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Beading Tutorial Answered

What software would you use to make printed beading tutorials?

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

1 year ago

Is beadwork usually two-dimensional, with patterns that look like raster graphics?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raster_graphics

I think GNU Octave might work, because I think it has some tools for, like, crude image processing, basically treating a grayscale picture as a two-dimensional array of numbers, and a color picture as three grayscale pictures (i.e. for 3 color channels:R, G, and B)

Although, something easier to use might already be out there. Especially if it would work for needlepoint art too, because I think that is the same kind of game; i.e. a picture made a two-dimensional array of colored pixels.

I tried asking sourceforge.net about "beads"

https://sourceforge.net/directory/os:linux/?q=bead...

And I don't know if any of those results look useful to you.

By the way, have you ever seen a picture representation of the Arecibo message?

I am going to attach a picture of that message to this post, along with a picture of an ancient (circa 1682) wampum belt, because these are what I imagine when I think of beadwork.

Although it may be the case I have got it completely wrong, and this is not the kind of "beading" you are thinking of.

I am guessing the wampum belt was actually produced with colored beads, even though this picture of it is grayscale.

In contrast the Arecibo message is, in some sense, actually black and white. I mean, an authentic representation of the Arecibo message would have just two colors (e.g black and white) because it is based on a binary sequence; i.e. symbols with just two values, like for example, black and white, or 0 and 1.

Arecibo_message-rotated.pngWampum_william_penn_greaty_treaty.jpg