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Add Frets to a Violin? Answered


I have a violin and i play guitar. I want to learn violin but it's the concept of no frets i cant grasp. Could i add some with pipecleaners or something? Suggestions?

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nutsandbolts_64
nutsandbolts_64

9 years ago

I'm back (lol). I thought I had answered this question long ago. Apparently you're not interested.

Would Firework,
maybe Club Can't Handle Me,
or possibly Dynamite, interest you?

Or maybe consider the possibility of playing the guitar with a violin bow if you're really awesome?

Violin = no frets because the violin is a melodic instrument, it is a voice which is finely tuned and defined by millimeters of difference of your fingers. Unlike the guitar, which is coarsely a melodic instrument, only due to the fact that you press on tabs or whatever to vary the sound a at some level. No one wants to strum the same note all over again.

Most (if not all) violin beginners have their instructors place temporary "frets", as you may call them, in order for them to learn the proper finger positions and naturalize them into their muscles ("muscle memory"). Once the student has these positions engraved on their heads, the teacher removes the "frets" and... Yeah continues the lesson.

The reason why you say "no frets" is because "no frets" means you're a pro, "frets" means you're just.. a n00b to be straight. 

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armendariztj
armendariztj

Reply 1 year ago

While this is true in general there are exceptions, classical violin typically doesn't use them but, the developer of the solid body electric violin Mark Wood (who went to Julliard at age 16 to train to be principal Viola in the New To York philharmonic) uses them and has them as an option on many of the instruments from his company Wood Violins, they are designed to place the fingers directly on, and are lower profile than ordinary guitar frets, they are designed to allow normal playing technique, but increase accuracy (you can feel where the fingers should be), which is helpful in general, but especially on stage when it can be hard to hear yourself (especially with solid bodied instruments which are nearly silent).

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kostelnik
kostelnik

8 years ago

Best option is to buy fretted violin. When you will became fretless violin player, you will find always songs where fretted violin fits better. You can check out this instrument http://www.e-violins.com/products/2-electric-violin-legacy-4.aspx

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Soren012
Soren012

9 years ago

Myy teacher put white tapes where the notes are under the strings [on the fingerboard]. Just find the note, then put a tape there under the strings. If you want you can put a sticker for the naturals and sharps. By that i mean one below the middle of the space between the 1st and 2nd tapes. Then one above the middle between the 3rd and 4th taps. Put stickers anywhere you want but still where i told you. only do the first four notes on each string.
G string:A,B,C,D
D string:E,F#,G,A
A string:B,C#,D,E
E string:F,G#,A,B

I hope this is very clear to you. If not, Ill change my picture to what i mean.

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yodofizzy
yodofizzy

9 years ago

here is a great website
http://thefiddleshop.net/87000_fiddle_fretter_fretters.asp
they sell this fretboard like thing...
i think its pretty much like a fretboard sticker for violin

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nutsandbolts_64
nutsandbolts_64

10 years ago

Masking tape would suite it. Actually, you can just use a pencil and mark it with it. If it's hard for you to see, use double-sided tape. Just take off one side and leave the other, bright wight cover on. It should do. You could find a violin instructor somewhere around your area and ask him/her to find the places where the notes go.

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Houdinipeter
Houdinipeter

10 years ago

Also just so you know, violins, chellos, violas and mandolins all have the same spaceing: in 5ths on the way up.

This is much different than playing guitar or bass.

good luck!

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cantinora
cantinora

10 years ago

I play the guitar, as well as most other stringed instruments (violin, viola, cello and standup bass were actually my first instruments) I have to agree with what's been said already. Taping the neck is the best way to learn. If you take it to an experienced player they can tape it up for you, I would suggest they tape it up to position IV as it will make learning all the most used positions easier to pick up. There are fretted violins, if you want one, you should just buy it.

Learning violin fingering is alot like learning guitar chords, a little uncomfortable at first, but after a whileb it's second nature. You should not cheat yourself by trying to make the violin "easier." Also you will lose the vocal quality of the instrument when performing glissando or portamento. Also, vibrato will not sound the same as there will be discrete difference between the tones.

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The Wooden Moustache
The Wooden Moustache

10 years ago

you could use a lute maker's technique.
also this is used on a Viola da Gamba.
They use gut string wrapped around the neck at the appropriate fret spacing.
It may be what you want.

frets.jpggamba-frets.gif
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Shadowman39
Shadowman39

10 years ago

Most people who are beginners at violin add tape where the fingers should go (across the neck, just like the frets of a guitar). But you'll want to make sure they're in tune.

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orksecurity
orksecurity

10 years ago

You'll learn appropriate distances with practice, just as you learned approximate distances on the guitar with practice... and you'll learn to move your fingers a bit to adjust the tone if you didn't hit it exactly right the first time.

Think of it as playing slide guitar rather than fretted guitar. Same principles apply.

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Re-design
Re-design

10 years ago

Nope. Just bite the bullet and learn where to make the notes.

A pipe cleaner won't be stable and will shift. It might not even make a note.