New york K'NEXers.

Anybody from new york who is a knexer?

Topic by NYPA   |  last reply


New York: Not exactly tourist-friendly

A British mother took her teenage daughters to New York as a Christmas present.Shortly after arriving, she was hospitalised with pneumonia.Social workers told her they would look after her daughters in a foster home, but:They were taken to an orphanageThey were strip-searchedThey were asked intimate questions like whether they had been abused or attempted suicide.They were required to shower in front of observing adults.They were split upThey were prevented from visiting their mother in hospitalThe Social Services have informed the mother that she is now under investigation.Is this a typical occurrence in the US?Or is it just New York?BBC storyAOL articleDaily News article

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


NYC Electronics Shops

Are there any good electronics shops in New York City to go to? Im looking for like components resistors capacitors switches encosures etc etc. And I will be around times sqaure and manhattan.

Topic by jackillac92   |  last reply


Things to do in New York? Answered

I'm going to New York, NY, And I want to know what are some must see things. I already know about the Statue of Liberty, Broadway, Nintendo world store etc. But I'm wondering what things there are that people don't all know about. Any help?

Question by Bartboy   |  last reply


Make building in New York?

Hey, I just noticed yesterday, i was walking down third avenue and 81st (not sure about the exact address) and i noticed a building that said MAKE. It appeared under construction, but does anyone know if it is a building of Make Magazine ?

Topic by schumi23 


KipKay in the New York Times

Kipkay gets a nice mention in this New York Times piece Making Money, the How-To Way. Congratulations! Learning how to turn a flashlight into a laser is not a top priority for most people. Yet Kip Kedersha's step-by-step instructional video that teaches how to do just that has been seen online by more people (1.88 million) than live in Manhattan (about 1.6 million).Mr. Kedersha's online library of 94 videos includes tips on how to chill a Coke in two minutes, simulate a gunshot wound and start up a PC quickly.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


4th of July/New York

Hey everyone I haven't been on for a while because Ive been In New York with my Family and Its awesome where at the KOA in Niagara falls New York I saw the falls twice in the since Sunday and here's what happened Sunday I saw the American side of the falls saw my First rainbow and my First water fall that was Niagara, Monday I went to the Devils Hole state park and I know now why the call it Devils Hole because you walk about 3 miles around the gorge first you go down a lot of stairs walk 1 3/4 milesthen walk 1/2 a mile to the parking lot. and Tuesday I went to the Canadian side of the falls and got over charged for a hamburger ant Wendy's I got a #2 plain and It coast me $6.50, Wednesday I got to tie-die my on shirt for $5.00 I went to the whirlpool state-park and I went to a buffet called " The Grand Buffet " and we got charged $83.90 American and we went to see The Fire works over the Niagara fall at night. and my mom fell down XD then my Me-Maw(laugh all you want but when i was spoused to call her grand ma for the first time it came out Me-maw) kept yelling : Get up !!!!!Get up!!!!! Get up!!!!! Then on Thursday we didn't do much except go swimming. on Friday we went to the old country buffet to eat and then we went to the aquarium we went back to the camp ground and didn't do much On Saturday we came back to Maine at 11.00 at night. and that was my whole trip thank you for reading =D

Topic by Metal4God   |  last reply


if you live in eastern canada or new york state...

OMG! there was an eartquake! did you guys who live in the places mentioned above feel it? i felt tiny tremors, i live in central new york.

Question by Acepilot42   |  last reply


Maker Faire NYC 2012

Who is going? Would you like to meet up? I will be there tomorrow (Sunday).

Topic by susanrm   |  last reply


I'm in the New York Times!! (So are some other people you might know)

I'm in the New York Times magazine! After Randofo posted about their Innovation Contest, I submitted a few of my projects, and my beach-skates got chosen as a judges winner! OK, so they've reduced an entire instructable to two dozen words and and an icon, but I'm still in the second-largest newspaper on the planet! (Oh, and two others of the top four choices are also Instructablers...)

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Factory Tours in Pennsylvania by Made in America.

Hey guys n gals that live in or around York, PA....during the period of June 17-20th, in York County, PA 20 factories will be opening up their doors for visits behind the scenes. Find out more about this at: Made in America, 2009 York CountyI saw this FIRST on page 168 of the new MAKE mag.

Topic by Goodhart   |  last reply


New York Cabs Going Green

"NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York City's yellow taxi fleet now will go green at the rate of 300 new hybrid cars a month, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said on Wednesday, citing an agreement with car-makers to supply the fuel-light cabs.There are already more than 1,300 hybrid taxis in the city, and each one saves its drivers about $6,500 a year, Taxi and Limousine Commission Chairman Matthew Daus said in a joint statement with the mayor."Read More

Topic by Weissensteinburg   |  last reply


Collaborative Projects in New York City

If anyone has an idea for a big project that you could use help on post it here.

Topic by leevonk   |  last reply


Instructables mention in New York Times

Everyone's getting into the garden this summer (and you should too - by entering our Garden Contest!), and nothing's hotter than growing things upside-down.  Cutworms ravaging your tomato plants?  Take a tip from Instructables and the New York Times, and grow them from hanging pots.  You don't have to be an apartment dweller to take advantage of these low-profile planters that are cheap and easy to DIY. Check out our mention in the Garden section of the New York Times this week.  They know a good thing when they see one!

Topic by scoochmaroo   |  last reply


interview with a robot (new york times)

NY Times correspondent Amy Harmon chats with Bina48, a robot based on a researcher for artificial intelligence. The robot 'lives' a the Terasem Movement Foundation, Inc, located in Vermont. The robot comes complete with a database of memories for conversation, a peculiar speech cadence and creepy eyeballs to scare the children. [Link]

Topic by mikeasaurus   |  last reply


Time for a free boat!

Times are tough. People don't have the money that they used to. Some of those people own boats.According to the New York Times, boat-owning Americans are abandoning their boats in droves by sanding off the names and serial numbers and setting them afloat.Do you know what this means? It's ripe time to get yourself a free boat like Tim Anderson did some years ago in much more prosperous time.

Topic by randofo   |  last reply


YAHOO ! The NYC trip is BACK ON !

I just got the message today (peaked at my work email, since I was off yesterday) and they have found ANOTHER WAY ! This is going to be GREAT! I haven't done a lot of venturing outside my immediate area for a long LONG time (mainly due to my wife's condition). She does not want to go with me mostly because of fear but I can't let that prevent me from having the experience. She will be ok that day visiting her sister, etc. while I am in NYC ...

Topic by Goodhart   |  last reply


If it weren't for Bad luck, I'd have NO luck at all........

Now, once again (second time now) the trip to NYC has been canceled. Due to unavoidable problems with the Bus company - which tried to get more money out of us for the trip, we have had to cancel all my plans for this Sat. I am distraught to say the least....UPDATE:There is a possibility of my still being able to go...we shall see....UPDATE #2:Confirmed ! I am able to go after all.....I will have a little less cash since the bus will be a bit more, but I am going after all...

Topic by Goodhart   |  last reply


3D Printshow | London-Paris-New York

Hey guys, I'm based in London, and I'm also a real newb when it comes to 3D printing tech despite having been fascinated by it for a few years. I'm particularly art-interested, so for me 3D Printing is exciting because of the creative/social potential.  I'm not blessed with the ability to understand the engineering/programming side of the industry, but I'm really into conferences and events where we can talk about the implications. I was wondering if any of you have been to /seen/heard of 3D Printshow - its recently gone global which bodes well for a good event, but I've not seen/heard that much hype and wondered if anyone here knew much. http://3dprintshow.com/ :-) Most-D

Topic by Most-D   |  last reply


Help me find a shop.? Answered

It was a shop that sold new york themed goods, and some extravagant things like the resolute desk and hot dog carts, any Ideas?

Question by Warlrosity   |  last reply


Lady Liberty, Ten Times Larger!

A maze featuring a recreation of the Statue of Liberty 10 times larger than the original has been unveiled in Yorkshire.Composed of more than a million living maize plants and covering about 18 acres, is one of the biggest mazes ever constructed.With a length of 1,300ft it dwarfs the real Statue of Liberty, which is just 111ft high. "As a 'new' York Maze it seemed appropriate to base this year's design on New York," Mr Pearcey said."I also wanted to mark the links between York and New York."The Statue of Liberty is an instantly recognisable image and makes a great maze." Stephen Briganti, president and chief executive of The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, in New York City, said: "We are so pleased to see that the Statue of Liberty is being celebrated in such a unique way in York."Lady Liberty stands as a symbol for all the people in the world but it is especially gratifying to see her linking Old York with New York." Various sources(This post quoted from Daily Telegraph )

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply



Instructables at Maker Faire New York 2015 - Pictures!

Instructables was at Maker Faire New York again this year! Mikeasaurus and xxlauraxx were there to meet all the awesome people that were able to come out.  Check out the photos below to see what all went on including 3D printing and chainsaw carving! Did you get to check out the Faire or the Instructables booth? Share your stories from the Faire below!

Topic by Penolopy Bulnick   |  last reply


ITP Winter Show

The 2008 ITP Winter ShowFor those of you out there in New York, you may be interested to know that Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) is gearing up for their infamous Winter Show which will run this year from 5 PM - 9PM from December 17th to the 18th. If you have never been to one of these student shows before, prepare yourself to see more cutting-edge student artwork than the average human mind can process in a single evening. It is definitely worth checking it out (and its free!). For more information, check out their website:http://itp.nyu.edu/shows/winter2008/

Topic by noahw   |  last reply


Where can I find fabric dye in New York City? Or what kind of store would carry it?

I have some white cotton fabric I'd like to tie dye. What kind of store carries tie dye?

Question by    |  last reply


World Maker Faire 2013 NYC

Sad pup eh? Me too. World Maker Faire 2013 in New York City. I am dissapoint. Only noteable for us is trying out the augmented reality system by Jeri Ellsworth. Instructables did not represent. Autodesk did not represent Instructables. @carlbass The assimilation is complete. #SADROBOT #NOSHIRT. We went to Maker Faire today, I took along Caitlin and her two school buddies.  I knew to input the GPS the coordinates of the offsite parking lot entrance where you get the shuttle bus to the actual Faire entrance. 10 clams at the door. Driving around the park is like GTA. They seemed to have the parking lot better organized with more people to direct cars to open spots and the efficient school bus lady who counted off groups of people to load the buses as soon as they pulled in. I suggest more speed bumps/potholes and sharper turns for the bus drivers to negotiate.  Entry was quick and simple with preprinted tickets - still that extra surcharge for getting them online though.  It was a pleasant surprise that there were some vendors giving out free food samples today.  An applesauce in a resealable space-food pouch and an iced tea drink. On the return trip, the shuttle bus driver begged you not to leave behind litter like those green applesauce pouches and kids.  Which by the way, all in good to set up recycling stations to throw out trash, but why not mark the one for trash, trash, soiled paper cups were thrown in the paper because the one I think for trash had a big list of other things and not trash.  Food vendors seem to have been spread out on the periphery of the grounds so they don't create that big logjam in the center to impede flow to the rest of the areas of the fairground. Prices were still at tourist levels considering the captive audience. Not too many posted prices and if you have to ask, you can't afford it.  They did have some vendor kids throughout hawking cold drinks.  The Beer Garden seemed to be the centerpiece of the Faire.  The play/activity area geared for the younger/toddler set seemed to be expanded and set more apart from the more advanced maker stuff.  We did the inside tour first since it was nice weather to spend the rest of the day outside.  There was the esoteric mix of individual projects. Art and game machines from mounds of electronic discards. Projects and kits looking to launch on kickstarter. And the always hidden in the back room e-textile projects. The upper floor gallery room is always the best because it contains the light up projects, usually from NYU ITP. Jeri Ellsworth had a prototype of her augmented reality glasses.  An interesting project was having cross polarized glasses to see the image on a matched LCD display which no one else can see without the special glasses. One project used the light output from the laptop display to "burn" the secret message image onto one of those glow-in-the dark phosphor sheets. I'm not sure if the pancake-bot made it to the Faire this year. The performance space was closed off. I guess they couldn't book Arc Attack which was there first two years of World Maker Faire. No real Burning Man kind of stuff or major steampunkery. Outside, 3-D printers galore, everyone has one, way too crowded. Hackerspaces showing off their stuff. Giant tent if you want to line up to learn to solder. Coke/Mentos show late in the afternoon. Giant mousetrap show and circus aerial acrobat training rig going on. Giant tent if you want to make a stomp rocket that they shoot off with a compressor.Giant line too. Didn't the Disney imagineers tell them a zigzag snaking line is better for crowd control and keep the customers happy? Didn't see any quadcopters in the air.  Maybe all flights grounded with the recent local fatal accident with an R/C helicopter.  Some kind of go-kart racetrack. Usual stalls of handmade jewelry, t-shirts, soaps, candles, someone had a more detailed ugly doll. Guy with his found object stringed instruments played them well.  Maker Shed shop was the usual. Dark and expensive.  No real discount there. But it brings us back to this.  After what seemed like miles of walking around back and forth. I had to ask information if Autodesk had a booth presence at Maker Faire.  They said yes, back by the 3-D printer village tent.  I think we missed them going through the tent and found them on the outside end. The plywood hut sponsored by Sketchup didn't seem like where the Instructables people were. I was looking for the orange Instructable banner.  Looking to see there were no Robot shirts around, I asked the Autodesk people there, any Instructables people around? No, confused, do you work for Instructables? No, they are not part of my group. Jessy and Camille are not here and will be back soon.  Well, okay, maybe they sent Jessyratfink out as part of her Autodesk peer-recognition award. that would be cool to meet her, Caitlin thought the same, they sent Jessyratfink to Maker Faire?  We wander around to check out the other stuff and come back. Still no sign of Robot shirts.  I ask again and I get sent to a guy who I think is named Jesse.  I think he just happens to be in the Consumer Group who says the other guy Andy is more familiar with Instructables.  They thought they had a box of some instructables stuff, who knows what happened to it.  He did thank us for wearing our Robot shirts though.  Gee, I was hoping there would be some Robot shirts for Caitlin and her friends, at least Robot stickers.  We came to Maker Faire this year as redemption for last year when that Autodesk henchman kicked the crate of shirts under the table when he saw us get close to the booth. Caitlin uses that as an example of "Not nice, Mr. Moustache-man." It disheartens me Instructables seems like some corporate step-child. I can feel the that vibe going on.   I don't think Robot carries brand recognition anymore. No one asked about our Robot shirts as we walked around.  Some hackerspace also uses a yellow robot as their logo. We may pass on Maker Faire next year if there is no need to see any real Instructables staff. Doesn't Randy need to go visit his mom or something?

Topic by caitlinsdad   |  last reply


Optimus Prime gets a parking ticket in New York

Traffic Wardens are getting braver... Perhaps we should fear for the poor sap who tries to give megatron a parking ticket!

Topic by Biggsy   |  last reply


New York Times - Whiteboard Innovation Challenge Winners

Earlier this year the New York Times held a Whiteboard Innovation Challenge which "invited readers to share an innovation that they have made in their daily lives", these innovation did not have to be physical prototypes, just ideas that would make the world a better place. The NYT commissioned all-star judges: Paola Antonelli (NY MoMA Curator), James Dyson (of Dyson Inc.), Ben Kaufman (Founder of Quirky) and Martha Stewart (Queenbee of homestead) to review the entries and each selected their own personal favourite. Hundreds of entries were submitted, only a few made it to the New York Times website. Of the four winners chosen for publication 3 of the winners were Instructables members: CEO of Instructables Eric Wilhelm's (ewilhelm) Toddler's Painting Station Editor of instructables Mike Warren's (mikeasaurus) Umbrella Light Prolific Instructables author Mark Langford's (kiteman) Beach Skates If you picked up the June 2012 Edition of the NYT Magazine the finalists are on the last page, along with a brief writeup from one of the judges on why that innovation was selected. See the scanned copy of the finalists below:

Topic by mikeasaurus   |  last reply


Potatobots Take Paris, New York, China and beyond

Ï»¿Tech meets art as students learn what makes machinery tick, and use those parts to anthropomorphize potatoes.  Not only do they make crazy creatures, they write back-stories for them as well.  "Each year, my students and I take apart old electronics (VCRs, computers, clock radios, and the like). We use the parts like the parts for the old-school Mr. Potato Head kits. In the 50′s, you didn’t get the big plastic potato, you just got face and body parts. We use the gears, springs, screws, wires, and other pieces as the body parts for our Potatobots. We photograph them on blue paper, and then I use GIMP to place them into scenes of the students’ choosing." Find out what happens when a Potatobot falls into a wormhole and how Tim got so much camel:  http://potatobots.wordpress.com/ Did I mention they can shoot lasers from their eyes?  Who knew playing with food could be so much fun?  

Topic by scoochmaroo   |  last reply


This, From That - Maker Faire and Instructables in the New York Times

Instructables and Maker Faire received some nice coverage from the New York Times article This, From That."This is a real geek fest," says Professor Schalk, a high-energy physicist in both senses of the phrase."If I was a kid, I'd wet my pants here," he joked.Some 65,000 people came to see the sprawling display of inventiveness and potentially hazardous fun. Many of them read Make magazine and its sister publication, Craft, and go to Web sites like Instructables.com that encourage people to take on projects and share what they learn. (Recent online projects have shown people how to convert a novelty French-fry telephone into a carrying case for an iPod; how to make a computer-powered coffee warmer from an old Intel Pentium chip plugged into a P.C.'s U.S.B. port; and how parents and children can build a small vibrating robot together.)By far, my favorite quote from the piece:"It's deeply American," said Xeni Jardin, an editor of BoingBoing. As for the family-friendly setting, she said, "It's like Burning Man without all the icky hippie elements, without the pants-free guy on a bike."And more:Roxanne Stafford, a designer who visited the Faire without knowing much about it, said she was "a little overwhelmed" by the size, the variety and the noise.She added, however, that she found an underlying message in it all. With the ghastly images from the Iraq war and the uses of technology that usually make the news, it is easy to conclude that people simply make things and use technology "to destroy one another," she said."Things like Maker Faire give people hope," she said. "Creativity is the best expression of humanity."More press about Instructables here.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Don't try this at home, EVER ! The trip to NYC

Ah, I have finally gotten a little time to put some of the details up about my Trip (definition of trip, to stumble, fall, or to almost fall....) to NYC. The bus ride to Manhattan was uneventful. We were dropped off behind the Winter Garden Theater at 50th St. and 7th Ave. For those familiar with the city, this is a little north of Rockefeller Center, and a little west of Radio Music Hall. My little adventure started with me being a little greedy with what I wanted to see on this short day trip. I started down 7th Ave. and decided to scoot over to Broadway. In walking down Broad way (heading south, now) one have to be careful as it crosses the other blocks on a diagonal and it is very easy to lose the road and end up on 7th (and further south; you start ending up on 6th Ave - the Ave. of the Americas). The blocks heading south were shorter then those in the East - West directions. Walking through the Theatre District, and finally reaching Times Square (which is on 7th Ave), I was taking my fair share of pictures (Later, after I get them all posted, I will have to get my Sis in Law to help me identify the buildings, etc.) . Moving from Times square, I get the Garment District. This was a fairly quick walk for me, I didn't see much I really was impressed by there. Madison Square Park, was a nice little area, and then came the weirdest building I have EVER seen (and I have seen a house the shape of a shoe), I came upon the Flatiron building (see pics). In the Flatiron District was Union Square park. A fairly small park. Now, the streets going East and West were numbered, and I had started at 50th St. I was now at 12th, where Broadway becomes University Pl. and it ends at Washing Square Park. This was a nice little park too, so I got a few pictures of it. By this time, not having had a breakfast, I thought it would be good to find something to eat. I moved west along 4th st. until I got to Broadway again. Once I got into Soho (South Houston), I started getting a little turned around (I had just walked nearly 50 blocks). When I got to Canal Street, it was so crowded, I only went about one block on the street and didn't find anything of interest, so I continued on south on Cortland. Somewhere in this area I found (somehow I got to Chamber's St) I found a little Indian restaurant called Jhankar. It was a pleasant atmosphere, and the food was good. I continued on Chambers to get to the east side. I saw the World Financial Center, and eventually found Ground Zero. I took a few pics of what I could see. I did wonder around Battery Park a bit too long, and finally asked someone how to get to the Staten Isl. ferry docking point. I was told it was another 20+ minute walk further south (I was already at the other ferry docking ports and had already walked for over 4-5 hours). He let me know of the Shuttle bus, which the city pays for, which would pick me up and drop me off right outside the area of the Staten Isl ferry. That was a really decent little ferry ride too. 1/2 hour over, 1/2 back. Now it was getting to be near 6 PM and I thought I had better have a little to eat before heading back to 50th st. After walking a few blocks, I realized I was NOT going to make it in time. I looked for a Subway terminal but found none (I had already walked as far as getting back up to the most southern tip of Chinatown. I walked (very briskly) up to Bleecker St. looking for a subway or a cab. I finally got a cab waved down (I am just NOT the type of person that waves down cabs), and we headed off. I called the Bus driver. He said it shouldn't be long, he should get me there in time; and said traffic is a bit heavy here on 4th street. He nearly blew a fuse (and he had just reason too).....but he calmed down and said he'd circle the block and hope I got there soon, and to give him a call when I did. Fortunately, when I finally got back to 50th and 7th, it was only 12 minutes late and he had just pulled up with the bus. Besides the quarter sized blister on the ball of my right foot, and the lunch/brunch I had I brought nothing home with me (well, I forgot about the sunburn on my head.....yeah yeah, I should have worn a cap). All in all, it was nice to see everything......and I will never again walk 70+ blocks just to see everything again. I will become familiar with the subways, as that is about the cheapest way to go (except the shuttle bus). And I am about as stiff as I can be....now for some pictures. UPDATE:More pics UPDATE #2 The few remaining pictures I have left have been uploaded with these to my Facebook album NYC Trip

Topic by Goodhart   |  last reply


Bamboo bikes Instructables in NYT!

Hey! Bamboo bikes Instructables were mentioned in NYT! Check out their article!   New York Times bamboo bicycle article Via Google alerts. Photo by Christian Hansen of NYT.

Topic by Culturespy   |  last reply


What does you Instructables account name mean?

What does it mean? Me? I lived in New york and Pennsylvania, so New york (NY) and Pennsylvania (PA). I also lived in Ohio, so my name is sometimes NYOH.

Topic by NYPA   |  last reply


Do the economy seats on a Japan Airlines 777-300ER have power ports?

Http://www.seatguru.com/airlines/Japan_Airlines/Japan_Airlines_Boeing_777-300ER.php says yes, but http://seatexpert.com/seatmap/388/Japan_Airlines_Boeing_777-300ER_(Version_W73)/ says noIt's a round-trip flight from New York, New York (JFK) to Fukuoka, Japan.

Question by MePerson   |  last reply


Maker Faire NYC 2011

Here is the recap and pix of today's festivities at Maker Faire in New York City. https://www.instructables.com/id/Maker-Faire-NYC-2011/ Eric will be presenting his "K'Nex Gun Site Acquired by Billion-dollar CAD Maker - What Gives?" tomorrow.   Dunno.  Look for my writeup or video...wait Enjoy!

Topic by caitlinsdad   |  last reply


Hurst model T motor

Hello my name is Freddy iam in New York DYI hobbiest and iam doing a table project that is a rotating workbench for different bench top tools to be used and it will rotate on this motor but my problem is how to power it.. I would like to plug it and later add a switch to it.. Any help would be greatly appreciated thank you for time and patience... Freddy Westchester New York/AKA YO

Question by FreddyS19   |  last reply


Tiny Talents - Learning Bar Tricks in the New York Times Magazine

Tiny Talentsby Virgina HeffernanOn the Web's amazing how-to sites, I am studying bar tricks. I should be learning, once and for all, how to do CPR, but all I really want to know is how to mix a Singapore Sling, palm a card and tongue-knot the stem of a maraschino cherry.The best thing about how-to sites like Howcast, eHow, WonderHowTo, Instructables, SuTree, VideoJug and ExpertVillage -- huge collections of videos that offer instruction in Chinese dining etiquette and surviving zombie attacks, plating fettuccine Alfredo and linking spins in freestyle kayaking -- is that they revive a lost era of two-bit skills, when Cross pens whirled around thumbs, Zippos burst in and out of flames and someone was forever trying to show you how.More news and press about Instructables here.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Instructables in the New York Times -- Romancing the Flat Pack: Ikea, Repurposed

Instructables, member mzed, and his Low-cost Spherical Speaker Array all were mentioned in Romancing the Flat Pack: Ikea, Repurposed by Penelope Green at the New York Times. ..."I think there is a movement around looking at all the products that are available -- this global stream of stuff -- and realizing you can tinker with them and rebuild them," said Michael F. Zbyszynski, 36, the assistant director of music composition and pedagogy at the Center for New Music and Audio Technologies at the University of California, Berkeley, whose own hack is a speaker array made from red plastic Ikea salad bowls, and who has made other musical objects from PVC plastic and coffee cans that "live in the zone of the hack," he said."It's all about not accepting what's presented for sale as it is," Mr. Zbyszynski said, "about not just doing a 'paint by numbers' of your life."...ReadyMade is part of a universe of D.I.Y. media and forums where Ikea hacks appear and are then found by Ms. Yap, who links her blog to them. It's a universe that includes Make magazine (more science than design-geeky, for the handmade-robot set) and Web sites like instructables.com, which was created by M.I.T. Media Lab alumni as a forum for its users to share knowledge about how to make or do practically anything, including, as a glance at the home page the other day revealed, a quick banana nut bread and "hacking a toilet for free water." Mr. Zbyszynski's speaker array, with its goofy "Lost in Space" aesthetic, first appeared there.See more news mentions of Instructables here.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Dorkbot on the Beeb.

Before there were makers there were dorks, many of whom went to Dorkbot meetings to watch people do strange things with electricity.The Dorkbot movement was started by New York artist Douglas Repetto but they have grown far beyond the original idea of "dorks in New York" that he conceived. Now the world is dotted with Dorkbot chapters and the regular London gathering is one of the busiest.BBC story, with video of high-voltage music machines.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


StreetWars

Trigger happy gamers have organized, broken through the digital/analog divide, and have begun to play "real" games!Contestants in the StreetWars tournament dart through New York's alleyways with water guns in their hands. They're on a three week long, 24/7 assassination mission where the winner gets $500, the title of top squirter in town, and if all goes to plan, stays dry.Shadowy World of Squirt-Gun AssassinsThe New York Times

Topic by noahw   |  last reply


Instructables in the New York Times - How to Improve it? Ask Those Who Use It

Instructables was mentioned in the New York Times article "How to Improve It? Ask Those Who Use It" about user-innovation. I know this might cause a stir, but specifically mentioned are the K'Nex guns. Here's the section of the article that mentions us directly:Even some of Mr. von Hippel's acolytes remain cautious. "A lot of this is still in the category of, , 'You could imagine this working out really well,' " says Saul T. Griffith, who as an M.I.T. engineering student was part of a group of kite-surfers who developed products for their sport that have since become commercialized. Mr. von Hippel wrote about Mr. Griffith in his 2005 book, "Democratizing Innovation."Still, Mr. Griffith can cite a long tradition of user design. One of his favorite examples comes from the title article in Tom Wolfe's 1965 book, "The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby," which chronicled car customizers whose innovations -- tailfins, double headlights, low-slung bodies -- were later adopted by Detroit. Mr. Griffith says that even now, millions of people modify their cars, far more people than the world's automakers could ever employ in research and development.There is currently no effective way for companies to harness the ideas of those millions. But the Web -- itself created by Tim Berners-Lee, an Internet user looking to do something new -- seems to offer an excellent potential idea-gatherer. Mr. Griffith's industrial design firm, Squid Labs, last year spun off a do-it-yourself community site on the Web called the Instructables, which features items as diverse as the Minty Boost iPod power source, dachshund wheelchairs and guns made entirely of K'nex toys, along with detailed instructions on how to build them. The Instructables intends to offer software to companies that want to build communities of citizen product developers.Mr. von Hippel, who has spent 30 years waiting for his ideas to take hold, says that as user communities like the Instructables spread, they will dominate innovation. He calls them "the dark matter of innovation."

Topic by ewilhelm 


Baseball teams.

Well does anybody cheer on a baseball team? I cheer on the New york Yankees. And just in case you don't know the Yankees are in the mlb (major league baseball).

Topic by Easy Button   |  last reply



Wanted: Analog or Digital Multimeter

If anybody has a old or broken analog/digital multimeter and would be willing to ship it to New York United States it would be really useful. 

Topic by Kante Tech   |  last reply


A challenging riddle

Alrite here is the riddle.The area code 212 is given to New York city 213 to Chicago and 312 to La. There is a very good reason why this is. HINT; The oder you are the more it might make sense.

Topic by thejrb   |  last reply


Duct Tape Roses Add a Lot to a Home - The Best of Instructables in New York Times

Duct Tape Roses, Concrete Lightbulb Wall Hook, and the Drainage Luge were all mentioned as part of Penelope Green's review of The Best of Instructables. Duct Tape Roses Add a Lot to a HomeThe duct tape roses I made over Thanksgiving were fetching (until they were gummed by the cat), but post-turkey lethargy prevented me from digging into the meatiest projects in "The Best of Instructables" (Make: Books; $34.99). One example: the concrete light bulb wall hook, described as "an excellent excuse for driving a lag bolt into your wall" by its inventor, Ray Alderman. He and it are emblematic of the instructables universe, a blogging community of do-it-yourself-ers, robot-makers, food hackers and techno-geeks who share their crafty ways at Make magazine and Instructables (makezine.com and instructables.com), sometimes selling the finished products on etsy.com, the online bazaar for handmade things.More news and press about Instructables here.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Instructables in the New York Times - In a Highly Complex World, Innovation From the Top Down

Instructables, and my Purple Shoes got a nice mention in the New York Times here.In a Highly Complex World, Innovation From the Top Downby G. PASCAL ZACHARYUSER-GENERATED content - from Wikipedia to YouTube to open-source software - is generating waves of excitement. But the opening of innovation to wider numbers of people obscures another trend: many of the most popular new products, like the iPod, are dominated by a top-down, elite innovation model that doesn't allow for customization."New technologies are becoming so complex that many are beyond the possibility of democracy playing a role in their development," said Thomas P. Hughes, a science and technology professor at the University of Pennsylvania.Consider: Electronic implants into human bodies; gene-splicing as common as cosmetic surgery; computer networks mining vast databases to discern consumer preferences. All of these innovations are the result of corporate or government initiatives overseen by elites."The process of innovation leaves out a huge proportion of the population," said Daniel Sarewitz, director of the Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes at Arizona State University.To be sure, experts like Eric von Hippel, a management professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, argue that the proliferation of "user-generated" designs signals the "democratizing" of innovation. Armed with inexpensive digital tools and networks, ordinary people, he says, can band together to push their own innovations. They also can hijack existing technologies, taking them in directions only dimly envisioned by the original creators.One example is an electronic community called Instructables whose participants share methods for customizing standard products in unpredictable ways. The chief of Instructables, Eric J. Wilhelm, who earned his doctorate at M.I.T., where he was inspired by Mr. von Hippel, has posted a clever means of turning a white Asics Gel-Foundation 7 running shoe into a purple model. (The $90 official version comes only in a white-black-and-blue combination.)Today's Web-savvy consumers "expect innovations to meet their needs," Mr. Wilhelm says. "If innovation isn't tailored to them, they expect to be able to tailor it to themselves. That is a big change."But does this really mean that elites no longer sit at the top of the innovation food chain?"Elites have a lot of leverage but less than they used to," says Peter Leyden, director of the New Politics Institute in San Francisco. "More people are getting their voices heard." Mr. Leyden sees an emergent American "republic of innovation," where growing numbers of people influence what innovations are made and when.Skeptics, however, say that the rosy scenario is exaggerated and that user-generated innovation is merely a kind of "democracy lite," emphasizing high-end consumer products and services rather than innovations that broadly benefit society."Difficult questions are going unasked about who is participating in innovation and on what terms," says James Wilsdon, director of the innovation program at Demos, a think tank in London.In that scenario, needed innovations can be overlooked. For example, huge amounts of money are spent on improving Web search engines or MP3 players, while scant attention is given to alternative energy sources. Battling diseases like AIDS or Alzheimer's - efforts that lobbying groups in wealthy countries help highlight - attract legions of well-financed innovators, while big global killers, like childhood diarrhea and sleeping sickness, are ignored.Popular pressure to pursue certain innovations sometimes gets results, of course. In 2004, voters in California passed a law lavishly funding a stem-cell research institute - in a rebuke to the Bush administration, which has banned federal funding for such research. "This was a great example of a democratic adjudication of an innovation issue," Mr. Sarewitz of Arizona State said. Even so, bureaucratic and legal delays have meant a slow start for the San Francisco lab, which has not yet received approval to spend any of the $3 billion in promised taxpayer funds.The California example suggests that the balance between expert leadership and mass influence is hard to achieve. The underlying complexity of many innovations demands an ever-rising technological literacy from the public, and yet such an outcome "is a dream that will not likely come to pass," insists Mr. Hughes, a visiting professor at M.I.T.For all the hoopla over the power and promise of user-generated content, consumer-directed design and other hallmarks of our new golden era of democratized innovation, one of the iconic products of our times - the iPod - can't be customized (no, I'm not counting putting on different-colored protective jackets). There is an unbroken line between Henry Ford (with his Model T) and Steve Jobs. The new iPhone similarly reflects the elite, corporate innovator's drive to find one size that fits many.The cliche that committees can't create great ideas, or art, still seems to be true - though whether or not that is the best way to innovate remains an open question. Who knows how much longer?

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Robotics Workshop, wed Sep 10, Manhattan NY

I'm teaching a robotics workshop for charity in manhattan on wednesday Sep 10th:http://newyork.going.com/event-381048;Robot_Building_Workshop_Learn_and_Build-Lee

Topic by leevonk 


The golden age between the first terror attack and the last.

Two nights ago at the MOMA I got the chance to catch Weimar NY (A Golden Gate Affair). I had my reservations at first, but my girlfriend kept insisting it would be absolutely marvelous darling and, in fact, it was. For those of you like myself who probably had never heard of this before, Weimar NY is a cabaret, burlesque, gender-bending, performance art, radical left-wing, extravaganza celebrating "the golden age between the first terror attack and the last."Having been part of post-9/11 New York I can honestly say that this is something that could have only developed as a response to that time-period. It's a document, celebration of and response to a certain amount of uncertainty, fear, depression and general hopelessness that descended upon New York after the fall of the towers and to that effect is still somewhat relevant today even if and especially because the face of the city changed after that morning. Something became different when all of a sudden the rest of America became New Yorkers.I think Penny Arcade (an infamous and outspoken ex-Warhol Superstar) summarized it best when she pointed out the difference between New York City and San Francisco. As she saw it, both places were filled with annoying disgusting tourists, but in San Francisco they leave. I think what she means by that is after 9/11, when all of a sudden everyone thought they were a New Yorker, there was a sudden influx of new migrants to New York different from all previous migrations. Again, as she also states, it used to be that people went to New York to reinvent themselves and now they were coming to reinvent New York and turn it into a suburb no different from any other. And it's out of this feeling that Weimar NY grew. It grew out of the alienation of the freaks, geeks, criminals, anarchists, drag queens and general delinquents that used to flood to Manhattan to be at home that were being pushed out by the influx of chain stores, Chase Banks, Gucci wielding bleach-blonds, meatheaded corporate-types and every other boring sort of mediocrity that usually just stayed home in its suburb. Personally this hits home because I grew up north of the city in the suburbs and the first chance I got to escape the suburbs I fled to New York City to be amongst the socially delinquent part of society. I was fortunate enough to get there just before anyone outside of the city knew who, what or where Brooklyn was, when the Moldy Peaches were still playing house parties and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs hadn't accidentally formed one evening in some bar on the LES (and for that matter no one referred to the Lower East Side as "LES" and you could still get stabbed there for pocket change). This was back when the city was dangerous and full of possibility. After the towers fell things changed. At first it was quiet and sad. But New Yorkers aren't the type to sit home and feel sorry for themselves. Shortly after the city burst with life and this sudden vibrant outburst of life, creativity and happiness drew incredible people from all over the world who once again shifted everyone's attention to New York. And these incredible people... incredible happenings... incredible everything! for that matter, then started gaining lots of people's attention and drawing people increasingly not-so-incredible. Once this started happening, almost overnight, it got to the point where Penny Arcade could refer to Manhattan as "suburbanized."Personally, it was the night I discovered that the Second Ave. Deli (an infamous New York institution) had been shut down and was going to be replaced with a Chase Bank that I resolved I had enough and needed to leave New York. It was almost officially no longer home or a refuge for the marginalized, unwanted and magnificent. This left an even bigger question, "where does one go from here?" I still have not resolved this issue (but am happily in San Francisco for the time being). And I don't think anyone has. I forget where I heard, but someone said recently that every period of time has its city. For instance, at the end of the 19th century it was Paris and the end of the 20th it was New York. The keyword there is "was." I personally think Weimar NY has picked up on this feeling and have encapsulated the "golden age between the first terror attack and the last" and will continue to carry on the torch of the grand society of wonderful weirdos and infamous outcasts so long as someone else is willing to listen.Any which way, I doubt if they will perform outside of New York City ever again, but should you happen to in the NYC, I recommend checking it out.(end rant)

Topic by randofo 


Laser cutter party!

Here's an awesome idea - host a laser-cutter party. Somebody with a laser cutter lets people bring their ideas and designs to make and show off. At this one in New York, they even made the snacks on the cutter...

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply