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AC motor power supply Answered

I have an old Dayton electric motor I pulled out of a lab blower. (I have no idea how old it is, I pulled it out of my grandpa's bottomless basement.) It looks like it still works, but I found it with no wires or anything attached to the terminals. (All of the internal connections look good, however.) So, here's the tricky bit, how do I run power to it? I copied everything off of the label on the motor, and I'll post it on the end. I've got very near to 0$ in the project bank, so the cheapest I can possibly do this the better. I don't need anything nearly as sophisticated as speed control, or anything like that. Here's the info from the label: model: 5K261 HP: 1/3 RPM: 1725 V:`115 A: 5.4 Hz: 60 Time Rating: Cont. Temp. Rise: 48C PH: 1 Frame: 56 Brgs: Sleeve Code: H S.F: 1.35 S.F.A: 6.0 Amb: 40C No.: S60CXCDY-4065 Insul: Class: A Thermally Protected: AUTO I'm not quite sure what I'm going to do with it yet, that depends largely on how well it works.

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CameronSS

11 years ago

Okay, the important bits: It's designed to run off 115 volts, on a 60 Hz cycle. That's AC wall power. The rated amperage is 5.4 amps. It will turn at 1725 RPM, and can generate 1/3 horsepower. Most of the rest is just codes about how it's built, and unless you're rebuilding it, who cares?

Supplies needed: One old power cord. Try to find a relatively hefty one, as 5.4 amps is a fair amount of current (Imagine a 5.4*115= 621watt lightbulb. That's how much power this thing uses.). You don't need welding cable, just something between that and the cord from a lamp. Attach the cord to the terminals and plug in (in that order ;-)).

Or just follow NachoMahma's instructions. He typed that as I was typing this. I never get to be first! *sad*

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guyfrom7upCameronSS

Reply 11 years ago

for 5.4 amps the minimum would be 22 gauge (really pushing the limit of the wire, max amps of 7, extremeley unsafe). A cheap cord for old extension cords or lamps are usually 18 gauge (I think) and the max amps for 18 gauge is 16 amps.

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tech-kingguyfrom7up

Reply 11 years ago

generally speaking, ac 110 volt devices should use 18 awg cords.

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NachoMahma

11 years ago

. Put a little oil in the bearings (if possible), tie/bolt/nail it down (do NOT try to hold it - it will want to twist a LOT when you start it), wire it to 110-120VAC (US mains), and let 'er rip. . Be prepared for a dead short, bad bearings, &c. Use a 15-20A circuit breaker (or slow-blow fuse) and an emergency shutoff switch (a wall toggle sw might work).