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A Level choices Answered

 I'm not after anything in particular here just want some opinions.

After recently applying to my local sixth form college I'm curious as to...well I just want to talk really.

My options are:
1.Chemistry
2.Physics
3.Mathematics
4.DT: Product design - Materials
Reserve:Computing

GCSE: P= predicted grade, C = current grade (Or already gained GCSE), L/10 = how much I enjoy, G/10 = how capable I am.
Maths: P= A*, C=V. high A, L8/10, G7/10
Physics: P=A*, C=A*, L9/10, G9/10
ICT: P=D(distinction), C=D, L7/10, G10/10
BPE: P=A*, C=A/A*, L6/10, G8/10
Chemistry: P=A*, C=A*, L9/10, G9/10
DT (Electronics):P=A*, C=A*, L9/10, G9/10
Catering: P=A*, C=A, L5/10, G8/10
Music: P=A/A* , C=B/A, L5/10, G7/10
Biology: P=A/A*, C=A/A*, L8/10, G7/10
English Lit.: P=A*, C=A, L6/10, G6/10
English Lang.: P=A/A*, C= B/A, L6/10, G6/10
PE: No GCSE



Anyone else recently applied for sixth form?
Currently at sixth form college or university?
Any advice?

I reckon I am going to end up (sounds so negative) in Engineering or Science, whether I choose University or an apprenticeship etc.

ANY advice appreciated.

Discussions

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radiogareth
radiogareth

10 years ago

Consider teaching, eg, Design Technology & Electronics which I see you are doing ATM. Making things and electronics have been, and still are, my main interests. You get decent holidays, reasonable pay and workshops you can use for all your own projects without the capital cost. With Maths and Physics and almost anything else, you can always be an engineer of some sort later. It's hard work, but education is the single most important thing you can give someone.

Good luck!!

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lemonie
lemonie

10 years ago

Office work doesn't have to be dull. If you play with "complicated machinery" and then head back to the office to analyse the results you can mentally be in both spaces at the same time (and possibly in others too)

L

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Kiteman
Kiteman

10 years ago

So, like I said elsewhere, just go with the flow.

Enjoy it.

0
Kiteman
Kiteman

10 years ago

Work in an outdoor experience centre?

Geologist / vulcanologist?

Wildlife ranger / field ecologist?

Palaeontologist / archaeologist?

Sport scientist?

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Kiteman
Kiteman

10 years ago

You're doing all four?  Sound.

Personally, I have never made any long-term plans for my career.  My move into teaching was kind of natural and organic.  I go mad in cubicles, shifts and factories don't really suit.

I love the blend of independence and comradeship of the staffroom (ignore all TV dramas - no school is even remotely like that).
I chose my A-levels (Phys, Chem, Maths, Further Maths) by what I liked at O-level (grade A in Phys, Chem and Maths, back when an A was worth something).  I didn't do A-level biology because I didn't want to dissect stuff.

I chose my degree (Paper Science) because it let me avoid specialising in just one of the pure sciences, and there was a very generous scholarship available.
Each move thereafter has just seemed one more natural step.  Without trying, I have ended up as a (respected, apparently) senior manager in my school without really trying.
_____________
I suppose that's a long-winded way of saying that, unless you have a very clear and personally important goal in mind, I would not really plan more than 6-18 months ahead.  Go with the flow for as long as you can (until you are ready to settle down with kids and/or a mortgage).  Do what makes you happy - if bills become a problem, there's always the breakfast shift at McDonalds.  Decent wages alone rarely make a body happy.  Lower wages in a job you like will mean less stress, better health and longer-lasting sanity.


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lemonie
lemonie

10 years ago

Sounds like a good choice. Science qualifications are generally valuable, it'll be easy to get on a good Degree course etc. 1-4 tie into each other, which helps.

L