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Battery choices? Answered

I have been having a lot of dead batteries because I don't drive very often.My battery always checks out ok so the warranty doesn't help me.  If a new battery would help me, should I choose a cheaper battery with lower CCA or a more expensive on with higher CCA and a longer warranty?

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Vyger

3 years ago

A problem with car batteries (lead acid ones) is what is called sulphateing. When a battery is partially discharged a coating forms on the plates and this coating forms an insulator. Eventually the battery reaches the point that it cannot take a charge due to the sulphate coating. When this happens the battery is dead, unable to be charged. To prevent this coating from forming the battery needs to be kept charged. So if the car is not driven very often, the battery should be given a charge to bring it up to full. Doing this will keep the battery in good condition. As the others said, a trickle charger would work good for this. It doesn't matter how expensive a battery you get you need to keep it chargede in order to keep it healthy.

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Josehf MurchisonVyger

Answer 3 years ago

Frozen batteries don't work or keep well ether so they might need a battery warmer.

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VygerJosehf Murchison

Answer 3 years ago

And if they do freeze semi solid, which will happen if they don't have a full charge, the pressure from the ice will cause the plates to warp and or the case to rupture. Once the plates have come into contact they short out and the result is a very dead battery.

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Josehf MurchisonVyger

Answer 3 years ago

Dead of winter we get - 40 to -56C that is about -40 to -70F.

Freeze your tinkle before it hits the snow.

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Josehf Murchison

3 years ago

First, where do you live?

I live in the Great White North and no matter the battery if you treat it wrong kiss a five year battery good by in one year.

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Jack A Lopez

3 years ago

Have you heard the expression, "throwing good money after bad" ?

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/throw+good+mon...

If your car's starting battery is losing charge while you sleep, or rather while the car sleeps, it is probably some small electrical load, like a reading lamp that got left on, or a door ajar, a light in the trunk that never turns off, or something.

If you owned a multimeter, and knew how to use it, maybe you could insert that meter in between the car battery and the rest of the car's electrical system, for to measure how much electrical current is flowing, when the car is seemingly, completely turned off.

I mean that would be like a real, physical measurement. You know, numbers, man!

Then it might seem more like science, less like voodoo. Maybe...

Of course, there are tricks for dealing with small energy sucking loads.

The best way to deal, is to just turn off these energy-sucking loads, if you can find them, if there's a switch for to turn them off, or a fuse to pull out somewhere, or disconnect the battery.

Another trick, assuming it is impossible, or inconvenient, to actually turn off whatever is draining the battery, or to disconnect the battery completely, and also assuming the load is small, the trick is to connect the battery to a "trickle charger", also called "float charger", some small, preferably cheap, charger capable of re-supplying the energy being lost to the load. For example, a gizmo like this one,

http://www.harborfreight.com/automatic-battery-flo...

which means you have to plug your car into an extension cord at night, or whenever it is your car sleeps.

Also there is a solar powered version,

http://www.harborfreight.com/15-watt-solar-battery...

that does almost the same thing, while the sun is shining, and you just plug it into the cigarette lighter socket.

The performance of the solar powered one, kind of, uh, depends on the weather. If you live some place sunny, and your car sleeps outside (rather than in a dark garage), it may work out really well for you.

Anyway, I do NOT think the answer lies in going shopping for a more expensive starting battery.

I mean, unless you want to buy some kind of portable, back up thing, like one of these battery-in-a-box, jump-starting tools. I guess that is the only other trick I can think of. Actually these days, I mean at the time of this writing, there exist lithium-ion based battery packs capable of throwing enough amperes to jump start a car, and small and light enough to carry in your back pocket, but you probably shouldn't, because, you know, Li-ion batteries have been known to spontaneously catch on fire sometimes.

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iceng

3 years ago

Should I assume you are talking about a car battery..

What kind of car and year ?

Different cars I know of, allow you to pull a certain fuse so you can start the car after a weekend in an airport lot.

Your battery is being discharged by some electric device (usually a radio feature) while you are letting it sit.

I would have a hidden battery disconnect but that would mess with your radio station buttons and remote un-lock. Your manual should explain how to fix this.

Best of luck..

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rickharrisiceng

Answer 3 years ago

+1 A charged lead acid battery should last many months unused.