I want to weld the wire back togeather, but the trouble is that I weld with Oxy Mapp gas and my welding wire is the same thickness as the fence wire. I am worried about melting the fence when I am trying to repair it. So what I think I need is some way to ark weld the wire, but I do not have an ark welder. Are there any homemade welders I can make for this purpose, because I do not want to buy something I will never use again?

Topic by Sedgewick17 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


how to make a woven bag / wide starburst bracelet?

Hello, Does anyone know how to make a bag like the one in the photo? I know how to make these one 'strand' wide (like a starburst wrapper bracelet) but am struggling to work out how to make them wider. Any help would be appreciated! Vicky

Topic by terrorvicky 10 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


How can I use woven plastic feed bags (dog food, bird seed, etc) to make grow bags for vegetables?

HI, Could someone give me detailed instructions (from start to finish) on how to use the woven plastic feed bags to grow tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, cucumbers, squash, etc?  The bag sizes vary from 10 pound to 50 pound capacities. Thanks everyone.

Question by pickled 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


How do you start a contest on this site? Answered

Hi, I'm the person who made the "Woven Rug" video that got featured recently. I would like to start a contest to see what other people on Instructables can do with 8 knitted rolls. I've seen some amazing things on this site and I bet other people can come up with way more creative stuff than me. There would be a cash prize at the end and that amount would be $5 times the number of people that enter. The 1st place winner would get 60% of the prize. The 2nd and 3rd place winners would get 20% of the prize each. Instead of having one or a few people judge the contestants I think it would be great if everyone on the internet could vote for the contest winners.  I would love to host and sponsor this contest but I can't make the entry fee any less than $15.00 (give or take 2 dollars for shipping).  Another thing is I'm not sure how many people would even enter a contest like this.  How many people would be interested in this contest if I started it? What do you think?

Question by knitwitcharm 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Favorite Paracord Projects

My favorite paracord project is the Woven paraocrd bracelet/watchband by Stormdrane. What is yours?

Topic by BLUEBLOBS2 7 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


What would be the best way to dye a plastic bag?

I've been trying to fing a green way to dye bags for a long time, mainly so I can have some different colors for my woven plastic bag bags... Does anyone know a green way to dye them? Or at least change their color?

Question by dobbylvr 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago



How do I fold up my long extension cord?

I have seen very long extension cords that look woven instead of a role.  How do I do this?

Question by JohnR393 3 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


The kind of content to post

I am trying to find out a little more information before I post something. The site doesn't seem to have a page telling what it's all about. Do you have to post about something you made by hand? For example, our company helps customers design woven labels for clothing. So, can I give examples and step by step instructions about  how to design a woven label? Ultimately, they'd have to order the labels with us after they design them. Would that be viewed as poor taste, like we are trying to promote our website? If you want to see what I'm talking about, you can always review the site and see if it qualifies http://customwovenlabels.com/ Thanks!

Topic by ashleyhudson 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Craft: Making lamp shades with waxed paper

I have several lamps with cool shades that resemble brown paper with woven paper. They remind me of the lamp shades that I have seen at art fairs created with brown paper and waxed paper. Anyone know how to make them??

Topic by pgw 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


How can I glue these two things together?

I have a piece of hardboard and some woven speaker cloth. What's the best way to adhere these together? I'll be attaching the cloth to the rough side of the hardboard. I have tried SprayMount to no avail. Thanks everyone

Question by sladek 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Up-cycle an electric blanket? Answered

Our non-woven electric blanket has become unreliable and has been retired.    Is there anything useful I can do with the cords or blanket itself?  It's a lot of bulk to put in the trash.  The wires in the blanket make it undesirable as a regular blanket or quilt lining. 

Question by mole1 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


fiberglass for resin forms VS fiberglass for thermal insulation?

I see woven or braided fiberglass (in tube, rope, sheet, band) for use as 1)  a seal where the seal is going to be exposed to high temperature (eg: stove door gasket); 2)  for use as a thermal guard (eg: tubing around electrical wire); 3)  and then used for it's' strength in resin impregnated sheet (egs: roof sheeting; mould making; boat building). My question is whether there's any difference between the fiberglass fabrics available for thermal and resinous uses? Are they interchangable? Fiberglass is fiberglass no?

Question by balisticsquirel 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Bagster

Waste Management's new "Bagster" is a 4'x8'x2.5' woven fabric bag with huge straps. The intended use is as a disposable dumpster, but the construction itself is awe inspiring. How can we use this wonderful $30 product for other things?  We'll be using it as a liner for our general purpose trailer. My first thought was as an inexpensive raised-bed garden (floppy sides need some framing to make this work.  How about as a hammock? It doesn't hold water or it would make an interesting pool... Anyone else interested in this thing? Here's the official website: http://www.thebagster.com/

Topic by vtbeachldy 8 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


Meet our own lynnebruning in Denver

Come meet award winning wearable artist, textile enchantress, and Maker Lynne Bruning at Denver Makers' May 21st Meeting!Lynne will discuss how to weave conductive cloth and demonstrate how to embed electronics, LilyPads, conductive thread and LEDs into hand woven fabrics.And if you can't make it to Denver, see her at San Francisco's Maker Faire 2009! (really in San Mateo)I cannot wait. She is my hero.Lynne, if you're reading this (which I can only assume you are) how bouts an autograph at Maker Faire?? I'll get you a t-shirt. . . . http://lynnebruning.com

Topic by scoochmaroo 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Demo (Contractor) Bags Are Sometimes Better than Garbage or Other Bags

Folks use garbage bags for storing and hauling .  Problem is, garbage bags rip easily and usually are good for one use. Demo bags are woven from polypropelene and are strong and  can be re-used.. Haul one load, dump it, bring the bag back,  Refill and repeat. Or use it for moving. No worries about ripping. They are not waterproof or completely dustproof. So one may wish to line it with a plastic bag. http://ecobrooklyn.com/demo-bags-trash-bag-alternative/ I think I may try to use this as a potato bag for growing potatoes a described in an earlier instructable

Topic by Wilmette 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


published instructables not indexed?

Hi, I posted an instruction long time ago. Here is the title and link. How To Make Braided/Woven Headband Instructions (https://www.instructables.com/id/How-To-Make-BraidedWoven-Headband-Instructions/). I log in and posted another instruction this week and noticed that the above article has only been viewed 286 times. I copy/paste the exact title to google but couldn't find it. Then I copy/paste the title in instructables.com, couldn't find it too. Same thing happens to my new instructions posted this week: How To Make Mini Korker Hair Bow Instructions (https://www.instructables.com/id/How-To-Make-A-Full-Mini-Korker-Hair-Bow/) Please advise. Thanks. Michelle

Topic by hipgirl 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Cat Food Bag Recycle?

Any new ideas for this cat food bag? It's too big for a wallet, and making a purse or messenger bag out of it just seems... redundant. I mean, it's already a bag, right? But my brain isn't coming up with anything else more creative. Its really too cool to throw away though. It's wonderfully shiny and colorful on the outside, and it appears to actually be woven together of some sort of tyvek material. It looks like it would survive a lot of abuse. I've got basic sewing skills, and whatever materials that I don't have around the house I can pick up from Lowes, Walmart or Joanns. :-)

Topic by Bitsi 11 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Ordering Custom Textiles

Hey everyone. I'm trying to recreate the vest from Ferris Bueller's Day Off. I know it sounds strange, but I really want that vest. I've been obsessing over it for a long time. Now, I look at the vest on display, and I can't decide if it's a knitted vest or made out of fabric, like sewn together. It looks like it has an elastic band around the waist and a black collar, so I think it might be sewn. But I can't get that fabric anywhere. Is there any way to order custom textiles that ISN'T Spoonflower.com? I don't want printed textiles, but something woven.  Can someone point me in the right direction? I have no idea where to even look, mostly because I don't know the terminology. THANKS!! -Max

Topic by Super Cameraman 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Re-design messenger bag strap so that it doesn't slide or bunch at the loop

Hi all, I have a Clive messenger bag that is perfect for my carrying and commuting needs, except for the strap. The material of the strap is pretty flimsy, not the tough woven type as found on timbuk2 or Chrome messenger bags. If the bag is too heavy (with books, etc) the strap slides so that it's too long. The strap is sewn into the bag on one side, and on the other side, the strap goes through a small (maybe 5 mm diameter) metal rectangular loop. The strap always bunches and the loop hangs vertically so that the tab connected to the bag and the bag strap are all bunched. Does anyone have any ideas on how to re-sew or replace the strap and/or loop so that the strap doesn't bunch or slide? Thanks

Question by 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


USED TREADMILL BELTS - any good uses for them?

I fix gym equipment, so I throw away quite a few used treadmill belts. some of them are in good shape but just got too dirty to be useful anymore (friction problems).  seems a shame to throw out all that plastic, surely there are some good uses...can anyone think of some?  I just installed 8 today and hauled away the old ones. In the past i have screwed them to the bottom edge of garage & bay doors to act as an extra weather seal - helps prevent the cold air from rushing in those air gaps. the belts have a pvc topcoat and textile/woven fiber bottom. I wonder if any recyclers would take them...i hate dumping stuff in landfill. Wasnt sure where to post - resources, free stuff, Green....they would all apply really...

Topic by mickeyaaaa 5 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


What is this weird transformer?

I opened up a microwave hoping for a microwave transformer. But instead i got this weird looking one. i was hoping someone may be able to identify it and tell me if i could use it for a tesla coil. also, there was no capacitor??!! the largest caps i could find were those three red ones in the pics. it apeared to have litz wire on the outside and normal wire wind on the inside. Numbers in it were - 97INV (im not sure if its a 1 or i)   and F69144TOAP and finaly   F607C.  Update:  ive now taken it apart, see picture. so, im guessing the litz wire was the primary (240v) and the solid wire is secondry (around 2kv). the secondry contained one really long winding and then another winding which only went around once (like in a normal mot). It looks like some sort of high current flyback. also, the secondary is also some kind of litz wire. It has many smaller hair thin enameled wires woven into a single strand. My guess it this thing operates at really high frequencies

Question by makincoolstuff 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Plastic Bottle Boat Set to Sail Pacific

Talk about keeping the bottle - how about keeping 12,000!David De Rothschild is currently building a sailboat from 90% recycled materials, which he has dubbed the Plastiki and plans to sail from California to Australia! Joining him on the Plastiki will be a permanent crew of three sailors and scientists plus a handful of other crew members who will rotate through the voyage. The Plastiki is expected to stop in Hawaii, Tuvalu and Fiji on its way to Sydney, a trip estimated to take more than 100 days.The vessel's twin hulls will be filled with 12,000 to 16,000 bottles. Skin-like panels made from recycled PET, a woven plastic fabric, will cover the hulls and a watertight cabin, which sleeps four. Two wind turbines and an array of solar panels will charge a bank of 12-volt batteries, which will power several onboard laptop computers, a GPS and SAT phone.The plastic sailboat is taking shape in an old pier building not far from this city's famous Fisherman's Wharf and is scheduled to set sail in April.Read the whole story at CNN's Tech spot.

Topic by scoochmaroo 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


LED Suit of light

Hi, I am looking to build a fancy dress costume, and have approximately 12 months to make my costume :) What I would like to build is a replica of the following (or something similar): http://www.gizmodo.com.au/2012/02/night-snowboarding-in-an-led-suit-is-mesmerising-to-watch/ I have searched for flexible fabric with woven LEDs, i have also searched several suppliers on Alibaba for flexible led mesh screens but nothing seems to be quite suitable. I think, for this, i would maybe be best off building the suit from strips of waterproof 5050 SMDs like this: http://www.alibaba.com/product-gs/615439688/business_agent_smd_505_led_strip.html Power would be in the form of the biggest 12V power supply I can find. The only problem here is that at full brightness, the suit is going to consume A LOT of juice... I have seen this costume which is similar in construction, except all the LEDs twinkle (like TV static): www.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DLal9uma1iVc&ei;=nwgtUNT7B6_Z0QXekYGwDA&usg;=AFQjCNENmYUCu_AwYaEAwqAiWSDFRFnUeg&sig2;=FXRYO81ccZavpYyeBsZMyQ This has the added advantage of lower power draw as not all of the LEDs will be on at the same time. I actually much prefer this concept, however I have absolutely no idea where to begin on schematics... Any insights or friendly advice from the experts would be handy, I have a rudimentary knowledge of electronics, and am very handy with soldering. Thanks!

Topic by Zander83 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


What is the best way to grind glass, somewhat smooth? Answered

Now before you rush to write down an answer let me tell you the details! The chunk of glass is 28 inches wide by 28 inches long and 2.5 inches tall. Composed of 160 painstakingly cut strips of glass that have been glued together into a jumbo block. Now try as I might, when laminating things together of ever so slightly different size together you are going to get high and low spots - And yes, this would have been soooo much easier a job if I had smoothed out the rough edges before laminating - Pesky hind-sight. Unfortunately my planer doesn't seem to work so well on glass, who knew :) Anyway, I will post some pictures to give you an idea of what it is, that has to be ground down. First off • It does not have to be perfectly smooth • A mottled surface would actually be appreciated • It is not going to be a lens of any kind, all though light will be transmitted through it. I have the following tools, but first - No I am not taking it 1700km to have it kilned. No, the local glass shop seems to have less tools then I do, at least in this scale. • Angle grinders • belt sanders • orbital sanders - but really? On the back side I used the angle grinder, with a metal grinding bit. Not to bad really all though the edges were taking a pounding. This was prior to applying resin and woven cloth, to give the glass a bit of tooth and reduce the high edges. This is for an instructable I am working on.  

Question by iminthebathroom 8 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Composites! My recommended source for resins, glasses etc.

First, I am not affiliated with this company at all. But, the HPV team I am on has used this company as a supplier for glass and epoxy resin the past two years with excellent success :) Even the gentlemen from Lockheed Martin that has helped us greatly was pleased with the resin.http://www.uscomposites.com/ http://www.uscomposites.com/epoxy.html <-- the resin (their brand - west systems is great, just expensive)We used the medium hardener/epoxy which gave us a pot life around 20+ minutes at 75ish degrees F and cured overnight or so. I highly recommend the pump attachments to make measuring an exact science.With one exception, every batch we made came out perfect. That exception was a set of test samples that took four days under heat lamps to cure. We think that there wasn't enough hardener to kick properly. The stuff was used to make HPV fairings for the past two years with a K-mat core. The picture here is last year's fairing that got vacuum bagged.Funny story, the gentleman that assisted us (with his experience) apparently knows Burt Rattan - you know, the man that built SpaceShipOne. The window idea was just an off the cuff joke we had that eventually made its way into solid works and ProE -- and then when no other window design was thought up it was cut out :PWhen I remember where we got it, I'll post our source for Micro Balloons (air encapsulated in glass) and K-mat (square scored foam core backed with a very thin layer of glass weave).Going from memory - the fairing below used 3mm Kmat core with S-class woven glass (can't remember weight). We might have used E-class glass too (not sure) because we have a roll of it from last year. Flanges (not shown) are used to support the upper canopy in place. They are made from glass with a "coremat" core. The lower removable section also has a flange to hold screw bosses - this was made from the same "coremat" setup.The whole thing was layed up on a male plug that was made from Styrofoam that was cut on a waterjet in 1 inch thicknesses - glued together - sanded - filled - glassed (to get it nice and smooth) and then covered with a wax mold release. When everything was layed up, a vacuum bag was cut for it and I believed they pulled 10psi (they went higher and the foam started collapsing).Now you may think I'm sharing trade secrets or something. Maybe so - but the experience we had access to was so helpful (this stuff looks a lot easier than it really is). I'm told that enclosed rear wheel was pretty difficult -- and it got quite a bit of attention at the competition :PAs I find more pictures and videos from past projects -- I'll post what I've learned. If you have any questions, I'll try to answer. Just keep in mind I'm not an expert :PPS: Next time you ride Dr. Doom at Universal Studios, Orlando -- look up at the decorations and such on the ride. Our experienced friend did all of those - yes, those pyramid/circular thingamabobs are fiberglass (he still has the molds :P). He came in 100lbs underweight ;)

Topic by trebuchet03 12 years ago  |  last reply 12 years ago


INSTRUCTABLE COMMUNITY! see if one of your instructables can help someone in a developing nation. Building for a good cause!

I saw this website called honeybee, Anyone who likes to solve problems using everyday things or inventing new things. Check this out This is a list of problems people have in developing nations they need help building constructing and recycling tools and machines to help them in there everyday lives, I have read them and i think the inscrutable community could really help there cause. take a look see if you made something that they need. http://www.sristi.org/hbnew/seeking_solution.php video about it http://www.ted.com/talks/anil_gupta_india_s_hidden_hotbeds_of_invention.html here's there about us   WHO ARE WE? Honey Bee Network is a crucible of like-minded individuals, innovators, farmers, scholars, academicians, policy makers, entrepreneurs and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). A Network having presence in more than seventy five countries, what has made Honey Bee Network tight knit and efficiently functional is its philosophy. Honey Bee signifies a philosophy of discourse, which is authentic, accountable and fair. The Network has been woven around three basic ideals. The Network believes that a knowledge system in order to become sustainable has to be both just and fair. Hence, while collecting knowledge from the knowledge holder, the Network has made it a norm to acknowledge the knowledge provider with name and reference, if otherwise not desired by the knowledge provider. This particular practice has come handy in protecting the IPR of the knowledge provider. In the second place, the source of knowledge i.e. in the case of Honey Bee Network, the traditional knowledge holders and grassroots innovators must be acknowledged, if otherwise desired so by the knowledge holders themselves. Finally, any proceed that accrues from the value addition of local traditional knowledge and innovation; a fair and reasonable share must go back to the knowledge holders. These have been the guiding principles of the Network, which are fundamental to the functioning of the network and constitute the major non-negotiable for the Network. WHAT ARE WE DOING? Over the last sixteen years or so, the Honey Bee Network has lived the very spirit of the philosophy that it holds so dearly. Moreover, the actions that have followed the philosophy have grown and matured over a period of time and their trajectory of maturation has been based upon the strong realization of the essence of the philosophy. ‘Honey Bee’ Newsletter, the creative mouthpiece of the network, is published in seven Indian languages (Hindi, Gujarati, Tamil, Kannada, Telugu, Malayalam and Oriya) other than English. The very logic tells that any documentation and dissemination of local and traditional knowledge and innovations in English, certainly connects us globally but alienates locally. Living out the concern, the regional language versions reach out to the thousands grassroots knowledge holders, who otherwise would have been alienated from the benefits of knowledge, they themselves contribute in the first place. Acknowledging the very source of the traditional knowledge, the Honey Bee Newsletter and its regional versions carry stories of the local ingenuity with the consent of the knowledge holder. Another source of acknowledging the local genius has been preparing the database of the traditional knowledge and grassroots innovations and Honey Bee Network, over the last twenty years has documented more than 1,00,000 ideas, innovations and traditional knowledge practices. Honey Bee, true to its metaphor, has been the source of pollination and cross-pollination of ideas, creativity and grassroots genius, without taking away the nectar from the flower for ever.

Topic by LoganMackey 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


History of Printing Mesh

Sit in on a trade show seminar or visit an online forum, and you'll encounter countless debates about the "right" type of mesh to use. The truth is, while there are some guidelines to follow, the best way to determine what's right for your shop is by trial and error. Only problem is, who has the time to experiment? There are literally hundreds of mesh types out there. Trying to choose the best one can seem like an overwhelming task, but by following some general rules of thumb, you can narrow down your mesh choices to a dozen or so. Then testing each kind won't seem so unmanageable. Specs. It may look like the screen on your back door, but screen printing mesh isn't the same kind of material. The biggest difference is that unlike what keeps bugs out of your house, this type of mesh is made from fabric, not wire. For this industry, monofilament polyester is the most frequently used mesh material. When you start shopping for mesh, you'll also need to determine the weave, count, thread diameter and color that's best for your shop. The type of weave is a no-brainer. When researching mesh, you may come upon the terms plain-weave and twill mesh. The difference between the two is how the threads are woven to create the mesh pattern. Make sure you purchase plain-weave mesh instead of twill mesh, which can cause moiré problems, especially in the high mesh counts. Mesh is often referred to by its mesh count – i.e. 120 mesh, 230 mesh etc. – representing the number of threads per inch. The lower the count, the bigger the mesh openings. Low mesh counts are commonly used with specialty inks such as glitter and puff to allow big ink particles to reach the substrate. High mesh counts are mainly used to print fine details and halftones. Printing through high mesh counts also produces a thin layer of ink on the garment, creating a soft hand. Mesh with a count that falls somewhere in the middle is what most screen printers rely on for their basic, everyday print jobs. The last factor you'll need to decide on is thread diameter. Until a few years ago, terms such as S, T and HD were commonly used to refer to thread diameter. Now, however, a more universal method of referring to the diameter number (in microns) helps keep consistency throughout the industry. While there's no standard thread diameter for each mesh count, there's generally a heavy-duty and a light version for each mesh count. The thinner the thread, the better the detail, but the weaker the fabric. The mesh manufacturer or your local distributor will help you weigh the benefits of each and determine what's right for your individual shop. As you shop for mesh, you're sure to come across different colors. Mesh is typically offered in white and yellow, although orange is available from some manufacturers. During exposure, a white mesh will refract the light similar to the way in which a fiber optic cable works. The light travels down and out, affecting edge definition and quality. This isn't as important with lower mesh counts, but when you're doing a lot of fine detail and halftone work, such slight adjustments will show up in the final print. For this reason, many printers stick with white for lower mesh counts, but use yellow or orange for higher mesh counts. Assess Your Need. Everyone has a preferred type, but there are some general guidelines to go by when you're in the market for mesh. Look around your shop and you'll find clues to what type of mesh counts you should be printing with. The three factors to base your decision on are the type of garments you're printing on, your ink type and the kind of frame system that you use on a regular basis. You'll also need to take into account the type of print jobs you typically do. For most screen printers, T-shirts are the order of the day. They can probably get by using a middle-of-the-road mesh count such as a 110 mesh. However, if you print a lot of athletic numbers and use thick ink to withstand the rough treatment jerseys encounter on the field, you'll probably need a coarser mesh count to allow the thicker ink to reach the material. In such cases, it's not necessary to use a high mesh count. On the other hand, if you do a lot of halftone and fine detail work, you'll need a higher mesh count to retain the minute details in the design. Also let your distributor or manufacturer know what type of frame system you use, as some types require sturdier mesh (and higher thread diameters) to withstand repeated use. In general, most screen printers find that a 110 mesh count will work fine for most jobs. The key word here, though, is "most." Don't rely on 110 mesh for each and every single job. Instead, try out different mesh counts with different print jobs, and keep a record of your production results. Note the mesh type, screen tension, type of ink and whether the print job is multicolor, process color, etc. Also note the garment type: Are you printing on a nylon jacket or a cotton T-shirt? Regularly reviewing your records will help you see a pattern, and decide which mesh tends to work best with a particular ink and design combination. You'll be surprised by the varying results between your "everyday" mesh count and one that's a little higher or lower. If you want to experiment with different mesh counts, start with the coarsest mesh and work your way up to the higher numbers, noting how the print looks with each version. Hit the Trail. Most screen printers have an established local distributor that they order supplies from. Others may prefer to order directly from the manufacturer. To find a list of mesh distributors and manufacturers, check out IMPRESSIONS' 2003 Sourcebook. Decoding the Salesspeak. The world of mesh can get a little technical. Here are some key terms to help you navigate the terminology: Low-elongation (LE) mesh – Most monofilament polyester fabrics are low elongation. The term refers to the mesh's ability to retain its tension level. In the past, stretching screens required tensioning the mesh to say, 25 N/cm, letting it relax to a lower tension then repeating the process. Today's low elongation mesh typically only requires one go-around. Monofilament polyester mesh – Some printers who've been around for years still use multifilament polyester mesh. However, the majority of the industry has switched to monofilament. Although it must be abraded for good emulsion adhesion, monofilament mesh tends to stretch, hold tension and print better than multifilament mesh. Plain-weave mesh – Almost all mesh for the textile printing industry is plain weave. The term refers to the method by which the threads are arranged to create the mesh openings. Warp – The threads that run the length of a roll of mesh. Weft – The threads that run the width of a roll of mesh. The Numbers Game. Mesh is typically ordered by the roll, usually in yards. The price depends on the width of the roll (40", 50", 60" wide, etc.), the mesh count and the color. White mesh is not quite as expensive as yellow or orange mesh, because it doesn't go through the dying and rinse processes. Setup Surprises. Be careful how you open the packaging surrounding your new roll of mesh. Avoid using a knife if possible – mesh can be damaged just by being carelessly opened. Once you've opened your new mesh, store it someplace out of the traffic flow. Try hanging it on a wall like a paper towel roll. Getting it up and off the floor can prevent accidental damage. Keeping the roll visible also allows staff to monitor the supply. Don't wait until the last minute to order mesh – you may not be able to get a new supply in time for that next rush job. Care and Feeding. Once you stretch your screens, what can you do to keep the mesh in top shape? For one thing, be careful with your screens. While coarse mesh can withstand more wear and tear, high mesh counts can be easily damaged when moving them around the shop. To extend the life of your mesh, try stretching your screens so that the squeegee stroke runs parallel to the warp. After several print jobs, who can remember what the mesh count is on a particular screen? To help keep confusion to a minimum, consider writing the mesh count number directly on the screens or frame. Or, color code your stock: white for lower mesh counts, yellow for the more detailed work. So while there's no hard rule for what mesh counts to use, knowing what to look for can help you find what's right for your shop. – CW from Internet

Topic by sharefilters 10 years ago


TEDxBaghdad - Iraq - violence, dust storms and open sourced manufacturing

Baghdad Iraq. It was once the jewel of the Muslim empire and epicenter of knowledge in the Eastern world. Now it is best known for corrupt governance, bombings, and dust storms. It was also my parents’ home. After visiting once in 1991 as a child the few memories I have of Iraq seemed to be shouting matches as my parents yelled over the phone making overseas calls. Names of Uncles I had never met were mentioned and a phone was handed to me and I was left to nervously fend for myself with my weak Iraqi slang and an Uncle who apparently knew all about me while I knew nothing of him. The country was an impenetrable black box to me that would spit out another refugee somewhere in the world every few years or so. Sixteen years later the first wall between Iraq and me was broken. In 2007 my nuclear family had traveled to Syria and for the first time I met family members who still lived in Baghdad. I knew them now. My uncles and cousins grew flesh and blood. I could feel their prickly faces as we greeted with the traditional Iraqi 4 sided cheek kiss. They could graciously give me their dishdashas as gifts. Names finally had faces, but those faces were deep, sunken and afraid. 2007 was a bad year of sectarian war in Iraq, which is why the Damascas district of Harasta was flooded with Iraqis. The sound of construction continued through the night to keep up with the massive (ab)use of the "tourist" visas. I saw something in the Iraqis in Syria that I hadn't seen before; something that scared me. I saw hopelessness. It was then I settled on a long-term project to return to the country and share something that I had just discovered around the same time: the future doesn’t come prepared -- we make the future. The do-it-yourself attitude that was growing in America was being combined with the culture of sharing that you find in hackerspaces, at instructables.com and in open source technology. This atmosphere made anything possible. You want to build a vertical generator without any spinning parts? Sure! How about a walking quadraped robot with a sofa? Do you want to quit your job, write zines and sell them in the crafting circle? Sure! Start a business! Write a novel! Organize a benefit concert! Sure - sure - sure! “Make your own future” was the message. It was a message of hope - it was the message that I wanted to share in the Middle East, and especially in Iraq. In 2011 the opportunity to work on sharing this beautiful message in the Middle East presented itself to me, so I quit my robotics job and took it (sorry Andrew). A few friends and I started a tiny organization called GEMSI - The Global Entrepreneurship and Maker Space Initiative. We funded ourselves through Kickstarter and our first project was a Three-Day Maker Space hosted at Makerfaire Africa. We were hoping to let people experience the feeling of the Maker Movement first-hand. We collaborated with Emeka and the team from MFA, Cairo Hackerspace, along with many amazing egyptians from all over the country. We had a successful first attempt at sharing the message of "Yes you can!” It was a great start, but Iraq was still an impenetrable fortress to me. It took till 2012 and a chance encounter with friends in Cambridge, MA for me to find my first avenue back into Iraq. Via my friends, I met someone who’s friend was affiliated with TEDxBaghdad. A few steps removed, sure, but when I heard about TEDxBaghdad I knew I had found my way in. I knew TEDx and the types of programs they hosted; I knew they were hopeful, inspired, and shared a vision for a brighter tomorrow. I started communicating with Emeka from MFA, who also works with TED, and he put me in touch with Yahay. After my first skype call with Yahay I knew I was going. Someone else had done it - someone broke that barrier, did amazing work in the country, and survived. It wasn't the death trap my family was telling me it was. There was a new narrative being woven and I knew what I needed to do. I booked my flights before I even finalized any workshops. I needed to meet the TEDxBaghdad team. Later, I called my parents and told them I was going to Baghdad and they said, "Shinu?! Inta Makhabal?!" That probably means exactly what you think it does. Needless to say, they had their concerns, but I was going regardless. Now that the tickets were bought, we started planning. Yahay put me in touch with Abdal Ghany, one of the Iraqi organizers living in Baghdad. He coordinated everything. It was amazing. These guys kick some serious planning butt! Ghany basically told me, “Show up and give your workshop. We'll take care of the rest.” This was a welcome change from the hours of facebooking, planning, and coordination I usually have to go through to schedule events. It really seemed like this was possible. I was going to give an Arduino and 3D printing workshop in Baghdad and I was really excited! I sent an email to Sparkfun and Makezine asking them for open source electronics donations since I knew bringing my electronics box through the airport wouldn't be a good idea. They sent me a nice goodie-bag of beautifully packaged Maker products. These two organizations have given me a tremendous amount of help throughout the years, for which I am extremely thankful. I packed a suitcase filled with 2 3D printers, 25 Arduinos, an assortment of other open source hardware and sensors and headed out looking a bit like a bomb development lab. Yeesh! Somehow I made it through China, Saudi, and Turkey without any serious interrogation. Mostly just really quizzical looks from my unzipped bag up back to me... "You're a teacher?" they ask. "Yes," I say, "yes I am." Turkey was the stop before Iraq. Turkey was brilliant, sunny, lush, and seemed to be comprised of mostly happy smiling people walking by the sea. Coming from the deserts of Mecca, this was a welcome sight. I let the green of Turkey wash away the dust of Saudi Arabia. The mishmash of cultures, sounds, foods, religions gave me a great feeling of liberation. This was a lively place and the two hackerspaces I met up with there, Base Istanbul and Istanbul Hackerspace were fantastic hosts. Furkan and I spent a lovely day together chatting about Maker culture as it spreads through the Middle East and then in the end we had a potluck BBQ with members from both hackerspaces by the rocks of the sea. It was great to see these two Turkish hackerspaces and to be reminded that this movement is truly global. My dream of hackerspaces empowering people globally is really possible – and it’s great to know that it is a dream that is shared by others. I left them full of enthusiasm and flew directly to Baghdad. Landing in Baghdad was strange and a bit concerning. Looking out of the window all I could see was a brown cloud. We were landing in a dust storm. I had heard about the turab (dust) of Iraq, but this was the first time I saw it in person, and it would be one of the things most often on my mind. Getting a visa for me was surprisingly easy, except for the fact I forgot my passport on the plane and two guards had to escort me one to each side back to the airplane to retrieve it. But once I had my passport, I told them my laqab, which is the full name that includes ancestry. Showed them a copy of my dad’s passport and my Iraqi birth certificate and I was in. I was hoping for a nice stamp, perhaps with some Iraqi relic on it. But they took my passport and wrote in it: "Originally Iraqi", so there it goes, it's official. Ahmed, my cousin, was not at the airport when I took my paper work and headed out to the lobby. The airport was sparsely populated and heavily regulated. I barely managed to snap a picture before a guard came up to me and had me delete them from my phone. In the lobby I met a man just released from a Swiss prison. The Swiss had given him the option to be sent back home to Iraq, or be jailed. He chose to leave and come back to Iraq. This becomes a theme later as I see more and more people, all of whom desire to leave the country to become refugees elsewhere. It seems that when hope runs out for the country you live in, the only option is to find a new one. This story is one of a million various stories of struggling to find a new life. Each varies in its details, but all have survival at their core. Ahmed arrives 30 minutes late, apologizing. He's wearing jeans and a polo. His hair seemed freshly cut and his face was serious. We had never met before. The only thing I knew of him was that he thought I was reckless for coming. He had been spending hours on Skype with me attempting to convince me that coming would be a bad idea: "You have no idea how bad the bugs are. Just wait till you see the dust storms. The heat will kill you... etc" But once I saw him in person it all changed. I didn't think I'd grow to like Ahmed, but I grew to appreciate his ways and he became like a brother to me before I left. He took me to Mansour, a neighborhood in Baghdad, telling me stories about Iraq as we travelled. This is the neighborhood where the house my dad designed and family built stands. On the ride home we had our car checked for bombs at least 4 times by what Iraqi's call Saytarat, which is the equivalent of a checkpoint and, to me, seemed a total nuciance. They were the reason he was late. What would normally be a 20 minute drive can become three hours long because every car is checked for bombs. They are everywhere; throughout the city, on every road. We passed the guard who watches over my family’s neighborhood, and he takes his hand off his machine gun to wave at Ahmed, and I begin to recognize that weapons, car inspections and burned out cars are normal here, so they don't think to comment on it - like an empty lot in Detroit, or the homeless in San Francisco. We got to my family home with no time to rest. I had to leave to meet up with Abdul Ghany and the crew at a Cafe in an hour and then conduct the workshop in two. Ahmed comes with me - he doesn't trust people we'd never met before and won’t let me out of his sight. I trust first till proven otherwise, he has learned to do the opposite. It’s a telling sign of how different our lives are on a day-to-day basis. As soon as I met the TEDxBaghdad crew, I felt at ease. MNA, Abdul Ghany and the entire crew were thoughtful, hardworking, and inspiring people. I was really happy to have intersected with them and they helped me in more ways than I could count. We first met up at Everyday, a local Mansour café. Everyday cafe was hyper airconditioned and everyone seemed to think it was hotter than it was. The crew was awesome, they were really a great first introduction to the excited young people of Baghdad and they certainly have the famed Iraqi hospitality. But here's a tip: do not order a fajita in Baghdad ;D. Mohammed Al-Samarraie pulled out their iPads and started showing me video production work he was doing for TEDx. Abdul Ghany comes a little late and we have head out to the workshop. The workshop was held in a two story office building surrounded by palm trees. Looking out the the tinted back window we could see the muddy river run past, winding and dark. Slowly the TEDx people started trickling in. Then I started to get nervous. The checkpoints didn't bother me, the tanks in the streets were not an issue, but here were these people coming to learn something from me. What could I share that would really matter to them when they had so much to deal with daily? What could I share that could be relevant to people who see bombings as I experience lightning storms? I have been to other places in the world to share this kind of information, and some of those places have had political problems and ongoing revolutions. But Iraq was the first country I had been to that really seemed like a war zone. I decided that first I needed to learn from them! What were their projects? What did they hope for? I hoped they would learn from each other and get excited about their projects and I wanted to be able to share things that were relevant to them. Thus, everyone was encouraged to talk about who they are, how they learned about TEDxBaghdad and to share their project, share with us their mission, or share an inspiring story. I was amazed to hear about all the incredible initiatives the crew was doing. From intercultural exchange programs, to street clean ups, to historical artifact preservation, each of them shared and I started realizing something. They were not as interested in new technology as they were interested in arts and culture and after hearing about a few of their projects I started realizing why. Learning about culture and paying attention to the arts gives people the ability to pay attention to details. They can look at another human being and see all the subtleties that make us who we are. We each fall in love, we struggle, we question, and have doubts. Arts give depth to a black and white world. Sectarianism is difficult when we pay attention to the commonalities that tie us all together. What would the world be like if anyone who wanted a weapons license was required to have visited India, could pass an art history exam and could play stairway to heaven on the guitar? We were in a sort of office building near the river which ran by dark and muddy looking through the tinted windows. One by one, they stood up in front and gave their short presentations. There were doctors, engineers, and designers in the crew. They each stood up and told the story of how they found out about TEDxBaghdad and it was incredible. Each of them had a friend recommend it to them, and it was mostly done through Facebook. Some people's projects were related to health, culture, antiquity preservation, and connecting Iraqis with the rest of the world. While they spoke I made a graph of the things that connected all of their ideas together. It was a beautiful thing to see. The common themes were to help Iraq as a country through the integration of new ideas and how to bring a new face of Iraq and present it to the world. To have the news about Iraq be about amazing things, inspiring things, rather than explosions. Being in that room with that energy made me feel like we were already on our way. I pulled out the boxes of donations given to us by Sparkfun and The Make Shed and now it was my turn. I told them about my story coming into contact with my friend Alex through instructables.com, how being in San Francisco and Cambridge opened my eyes to a new way of entrepreneurship using communities and open source technology. And how they could make anything they could imagine if they got together to do it. We discussed how sharing and collaboration was a common value that held the entire system together. I used the concept of the LED throwie, which is a simple idea by Graffiti Research Labs to connect an LED to a coin battery and a magnet. They used it to throw at ferrous buildings as a form of electronic graffiti but once they uploaded it to instructables the idea was out there and people were inspired to take it and derive many other projects. You can never know what will happen when you share something or when you create a tool and share it. People created outlined throwies, LED floaties in balloons and finally we start seeing LED floaties which are sequenced to act like a light show at a phish concert. Hahaha! We then talked about the Arduino an easy to use microcontroller designed for artists. It's a bit of technology that is a simple and easy to use platform to build interactive projects. We talked about how the open nature of the project people can use the Arduino and then use shields to add features like being able to connect to the internet or play MP3s. Open source tools make building new products a lot like using legos. We were in the middle of using some of the sensors The Maker Shed had sent us to make a DIY heart rate monitor when the power went out and all went dark except for the LED throwies we had made. It suddenly felt very intimate. We put all the LED throwies in the center of the room and huddled around it for story time. The feeling of connection was palpable for me. Sure the lack of power meant that we were not going to be able to 3D print, but being in the dark with TEDxBaghdad was one of my favorite memories of this trip. The lights went on and we had a long question and answer session / photo shoot. Some of the doctors were interested to use the Arduino based heart rate monitors to replace the broken ones in the hospital. I heard about this and was flabbergast that the most basic and cheap tools I had brought with me might have a direct impact and may even save lives. Technology might not solve the political problems of the country but it seems that there was a lot of room for development and that the crew I was with was creative and excited to make use of it. I passed out 20 Arduino kits that day, including the Lillypad which is a version of the Arduino intended to be sewn into clothing. Although there were very few engineers in the audience, everyone seemed to be buzzing with ideas and ways to use the Arduinos. What a great workshop! I was super excited because not only had they understood the message, they seem to have been infected with the feeling of capability! Now to seal the deal, we were all going to go out and eat a classic Iraqi dish Simach Masguf. Ahmed has been calling me hourly making sure that I was OK, but I felt safe enough with my new friends so we all headed out to a fish spot by the river. Hours go by, lots of fish is eaten, and lots of juice is drunk. Some of the crew smoke some sheesha. It was like I was with new old friends. My Iraqi slang was improving hourly and although we had just met I knew me and TEDxBaghdad we're going to be working together again very soon. I would have stayed all night eating and chatting about future projects and the problems to solve in Iraq, but the cerfew was about to set in and we had to jet. Yeah, there is still a curfew. On the ride home my head is filled with contradictions. Hope and confusion mix in my head as my family rings 4 more times. I get home safe and decide that the only way to deal with the complicated situation in Iraq was to act with irrational hope and optimism. That's the way TEDxBaghdad seemed to work. And that's going to be mine as well. The next day there were five explosions in Baghdad so TEDxBaghdad and I decided against going out to the Iraqi National Museum even though we had to request permission to go. We meet instead back at Everyday and there we solidify our commitment to working for a more beautiful Baghdad and a country which will become a producing nation once again. Sharing with the world it's art, science and literature like it once did years ago. +BG

Topic by lamedust 7 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago